Мирский Христо: другие произведения.

9. Urrh, cum commentis (impressions on etymological canvas)

Журнал "Самиздат": [Регистрация] [Найти] [Рейтинги] [Обсуждения] [Новинки] [Обзоры] [Помощь]
Peклaмa:
Конкурс "Мир боевых искусств. Wuxia" Переводы на Amazon!
Конкурсы романов на Author.Today
Конкурс Наследница на ПродаМан

Устали от серых будней?
[Создай аудиокнигу за 15 минут]
Диктор озвучит книги за 42 рубля
Peклaмa
 Ваша оценка:
  • Аннотация:
    This is the full variant of one enormous scientific book, the nearest genre to which is etymology, but not only. Not only, because I am going from the etymology with the purpose to explain popularly (as far as this is possible in such matters), how people of various nations think about ... everything, and in almost all Indo-European languages, what ideas are hidden behind the words, how they are related with other words and roots, and with other languages. But, please, look first at the shortened variant, and if you could spend a pair of months for this book, only then look exactly here.
    The major used languages are: English, German, and Russian, but also very often Latin, French, Greek (usually old), many Western languages, as also Slavonic ones, and many other old languages (like Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit and others). This is a book about Creation viewed through the words. This is also philosophical book, there are many comments and suggestions of the author. It is result of more than a decade work in this area, albeit by a dilettante (at least in the beginning); but being not exactly with linguistic education I am making the things much more interesting for everybody, so I think this is an advantage when writing popular works. This is entirely unique, unorthodox book, but it is hard to read, I must warn you. Having read it ones, though, even superficially, and having become familiar with the sundry abbreviations used in it, you may employ it to look for whatever in it by keywords, or, better, by beginning of some roots like in an index, and make it an useful handbook. Only don"t hurry, read carefully, and think alone, try to find your own examples in the languages you know.
    Keywords: etymology, many languages, hidden ideas in the words, people's psychology, philosophical comments, suggestion on various themes, popularly written, in English, serious reading, for intellectuals.




U R R H ,

CUM  COMMENTIS


(Impressions On Etymological Canvas)

(English Internet Version)



Chris MYRSKI,    2007






[ Although this is a whole, and quite enormous, book, I have no idea about the cover. I may say at least that the colour has to be in bluish-greenish or greyish hew, hinting that this is something serious. But there are, usually, no pictures on scientific books. ]





     To the readers:

This book is not what you might think it is, because it isn't work of fiction (say: action, thriller, or love story), neither dry etymological research, nor philosophical essay, but has elements of all this and something more. You may think it is some popular etymology (guide around the interesting world of words), though certain ideas that I give here are beyond any etymology and I also work in several languages (like: English, German, Bulgarian, Russian, French, Italian, Latin, Greek, even Persian and Sanskrit). Although some knowledge of foreign languages (and I don't say exactly of which) is preferable this isn't strongly required (because almost every person understands some other language besides his /her mother language, or, then, every language contains many foreign words); and if you don't know some words or don't believe in the given explanations (or even if you believe in them) you may do your own research in every other language that you know or use. It might not sound decent to boast that this is an unique work but it is --- what can be explained mainly with the fact that my guesses are not strictly scientific, but then they are interesting (what should not mean they are not true). In a way, the book is popular explanation of all the things viewed through the eyes of different nations; and when I say "all" then be sure that this work is an open system and many more things may be added even by you.
Still, being very informative, this isn't a book to be read in slumber, or to be read and forgotten, but to be used as kind of handbook --- if you want to think about what you say (what young people, as well as old ones, like to do, only those in the middle don't like, neither to read, nor to think because they have no time for such "luxuries", they have to win their bread). So, those that like to think about the words are, still, a big amount, but they are handicapped by not having enough knowledge about the words and roots and relations between them. And this is so because they have not yet read this book, but now they may amend this failure. At least I, for my part, have answered many questions, and you are invited to participate in the answers. And I'll tell you, some of them are pretty piquant, not to say cynical, so maybe you would like them.

The author





INTRODUCTION |I_IntroChp|


When I was lying one day in my bed reading one of the two or three books that I usually have by side for reading (because the only way to find satisfaction in reading is to change it with another reading, as it is also with the eating, or working, or sleeping with somebody, and so on), and in two or three languages, because with one only language one can't get much satisfaction --- and here I don't mean this in the linguistic sense only but as tongue too, for that is what French langue or Latin I_lingua mean, which are related to the longitude and all the I_long things, and which words come from old time, from Sanskrit I_linga (or lingam), what was, to be frank, not the tongue, neither the language, but, I am sorry (or: am I to be blessed?), the penis or phallus --- and then ... I was struck by an enlightenment.
But allow me here, in the beginning, to make some remarks about shortenings of the names of many languages in three letters (or even two) as for example: Fr. = French, Eng. = English, Ger. = German, It. = Italian, Skr. = Sanskrit, which is old or ancient Hindu, Rus. = Russian, Bul. = Bulgarian, etc. (full list is included in the following Preliminary Remarks); also for the names of the people speaking them with the same letters but ending with "*" (say: Fr* = the French, Rom* = the Romans, etc.); also if preceded with "o." this will mean "old" (say, o. Gr.); and I shall use other common shortenings (like acc. for according, resp. for respectively, etc.), and other not common ones (like w. for word, syl. for syllable, bc. for ... because, etc., so that you better read the Remarks and try to remember something of the said there). You have also to became familiar with the every-level-nesting-brackets, like "3(" and ")3", which will tell you on which level of nesting exactly you are (but for the first level "1(" and ")1" will not be used as unnecessary); this will be very useful sometimes, and the Ger* normally have two to three levels in each sentence (and in some more sophisticated cases up to five or more) though they use only commas for the purpose (what isn't clear enough, in my view).
And now to return to my enlightenment, but allow me first to add a remark about the just mentioned I_phallus, which might as well be called so because it is closely related with the ... falling |I_fall| (bc., and I am sorry to say this, my dear reader, if you happen to be "he", it is fallen in about 99 per cent of the time). So, and as to the enlightenment, this was a peculiar thing for the author because he is not a believer in traditional sense of the word, but it still was possible (for him to be enlightened) --- and do you know why? Well, because of the ... date! Because it was 04.04.04 (and I hope you will not ask me whether the date is in European or American standard, or wasn't it, say, in 18th century) and probably the time was 04:04 in the afternoon (but as to the seconds, frankly speaking, I am not sure). But you know that number four is something very hard, square, like a diamond, hence this was the day with three, not just stars (like on a motel), but diamonds, and there is only one such day in a century, and on such days even unbelievers may be struck by enlightenment, especially if it is one of big importance (as this one was), bc. it went about the name of a God and about all created by Him. And not of some God but of the God, the one & only possible God for all human beings in the Solar system, my Urrh, praised be His name, now and forever. So that: gulp fast the Remarks and let us proceed to the Creation.





PRELIMINARY REMARKS |I_PrelimChp|


The commonly used shortenings for languages |I_langs| are, as follows:

Alb. = Albanian;
Am. = American;
Ar. = Arabic;
Arm. = Armenian;
Avs. = Avestan, i.e. old Persian;
Azr. = Azerbaijani;
Blt. = Baltic (Lithuanian, Latvian, etc.);
Bul. = Bulgarian (often cited as "our", bc. the author is from, and lives, there);
Cel. = Celtic (but, acc. to some etymologists, it is one of the Teutonic ones);
Cz. = Czech;
Cyr. = Cyrillic (alphabet);
Dan. = Danish;
Eng. = English (and in very many instances "your" means Eng., what is so bc. the author is not of Eng. origin and the book is in Eng.);
Fr. = French;
Ger. = German;
Gr. = Greek (more often it is old shortened to o.);
Got. = Gothic;
Heb. = Hebrew;
Hin. = Hindu;
Hol. = Holland (or Netherlandic);
Hun. = Hungarian;
Icl. = Icelandic;
It. = Italian;
Lat. = Latin (sometimes it is medieval, shortened to med.);
Norw. = Norwegian;
Per. = Persian;
Pol. = Polish;
Port. = Portuguese;
Rom. = Roman;
Rum. = Rumanian /Romanian;
Rus. = Russian;
Scan. = Scandinavian;
Srb. = Serbian (or sometimes Croatian)
Skr. = Sanskrit (old Hindu);
Sl. = Slavonic (normally old), sometimes pre-Sl. as older (before our alphabet);
Sp. = Spanish;
Sw. = Swedish;
Tar. = Tartaric;
Teu. = Teutonic (very often old);
Tur. = Turkish;
Ukr. = Ukrainian;
as also I/E. = Indo-European or I/G. = Indo-German (depending on the sources); these are common for many European languages roots (or syllables);

It has to be added that if after the letters for the shortened language name stays "*" this means the people (e.g.: Eng* = the English; or Am* = the Americans in USA; also Rom* = the Romans; Skr* = the old Hindus; etc.);

~ ~ ~

There are also other often used shortenings |I_abrevs| like:

bc. for because, c. = common, o. = old, w. = word (ws in pl.), r. (rs) = root (-s), syl. = syllable, let. = letter (lets in pl.), prep. = preposition;
then: assoc. = association, deriv. = derivative (derivs in pl.), dict. = dictionary (dicts in pl.), etym-gy (-sts) = etymology (-sts), resp. etym-cal /-ly, exclam. = exclamation, explan. = explanation, imit. = imitation, lang. = language (langs in pl.);
then: smb. = somebody, smo. = someone, smt. = something, smm. = sometimes, smw. = somewhere, smh. = somehow, and ntg. = nothing;
then also: acc. = according (-ly), beg-ing = beginning, comp. = compare, diff. = different (diff-ce = difference), disc. = discuss (resp. disc-d, -ing, or -on), ment. = mention (resp. -d, -ing), m-ing = meaning (in pl. m-ings), poss. = possibly (-ble), rel. (-s, -d) = relate (relates, related), resp. rel-n = relation, sim. = similar (resp. -ly or -ty), s-ing = sounding, sp-ing = speaking, sup. = suppose (or -d, or -edly for supposedly);
then smt. more: f.ex. (= e.g.) = "for example", t.s. = "the same", b.t.w. = "by the way", m.o.l. = "more or less";
then: ">>" means "see ... forward (via the index)", resp. << is "see backward", and in such cases the ment-d w. is usually shortened to its first let. only (this may happen occasionally on other places when t.s. w. is repeated);
and some obvious shortenings, like: 1st = first, 2nd = second, etc., numbers (from two & above) are written with digits, then cent. = century (cents in pl.), mill. = millennium (mills in pl.), then adj. = adjective, char. = character, pl. = plural, fem. = feminine, masc. = masculine, neut. = neuter, btw. = between, resp. = respectively, then & = "and" (a bit stronger than "and", but the distinction is not rigid, it is used mainly for economy), & maybe some others. I use also "--" hyphen (not "-" or "---") as sign for rel-n btw. ws.

~ ~ ~

There are also remarks about the used chars to be made, bc. neither the Lat., nor the Gr. alphabets (especially the latter) are good enough in sense of phonetics (to say ntg. about the Eng. writing) missing many important sounds or making imposs. to guess the reading without looking forward with more than 2 chars (& even then not always, i.e. there are many exceptions). On the other hand I wish not to force the readers to study Cyr. alphabet (which is more suitable, at least bc. it was made later than the Lat. --- in 7th century). For such problematic chars |I_chars| (always in Sl. ws, smm. in other langs 2(with diff. alphabets)2, or set in single quotes as sign how to be read --- i.e. when a transliteration is given) the following combinations are used:

'zh' for the Sl. sound that may be found in Fr. jour or bourgeois;
'sh' for the well used in Eng. sound as in sheet (or, if you like it, as in shit); in Ger. it's written as "sch" (also "sp" & "st" in the beg-ing of their ws are read 'shp' & 'sht', resp.); in Tur. it is given as "ş", or in some other langs as "š";
'ch' for ws like choice or cheating, so that here I use the Eng. way of writing (but the Ger* use "tsch" instead; also "ç" in Tur.; in some other langs as "č");
an only 'z' is like in Eng. zero (but in many langs it is usually written as single "s");
and then 'tz' is not like in zero but like in Ger. Zahn or Lat. Cicero;
then 'å' is used for one often met vowel like in Eng.: bird, burn, alive, etc. (or in Ger. endings -er, like Lehrer, Bauer, etc.), what is typical Bul., Eastern, & Ar. sound; also for the sim. Eng. sound as in cut or but; this isn't Rus., but they read each unstressed "o" in a slightly sim. way (say oknò-window is read 'åknò');
then 'þ' is m.o.l. graphically sim. to what is the Sl. (Cyr.) so called "soft sign", like in Sp. cañon (= canjon, read 'kanþon'), or (if some of you like to say it) as in Sp. coño, but it is widely used in Rus. after every poss. consonant (e.g.: govoritþ, rechþ, lozhþ, etc.);
then for the Rus. 'eri' is used the sign 'û' (like in: , , bûstro, etc.; in fact, 'eri' is 'erû'); though it sounds not much away from Bul. 'å' it is read as if you want to say 'å' but say 'i', and m.o.l. plays the role of the Lat. "y" (not in Eng. reading), where the latter is called in Ger. ygreck (m-ing literally: a "Gr. 'i'"). There are other vowels in old Sl. & other langs but I shall write the nearest possible sounds for simplicity.

And, of course, when in Sl. or in many other langs is written "u" or "e" or "i" or "a" etc. you have to read this like in Lat. (or, normally, in Ger., Sp., It., etc.), not like in Eng.; also "j" is not your 'dzh' but your "y" (like in yogurt); and "h" is to be pronounced, not used to take breath or just skipped. On the other hand "v" is meant like your "v", i.e. I avoid using of Ger. transliteration with "w", bc. in old Lat. there were only 24 lets (without "j" 2(written as "i" followed by a vowel)2 & "w"; and in It. they do well with only 21 lets, without also: "k", "x" & "y")2 ), but also to make smm. poss. the usage of "w" like it is read in Eng., what turns out have come from olden times. So, as you see, the need for one worldwide alphabet is more then actual (& I make one proposition at the end of the book), but we work with what we have (as it is in all social matters where the bad thing is the man itself 2(& the woman too, for that matter)2 ). It may be added also that for some Gr. ws I need, occasionally, when there are not good Western variants & they must be cited smh. in the index, a suitable Lat. transliteration, in which cases the only new lets are: 'ê' for "η", and 'ø' for "ω", using the accepted "ph" for "φ", "ps" for "ψ", "ks" for "ξ", "th" for "θ", & writing, of course (what usually isn't done), just "h" for "χ", "k" for "κ", "r" for "ρ" (bc. it's always good if a biective 2(i.e., in both directions, or reversible)2 transformation can be applied 2(with the single exception 3(if this must be called e.)3 for "σ" and "ς", which are both given as "σ" and, therefore, replaced with Lat. "s")2 ).
For avoiding of too many punctuation chars I write the ws from the lang. of narration (i.e. Eng.) without any difference (no quotes 2(well, smm. quotes are used when the m-ing of the phrase may be ambiguous)2, no italic), the ws from other langs with Lat. alphabet I give in Italic (though it is used also for emphasizing purposes --- so that you have to show a bit of intelligence to distinguish the cases), the Gr. ws are with Gr. characters in the text (but if they are in the index they are transliterated as said above & given in Italic), & the Sl. ws (or of some other langs if they don't use Lat. alphabet & I have used good phonetics 2(i.e. Cyr.)2 for them) are given in small caps (as in the Rus. examples above). Using this phonetic transliteration makes it redundant to give pronunciation for the Sl. ws (with minor exceptions, and stressing is also smm. marked), for the other langs it is left mostly to the reader's intelligence to guess (especially for Ger. or Fr.), but as exceptions for some strangely pronounced ws I give also the pronunciation in single quotes using the above-explained combinations of chars (double quotes are used for exact quotations, or how the ws or chars are really written, not read), and for the Fr. nasal vowels I add a tilde ("~") after them (i.e. 'a~' or 'e~').

~ ~ ~

The etym-cal sources that I have used are in 3 (+ Bul.) major langs, namely:

a) Rus. --- Rus. Etym-cal Dict. by Max Vasmer, 1964 - 1973 in Rus. (there exist also German version bc. he is a Teuton, judging by the name); I have looked also in Bul. Etym-cal Dict., but for our Sl. ws (which are about 90 %) it contains just translation from Max Vasmer; still, I have looked in some other books or papers in Bul. or Rus., but not much & not in scientific journals;
b) Eng. --- The Oxford Dict. Of Eng. Etym-gy, edited. by C. T. Onioins, Oxford Univ. Press 1966; also Britannica World Language; also the big Oxford English Dict. (which exists in compact edition, too), & occasionally other sources in Eng.;
c) Ger. --- Der Grosse Duden, mainly b.7, Etymologie, Bibliograf. Inst. Mannheim /Wien /Zürich 1963 (hence, some knowledge of Rus. or Ger. or Bul. is preferable for you but it is not strictly required);
there are also other sources occasionally used, say: Fr. etym. dict., some books with interesting ancient &/or Eastern ws, smt. heard from smb., etc.;
as also some really big o. Gr. (smm. new Gr.). & Lat. (or Gr.--Eng.) dicts (which are, m.o.l., explanatory, supplying additional information); & an occasional look in some other langs.

All the work done here is composed in an unique multilingual dictionary named EXPLAIN (written in Bul.), with about 11,500 key ws, where the point is not to do just etym-cal research what is, in a way, easier, bc. they go only back on the etym-cal tree (what is done by many specialists & I have used their works many times), but to seek for rel-ns btw. the branches or leaves of the tree, which may give us ideas about the hidden m-ing(s) of the rs (mainly syls) & revealing in this way the thoughts & views of different nations --- hence, if a rel-n from, say, current Eng. to current Ger. is given, I usually don't mean it literally, but am avoiding citing of too many o. Teu. ws (as not commonly known; or, after all, cite some of them).
There might be critics for having not been given much Fr. ws, what, in fact, is true, but there are 2 reasons for this: one is that I don't speak that lang. (what is excusable enough), & the other is that Fr. is a very mutilated Lat. & shouldn't be taken very seriously (f.ex., they use 3 diff. kinds of stresses above the letters where neither of them is a real stress), and, therefore, it is better to cite the original Lat. &/or Gr. ws (what I usually do). So that, as far as the narration goes in Eng, the Fr. presence here is enough, bc. what is Teu. is explained good, and what isn't is given in Gr. & Lat. (plus other Rom. langs smm.); to add that, if one asks this question: what is more in the Eng. lang., Fr.-Lat. or Ger.-Teu. influence, I would join the official view of the etym-ists & say that this is the Teu. part (about 2/3 of the ws, & mostly the ws from our natural environment 2(like: eat, sleep, go, bread, meat 3(not exactly but flesh)3, fish, stone, water, etc., etc.)2, where the social or moral ws are Lat. & come through the Fr* 2(like: honest, gentle, just, beautiful, bourgeois, vivid, cause, connect, attend, etc., etc.)2 ) --- at least bc. the grammar is (m.o.l.) like the Ger. In this way the Sl. part of the book is a plus for Eng. sp-ing (or understanding) readers; as much as the Eng. &/or Ger. part is an extra for Sl. readers (& as far as my Eng., frankly sp-ing, isn't very rich the book can easily be read by persons for whom Eng. is foreign lang.); or sim-ly for Ger. readers. And, after all, I have never even dreamed to think that I may give all the related ws (& in all poss. langs), hence what is given is just for illustrative purposes and the reader must find at least as many as the cited ws, even not knowing more than one foreign lang. (as I have, occasionally, found & succeeded to explain many Sp. ws, not knowing the lang.).

The religious themes have been consulted in different books about the Greek religion, the Christian religion, the Koran, the Buddhism & Zen-Buddhism, but not studied in any details, bc. I think the important things are not the details & small diff-ces, but the common ideas (and mark that exactly this is the reason why all religions insist on details & differences, not on really important common ideas & moral --- bc. they want more to differ from the others than to be of better use for the people). Some mathematical things are included, not only bc. of their importance, but also bc. the author has mathematical education & likes to explain such points. Some common sense reasoning or moral is also present bc., although these have to be obvious things, they are often avoided or even distorted (be it so bc. of the interests of the ruling classes, or of the business circles, or bc. of the natural wish of the people to live in a 2(presumably happy)2 delusion, or bc. of smt. else), so that they deserve to be commented here (as it is stated in the title of the book), but more tedious fragments are enclosed in square brackets (& marked with "comments" or "suggestions" in the index 2(but only there)2 ) to allow the reader to skip them over if he or she wishes so.
Being indispensable in such a book there is at the end a common index in Lat. alphabet with about 8,470 key ws (2,850 Eng. 2(i.e., well accepted in Eng., not that they originate there)2 & 5,620 non-Eng.) where all langs are mixed. This mixing may not seem very proper (especially having in mind that the Eng. ws are 1/3rd of the whole), but, I sup., in this way it's easier to look in the index (I mean that the index is only one), and you may easily distinguish btw. the langs, bc. of the mentioned diff-ces in the way of writing of the ws. The indexed ws are made bold in the text to inform you about the indexing; besides the ment-d "comments" & "suggestions" index entries there are also: "phrases", "sentences", "verses" (which, however, are not marked in the text being recognizable places), & poss. some more; and there's a small place provided for making of your own index (if you want this in order to find fast by 2nd reading the places which have seemed to be of some interest for you by the 1st reading).
And my Urrh (Whose name you may read in Eng. version, to rime with "stir", i.e. 'År', or in Ger., Lat., Sl., etc. version 2('Ur', to rime with, say, bonjour)2 ) was really my enlightenment (together with the date --- I am not lying to you, no, not me), and it is strange that nobody has come to this idea before. So, bon reading now.

~ ~ ~

Yeah, but now follow some remarks about the peculiarities for the Internet |I_IntNet| version, exactly this one, bc. there is a diff-ce btw. reading a book, with pages, (hidden) indexes, special chars from other alphabets, etc., and reading smt. on an Internet site where you have no pages, and can move when searching smt. (usually with "Ctr./F" --- what in some aspects is even better), but you have to have ways for writing the (beg-ing of the) needed word. The latter means that here must be invented some ways for simulating of an index, and in it only the basic Lat. chars can be used, even not Cyr., so that all special chars in this pseudo-index (but only there, not in the very w. in the text, hence we are not diminishing now the lets) must be changed; and there are also diff-ces in the ways of the diff. langs (how to make the distinction); and maybe other things. So that let us say how it is made, what in some cases (though not much) denies what was said above
The index here is simulated preceding the w. with "I_" (e.g. I_word, as you have seen it already several times), and the indexed w. (though not the very index) is to be seen also by the bold chars. The Eng. lets, as also the foreign with Lat. alphabet are left as said, but the Cyr. alphabet is to be distinguished by the underlying (what maybe isn't a very good decision but it is the only one left (bc. the all caps are for headings and there are not small caps here or embossed etc. chars). As a rule, in the normal case (when there are no special chars), the indexed w. is part of the text (say, "we are speaking about this I_word, which ..."), bc there is no nead to repeat entire ws, but when there are some diff-ces in the index and the written word then the index is put in, or just finished with "|" (e.g., "the Gr. μορφη |I_morphe^| means ...", or "the taxidermist |I_taxidermy|, who fills ...") Then there are added some useful indexes like I_langs, I_abrevs, I_chars etc. (e.g. I_Contents leads you to the Contents), and others, and they (as also the others, like I_phrases etc.), are always visible, so they mess with the text, but you have to swallow this inconvenience. On the other hand making diff-ce btw. << and >> here proves to be of a better usage (and the ws in such cases are written without "I_").
Now about the special (really, and important, not to be confused with others) chars. (bc. there must be no chicks above or below the chars when you are forced to write them in the small search window 2(and also there must be used an unique way of writing the lets, in both directions, bijective, as it is said)2 ). So this is treated in the following way: "ş" is normally given as "sh" where its pronunciation is beyond doubt (mainly in Tur.), or smm. is left merely as "s" (say, in Pol., as also when it was written as "š"), sim-ly "ç" is given as "ch", or left smm as simple "c" (say, in Fr., as also when it was as "ċ" or "č"); then the normally accepted on the West "ä", "ö", & "ü" are given with an "e" following the let. (i.e. "ae", "oe", & "ue"; this may not always be bijective transformation but it is a broadly used way), also the Ger "ß" is written as "ss"; then the Cyr. "å" (like in "bird") & "û" ('eru^'), are followed with "^" (what doesn't look very nice, but there must be unique char. and the only one left is the dollar sign 2(even "#" is used for masking of some "bad" ws)2 ), and the soft sign "þ" is given even crazier, with only the "$" sign; then sim. approach is used for the 2 Gr. chars, 'ê' for "η", written in the index as "e^", and 'ø' for "ω", written as "o^"; and any other marks above or below the char. are ignored, even the Rus. "ë" ('jo') is given as plain Lat. char.
Ah, and one advice. Bc. to read this enormous book on an Internet site is simply imposs., so don't even try this! What you may try & do is to read by half to one (so called) chapter of the book, say, once in a week; or then search for smt. (but even to search you have to have some experience in reading of the book, so that you try to read at least a pair of chapters 1st). Then keep the beg-ing "I_" always in the search window bc otherwise for Eng. ws you will stop not where you want. OK, but having got a bit used to the book, I hope, you will find it very useful.





THE CREATION


IN THE BEGINNING |I_BEGINCHP|
{
Well, I sup. you will allow me to intervene even in the beg-ing of the beg-ing, bc. this simply couldn't be true, but such is the tradition, so let us not break it. Still, there can't be a beg-ing or an end in some cyclical process (the well-known "egg & hen" problem) and the choice of one point to start from is a matter of taste. Take f.ex. the year, which for us begins with the winter, but in southern hemisphere with the summer, & in old times (acc. to the known zodiacal calendar) it had begun with the spring, what is more natural (hence, the egg-hen problem begins with the egg, or, as the Rom* have said: |I_phrases| ad ovo). So that it is suitable to say at this point smt. about the names of the months, which are called so not bc. of some saints (the saints, if at all present, have come later, after the core idea has been introduced; to add that all the zodiacal constellations were imagined later on --- bc. they have ntg. in common with their pictures) but bc. of some hidden ideas, and in this situation we must begin here with the beg-ing, which is I_March, bc. ... well, bc. this is the beg-ing of the march (in Eng. there isn't even any diff-ce in these 2 ws but in Ger. it exists and the month is März |I_Maerz| where the march is I_Marsch).
And if we count in this way then I_April is smt. I_apres (after 2(the winter)2 in Fr., or, better, before 2(the summer)2 in Lat., bc. a I_priori |I_phrases| is before 2(the experiment, or the time --- >> hora--ora)2 ), then comes May which is a very good month (& very interesting, but there is much to be said about it so that I will abstain for the time being from more details), then come 2 ... jubilee months 2(>> jubeln)2 --- I_June & I_July (for which we say just smt. like "yeah"), then follows the I_August which is au + I_gusto (m-ing: what a kief, kef 2(>> k.)2, or keif-pleasure), & then comes exactly the 7th month which is called therefore I_September! Then there are I_October, I_November & I_December (the last being, clearly, the 10th month, though now for us, it is the 12th). But there is smt. more, namely this "br-", which signifies the cold & begins to be added to the names from September to December plus I_February (this being 'fjuu' 2(of the wind)2 + 'br-'), with exception of the I_January, which in Eng. is easy to be explained as: 'jah'-yeah + new + year! If not 'br-', then at least 'r-', is left in März-March (or mart in Sl.) & in April, but there this isn't the only idea. So I hope you will not curse me, my dear reader (or readeress --- I simply adore this w. bc. I have not met it yet in a book, but I don't meet much Eng. ws moving around in my country 2(see Appendix-2)2, with the exception of, say: action, thriller, play-off, f#ck-off, & so on), for this distraction from the theme to the names of the months.

~ ~ ~

In short, it couldn't be a beg-ing but it's better to be some beg-ing. And it is an interesting thing with this w., too, bc. "begin" surely comes from Ger. I_beginnen (begann, begonnen), but be- in Ger. is a prefix & ... well, there isn't a w. "ginnen" in Ger. (& the etym-sts say it is from an unknown lang.?). Still, it is poss. to guess smt., namely that this gin- /gon- comes from Gr. γωνια |I_go^nia| m-ing an angle, and there is Bul. I_gonja (as to pursue, or drive out) or Rus. gnatþ |I_gnat$| (t.s.), bc. to run away or after is to make some angle (isn't it? 2(I mean that if one tries to run away going always in straight line, one wouldn't succeed to run away)2; and, besides, there was in o. Gr. a w. γονη as a birth, fruit, or womb --- i.e. smt. driven 2(or driving, or capable of doing this)2 out), but --- but this isn't quite a proper way to look at the w. begin. And what is the proper one then? OK, the proper way is not to discard be- as prefix but to begin with the r. beg- and then to remember about the ... Heb. name I_Begin, which surely means a big men, smt. like the I_beg (or bek, or bekh), what is a widely spread in Asia & the Near East (Tar., Azr., Tur., & so on) title of a ruler, which may became also I_baj (or bej in Sl.); then very near to this is Tur. ... I_bayram (a religious feast, but mainly big eating or big blast 2(i.e., a king's meal, I sup.)2 ), or I_bayrak (known also in Bul., a banner), or Tur. bekâr |I_bekar| (read 'bekjar', a bachelor, not married man, i.e. he is feeling like a beg--baj), or, poss., the town I_Beirut (a baj-town 2(or route?)2 ). Aside of this there are sim. ws in Blt. langs (like begu & begti as to run), as also in the Sl. langs (in Bul. I_bjagam is to run, in Rus. bezhatþ |I_bezhat$| is t.s., also I_beg is a run there), hence this big man simply runs the folks! But there is smt. more here, bc. you know the Eng. ... I_back, and the I_bay (in diff. m-ings), where the latter is given as rel-d to Lat. baca (small fruit, but a bay on a coast too) & Fr. baie & Sp. bahia etc. (hence it is known on the West). And, why is here this running, and the power, & the back, & the coast? Well, this is part of what can be said about ... just the let. "b" (or bo- /bu-), bc. to say it one has to make round cheeks & compress the air & the cheeks begin then to blow out; this may also be ... a shell of an egg (half of it, to be more precise), bc. this is usually the coast (& our back), and you know that we like to have our backs guarded (by a bay or a baj--beg).
So this is the beg-ing, but if we haven't forgotten about the egg--hen rel-n then we come to the I_circle, I_cycle, or cyclone, what is o. Gr. κυκλοσ |I_kyklos| . Here are other ws, like the I_typhoon, or the tycoon, but this isn't so interesting; more interesting is to go to the ... sickness, bc. one is I_sick when he/she goes round & round, in circles, or sees that the world around him/her goes in circles. So that here comes the heard Fr. I_chicane (Schikanie in Ger.), or Ger. I_Schicksal (a destiny, what is a bad or destroying one, not a fortune), then Heb. I_shiksi (non-Judaic woman --- it is obvious that the name sounds disdainful), or your I_sickle (or the scythe). Then I may quote, hmm, the I_sycamore-tree, or also the I_sycamine (the biblical fig-tree), which are very twisted trees & coming from ancient times. All this is rel-d to Ger. I_schieben (moving rapidly, in & out, or by rotating --- but you must allow me to explain that if we smash the circle & go to one dimensional 2(1-D)2 figure this is exactly the reflexive movement of the piston, for- & back- ward, in & out, what is unavoidable by the copulation too), which r. is widely spread in the Sl. langs (Bul. I_shibam, what means to hit with a stick, but also in the sexual m-ing of copulation, a sim. Cz. shibati or Pol. I_szib 2(swishing flying)2, etc. ), here is the Eng. I_shiver (bc. smb. may begin to schieben me), but there is also Heb. I_shiva, what is the mourning week after a funeral (shibana-fucking --- ah, sorry --- week). Here is also the widely known I_shock, or your (to) I_shake /shook, or Rus. jargon siganutþ |I_siganut$| (to hit hard), or your (to) I_shove (together with the shovel), also Tur. & Ar. şebek |I_shebek| (a monkey --- bc. it moves fast), & so on, what in the sexual m-ing is best represented in Tur. sik (more precisely in I_siktir & I_sikana, what are hard curses, the latter one about the mother 2(which is ana in Tur.)2 ); there is I_sic also in Lat., but this means ntg. bad (just: so, in this way --- as in the sentence |I_sentences|: "Sic transit gloria mundi.", i.e. "So perishes the world glory."). ( From here one may go, if one likes it, to the Eng. shit, but about that on some other place. )
This r. begins smw. in the Skr. where were 3 main Gods, namely: I_Shiva, I_Brahma, and I_Vishnu (& I_Krishna is one of the incarnations of the latter). And do you know what their names mean (bc. in ancient times all the names have had some m-ing, or, as the Lat* said |I_sentences|: Nomen est omen)? Well, this is easier to be observed in the Sl. langs (but in the Western ones too). The God Shiva was the destroyer (that is why he schiebt-f#cks; to add that there was a name I_Shivlinga 2(<< linga)2 m-ing "The Red Penis") & in this connection I may ment. also the Ar. ... I_sheikh (or your I_shut & I_shatter), then ... the play I_chess, of course (bc. it's I_Schach in Ger. or in the Sl. langs, but this is also title of a ruler), then even just the let. "s" especially in Gr. ("σ", i.e. I_sigma), bc. it is the most "snakish" one (curled & with heaved head) & it hissed, like I_Sibyl (Sibylla in Lat.; or sibilo what is hissing); the snake was also a goddess in some ancient religions. To the monkey-şebek may be added also the wild dog shakal (I_Schakal in Ger., chakal in Rus., I_jackal in Eng., & so on), which sounds very near to Skr. I_shakti, what meant strength or power (or shaktra was strong). In a wider sense this is not only the destroying but the life as a whole; still, some shaking or shoving stays put in the root. OK, & then comes the God I_Brahma who is the highest god, the creator, and his name sounds like some "brr", what in Bul. is bråmcha |I_bra^mcha| (to zoom; in Eng. there's a sim. w., ... I_broom, though you usually don't put it in rel-n with the sound of sweeping), but you know about the I_Brahmans & surely have heard the w. I_bravo (giving the Eng. brave); this "brave" s-ing. of the name has been found very convincing of the power hidden in it from representatives of many ancient folks bc. there are many names that can be traced to Brahma, like, say: Tur. Abram or I_Ibrahim (and then, maybe their I_ibrik as a kettle --- bc. of its nicely curved nozzle, I sup.; as much as their, known also in Bul., ibrişim |I_ibrishim | meaning a spool of thread --- this bc. of the cycle), Heb. I_Abraham, their very name ... I_Hebrew, resp. I_evrej in Rus. /Sl. (not that they think of themselves as Brahmans, of course), and maybe others. And the 3rd god, I_Vishnu, is he who does the things, keeps them running, maintains all --- vårsha in Bul, or vershitþ |I_vershit$| in Rus. is exactly to do (in Western langs there are, e.g.: the I_vertex or vortex, vertigo, verification, etc., i.e. the rotation, which is a kind of work 2(though not all, or each, work)2 but we shall come to the rotation). Even I_Krishna is present in the Sl. bc. in Rus. krushitþ |I_krushit$| is to destroy, as also in Eng. (your to crush), or there's also Bul. (not Sl.) kråshen as lissome, flexible (usually used for maiden's waist), though here the ideas become mixed with Shiva; but poss. one can't repair the things without some crushing, where the shivering is smt. diff.
In other ws, and this is a very important moment, there is not just the Creation, there is also the maintenance, everyday work; but there must also be the unavoidable destruction (and one of the reasons for the wars, looking from psychological point of view, as some unconscious feeling, is that there is smt. to be destroyed 2(well, not exactly ours, by the enemies, but still smt. for crushing)2 --- bc. this will give rise to a new creation, will give work to many people, will give goals for living)!

~ ~ ~

So no Creation begins without I_schieben-ing or shivering, or, to put it bluntly (& to change the r. but not the meaning), without --- let me say it in Ger. bc. there it sounds more decently --- I_fick-ing. In Ger. Ficke is given as pocket, but I hope all of the readers understand well what kind of pocket it might be (it's also fem.) bc. fickerig is fast & trembling movement (m.o.l. like your fickle as unsteady). The r. was known in Lat. as I_futuo, and if we return to the I_sycamore /sycamine (sic- -- fic-), then these trees are very "fickingly" twisted, but this is also Fr. I_fic (a pimple, or a small tumor), or It. fico, what is the fruit of the sycamine (a currant), which is I_figue in Fr., I_Feige in Ger, & so on in many Sl. langs (say, fig in Rus.). ( From this fig in Rus. exists the jargon I_figovina, what means smt. small, a gadget, what is, m.o.l., = to hujovina, but the latter is derogatory & rel-d to their I_huj what is, I beg your pardon, a penis. And a I_gadget, b.t.w., in Bul. sounds very near to your w., namely I_dzhadzha, what surely is Tur., although your w., I sup., has to be split in gad + get, m-ing: to get the bug! Such building is interesting though not unique for you, bc. t.s. is the situation with the ... I_target 2(to get, here hit, the tar, i.e. the point marked with black)2, or the ... I_budget 2(to get the bud, though etym-cally this isn't very sound & here Fr. bougette 3('buzhet')3 m-ing a money bag is given, which had come from an o. Fr. bouge m-ing a cask or a bottom of boat, but I sup. it might as well be also from the known bouquet --- shortened to bud)2, or then the I_midget 2(here the small fly coming from Ger. Mücke |I_Muecke| comes into play)2, & others 2(say, the I_spigot may mean to get it where it spits)2. On the other hand this may be just some ending in Fr. manner 2(bc. in Bul. the budget is bjudzhet 3(c. Sl.)3 & the midget is mizhiturka)2, but it has to have come smh. --- and that is what I'm telling you. Even if this is etym-cally questionable it may as well be the so called vulgar etymology, bc. the people have to have some image in their heads, & rel-ns to other ws, in order to accept a given foreign w. )
But to return to the Lat. I_futuo, which isn't of the kind of ws that one will find in dicts (or, if you find it in some dict. then it will be given as to I_fertilize 2(& that is where this Eng. w. comes from)2, or make pregnant) but it's exactly your (to) I_fuck --- ah, sorry, I didn't intend to spit it but it's better not to be squeamish in etym-cal matters --- and when the Ger. variant is more legal in its m-ing & nearer to the I_figue-currant (it is said there was a Norw. fik(l)a as vivid movement, also vycken as to hit with a stick --- & then, I think, I have to ment. the I_Vikings too), then your (& Lat.) w. is a better imit. of the pushing of air out (of "some" place). Well, it's a matter of taste, there are sim-ly s-ing ws in many langs, say, in Bul, we use I_fukam (se) as to show off, but also as to hit or futuo (>> fog or vogue too), or also the variety I_fucha as to move very fast or to swish, blow (like a wind), here are the known I_fusion (or Ger. Fuge & fügen |I_fuegen| 2(to fill or join, also to put up with)2, & the musical fugue) & I_fission, which both are near to Lat. physica (or Fr. I_physique or Eng. physics, etc., from o. Gr. φυσικη), though the m-ing is diff. (from here we may go also to the ... pissing, but about this on some other place). ( And, again b.t.w., from this physical r. I derive one often used Rus. cynicism, namely I_pizda, what is a vagina, medically sp-ing! Nobody says this is so 2(bc. such ws are missing from the etym-cal dicts)2, but I have thought many days 2(or were they sleepless nights?)2 and have come to the conclusion that it may be just some naked feminine physical part, but this is the most attractive one for the men. To go from the mere pissing I found very dull 2(& even if it is so this is closely rel-d & they say pisþka |I_pis$ka| for the penis --- well, for a boy's one)2. )
Yeah, but then surely has to be ment-d also the I_foetus (simplified in Eng. to fetus, an embryo), though we will come to it later too; and also your ... (with or without "to") I_fit with all of its m-ings, partly = to those of Ger. fügen, which w. might have started from the futuo (bc. of the let. "t") but was then modified under Ger. influence (bc. of the "i" in ficken) & suggested some actions performed usually by the phalus (bc. of the beg-ing "f") --- so I hope I was sufficiently precise with the last w. bc. it deserves it. And not to forget also the ... I_future (as tense or not --- bc. it is like a wind, one can't grasp it, and in Fr. futur is read 'fjutju' 2(though in Eng. it isn't much diff.)2, but, on the other hand, it begins with the current moment, i.e. it is a kind of creation or beg-ing), what is also Lat. (futurus; & fui is one of the forms of their verb to be 2(sunt)2, resp. in It. for the Perf. tense: io-I fui, tu-you fosti, egli-he fu, etc. --- smt. has just otfuchalo-gone-by). But also --- now obvious for me --- the I_function, in nearly every poss. lang., bc. it means: to stick in, fit, fill the place, some futuo-action, & that is why you say that smb. functions at a given position, occupies it (what is so in many langs: the Bul* 2(Sl*)2 say izpålnjavam |I_izpa^lnjavam| for to perform some duties or work on a certain post, where izpålvam is to fill smt., the Ger* use even the phrase "to put the post on", like a dress 2(den Posten bekleiden)2 ). You see that the ws are very interwoven & the m-ings differ, so let us return now & stick to the figue-fruit, where, really, many ideas are put in work, bc.: here are the known in ancient Greece sycophantes |I_sycophant| (in Lat. writing), for whom is said (in philosophical literature) that they were showing (selling) figues; then the sign of I_figue (to put the thumb btw. the next 2 fingers) comes on the scene (I shall explain why); but also the twisted form of their leaves plays its role, which gives the ... I_figure, of course, together with the shame of showing some hidden (by leaves of figue) places. I should add also your ... I_wig, bc. it performs the function of a leaf of figue, only put on the head; and there is also Lat. I_fingo m-ing: to build, make, invent, lick etc.,. what isn't much away from the act of f#cking, if you look at it as act of creation (what is true, bc. up till now it remains the only way for reproducing of human beings), but on the other hand this fingo gives your I_finger|s. ( I sup-ed here have to be the I_Whig|s, adherents of Presbyterian cause in Eng, one of the 2 leading parties for about a cent., but they are given as poss. shortening from some expedition called in Scan. whiggamaire what was to be split in: whig 2(as to drive --- i.e. smt. like your whip)2 + mere 2(as your mare-horse)2, so maybe this is a coincidence. )
Then bc. of the sycophants & Ger. Feige the w. I_Feigling means there a coward (or take Eng. 2(to)2 feign), and the Rus*, for their part, use I_figljar for a clown, a person making indecent or silly gestures. And about this I_sycophant|s : I personally don't believe in what is said that they were selling sacred currants (from a coppice around some temple), bc. for me is clear that the negative m-ing or the w. comes from the ... well, from the so called (men's) balls, which have the habit to shake like pendulums --- don't they? T.s. idea hides the sign of I_figue (faire la figue in Fr., or far la fica in It., but the Rus* say also "to make the bird", waving with the 2 curved fingers, what is a try to behave more decently), for to show one's testicles, obviously, isn't decent (what I explain here bc. many people think this sign has a more vulgar m-ing of a shit --- ah, sorry, girls). Then, have you ever thought: why your I_currant & ... I_current (things) sound almost t.s.? This is bc. the time is measured (or at least was) by mechanical clocks & they have some kind of "currants" that say tick-tack, &, besides, kurantû |I_kurantu^| in Rus. is a clock that chimes; the idea of a I_pendulum is to be seen also in the variety I_mandalo (t.s., but >> m.), what rel-s very well with Ger. I_Mandel, what is their name for an almond. And maybe (or at least I think this is highly poss.) the ... I_fok-mast (given as from Hol.) may mean that it is smt. for "focking", bc. it is placed in the foremost part of the ship where every man has smt. for ficking (& maybe the naval people just liked to say "fock it", or the like?).

~ ~ ~

But these are not all the approaches to the beg-ing and let us look now by the Slavs where they (or rather, we) say I_nachalo (for a beg-ing) or nachatþ (for to begin, in Rus.), and here the r. has come from old times bc. in Skr. I_nachati was to get or reach smt., t.s. was Avs. I_nasaiti (also ashnaoti was to reach). This is not only the beg-ing, this is the whole process of the beg-ing together with the delivering to some end, and the Rus* say also I_nesti for to carry (what is o. & c. Sl., in Cz. it's nesti, in Pol. is 'nishch' --- with some "chicks" above "s" & "c" --- in Bul. is nosja, etc.), but this is used also for ... hens in the m-ing of laying eggs (i.e., giving birth). At t.s. time this sounds exactly as your nest, which is Ger. I_Nest (or Nestel), given from an o. I/E. nizdo, what in Sl. is nearly t.s. (I_gnezdo in Rus., Bul., etc.), and the Rus* use also the w. I_nerest for throwing off fish-eggs (o. Rus. & Ukr. ners); and where the Nest is there is your ... I_next. There was a Lat. I_nidus (sim. to nudis what is naked) m-ing a nest or a box, but it sounds slightly diff., though the idea of lying down --- I_nieder in Ger ---, presumably to lay eggs, has to be present. So that this r. is known on the West, but the m-ing of giving birth is restricted to birds only, bc. women don't nest (and then the w. I_birth is one more modification of on bo- /bu- based ws 2(more precisely, birth comes from to I_bear, of course)2; but the I_bird sounds exactly like the birth 2(acc. to me, bc. it isn't Teutonic or Fr., and in the dicts is given an unknown etym-gy for bird)2 bc. they often give birth, but we shall disc. this further).
Still, there are many slightly modified ws on the West like: Lat. nanciscor (to meet occasionally, or to receive --- maybe some god has put it for me to find), or I_natal (resp. prenatal), or native (Lat. I_nativus), or the nations, or Lat. I_natura (a nature), or Lat. nascor (nascere, to give birth, to happen, to arise --- from here is your I_nascent), or Lat. nato what is to swim over (where from I_NATO has come, i.e. the abbreviation was so chosen to match this Lat. verb; and life has come from the sea, your know); or take Fr. I_naissance ('nesa~s', a birth, a beg-ing, from here is the I_Renaissance), or naître |I_naitre| (to give birth, etc. 2(which in o. Fr. must have been read 'nestr'2 ), what has given your I_nee (just in Fr., past participle of this verb) as maiden name. Here has to be ment-d Ger. naß |I_nass| (wet --- bc. some moisture is needed in the sexual matters), and poss. their I_genesen (genas), what is to become well, or to give birth to a child (it may be stated that the last comes from the gene, but ge- is much used Ger. prefix 2(for building of Partizip Perfekt)2 & might have to be taken away for analysis; & then the m-ing is m.o.l. that of the naissance). Also Rus. snoshatþsja (to copulate) or I_snoshenie (a copulation) is rel-d to nosja, bc. the beg-ing "s" here is equal to the Lat. co- (& the Cyr. let. "s" is written exactly like the Lat. let. "c", & also you read the let. "c" as 'si', so there are no reasons why the Sl* shouldn't translate co- into "s"), and the copulation, as you well know, is the only way to give birth for many animals, including the human beings (& I find it interesting to ment. that snoshatþsja is used also in the sense of social communication, & even the Ger* use the expression "geselschaftliche Kopulation" in this sense; you, for your part, use sim-ly to intercourse).
We shall return to naître shortly but for now let us remember the consonants "ntr" and continue with the Sl. particle I_na (there 2(it is)2, take it). Particles are not exactly ws but here we have good rel-n to Ger. I_nahe what is your I_near, or nahen, what is to come nearer, but then nähen |I_naehen| is to sew (bc. this is a way to make pieces of cloth to stick one to another); also Ger. Naht (a stitch) & I_Niet (a rivet) & your I_nut (though it means smt. else) must be ment-d, together with Rus. nitþ or I_nitka (a thread); but then I may add also your "I_now" (Ger. I_nun, but also na or nanu with slightly modified m-ings), & smt. Gr., & Skr., what may hardly be rel-d to naître, but "now" is a very near time & this fits in the context. Well, and then I may cite o. Gr. νοστεω as to go home, to return, where from Lat. (etc.) I_nostalgia has come, & this is a kind of cycle; on the other hand the nostalgia has to have come from (or at least to be closely rel-d to) ... our things or cause, bc. in Lat. I_noster means exactly our (what explains the so called Cosa Nostra as "The Cause Of Ours"), or in Fr. it is nôtre (where this sign above "o" is used to mark missing char, hence before some time it was again "nostre"), & in Bul. /Rus. our is I_nash. But, did you get it: why our things should be here? Ah, bc. of the grasping movement with the hand, what is a cycle or returning (or beg-ing, when it, anyway, is a cyclical process)! Even, if you would like it, I may cite here the well known I_nose, which is Ger. I_Nase, Sl. nos, & so on up to Skr. I_nasa --- maybe bc. we always carry (nosja) it with us (?); or, more seriously, bc. it sticks out, it is the beg-ing of our face (especially if one goes on 4 legs, as the animals do), but we shall come again to the nose.
Sp-ing about birth we come now to the I_navel, and even to the ... Galaxies, but let us not hurry up. The navel sounds better in Ger. where it is I_Nabel (or Nabe is a hub, center of wheel), but then here surely emerged some ... clouds in the form of Ger. Nebel (a cloud, mist), which is Lat. I_nebula & also Sl. I_nebe (in Bul, or nebo in Rus., m-ing a sky), what has come from far off times, namely from Skr. I_nabhas (a cloud, vapour, sky) or Avs. nabah (an air space), or, if you like, from old Assiro-Babylon & the name of a king, ... Navuhudonosor or I_Nebukadnesar (or how you name him, bc. there are several variants), which begins with some Nebu who was a god, and the whole name is said to mean: "(Oh, God) Nebu, defend my borders"! This r. has given also o. Gr. νεφελη (a cloud or darkness; the source for the nebula). Now, some of you may observe a rel-n with some be- /bo- /bu- sound of filling or infusion (we shall come to this on Bohne), what isn't surprising bc. you can't bind together the center (the navel) & all that lies around it (the nebula) without this idea in your head --- and the ancient people were born philosophers (in sense that in old times all was in one heap --- the philosophy, sciences, religions, myths, & morality). So, then let me add also the given I/E. r. nebh- (a navel or center of a wheel), Per. naf (a navel), o. Prussian nabis (t.s.), but also Lat. I_nefas m-ing ... a dishonesty, misdeed, or a monster (what can be explained only with the idea of the nebula-mist), or also one Gr. w. that we have as jargon in Bul., I_nefela, with m-ing of diseased, unsuitable, applied mostly to women (for which some guys say that they are: either "a little undisposed or much displeased"), hence they are "dark"; maybe with sim. ideas in their heads the Fr* have formed their nèfle |I_nefle| m-ing a medlar (which is smt. misspelled --- >> Ger. Mispel). In the sense of native (i.e. born via the navel, widely sp-ing, bc. in Lat. I_natis is a ... bottom, but surely with the idea of the womb) is given also Fr. naïf (or naïve |I_naive| /naive for you), which has to be written (in Fr., not in Eng., where it is just a matter of taste) with 2 points over the "i" in order not to be read as 'nef'.

~ ~ ~

Well, now let us return to the consonants "ntr" (as in the nature) that give us the ... nitrates, of course! This is o. Gr. νυτρον (I_natrium or natron), or Lat. natrium or nitram (or Ger. Nitron, & sim. in Sl. & other langs), or your I_nitrogen (signified with the let. "N"), but this has come from ancient Egypt, & written with their hieroglyphs had to be read as 'ntr(j)'. This explains the I_natura, natio, etc. (bc. N is basic element for all life forms), hence your I_nut too (either as a food, or used to fasten a bolt), but there is smt. interesting in the Sl. langs where vnutrþ |I_vnutr$|is the prep. into, and I_nutro is o. Rus. w. for intestines, guts, what has come from o. Gr. εντερα |I_entera| (t.s.), and before that was Skr. I_antaras (internal) or I_antram (intestines), or Avs. antara, giving also Lat. interus, your I_inter- (also = I_intel-, b.t.w.), Fr. I_entrez ('a~tre', come in, enter) etc.; but if we had started with "in" only we have hardly had come to the N, and the giving (or carrying) of birth. Hmm, we might have come to the birth but via the Ger. suffix I_-in, which is not only your (and Lat.) prep. but is used for building of fem. form from ws being initially masc., bc. were applied only to men (you don't have this bc. you've discarded the genders, but they 2(& maybe all other nations)2 have, like, say: Lehrerin, Arbeiterin, Bauerin, Professorin, etc.) --- and how else could you explain this, if not with the idea of some entering into them (by men)? In this sense Fr. I_encore m-ing "more" may be explained as a further movement to some core (viewed here as a hole) until you enter into it.
Anyway, in the mere s-ing of 'ntr' is hidden some torsion appropriate for the intestines (they are twisted, interwoven), and if animals feed through the mouth (& that's why you speak about I_nutrition; & about nursing |I_nurse| too) then the plants take what they need from the earth, where is this nutritious I_algae (or algue in Fr., a see-weed), or, more precisely, Ar. al-kali (to be decomposed, b.t.w., in: all + καλο, but for the ambiguous m-ing of the last w. >> calamity). And bc. in other langs (e.g. Sl.) for the element N Fr. w. I_azote is used let me say that this is: "a" (here not as negation but as an article, or for taking of breath) + some "zoe" --- which has come from o. Gr., where: ζωοσ |I_zo^os| was (and still is in the current lang.) alive, ζωη |I_zo^e^| was a life or means for life, ζεω was to be excited or to boil with feelings, etc., what has given the known I_zoology. ( This reminds me to add here Rus. I_zajatz what is a rabbit 2(although the etym-sts say it has to be from a Skr. I_hayas, in what I don't believe bc. it meant a horse, and it is very difficult 3(in spite of its jumping)3 to confuse a horse with a rabbit; but it is sim. also to one Lat. w., I_haedus, what is this time a wild goat, what may be correct bc. we may go from here to some o. Teu. gaits which corresponds well with your I_goat 3(&, resp., goad, bc. it has horns)3, but this, of course, is another matter --- and that is why I have put this in parentheses)2. ) This "zoe" is rel-d (I mean, it just has to be so, not that I have met this smw.) in o. Gr. to their ... god I_Zeus (Ζευσ) as maker of all zoological (& not only) beings, as also (I sup.) to Ger. I_zeugen (pronounced 'tzojgen', just like Zeus is read 'Tzojs'), what is to speak, make statement, or produce children (we shall come to very sim. idea on testis), & resp. erzeugen is to produce; from here it is rel-d also to their I_zeigen (to show) or I_Zeichen (a picture, sign), but the r. can be found also in Rus. zhiznþ|I_zhizn$|, what is a life (though >> also gene, zygote). Bc. of this lively 'zh', which has to buzz but doesn't much in the Gr. original, the life becomes I_vivo (-are) in Lat. (to live; here is the vivarium), or the short Fr.I_vie (that you must have heard bc. of the phrase:|I_phrases| c'est la vie), but vivo (which, still, isn't with 'zh' but that's the Lat. lang.) corresponds well with our Sl. zhivo /zhivoj (alive) or Bul. I_zhivot (a life). And even, I sup., it is poss. that this "zoe" has given also the name of the whole ... I_Asia --- bc. of the many exotic animals living there (tigers, monkeys, elephants, also lions, no matter that they are to be found also in Arabia, bc. the latter may be counted for an outpost of Asia).
Now, sp-ing about filling of the mouth and going around the r. ntr- we may come to Ger. I_Narr, what is a silly person (& to fall in love is often called vernarren, what is a rightful observation), for which the etym-sts are in doubt. On the other hand there's your narration|I_narrate|, which is Lat., for they have (or have had --- I usually sup. that what is B.C. "was", and what is after "is", but I'm not very strict in these matters) narro (-are) as to speak, tell smt., inform, & narratio is (or was) a story. On the 3rd hand --- why not?; Hindu gods have even 4 hands --- there is one southern fruit with tiny red seeds (which you just suck & spit out) which in Lat. is granatum (>> g.), or pomegranate for you, but this is the well known on the South Tur., Ar., & Per. I_nar. And on the 4th hand there is a Rus. (known also in Bul.) I_nar as hard bunk made out of wooden planks (though I, personally, have the suspicion that the Rus* have been influenced by some southern 2(for them)2 folks), what has to be explained (I mean, this can be done) as a bunk for Narren (Ger. Narr in pl.). But there are even more "hands", bc. there is Tur. & Per. I_nargile (a kind of pipe for smoking of tobacco looking like a pumpkin with long elastic tubes; you call it hookah), what I think has to be split in: nar (in Ger. m-ing) + I_gaile (= gaire, Tur.-Ar. for worries 2(but these are not big troubles & the m-ing is often inverted to pleasures)2 ), i.e. "these are the worries of the man"; then there was said smt. about another Southern-Rus. (Uzbekian, Kirghizian, Turkmenian) I_nar as a cross btw. dromedary & camel (you use 2 diff. ws, b.t.w., but we say a camel with one, resp. 2 humps), what I can't even imagine (but it's said so), so that it has to be some very "narry" animal (& you know, that if you call, say, some girl a camel she wouldn't be much pleased). Then I have the rights to ment. also the ... I_narcotic|s and the I_narcissus --- so let us bind now the pieces together.
What I propose as an explan. is that this I_nar- r. is rel-d to the ... teeth, and taking of food or sp-ing, & it was very old r. bc. in Skr. was known that I_Narajana was an alias name of Vishnu. With this I don't want to say that the sacred Vishnu was a Narr, but poss. he has spoken very eloquently, or was the giver of the food (what rel-s us with the nitrates); on the other hand, if one speaks too much he may look like a Narr, & even if he doesn't speak but just stays with opened mouth this was observed, from ancient times, as an evidence for silliness; and then the fruit nar, when you open it, looks like a mouth with many tiny (though red) teeth, & it, surely, is also a food. And if the fool-Narr is unique in this m-ing in Ger. (Teu.) there are other sim. & rel-d ws, like: I_nahren, what is to feed (resp., Nahrung is a food, & nahrhaft is wholesome food), but this is a kind of nahen-nearing (about which we've spoken before a while); and mark that in Eng., out of nowhere, a double "r" have emerged, giving your I_narrow, & the nahren-feeding is done by taking the food with hands &/or teeth (we narrow the space btw. it and our teeth); there's also a Ger. naschen as to bite, given from an o. Teu. nasjan (= I_genesen), & others. But the feeding is present, bc. the Ar.-Per. nar-fruit might have been called also I_naranj ('naranþ', I sup.), what sounds paradoxically near to Bul. (da) I_nahranja, what is to feed (though this isn't etym-cally very sound bc. na- in Bul. is a prefix & the r. is hrana, but the prefix is around this r. & means to stick in, & the r. is smt. old where diff. ideas may be mixed; comp. also with Ger. ernähren as t.s. to feed), & this naranj has given --- would you guess it? --- the well known Fr. I_orange, resp. It. arancia ('arancha') & sim-ly in Sp. (where, in my view, the people have put an "o" in front of it seeing well how obese & tasty it is)! So the orange colour is meant not as a colour but as the typical colour of a fruit that feeds good, and this has come from the old Skr. where I_narangas was an orange tree, what says us that the kind of fruit is not exactly fixed & may be: an orange, or nar, or apple (or paradise-apple), or the like (to what we shall come on pomme too).
And now some ws about the I_narcissus, which obviously (by the ending -us) is Lat., but then also Gr. (ναρκισσοσ), and it is not difficult to guess that the '-kiss' here is some laugh (even not going to your kiss bc. in Bul. we say I_kiskam (se) for to giggle), what is in accordance with the Ger. I_Narr-fool; and you know that this person (Narcius or Narcissus), having looked once at his reflected in the river image, had fallen in love with himself (what surely is a silly behavior), and later on he had withered & died & turned to flower (punished by the gods, presumably); and also: look at this narcissus flower --- isn't it like an opened mouth with white (or yellow) teeth-leaves? Taking a look in an o. Gr. dict. we may find ναροσ |I_naros| as a fluid, what isn't rel-d to the fool, but is to the food (say, to mother's milk); we'll find also their ναρκη as frozen in stupor, what is also Lat. (I_narce), what explains why the o. Gr* have chosen this name; though it is also poss. that in stupor falls not only the fool, but those who look at him too (bc. from ancient times is known the saying that: even the gods cease talking seeing some great folly). From this stupor come the I_narcotic|s & narcoses, of course, but they are like food for those who take them, they can't do without them.

~ ~ ~

That's OK, but there, still, is another approach to the beg-ing and it is through the 1st let. of maybe all alphabets, or more precisely via the syl. an-. Let us start here with Ger. I_ander (another one; where is aslo your I_other, & Fr. I_autre, read 'otr'), which comes nearly in space from o. Gr. ανδρο- (prefix for smt. human) or ανθρωποσ (a human being, though one may look at it as some "an-" 2(father or mother, m-ing a beg-ing, an idea of smt.)2 going on the path-I_tropus 2(in Lat., or τροποσ in Gr.)2 and here are all the androids |I_android| from SF). But ander--I_anthro comes from old times (and what doesn't?) & contains some piquant ideas. In o. Skr. I_anas was a whiff or breath and aniti was to breathe, what has given o. Gr. ανεμοσ|I_anemos| (a wind), then Lat. I_animus (a soul), & from here are the following Lat. ws: I_animal, animation, anemia, I_anatomy, all the I_ancient things, & so on (the let. "a" is the most open one, & 'a' or 'an' is t.s. vowel, especially if you ask the Fr*). So you see that it is not only a mother (which is I_ana = anna in Tur., & analik is a motherhood) but a beg-ing, & sim. unisexual idea like this ana -- ανδρο stays behind the rel-n I_Hera -- I_Herr (to be disc-ed). But some sexual notions are still present bc. in Lat. we have I_Anno (Domini, shortened to AD) as an year (a beg-ing), then the annals (I_annalis in Lat., m-ing a chronicle, history), then the analysts & analyzing|I_analyze|, etc., but these are (I mean, they have to be) some sort of I_canal|s through which smt. flows (some particles), & there is one special canal called ... I_anus (I've promised you piquant ideas, haven't I?), which in Lat. meant also a circle, ring, or an old women.
Here is also your (to) I_annul (Lat. annulare), what officially comes from ad + nullum, but it might also be anno + some suffix (bc. the number zero haven't existed in old Greece, the numbers beg-ing with the one, hence it has been added later). As far as all things exist only in dynamics (|I_sentences| or παντα ρει, παντα κυνηται, i.e.: all flows & changes) there must be some (imaginary) annals /canals, that lurk also in the ... I_history (ιστορια in o. Gr., and I_istoria in Rus.), which is rel-d to the, hmm, I_hysteria (υστερισμοσ), where the latter comes from o. Gr. υστερα what is exactly a womb! This, b.t.w., says that in ancient times people were well aware that the hysterias are rel-d mostly to the women, or to the humans with "isteras", what has to be known by technically educated persons, bc. they know the w. ... I_hysteresis, and the picture of it is a vertical oval with twisted vertices (the top one to the right, & the bottom one to the left) & a bit slanted to the right --- it is formed when a curve rises (say, increasing the temperature) in one way (the lower curve), but when you go back (decreasing it) it falls by a sim. curve, though leaving some space btw. both parts. But that is how one will draw a draft picture of a vagina.
From the zeros-holes & canals is easy to come to the I_chaos, which is also a beg-ing (& an end, alas) of any organized system, so let me tell you smt. to this point too. The chaos is o. Gr. χαοσ (& in Sl. it is I_haos), which is given from their verb χα m-ing to open the mouth, to say 'aa', i.e. it is one bug mouth that eats all; in today's Gr. there is no χα, but one may find χαζευω |I_hazeyo^| with t.s. m-ing (what is also Bul., but not Rus., jargon I_zjapam), & near to this χαζοσ |I_hazos| m-ing ... a fool, simpleton (the opened mouth as synonym for silliness; >> Tor--door with sim. idea), or also χαλαζι (a hailstorm; so that add your I_hail too, as also Bul. I_hala with sim. m-ing of smt. fast moving & devastating). Near to the latter is one Bul. dialect, talazi (in pl.), m-ing a gush, which is not Bul. but Tur. I_talaz as a wave, & even not Tur. bc. there was o. Gr. θαλασσα m-ing a sea, but this must be diff. r. (>> Tal); nevertheless the m-ing fits here, and I will use the place to add also Tur.-Ar. I_talasim (surely read talasåm, as in Bul.) m-ing a ghost, vampire (i.e. smt. sowing chaos). Then, looking around in the o. Gr., may be found also: χαζο as to retreat (like to fall in a hole), or χασκω as to open the mouth, or χασμη as to I_gape (where the latter comes from your gap, which is poss. rel-d to the gate). Yeah, but in Lat. this makes a strange rel-n to the ... cause (>> Lat. I_causa for poss. etym-gy), as if the chaos is the cause for all things to emerge, what isn't exactly true (the chaos is like a field on which diff. plants may grow, but one doesn't call the field a cause for growing, the cause are the seeds), but this m-ing is widely accepted, especially in the social matters, and, really, there are many examples when the things must 1st go worse or broken, in order to become better later.
[|I_comments| And now I can't miss the chance to indulge in some thoughts about the chaos & the society bc. what the contemporary democracy tries to put in our brains is that the more kinds of freedom we allow (of markets or wealth or behavior or the like) the better for the society, but this isn't always true. What is true is that the ultimate state of freedom is the chaos or I_anarchy (where the latter means not arch-things, >> arc), & our goal should never be to create disturbances but to build a good order. It might be said that the God (or the Nature) uses in His (its) doings 2 major instruments: law & chaos (or order & disorder), so that there has to be some chaos in the best order, as much as there exists an orderliness in the utmost chaos, but He /it uses them both, and, of course, there has to be moderation in all things. Our main problem in this aspect is that we (all the humans, as well as all the other animals, not to ment. less organized forms of matter) can't cope with the destructive processes (& there, surely, is no development without some destruction); we can build & create, but we can't (in general, with only small number of exceptions) rationally destroy what has to be destroyed, and not knowing how to perform the destructive part of any creative work we are forced to believe that the chaos will do what is needed. Well, it does it, but with great social sufferings; we reach, smh., the (near to the desired) order, but at a big social price! This is to be seen in almost every time, but we in Bul. have in the recent times seen it very well (I mean, those who are capable to observe, compare, & make conclusions have seen this), bc.: only the free market doesn't help us at all (it has to be monitored & governed by the state), only allowing private businesses doesn't make better the businesses (people have not the money to search for better things, they look just how to survive), only the total rejection of the idea of communism doesn't better our living conditions (bc. the idea was, & is, very good & very old, & it is applied, but thoughtfully, in many Western countries; what was bad was not the idea but the realization), only allowing more freedom (say, each citizen to have rights to buy as much weapons for his security as he likes) doesn't enhance the security but on the contrary, only hiding us behind the democratic ideas doesn't eradicate the economical & other inequality (bc. more freedom generally means that the strongest 2(as a person or a state)2 will have better chances to survive & prosper), & so on. So that a big part of the human population on the Earth still looks at the chaos or anarchy, or terrorism (as it turns out in the beg-ing of this new cent.), as a way for escaping the crisis, but it isn't the right way. The democracy puts some chaos in the system of governing, yeah, it does this, but, I am afraid, this isn't the needed quality, nor the needed dose. ]

~ ~ ~

So, and after all this I may as well include here some illustrative examples about the bending in circle & nearing of the end to the beg-ing. Let me start with the curious Eng. rel-n btw. end & "I_and"! I have just explained that the latter is Ger. I_ander (etc.) but on the bottom of it lies the anas--animus or the 1st let.; and the end surely is Ger. I_Ende (t.s.), given with old ws like: o. Frisian enda, Dan. einde, etc., or an I/E. r. antio- --- but the point is that this is not an end, but smt. controversial or opposed, a cycle, bc. here is given the well known Lat. I_anti-, but also their I_ante, what is before (to remind you the shortening "a.m." for ante meridiem, i.e. before midday 2(and there's also It. anzi meaning "rather")2 ), though there was a Lat. antiae too, m-ing bent-down hairs, i.e. this time not a beg-ing (but maybe again a cycle); I would add here also the Fr., Eng., etc. I_antenna, which is named so bc. it stays before the wave entry on radio etc. sets; or It. antecamera what is an anteroom, entrance hall. There were also: o. Gr. αντιοσ as opposed and ανταω as to meet occasionally, and in Skr. was I_antas as an end, limit, death, and antiah as last. It is clear that here are also: the antic or I_antique, the I_ancient things, the ancestry, etc. (>> further east), which are not so much at the end (looking backward) of the things but at the beg-ing. ( Here may arise also the question: why what is ante- or before should mean also anti- or opposed, but from the point of view of the contemporary position all ante- things are contrary 2(there exist, in fact, only what was and what is, the future can't be really seen, so that if it is not the one thing it must be the another)2. ) But all that was easy. Let me pose now a more interesting question, namely: what rel-s both Ger. ws: I_wider (against) & I_wieder (again)? Yeah, but put in Eng. this is again easy, bc. you've taken t.s. idea & transferred it onto another r., and being now convinced in this (& ment-ing the cycle) you may easily guess the answer, but in Sl., where wider is sreshtu or protiv & wieder is pak or otnovo or snachala (Bul., Rus.), or in Fr., where the 1st is contre & the 2nd is a noveau, this isn't at all obvious.
[|I_comments| Let me philosophize here again. In our unlimited world, & with our limited perceptions, there are only 2 ways to get some, m.o.l. adequate, picture of this world, to be capable to still measure quantities going on & on in one & t.s. direction, and these ways are as follows: either to distort the scale, & distort it as much as poss., or, to put it better, the more we go away from the zero point the more we distort the scale; or, otherwise, to bend the scale in circle, & after reaching the limit or end point, then, continuing to go in the same direction, to move through the 1st point! We, & all the animals, use both ways. The 1st way leads us to the most beautiful (if such superlative may be used) curve called I_exponent (etym-cally built as ex- beyond all points, or the like), marked as ax (or ex) which is an infinitely smooth curve (the mathematicians have devised a complicated method for measuring of the smoothness of a curve not by moving of finger above it & waiting to be hurt or not, but by measuring of the speed of rising or falling of the curve, & the speed of the speed, & so on, until it is poss., what is called building of derivative function, or differentiation|I_differentiate|), what has to say, that the exponent always rises (resp. falls), and its speed is like the initial curve, & so on ad infinitum, i.e. it is an ever differentiable function with a deriv. (providing we use as basis the so called Neper number e) exactly the same initial function. It has to be well known that we, f.ex., hear in logarithmic|I_logarithm| (the w. being built from logging onto some rhythm, measured in times, not by adding or subtracting) scale (and the logarithm is the reversed operation of the raising to power; and, to show that changing of the scale may drastically change the form of a given curve, let me add that if you use one-sided logarithmic scale 2(i.e. only for the abscissa)2 & draw an exponent by points then you will get an exactly straight line), and that is why the power of a sound is measured in decibels (where, f.ex., the difference btw. 2 & 3 is t.s. as btw. 2000 & 3000, what, obviously, isn't the case with the linear scale).
So, and as to the curved in a circle linear scale you have to think about the face of a normal (analogous) clock where after 12 o' clock comes the 1st hour, so that it is called also clock arithmetic, but it isn't centered, so that it is better to imagine a thermometer measuring, say, from --50 degrees through 0 to +50 degrees (this will be centered modal scale), with the only requirement that it works, what has to say that by raising the temperature after +50 degrees there follows -50, then -49, and so on! This may seem pretty strange for some of you but it isn't entirely new idea, bc. you have seen also digital devices with, say, 2 positions, which after 99 give 00 (only here the center of the scale, or the zero point, isn't in the 0 but btw. 49 & 50); such devices & arithmetic are, in fact, easier to make bc. we don't need to bother about the carry. And this also has to be known (& used in live forms), bc you all are well aware that the poles are connected one with the other, say: big love turns (& this when it grows!) almost always into hatred; burning & freezing give t.s. sores (& are treated in t.s. way); when the light is too strong (say, when one looks into the Sun) one becomes blind (at least temporary); or in a very noisy room one may become deaf; or take the colours, where in the rainbow (& also as wave lengths) they follow from red, orange, etc., to violet, but we feel that as much the orange stays near to the red colour so also stay the red one to the violet (but they are diametrically opposed), etc. In short: in one &/or the other way we get distorted information, but we (normally) don't break the measuring unit --- and this is what matters here. ]
But let us return to I_wieder -- wider rel-n & look more precisely at the words for "again" in diff. langs bc this may teach us smt. The Ger*, as a folk of philosophers, use here the idea of the cycle, about the Eng. understanding we shall come again after a wile, the Rus* say snachala or zànovo or snova (in Bul. it's I_otnovo, but also pak), what (with the exception of pak) goes from the new thing (though >> neu or novûj for etym-gy), as much as Fr. a noveau (or It. di nuovo) does. Well, to begin anew may also be observed as a kind of cycle, but the point is that in rejecting all that has been done in btw. and returning to some point wide away in time we, in fact, go back in time! That's it, but this isn't an evolution (or at least isn't a good one), this is a revolution, and you have seen that this is characteristic not only for the Slavs (as f.ex. Bulgaria, where we've succeeded to return about half a cent. back in the living standard; and, I sup., the situation is sim. in Ukr. or Bjelarus, m.o.l. t.s. is in Russia, though it isn't so in Czech or Poland, so that there might be exceptions, of course), but also for the French (who, really, are widely known for their revolutions & guillotines for killing of dethroned kings or aristocrats). And as to your I_again the vulgar etym-gy (or at least I think so) has to make the splitting: a + gain, m-ing that this isn't an entirely new way & we have some gain going on it again (the beg-ing "a" here is meant as article, like in, say, your I_ado = a + do). Your etym-sts don't say exactly this and give old: ongean, ongen, ongegn, ayen, etc. leading us to an o. Ger. ingagan /gign, what is now I_gegen (= wider, i.e. against), but I am sure this contains t.s. idea.
Ah, if some of you ask: why I_gegen is again a cycle (roughly sp-ing), then let it be said that this is Fr. I_gage ('gazh'), though it means a payment, fee, wage (>> wage), salary, but this is also Bul. (Tur.) I_gaga, what is a hook (what explains how the Fr* get their wages --- with a hook, called gagne 2('ganþ')2 ). Also I_gagner in Fr. is to get wages /fees, and I_Gegner in Ger. is a competitor (gegen-against whom we fight), & your gage is smt. sim., & the Ger* use literally Fr. gage, & your gag is smt. that one has bitten (like a fishing hook; or else it's an imit.), etc. There's also Bul. jargon I_gazhe /gadzhe m-ing a (sex-) friend, beloved, what is, on one hand, Fr. I_engager (engage for you), but, on the other hand, this is officially given as coming from a ... Gypsy (or rather Zigeunerish, bc. there are some diff-ces --->> Zigeuner) I_gadzho, m-ing this time an alien person and from here a beloved girl, but this surely is again in the sense of smb. "hooked" (when it means alien and beloved), and there was also a Gypsy gadzhal as paid soldier, & so on. ( Your jargon gaga is an imit. & will be ment-d on another place. ) OK, and now I have to say smt. about the jumped over Bul. pak as again, but before this I will raise a new question, bc. in Ger. there's also the w. I_Widder, with the special m-ing of castrated ram, which in Eng. has become wether (which I shall never cease to confuse with weather & whether 2(and that is, maybe, the reason why thе wether is now thrown out of most Eng. dicts)2, but that is my problem, isn't it?). And the new question is this: where in this Widder-wether the cycle must be hidden?
But don't think that the etym-sts will help you to guess bc. for the I_Widder they give Lat. I_vetus as old (where from the veterans|I_veteran| & the veterinarians|I_veterinarian| have come; I would squeeze also one Rus. w., I_vetchina, m-ing a ... ham, smoked joint of some vetus animal) but I doubt in this. I mean, I don't doubt about vetus being old, bc. I have heard the It. phrase I_vecchio ('vekkjo') mio, or t.s. in Fr. as mon vieux ('vjo'), what means "my old (friend)", then there is the known Lat. I_veto as the right for rejection (given initially to the Roman Tribunes in order to oppose the Senate), and I know pretty well that veht in Bul. is old, weather-beaten (so that the veto then is to be explained as the right of the "vehti"-old ones), as also that I_vek in Rus. (what is c. Sl.) is a century, which might be thought as smt. old & strong (it's given as coming from Lat. vici as to conquer, make victory, but in my view this is a small confusion, though with sim. m-ing), and you all know about the Scan. Vedas|I_Veda|, which may lead us to the Skr. There are also our Church-Sl. I_vehi (usually of the history), what are the most important moments (in it), or zavetû (I_zavet in sing.), what are the commandments of our predecessors, their heritage, >> also I_wissen later on, but this is smt. diff. (the r. has initially to be vek-, though it may mutate to vid- --- >> video); where with the Widder we might have started from the video (bc. to fight smb. one has to see him, to stand against him), but this is another idea. Anyway, you see that the things are mixed, but we are not looking for an exact etym-gy of Ger. Widder (so much efforts for a poor castrated ram wouldn't pay), but for the hidden cycle. ( B.t.w., a century in Fr. is ciècle|I_ciecle|, where also a cycle may be seen, but this has to be meant as smt. cut away, a big chunk of years. ) And, besides, it (or, rather, he) isn't really old bc. it is said that the Widder was one-year old ram (& even if we weren't told this it must be clear that there are no reasons in keeping a castrated ram to grow really old); to explain also that the animals are vetus not bc. of their (current) age, but bc. of their precedence before the humans (for in Lat. veterinus was an old animal, veterinarius was working animal, & veteres was a predecessor --- a kind of father). So that you, still, continue to think and I will proceed further.
The particle I_pak (again) in Bul. has to be smt. of the kind of Ger. I_Tag (a day) or Rus. I_shag (a step) or Lat. pag- (e.g.: I_page, pagan), to which we shall come in its proper place, and may be easy rel-d to Rus. I_poka, what means: after a wile (& is used as your bye-bye). But this is known on the West too, bc. there is an It. I_poco (a little), which you might have heard from the musical phrase|I_phrases|: a poco a poco (little by little, slowly, like given in drops); there's also some Lat. I_apocopa (grammatical cutting, what reminds me about Rus. kopatþ|I_kopat$|, to burrow or dig), which is given (the 1st syl. only) from o. Gr. απο|I_apo| (a prep. m-ing: forward, from, out), and then this has to have given the known ... apocalypses (I_apocalypsis in Lat. and αποκαλυπτω in o. Gr.) --- if we take the apo- apart then from the rest a kalo-good (to be disc-ed smw. later) may be extracted, i.e. with the m-ing of: until (before) the things bettered (bc. they have to become worst at 1st!). ( Απο-forward is smt. like your I_afore, and don't be bothered that before isn't after bc. in a cyclical process the direction isn't much important. ) So the cycle in pak--poka--poco--apo isn't very clear to be seen but it is still (smh.) present. But, having begun to dig here, there is also Rus. opjatþ|I_opjat$|, m-ing again "again", what might be rel-d with Bul. I_napuk (in spite of), what is an imit. (of the kind of your, sorry, fart), but I think it's better to rel. it with your ... I_oops (i.e. to repeat bc. an error has been made).
Ah well, let me spit it now --- the cycle in the I_Widder is in his horns, bc. he has fought so much against the others, that they have become curved back. And then it is highly probable that Bul.(but not Rus.) I_oven (again a ram) was named so bc. of his bent down (ovezhdam /navezhdam) horns; though, on the other hand, his name has to be from the she-sheep (I_ovtza or ovechka, and this time also Rus. w.), but this may be explained as imit. of the disgusting (bc. of animal's smell) exclam. 'off /uff' ("pooh" for you, but it's with the s-ing of your I_oaf), so that it may be a coincidence (oven -- ovtza) as far as in many langs there are diff. ws for both sexes of the sheep (he is I_baran in Rus., what may sound not much away from Eng. ram, but the idea is diff. & he will be disc-ed later). Then there might be t.s. idea (come to think of it) also in Ger. I_Rind as horned animal, bc. t.s. s-ing has their Rinde (a rind in Eng. as a bark of tree) & it surely curves around the trunk in a kind of ring; on the other hand this w. might have come from the animals' hides, as imit. of tearing, but I think the point here is again in the horns bc. a horse or donkey or swine isn't counted as Rind but their hide can still be used. OK, and in order not to think that we may find the cycle only in the ram or the bull (though there may be other examples in the text) I shall ment. also Ger. I_Rebe, what is a vintage (& it surely winds), which w. you may split (I mean, you can, although it isn't etym-cally sound) in: re + be!

~ ~ ~

Still, bc. there is so much to tell you in this book, let me include here 2 more paragraphs about the I_continuum, starting with the r. con-; and let us distinguish it from co-, which we shall disc. later (>> I_coño), no matter that for the Fr*, f.ex., it may be the same. So here is Lat. verb I_connecto (to connect, fit together), or continuus (continuous, you write it in Fr. manner, but in Lat. this means also: adjacent, connected, unchangeable; or take Fr. continu as also: durable, whole) & from here comes the continuum. This r. in this m-ing is unknown by the Sl* (the Rus* use prodolzhitelþnûj what comes from dolgij 2(long)2 & for that >> dolg), with the exceptions of scientific usage of the continuum, but we have smt. shorter, namely I_konetz, what may be interesting for you bc. in Rus. this means an end, but in Bul. (exactly t.s. w.) is a thread, so you see that the idea is t.s. as in Lat.; there is also an obsolete Bul. konchov as bottom end of a dress; or I_konchina as a demise, death. More than this, there is also Rus. konþ|I_kon$| (kon in Bul., kinþ in Ukr., kün 2('kjunþ')2 in Cz., kone 2(in pl.)2 in Pol., etc.) what is ... a horse --- and try to explain this without the idea of smt. often used for connecting, or shortening, of the space (bc. the etym-sts give dubious etym-gy)! But I may enhance your conviction ment-ing that this sounds very near to Rus. kinþ /kinutþ |I_kinut$|, what is to throw (& look at it as a way to connect 2 points 2(there's also Sl. I_kinzhal as a dagger, which may be split, come to think of it, in: kinþ + zhalo-a-sting)2 ), or their I_kanun /nakanune m-ing: on the eve of smt., or their ... whip, which is called knut (what is Ger. I_Knute, but surely here is also your to I_knit), or --- why not? --- Bul. I_kjunetz, what is a pipe for leading of the smoke out of the oven & to the chimney, and what turns out to be Tur.-Per. künk|I_kuenk|. Some of you may go from here to the ... gene (via your I_kin), bc. it also provides a connection, now of the generations, but I find this is a diff. r. (though rel-d --- all is rel-d to almost all).
On the other hand the Sl. konþ|I_kon$| may have smt. in common with the ... mythical I_centaur (o. Gr. Κενταυροσ), for he was believed to be half a horse & half a man, and also bc. κεντειω was to prick, sting, go into, make a hole (i.e. a connection), or κεντημα was a sharp end, or the prefix κεν(ο)- meant to empty (what we'll disc. on I_census too). This is poss. bc. the 2nd half (ταυροσ) is a bull (>> I_Taurus), and the Slavs (I sup.) couldn't have grasped this "horsish bull" properly and thrown the bull away; but then it wouldn't be surprising if the ... I_dragon also has to be here (as flying horse), bc. it's Lat. I_draco (a snake or dragon) or Sl. I_drakon, and if a decomposition (of 2 syllabic w.) may be questionable (-co(n) might be a suffix, or the r. may be drak- where the idea is of scratching 2(like in Fr. I_drainage)2 ) the dragon itself comes from the Far East and, besides, it is rel-d to the horse through the I_dragoon|s! (Also >> canna later). In the sense of Rus. kinþ-to-throw, & with the image of a dragon-snake, we may go to --- hah, hah --- to your I_skin (where the etym-sts don't go earlier of an o. Icl. skinn) --- bc. we take out our coats (what is exactly skinutþ|I_skinut$| in Rus.) just as the snakes their skins (the prefix "s" may easily arise or vanish; becides, in It. it is widely used with the measing of taking smt. out, i.e. = Lat. ex-); and the ment-d kin--gene also isn't much away bc. to make a child one (read a man) has to throw his semen-seeds, what in Rus. (as vulgar jargon) is exactly kinutþ|I_kinut$| palku (the latter being a branch, twig, stick). ( Sim-ly s-ing to kinþ, & with a sim. m-ing, is Lat. cast, but there the point is not so much in connecting as in dividing, & about this on some other place. ) But there, still, is smt. else to be added, bc. it turns out that there was an o. Rus. kon (without "þ") with m-ing of a border or line, what even a Russian wouldn't believe until being reminded about the obsolete w. I_iskoni, or ispokon vekov, what means "from times immemorial" (i.e. from the end, but if you look towards the beg-ing), and there's also a Cz. expression do kona m-ing "to the end" (so that it, really, is smm. a beg-ing, but another time an end). And I have come to this iskoni looking for an etym-gy of the Sl. law which is I_zakon (o. Sl. & c. Sl.: Rus., Bul., Cz., Pol., etc. zakon, or Ukr. zakin 2(they still continue to kinþ-throw smt, it seems)2 ), for which is given smt. dubious but rel-d to this o. kon & the beg-ing (nachalo); this rel-n is very vague but I think the kon(þ)--end--beg-ing (& some line to mark it) has to be in play here, together with smt. thrown (set, established) from the gods.

Well, let us hope that this is enough for the beg-ing of the Creation, so that I will close at last these curly brackets.
}




IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD |I_GODCHP|
{
And, of course, we have to speak now about the I_God, bc. in Eng. (& Ger., I_Gott) he is rel-d to the I_good, & this is rel-d to the ... I_get|ting, bc. all that we want is to put our hands on smt. Here are given: o. Teu. guda as a god, I/E rs ghuto- /ghou- m-ing to summon or call via magic formula (to remind you about Ger. I_Gauleiters, or, if you don't like them, then about Lat. I_gaudeo m-ing to be happy, to amuse yourselves, like in the student's hymn Gaudeamus Igitur), also ghedh (or ghodh) m-ing to catch, get hold of smt.; in this sense turns out to be Ger. I_Gatte as ... husband. Hence the God is smt. that we want to get, or Smb. Who we want to catch --- I'm sorry to say this, but that is how the people imagine the things --- by the balls! Smt. sim. we have in Sl. langs where I_gotovo means ready, but also to cook (Rus. gotovitþ), what is traced to a Skr. I_ghatate (to work hard on smt.); this gives also the known Lat. I_gusto (with its derivs), what is in good accordance with the Gr. view to the cooking as kind of I_magic (bc. μαγερικο|I_mageriko| is a pub, restaurant, μαγερασ is a cook 2(& also Ger. I_Magen is a stomach)2, & μαγεια is a magic, but this is widely spread r. going to Skr. I_maja, what is an illusion, to what we shall come again on I_machen).

~ ~ ~

Well, this God--get--good was the Teu. viewpoint but this is not always the case, bc. in Fr. he is Dieu (in pl. Diex) but deux is two, what comes from the Rom* where I_deus was a god and dea was a goddess, what in turn is from o. Greece where Θεοσ|I_Theos| was a god (what is from sim. I_Devas in Skr., or Devi as goddess), but δυο (in Lat. I_duo) was the number two. I sup. it is well known that the one am I, my ego, and the two is the God bc. only God may exceed his I_ego and think about the others (in Bul. we have the saying: "He who knows 2, knows 200.", m-ing that if one can make some distinction then he can make also a more profound one), but the inability to take into account more things than one's own wishes is the cause of all human errors & misbehaviors. The struggle against the ego is the capstone of all religions, like: the Christ's love to the humans; the Islamic hospitality & tolerance; the Buddhist's thesis that God is the truth, and one has to meditate long in order to understand better 1st himself & then the other beings; and the Zen-Buddhist's, who say that Buddha has to be forgotten & a new man has to arise, who has killed entirely his self; and even, if you like, the main postulate of the communism (& fascism), the requirement to live & work not to satisfy his/her personal desires but to think about the community (or the better part of it), & to follow the "predicts" of the ruling party & the current ruler. But alas, too radical propositions rarely lead to smt. useful (and here people simply can't change their nature).
[|I_comments| Yeah, they can't change their nature, but often they (& the animals too, who have even stronger instincts than the humans) have to, & do so being forced by the circumstances. So that it turns out to be just a matter of power, which was, & still is smm., used by religious authorities, or in totalitarian states (for the Communists, f.ex., rejected all religions simply bc. they observed the communism as a kind of religion, not bc. they were against the delusions 2(if they worked in interest of the 1-&-only ruling party)2 ), but in many aspects it is so even in democratic societies, what is (partly) justified when done with purpose to force the people to work for the others instead of against them. But it might be said that this is also a matter or intellect, bc. every (m.o.l.) intelligent creature has to apply in his reasoning some reflection --- i.e. "I think that he /she /it thinks", what is, let us call it so, a reflection of 1st order; then "I think that he thinks that I think" is one of 2nd order, & so on --- what is t.s. as to take the others into account! So you see that the intellect may help, together with some unavoidable power (that of the law & order institutions, to which we shall come later again), but ntg. can be done if we lack the basic reflection, that of order zero, for which the old Greeks had had the proverbial saying |I_sentences| "Know thyself" --- bc. if one doesn't know good his or her own ego then how (and here usually, as I have learned from many of your books, the phrase "the hell" has to be put) he/she will know what the other beings want? Of course one has to be born philosopher, &/or have strong personality, for to be capable to know oneself, but if one can't, then what to do? Well, there are 2 major ways to make people do what they don't want to (feeling it is smt. against their ego) & they are: the force and the delusion! Both ways are, & have to, be used, and that is one of the reasons why all the religions have arisen (& even I have found my own God, the allmighty Urrh, which I will introduce to you in the next chapter).
One may deny this, saying that there are also other ways, like: convincing explans, or personal examples, or genetic selection of the best people (the idea of aristocracy), or building of good habits from the nursery age (like a kind of social conditional reflexes), or the like. Yeah, these ways exist, but ... but they are not powerful enough to be applied without the 2 above-ment-d ways. If you just try to explain (without force or delusion) to smb. that he/she doesn't behave good, or why he does what he does, you will only make more enemies instead of friends (unless you are a psychoanalyst, bc., strange or not, but when people pay to hear smt. they may listen to what is said to them, but not for free!), so that you have to apply some sort of delusions (bc. you can't always apply power), what is t.s. as to say that the slogan "Honesty is the best policy" turns out to be just a good wish (& that is why it is so proclaimed, b.t.w. --- bc. it is rarely applied). So that it doesn't matter much whether one thinks about the others bc. he is afraid of some punishment, or of the Hell, or that he may be turned to a pig or monkey in his afterlife, or that he may make the blunder to eat, say, his late ... grandma during the dinner (bc. that is why the Buddhists don't eat, not only meat, but even eggs & caviar, the last 2 being the children of those animals), or he is just reasonable enough to exceed his ego & try to understand our controversial world. If the next phrase may help you a little then let it be said that: this world may not be a very good one (& it surely isn't, for many of us), but it is the 1 & only possible world, under the circumstances. ]
Anyway, the God may be signified with the number two what goes back at least to the Pythagoreans, and here is the place to remind you that the ... I_theorem is smt. from the gods, or beautiful like God; or that the ... I_idea is based on some "dea"; as much as your I_dear, & ... the I_deer too (bc. it isn't a doe & is usually "he"). Also the I_Teuton|s, or die I_Deutsch|en, who were before Teutschen, are rel-d to I_deuten (to show, explain --- the God's truth, maybe), but smh. to the Deus-Theos too (we'll come to this again much further), and acc. to some Buddhist myths the Universe was created as emanation of the ... bowels of God I_Tathagata, whose name is interesting bc. it may easily be decomposed in some Theos-"Tata" (he who have I_done 2(I_tun-tat in Ger.)2 the things, or the father 2(in Bul., f.ex., I_tati is a father, but >> also papa)2 ) plus the I_Gott-Gata (giving also the I_Goth|s & the Gothic). To finish with the tun--done idea I have to stress also on the ... hitting (with some cudgel, & probably on the head) in doing things properly, what is perfectly clear in your do-done (comp. this with your dud or dull), or in I_due (it has to say "done" but has not yet said so), or in the I_deed (Ger. I_Tat) which corresponds to ... I_dead, of course (for the best deed is to make smb. dead!); or to cite also one of the sacred Skr. syls, tat, m-ing: that, absolute (Tat-deed). But there are more ws, e.g.: in Lat. there is I_totalis (total) or totus (whole) or totum (all), so that here is the I_totem too, or also I_tundo (-ere, to hit, blow, step upon), & others; in Ger. may be added the I_Tatort (a place of some deed but usually of crime); there is also It. I_tutti (whole, entire), or Fr. I_partout ('partù', everywhere) or tôt (soon, in a short time --- i.e. one may expect that smb. or smt. will soon be dead or finished), or the deed in Fr. which is I_etat (what means also: staff, situation, budget, action, state 2(with the heard coup d'etat 3('ku d'eta')3 as military change of government)2 ), or o. Rus. tatþ|I_tat$| (a vampire, ghoul), & many others (I sup. the ... I_intuition is to be split in: in + tue-do). But there were sim. words in o. Eastern langs too, like Skr. I_tundate or tudati (to prick, sting) or todas (that who stings 2(& to here, b.t.w., is traced our o. Sl. stoud m-ing a cold, what is now Bul. I_stud, or Rus. studitþ as to make it cold)2 ), or some Sumerian du (to be fit, valid, ready for smt.). There is also your don as a professor, which is Sp. (& Lat.) I_don as a master, and though the w. is rel-d to the donation, the point is, still, in his ability to give a healthy 'dånn' on the head.
B.t.w., this may be a curious coincidence (but may also not be so), that in the lang. of Aztecs, ancient American inhabitants, the w. I_theo-kal (or teo-kal bc. I have read this in a book in Bul. & we don't have "th" at all) meant "God's house", where theo meant exactly God, and kal was a house (>> kal--kalo, but >> kåt too; or, on the other hand, see ... ntg., bc. there is ntg. strictly proved about any rel-n btw. ancient Am* & other parts of the globe); even more curious seems that the sign for this theo looked like the Gr. let. "θ" (meant as an opened mouth with the tongue in the middle)! We may only wonder, whether there was really an ancient Atlantis, or some Asian tribes have walked through the Bering Strait when frozen and then down to the south & to the lands of Mexico, or smt. else. There is also much spoken about the commonness of their pyramids with those of the old world, but I don't think this is so important bc. the pyramid is a very natural figure, in fact the only one (if you don't count the cone, but to make a good circle isn't easy, and, you know, the buildings are almost always polyhedrons) that both, stays stable on the ground, & rises high up; more scientifically I have met this put smw. as the "principle of uniqueness of the simple ideas" which doesn't require imagining of non-existent rel-ns. Whatever the reason for this common things, I may add also that in the lang. of Aztecs I_tli meant a step & was pictured as a wave (>> Tau, Tal); also their ferocious god, to whom they sacrificed many human lives, & who was taken for Satan by the Spaniards, was called I_Huitzilopohtli, what (though this isn't serious) contains for the Sl-ic ear 2 peculiar moments: the huj-penis & the pohotþ-lust.
So, now let me add here that if we go back to the Skr. Devi, what is Lat. I_Diva (& your I_devote), we may understand why the Sl* say divitþsja|I_divit$sja| /udivljatþsja (in Rus.) m-ing to wonder! Really, in Rus. deva is a virgin (& Deva Marija is the V. Mary), or I_devka is a girl, in Ukr. it is divka, in Pol. dziewa, & so on, though nowadays it isn't pretty clear whether people wonder bc. she is so beautiful, like a goddess, or, hmm, bc. she is still a virgin (bc. it isn't very polite to call a girl in public devka). This r. is present also in the Blt. langs where in Lithuanian I_deivoti is to look with I_awe, hence it is very near to the name of I_Eve, & to Lat. I_ave (Maria). B.t.w., in Lat. devi & I_vidi (also in Rus.: divitþsja & videtþ) sound very sim., having t.s. consonants but in reversed order (though these are just assocs, and >> video later). It may be interesting to add also that in some Sl. langs one does not only wonder seeing a girl-virgin but thinks she is a ... wild thing (in Bul. div means wild, & I_divak is exactly a child of wilderness --- in Rus. it is slightly changed to dikarþ|I_dikar$|, what is nearer to Ger. I_dick or Dickicht 2(a thicket)2; also a game anymal, wild, is divech in Bul., dichþ|I_dich$| in Rus., divljač in Srb., etc. ), what is in the sense of God's creature; although one may wonder just seeing smt., bc. in Cz. I_divak is a ... spectator, say in a stadium. But then it isn't imposs. that you I_wild (with o. wilde, so that any assocs of the ... name of O. Wilde are justified) is also here, bc. this is t.s. Ger. wild, which is c. Ger. with Got. wildeis, & the m-ing is the same as Bul. div, hence the old people might have cut the 1st (for the Deus) syl. & added some ending, or roughly sp-ing have swapped its syls (if we look at the Got. w.). And the creature, b.t.w., in spite of its often disrespectful m-ing, comes from the creation |I_create| (Lat. I_creo (-are) what is to build, make, create; also the creator), what is usually done in ... I_crater|s (Gr. κρατηρ --- where you may grind & stir & boil the concoction), so that here the I_pantocrator|s have to be ment-d (who were so called not bc. they often, hmm, pant, or have nice pants, but bc. they "stir" all 2(>> also panis 3(not penis, but this wouldn't be a big error)3 )2 ). Yeah, but from the creature the etym-sts derive the known ... I_cretin (which was originally Fr. 2(read 'crete~')2, and in Bul. we say also I_kretam, what is to move slowly, to vegetate just making the ends meet). Smt. sim. exists in Church-Sl., the phrase bozhþja tvarþ|I_tvar$|, where the 1st is from our God (to be explained soon) and the 2nd is our creature (to be disc-ed), though tvarþ means mainly ... a bug or cockroach. But the rel-n btw. beautiful & wild things turns out to have come from very old times, bc. in Per. div was a devilish creature (semi-human & semi-animal), & the divs were usually of fem. sex.

~ ~ ~

On the other hand one may find a sim. rel-n in the w. I_devil, bc. he is a bad one but he is of the "species" of gods, & in Eng. we have good splitting in: deo + vile (or "the evil one", in vulgar etym-gy), where I_vile (giving also your I_villain) comes from o. Fr. vil (bad, mean, dirty, etc.), coming in turn from Lat. vilis (cheap, mean, bad), but the last is, in fact, the will (Ger. I_Wille, or Lat. I_volo as to will)! And if you ask "why the will has to be bad" the answer is that this is the free will, a willing without taking into account the wills of others (>> smt. sim. on malus). If you look for an etym-gy of the devil you will be told that there was an o. Eng. deofol (to be split in: deo + I_foul), etc., up to o. Gr. διαβολοσ (a vicious, contemptible person, libeler, devil), or διαβολη (to libel), what poss. has given Fr. (& then your) w. I_deviation, but this doesn't contradict to the just said bc. each folk has modified the w. & added his own explan., as f.ex.: Fr. diable, Sp. I_diablo, Bul. I_djavol, etc. A bit diff., but in t.s. line of thoughts is Ger. I_Teufel (read 'tojfel'), again a devil, and how the Ger* think about him becomes clear by citing one Swiss dialect, tüüfü (where 'tju', 'tfu', or the like, is a kind of spitting --- pfui in today's Ger., or tþfu in Rus., or pooh in Eng.).
The Rus. devil, to finish with him, is called (besides their dþjavol, which w. is older) chërt |I_chert| (read 'chjort') and is usually rel-d to the black colour (chërnûj |I_chernu^j|, 'chjo...'), but this has to be an assoc., as much as the rel-n to chertitþ |I_chertit$| (to draw) is (which is a very strong one, bc. pl. from I_cherta 2(a line)2 is chërtû, where pl. for chërt is cherti, and this might have his explan. in the basic colour for drawing --- black, or, smm. red; where the s-ing, for its part, speaks about some torsion or crushing). Personally I think that more important here is the idea of some exclam. for driving, say, dogs off our way, bc. in old times the Rus* said I_chur (what isn't present in the current lang.) when they wanted to avoid some temptation or to drive the devil away, also churatþsja is an o. w. (but still to be heard today) for being afraid of smt., & I have also incidentally found that in Afghani I_chur means a robbery (i.e. when people usually cry smt., either to drive the bandits away, or to attract smb's attention). But much later I guessed that here an It. influence is quite poss., from their I_certo ('chèrto') m-ing "smb." where pl. becomes exactly certi (& the dropping of It. "o" is explainable with the masc. gender, as well as the emerging of "ë" is natural for a stressed "e"). And if smb. asks: why "smb." here has to mean exactly the devil --- well, I sup. you know that in times gone not long ago a mere ment-ing of God or devil was qualified as cursing, where nowadays --- but you know how it is now. ( The It*, b.t.w., have the habit to drop smm. some ws that can be easily guessed, what is also Lat. habit, and they say, f.ex., I_purtroppo 2(literally "for big")2 meaning regretfully, i.e. "for big regret", but the "regret" is just missed. ) So, and then sim. to the devil is, of course, the I_demon (& then your I_damn), what is o. Gr. Δαιμονασ (where "αι" is read 'e', as it is even today with "ai" in Fr.), but this, too, may be split in: "deo" + "monas" (the latter m-ing one whole thing, smt. monolithic, or rather separated like a monk).

~ ~ ~

So till now we know that the God is always good for the Teu*, but in o. Gr. (& before) the gods could have been either good or bad (how they wanted to behave); as also that the important thing for the human beings is to exceed one's own ego & to think about the others. But there's another view to the God shown by the Slavs, where he is called I_Bog, what (besides the imit. ment-d on beg--bek--bay) comes from Skr. I_bhagas (giving to all, ruling over all), or Avs. I_baga (exactly a God), or Skr. bhajati (to give to, divide --- & this dividing is in the sense of number 2, of distinguishing; to add also that the let. 'B' is the 2nd one in all alphabets 2(at least from o. Heb. bina = to Gr. beta onward 3(>> later bina-two)3 )2 ). From here is also our Sl. bogat (in Bul., or bogatûj |I_bogatu^j| in Rus.) what means wealthy; and in Per. I may remind you the name of a known town, I_Baghdad, which (poss., I don't know Per.) has to mean "from the Gods given". One may say, "that's good, but there's ntg. of the kind on the West", and he/she will make an error, bc. the Ger* have their ... I_Bogen, what is an up-arc (whereas I_Boden is a floor, or a down-arc) & this is here, bc. you know that the I_arc|s are common element in all churches. Our Bog-Baga is an arc (which is I_arka in Sl.) bc. he stays above us (& may hit us on the heads, if we don't obey), & with the arcs, you may bet it, go all the I_archangels & the other arc(h)-things --- like the I_architecture, or the ... I_Arctic & I_Antarctic, which have to be here, bc. the 1st one is an up-arc (as it is on the map of the world) & the 2nd one is a down-arc or anti-arc. ( The etym-sts don't say exactly this but it's obvious; they give: Fr. arctique or o. Fr. artique and Lat. ar(c)teus as northern, coming from o. Gr. αρκοσ = αρκτοσ m-ing the north pole, but also a ... bear 2(bc. of the constellation)2; I may add also their αρχωσ as a leader 2(giving our o. Sl. I_arhont as title of a ruler)2, where all these m-ings fit well with the idea of the God-arc. ) There is (in my view) smt. of the kind also by the Muslims, where the name of the holy I_jami (Islamic church, which in Tur. will be written as cami) in Mecca is called I_Kaba (maybe Caaba for you 2(& then also the town Kabul)2 ), what has to mean "God's house" (as far as I know it is just a stone, but I am sp-ing about the idea), where I do the splitting in: ka- m-ing smt. around Eng. cut (let's not dig much now, but it is so for the Slavs, & also the Ger* say I_Kate for a small house in a village) + the 2nd syl. -ba for our God Baga.
And now let me extend our knowledge of big & inflated things on bo- --- like your, hmm, I am sorry, I don't mean exactly yours, my dear readeress, I_bottom, what isn't like the w. I_down (where we just 'dån' smt. on the floor), but has to be split in: bo(t) + "I_tom", where the last has to be influenced by o Gr. τομοσ (a piece or part of smt., but we shall disc. this on ... atom & tom), i.e. this is the thickest part of our bodies and it has to be down (bc., well, if our tops were thicker than our legs, then we could have never succeeded to come down from the trees, being unable to stay stable on the ground); though >> also butt. So, and what I meant to say is to speak about big & god-like things like ... like the I_bull, which we in Bul. call I_bik (bûk in Rus., or I_bugaj in Ukr.) but which is well known in Southern Asia (buga or buka), & he's a I_big animal. Although your etym-sts don't know exactly where from your w. big has come, I am sure the r. is old & Eastern and may add that in Hindu I_bagh is a tiger. And the bull may be looked at as god, bc. this is the golden calf, and its original name (what is from another r.) is I_Taurus (now known to you only as the constellation; in Fr. it is taureau, 'torjo'), which is o. Gr. ταυροσ, where one may hear his hidden power ('tårr') grinding all to dust. There was the mythical Minotaurus (Μινωταυροσ) who lived in the Labyrinth of Crete island, but in o. Gr. myths their god Poseidon was called also ταυρεοσ (bull-like), so that to be like a bull is usually a good quality; though not always, bc. there was the ancient name of Crimean peninsula (given by the o. Gr*), which was Taureus (I_Tavrija or Tavricheskij poluostrov in Rus.), where in a Gr. dict. is said that this comes from the name of some tribe (ταυριχη), but I am highly suspicious that these people were viewed as some ... silly calves! ( The r. taur- is also rel-d to the ... I_turn|ing via the curve of the horns, as we have explained this on Rind or Widder. )
Anyway, mark that "αυ" in o. Gr. was read 'aj' (now it is just 'u' but, I'm sorry to tell this, today's Greece isn't the o. G.), and in Lat. it becomes "au" but (bc. of the graphical sim-ty of upsilon with the Lat. "v") it often becomes "av", so that we come (i.e., have just come) to the r. tavr-, where an o. Rus. I_tavro (stressed on the end) may be cited, what was a stigma burned on the cattle to identify the owner, but these were normally bulls & cows (sheep have fleece and aren't so easy to be burned, & they are too small to care about each one), so that this is rel-d to the taurus. Then there is Tur. I_tabor, what is an army unit or camp (& surely here the bovine carts were meant); then by the mutation tavr- -- zavr- we may reach to the ... I_dinosaur|s (from o. Gr. δεινοσ 2(ominous, threatening)2 + σαυροσ 2(a reptile --- I_saurus in Lat., where from you say saurian)2 ), & (if you ask me) taurus -- saurus doesn't just rime, there's the curving circle hidden in both animals that unites them. One may say that this isn't rel-d to the god Bog, what is true, but it is rel-d to the ment-d creation, bc. in Rus. (but it's c. Sl.) tvoritþ |I_tvorit$| is to create or tvorchestvo is a creativity, & here is not only the creature-tvarþ|I_tvar$|, but many other Sl. ws like: Cz. tvoriti or Pol. tworzych (to create), Cz. tvar (a ... face or cheek) or Pol. twarz (a face), Lithuanian twora (a fence --- smt. just built, created), Rus. I_tvorog (a ... curd, though this might not be the only rel-n, bc. here some process of brewing is in effect, and it is given an Avs. tuiri with t.s. m-ing, but then I think tuiri fits better with Rus. varitþ |I_varit$| 2(to boil)2 ). In other ws, the taurus turns out to be a creator, & a very powerful one, bc. here has to be added also Sl. ... solid (body), what is tvërdûj |I_tverdu^j| ('tvjordûj') in Rus. or tvård in Bul. (or mutated to tzvjordû in Belarus) or the short trd in Slovenian or I_tvrdy in Cz., etc., as also the whole sky with all celestial bodies, what in o. Sl. was tverdþ |I_tverd$|.( The r. big- is rel-d even to the ... love, but we shall come to this much later. )
But there is even more to this, bc.: what do you think about your ... I_boss? As far as I can grasp the m-ing he is a boastful person (hence he is rel-d to the verb to I_boast, too), and in Bul. we have the jargon naduva se (he swells, inflates himself) applied to such persons, but the etym-sts give only Teu. I_Baas (a master), which was Hol. & Dan. but further etym-gy was unknown. Well, from strictly etym-cal point it might be so but the assocs are almost obvious, and there is also Tur. boş |I_bosh| (empty, free, acc. to the dicts, but it has to be so bc. smt. has been blown away; from here boşlaf |I_boshlaf| |I_laf| 2(known also in Bul.)2 means an "inflated phrase" 2(where, b.t.w., the 2nd syl. makes a perfect rel-n with your I_laugh, which, otherwise, is given as sound imit. from Ger. I_lachen)2 ). Or, then, there is also Tur. baş |I_bash| m-ing a head, or smb. acting as head, boss, or master (& in Bul. the jargon bash-majstor as top-master is often to be heard); there is also Rus. I_bashka as jargon for the head (or mug, as you would put it) given from Tur., Azr., Tar. & sim. langs. And to the Teu. Baas may be added that acc. to one of the fairy tales of Wilchem Hauf he was rel-d to the known Tur. I_pasha, being a bash-ruler of a province, but this has to be vulgar etym-gy. Slightly away from here is your I_busy (& the business), what is primarily an imit. (of buzzing), but may be rel-d (in my view) to o. Eastern I_bazaar, & to the boss too, bc. the bosses are usually those doing business. And as far as we have gone for a while to the syl. bi- (as in bik) it is convenient to insert here o. & c. Sl. bûstrûj |I_bu^stru^j| (in Rus., or bistår in Bul., or bistrûj in Ukr., or bystry in Cz. & Pol., or o. båstrå), what means fast, but also clear (for water, in Bul.), what has to be explained with the flowing water which is clear; here are given also: an o. Icl. I_bysja (to flow fast), Norw. boysa (to jump free), also their buse or Swiss I_busa (to throw oneself forward), & so on, but we'll stop here (hoping to come again to smt. sim. later).
Although I may add smt. else, namely the ... I_bus! Here (again) the official version is that it comes from Lat. omnibus, but this is a case form of I_omnia m-ing "all" (|I_phrases|omnia omnibus means "all for the people", omnibus horis is always, in each time, etc.) saying that the bus is a communal vehicle. But (if you ask me) it is strange, why some ending has to be taken as shortening of a long w. (it is like to shorten, say, dirigible to some gible, or democracy to ... mockery 2(& isn't it suitable?)2 ); and even if this is done it is done with some idea in the heads of the people, & that's exactly what I am telling you --- the idea of smt. big, or inflated like a I_bean, which idea we may see in Rus. busû |I_busu^| (small beads, in pl., 2(& add the I_bead too)2 used for necklaces), which were o. Ar. büsre |I_buesre|, which w. has given also our Sl. I_biser (a pearl).

~ ~ ~

Ah well, we have spoken about the Sl. & Eastern god Bog--Baga, so that let be ment-d also our Sl. Gospodþ as synonym (it's in Rus., or I_Gospod in Bul. --- you see, we, the Bul*, don't like much this softening sign, not that we haven't it as char. in the alphabet, we have it, but we almost don't use it; and the more I think about this the more I am inclined to believe that this is bc. ... our women don't like it when "it" is soft, they prefer "it" to be hard 2(& that has to be also the reason why we don't have the w. gentleman)2, but this was small diversion from the holly theme). So the shortest (& poss. vulgar) etym-gy (bc. that was what I thought at 1st) is that Gospod has to be rel-d to the Western I_gospel and understood as Gospod spel (the "God has sung" it), bc. there is much singing in the churches (& people who know this say that o. Heb. texts just cannot be read without singing 2(bc. they had had no vowels in the alphabet)2 ); but you, for your part, may rel. the gospel with the I_gossip|ing, if you like. This may sound not very serious, but looking into some etym-cal dicts it turned out that my guess was, in general, right (though they say ntg. of the kind bc. they don't pose themselves such questions), although let me give 1st the official version & then my comments. Yeah, but for this I have to say some preliminary ws about the strange contradiction btw. Ger. I_Gast (your guest, of course) & your (& Lat.) I_host, bc. the latter is the opposite of the 1st! Well, the point here is not in this who pays the bill, but in taking part in a common meal, also in returning according to the given, bc. I_hostis in Lat. (giving your hostility) was an enemy, a foreigner, and hosteo was to return accordingly (!), but then I_hospes was both a host &/or a guest. From here is their hospitalia (your hospitality), the I_hospital (which is Fr. hôpital 2(read 'opital')2, or Rus. gospitalþ |I_gospital$|), and there were o. Fr. hospel & hospis which have given your hospice & hostel, and Ger. I_Spital, what is a hospice or a hospital (& sounds a bit contemptuous, as if a spitting); the important ideas here (comp-ing hostile with hospitable), in my view, are not only in returning acc. to the received, but in treating of each foreigner as a guest, bc. some other time you may be in the same position & he may be the host.
So, and the official version for I_Gospod(þ) is from Lat. hospitus (a host) combined with potis (powerful), where is also Fr. I_hostie (church host), which is divided very hospitable btw. the church goers (but how you can still accept this heathen habit to chew, like dogs, the 2(would be)2 body of your savior, I can't grasp --- I, for my part, don't eat any part of my Urrh, at least bc. I cannot describe Him, neither His parts; I am not so silly to believe that I know how He looks like). So our Gospod(þ) is the Lat. hospitus (what is not much away from the house, though there other ideas come into play), but He being a host this has given Rus. (etc.) I_gospodin, what is your Mister (& Ger. Magister), & Bul. I_gospodar, what is a boss or master, so that we show nowadays our good manners in seeing in every man some kind of god (what I can't accept as a good idea, b.t.w.). Now about the rel-n I_gospod -- I_gospel: the latter was o. Eng.-Saxon goDspel, where the God is more than obvious, and this also tells us where from your ... I_spell|ing (of the words) comes, so you see that this is a kind of singing; more than this, your I_gossip, really, has to be here bc. it was o. godsibb (again with "d"), given from o. Norw. guðsefi |I_gudhsefi| m-ing a godfather.

~ ~ ~

In this way we have come to the name of I_Christ, which (etym-cally) was coined in o. Greece --- Ηριστοσ --- coming from χρισισ what meant to apply unction, where some grounding & friction is in play (what in my view sounds a bit dull for a name of god 2(bc. I have better name to comp. with)2 ). On the other hand his old names were Jahve (you prefer I_Jehovah) or I_Jesus, which are some awestruck exclams (I've met smw. that Jahve ment "I am" 2(maybe "I was"; >> Ja-I, also was)2 but this doesn't contradict to the said); such is the case with I_Allah too (through the idea of all the things, what is a very old r.). ( There is also o. Heb. Savaoth to which we shell come on unexpected place. ) Yeah, but there are other words near in their s-ing to the name of Christ, so that I'll say smt. about them too. One is Bul. I_hrisim m-ing humble, I_meek (where the latter is poss. imit. of some mooing), which isn't really ours but new Gr. χρισιμοσ m-ing suitable for unction, so that this is a deriv. of Christ (i.e. from χρισισ). Then I may go, with some doubts, to the ... aristocracy (Fr. I_aristocratie, where the interesting part is the beg-ing), which is also o. Gr. (αριστοκρατια) m-ing ruling of the best (of noble families, usually), what reminds me, naturally, about the I_Aristotle (Αριστοτελησ), who, if it may be said so, justified his name. Nobody tells us whether this is rel-d to the unction (bc. the m-ing is sim., & "a-" not always is negation), but there was o. Gr. αριστα |I_arista| m-ing the best, the excellent, and if "a-" is a negation then this may be explained as smt. /smo. not from the I_rest (like also the I_arrest --- you see, there are 2 m-ings of the w. rest, where one is of the left part, and the other is of the state of no activity, but they have to be united with some idea and it has to be this, that we prefer always to be or to have the best, & what isn't αριστα we just leave 2(to rest)2; >> also ... restaurant). ( Well, some of you may say that this 'aris-' is sim. to your arise, but that's the same idea, so that let us not diverge. )
I can't be pretty sure, but this Gr. w. sounds (to me) near to the ... Aryans, and they have come from the Skr. where aryas meant noble, and exactly I_Aryan was a Skr. w. with t.s. m-ing of elected people. This w. hasn't now a good m-ing (after Hitler, who, as I have read, had family name Schicklegruber, & you see well that with such name one cannot make a political 2(or whichever)2 career so that he had thought it better to chose a hit-s-ing name), but there was an Aryan lang. & Aryan people, & from here the name of the country ... I_Iran is given --- though in those ancient times this was name of only a small tribe living on the slopes of Hindukush mountain, but then the sphere of m-ing widened including the whole India, Iran & I_Iraq, and after many cents nearly all nations (i.e.: the Romans, Gr*, Teu*, Slavs, etc.) began to call themselves (or at least to wish to be) Aryans. ( I even find it poss. that Tur. 2(known also in Bul.)2 I_ayran 2(stirred yogurt diluted with water)2 is also influenced by this r., bc. milk is a precious, one may say elected, beverage 2(comp. with gallant later)2. ) In o. Gr. there was also αρειων as brave, the best one, from here is the name Αρειοσ, which, I sup., might have been mutated to Αρησ (though for this >> I_Ares), and (acc. to the Ger. etym-sts) from here has to be their I_Ehre (a fame); I wouldn't be surprised if also Lat. I_ars (your art, not what some of you might have thought) is influenced from this root. In short, & for fun of course, we all may count ourselves aristocrats, & Christ may as well be Aryan.

~ ~ ~

Now, I have already ment-d I_Buddha (& the -ists), who is not exactly a god but a very important prophet, whose name means Awakener & makes a perfect rel-n with Bul. budja (Rus. buditþ |I_budit$|, to wake up) or with bodatþ |I_bodat$| (to prick, stick into), as also with Sl. ... future tense (bûtþ |I_bu^t$| in Rus. is will /shall, from here bådeshte |I_ba^deshte| in Bul., or budushchee in Rus. is a future), after what also your verb I_would may be added. In the Skr. there were, e.g.: I_bhutus as a (well-) being, success, I_bodhati (to awake or make to see; = to Avs. baodaite), or I_bhavati as the verb to be, became, arise, hence this gives aslo your verb to I_be (Ger. ich-I I_bin, du-you bist, etc.), but from bhavati one may reach also (though not strictly etym-cally) to the verb to I_have. But there are very many sim. words (o. Teu. bhen, bhn, beo, bim, binm, ben, etc.), also the known o. Gr. βιοσ |I_bios| (a life or way of life --- the latter more precisely is βιοσισ, from here is Lat I_biosis), then o. Sl. bûti (to be), a Blt. biti, o. Irish buith, Per. bud (it was) or budan (it will became), and if the time isn't so important then also Rus. bûl|I_bu^l| (or Bul. bjah) for "was". I should add also the heard Ar. ... I_ibn (son of smb., or I_ben in Heb., but this is rel-d 2(what is only natural)2 with the father, bc. in o. Semitic I_abu was a father 2(though you may come to this conclusion also reading the 1001 Nights)2 ), then also your I_bud & I_body /buddy (the etym-sts cite a Teu. botich but not what was before), your I_beast (why not? --- at least in Ger. this 2(bist)2 is 2nd pers. sing. from to be), etc. And maybe you have heard that in the Zen-Buddhism I_bodhisattva meant an enlightened person (i.e. a satisfied body --- >> sattva).

~ ~ ~

So, we are moving around diff. gods, but are not done with them yet. Let me turn now your attention to old Greece, where I have already ment-d Zeus, but I may say smt. about I_Poseidon too, namely that he possesses such a big power that may make the things well posed. But, on the other hand (& as a joke), it is poss. that he has made the Rus. ... river I_Don, bc. posèv there is a crop, smt. that grows from seeds, hence he might have planted it. His name, in fact, consists of 2 rs, bc. a r. usually is one or 2 syls (& this has to be, b.t.w., the core idea lying in you building of comparative & superlative forms in 2 diff. ways, depending on the number of syls, say: longer or happier, but more beautiful). The 1st syl. hides the possession (Lat. I_possesio is a possession, & possum is a power 2(& that is the idea of your I_power, though, in my view, this isn't very suitable building bc. it comes near to the poverty; etym-cally it is given from Lat. I_potencia, but, though sim., these rs have to be perceived as diff. --- we shall come to the potency later on)2, or Fr. puissance, what is again a power; or possede, what is possessed), also the posing (in Fr. I_pose is a building of smt., posing or positioning), also the posting (though for the I_post may be applied an imit-al approach of ... saying 'psst', smt. that animal drivers often use 2(at least in Bul., but all horses "understand" only one lang.)2 ), & the possibility (Fr. I_possible), & other ws. If you want to remain in o. Gr. then there ροσον was the question "how much" or "to what extent" --- but do you know why it sounds so? Well, bc. of the compressed air, that says 'påss' when it goes out (it says smm. also 'piss', but that's not what I've in mind here); this forcing out of the air is not always very decent what may be illustrated with Ger. die I_Posse, what is a farce (smt. fem.), or der Posse, what is a joke (smt. masc.), & this masc. Posse is just another name for the Eng. --- sorry --- fart.
Then there is the other part of Ποσειδων (-οσ), which is not only the river I_Don, but also Ger. I_Donau (becoming Danube in Eng.), or poss. your ... I_London (bc. there also flows a river). In o. Gr. δονασ or δωνασ was a cane (which grows on rivers' grounds), δονεω was to shake, stir, run off, excite, what surely is alike your I_down, & Rus. I_dno (dåno in Bul, a bottom), & Ger. I_donnern (to I_thunder), & from the last w. is their often used I_Donnerwetter, what is a polite (acc. to the current views) curse m-ing "by gosh" or "darn it" or "by Jove" (literally it says "thunderous 2(or stormy)2 weather"; in Rus. this idiom is |I_phrases| chërt 2('chjort')2 pobery, lit-ly "the devil take it"). So that, seriously said, I_Poseidon (called also Neptune, brother of Zeus & Pluto) just possesses the dno-bottom, but my funny explans have reasons for existence, bc. the rivers, acc. to many fables, were made by some god or giant throwing smt. (& he has his trident for that purpose), & where this thing falls it makes a hole & the water just pops out.

~ ~ ~

OK, but there was also the Roman god I_Mercurius, who before that was called I_Hermes (Ερμησ in o. Gr., son of Zeus) and he contains very contradictory ideas in his name. On one hand we may come from here to the Eng. murky, which is given as emerged in 13th cent. from o. Teu. I_merkwjo, but this isn't only Western w. bc. t.s. means Rus. I_mrak (a darkness), what is o. & c. Sl. (Church-Sl. morok), with derivs in Rus. like morochitþ |I_morochit$| (to worry, but in sense of meshing things in one's head as if darkening the situation) & morgatþ |I_morgat$| (to wink), but here is cited today's Ger. I_Morgen (your morning --- bc. then the light begins to blink) & even a Skr. I_markas as a darkness. So this was about the dark aspect of Mercurius, bc. he was messenger of the gods & carried human souls through the river Letha in the kingdom of dead of Hades, and bc. of this accompanying he was patron of almost everything --- of travelers & businessmen, of thieves & bandits, of magicians & astrologers (& was often called Hermes Trismegistus, or triple-great), but he went there & returned, i.e. hid & I_emerge|d (hence count also the w. I_merge), & that is why he has also his shining side. Bc. he is, on the other hand, very bright & luminous, having given the name of the nearest to the Sun & the hottest planet, & not only this but the name of the shining, liquid metal mercury (Fr. I_mercure) too (which is I_zhivak in Bul., i.e. smt. alive --- << zhivot); to add that in the morning the light begins to shine, not to disappear.
( B.t.w., having ment-d the morning, let me say that in Rus. it is I_utro, also tomorrow is I_zavtra 2(& zavtrak is a I_breakfast --- which in its turn has to be, I sup., breakfirst, bc. it comes from Ger. Frühstück saying literally "early piece")2, what is also o. & c. Sl. 2(o. zaoutra, Slovenian zajtra, Cz. zeitra /zitra, Bul. utre, Srb. sutra, etc.)2, where, taking aside the prefix za /ze 2(here as "after")2, remains the r. I_utro 2(that's in Bul., or in Cz. I_jitro, or in Srb. jutro, or o. Sl. outro)2 what means exactly morning. For this r. or ws is said that the etym-gy is difficult, but in my view they belong to the cluster to be disc-ed not much later on jour & Jura 2(of fast, rubbing movement)2; poss. this is also the reason for Rus. mercury to be called rtutþ |I_rtut$|, which is also c. Sl. 2(like Cz. rtut, Pol. rteč, & others, but not Bul.)2, what sounds near to the utro 2(where the etym-gy is again dubious, sp-ing about old causes for actions, about the Eros, but this is tasting of the right way and I sup. the rel-ns to the jour & Bul. zhivak are stronger)2. )
When Mercurius was patron of almost all professions, and alternated the light & the darkness, we may search for more rel-d ws, & they, really, are to be found, like: Ger. das I_Mark (a bone-marrow, neutral), die (for fem.) I_Mark (a border 2(to stress that the core & the border may be observed as dual notions!)2, but also the known Ger. Mark as their former currency), the name Mark, if you want, Ger. Marke (as a post mark), also all of the m-ings of your mark, the I_Markt-market (place where wares & money change hands); and in order not to think that this is only Teu. let us go to the Lat. where mercatus is a business or a fair, I_mercator is a tradesman, then your I_mercantile & merchandise (which are Fr.-Lat.), or to cite also Fr. marche as a market (hence << March & Marsch), & so on. ( To squeeze the small remark that your-Lat 2(to)2 I_alternate 2(resp., the alternative)2 has to say that we 2(or smt.)2 returns to its alter-old state, & then again to the last old state, & so on, for what switching movement in other langs usually the w. "pulsate" is used. ) This Mark--Markt surely is rel-d also to the r. of messen-measuring (bc. a fair in Ger. is I_Messe --- i.e. the people go there to I_measure or comp. diff. wares), & to the remembering /marking (I_merken in Ger.) or I_remark|ing, & to ... the murder /morgue (we'll come to this after a while), but coming from a powerful god here has to fit also the ... I_mercy (though it seams strange to say that, e.g., the merchandise comes from the mercy). But then: what means to say I_merci (Fr. for "thank you" 2(stressed on the end, as usual for them)2 ) if not "have mercy with me"? A sim. idea, b.t.w., exists in Rus. I_spasibo (thank you), which is built from: spasi + bog ("Help God!", or rather "God help thee!"), and in Bul. we say I_blagodarja, what is blago + darja (smt. like "Be blessed!"), & >> also gnädig. But there is also Bul. (not exactly Rus.) w. mråsen |I_mra^sen| that means dirty, & mårsja |I_ma^rsja| is to make dirty (with a form "toj mårsi" for "he makes dirty", what sounds exactly as your mercy), and this fits well with the bad m-ing of Eng. I_mercenary (to do all for money). But it is not only this, and don't forget the changing, what here means to return acc-ly (measure for measure).
[|I_comments| Ah, let me insert here some explans about the measure, and why it is so important to return acc-ly --- bc. it was observed from ancient times that this is righteous principle but, still, the only cases when it is applied are usually in form of some vendetta, or eye-for-eye returning, though even this is better than the escalation of power & atrocities. It is simple: there is just a common law for all live forms to react not acc. to the cause, but in a distorted way, or, more precisely, to answer slight causes with stronger effects and, resp., strong causes with slighter effects, but never to return acc. to the cause; or that the law of mechanics for equal reaction to an initial action is not valid for the biological matter. It is only natural --- I'm afraid to say reasonable, bc. such reaction is very primitive, and we have also to make diff-ce btw. a bug (or even a microbe) & a human being ---, bc. this means that if the action is small the subject in question may get rid of it with stronger reaction, and v.v., if the action is strong, then there is no need only to spend energetic resources in fighting such power; in a way this may be viewed as characteristic of some hidden in the organism, as black box device, of some kind of soul (even in the microbe). So it's natural, but too primitive & has to be avoided, though in many social situations it's better if we react just as a log or stone if we can't apply some real judgment, but this inequality of the reaction is so strong with us (I can't tell you where you may read more about this law bc. I have come alone to it but it has to be known & written smw.) that even our social laws are made to comply with it (I mean that if one steals one chicken he/she has to repay at least 10 chickens, but if one kills a dozen persons he can't die more then once, & nowadays we even reject the capital punishment), and we treat our next not acc. to their real deeds but acc. to this law of distorted reaction, to say ntg. about the wars where we determinedly try to exceed all reasonable proportions. So that an eye-for-eye returning is better than ten-eyes-for-an-eye, but there surely may be found a much better reaction --- although, enough moralizing. ]
But there are other ws on the West on mar- m-ing smt. bad, disgusting, or spoiled, where is difficult to judge whether they carry the main idea of marking, or of murmuring (>> mare), or of changing of the light (the mrak-idea), or even of murder, but more probable are the last 2 causes. Let us begin here with Eng. I_mar as to spoil, what has ntg. to do with your merry, but has to do smt. with Rus. maratþ |I_marat$| /zamaratþ as to make dirty, to spoil, or with Bul. mråsen-dirty, and what has (in my view) to form the bottom line of your ... I_mare as female horse --- bc. on it in turn ends your I_nightmare! For (to) mar are given: o. Eng. merran, mierran, Frisian meria, o. Ger. I_marren (to tie smb., to torment), Norw. merja (a bruise, crush), Got. marzjan (to cause a stumble), but ntg. before this; and for maratþ is said that it is o. & c. Sl. (Ukr. marati, Pol. marač as to spread over), & they go to Gr. μορυσσω (to cover with dirt) & Skr. I_upamarayati (to sink into, make it soft), but then say that this isn't much probable (in what I doubt; having in mind the ideas of Morgen -- morgatþ they can be applied also to the sinking into, or covering with dirt; and Lat. mare-sea may also have its saying in the sinking). Then for the mare almost ntg. is given (o. mearh, Gaelic marc, & some marχaz as a horse 2(what may be some neighing, like with the horse >> h.)2 ); and even if in old times people believed (I don't know, but it's poss.) that to dream a (laughing) horse means smt. bad, there, still, has to be some push from another idea hidden in the r. to justify the nightmare (for which there ntg. at all is said). But it is not only this bc. the Sl* use the Fr. w., I_cauchemar ('koshmar'), & it also ends in t.s. way & for it is given an o. maere m-ing an ... incubus (a demon, or a nightmare too). And there are other w. with sim. ideas like: the I_martyr (given from o. Gr. μαρτυσ, but there it meant a witness, what is the idea of the Markt & remarkable things, but from the Lat. onward the m-ing changes, poss. with the ideas that we disc. now), & the I_maroon colour (from Fr. marron, but it is reddish-brown & may be influenced by the ... marinating, but even in this case it hides some tormenting), & one disgusting bird, the ... marabou (from Fr. I_marabout, which has to be zamaran-dirty with smt. bc. of its looks, and, besides, this Fr. w. has to be Ar. bc. it means also a ... Muslim hermit, who, surely, was meant as dirty person --- >> fakir for analogy), & there is also the known Fr. I_marotte (a whim, what also fits with the idea of fast changing), & surely others, but let me stop now here.
Ah, there are other Gr. gods, like Pluto, Ares, Eros, Hera, Pan, etc., but they will be explained in a suitable context, so let me add here only a pair of ws about I_Apollo (Απολλων /-οσ in Gr.), who was god of the light, son of Zeus & Lethe, & who has given (rather v.v., but the important thing is the rel-n, not the direction of building of the ws) your ... I_apology, i.e. Gr. απολογια (an apologetic speech), with m-ing of smt. white, good, beautiful (like Apollo was, & απολαυω was to find a satisfaction or gain), but there might be also other ideas.

~ ~ ~

That's good but there are many other ancient gods and I want to say smt. about one very old god, before the biblical deluge, but in order to come to him I will begin with one curiously s-ing Heb. name, I_Mordokai. The piquant moment is that it sounds very I_murder|ous, or like Bul. (smt. Balkan) jargon mårda |I_ma^rda| (stressed on the end), what is a bad, disgusting guy, so that the Heb* don't use this name much now (at least within the Slavs) & prefer to use lions instead (i.e. Leonid). Naturally, here are many ws around the globe, like: Lat. mort /I_mortus, Rus. (c. Sl.) smertþ |I_smert$| (again murder, death), Ger. Mord or Fr. mort (t.s.), diff. Eng. derivs, Lat. I_morior (to die, what reminds me the sentences |I_sentences|: De mortius nil nisi bene! 2(For the dead 3(say)3 only good things!)2; and Ave Caesar, morituri te salutant! 2(Destined to die greet you, Caesar)2 ), also an Ar. /Per. I_morde (dead), and in the Skr. I may cite the name I_Amaravati m-ing undying (where the beg-ing "a" is for negation, as it's in Gr. & on the West & by the Arabs, mara is our r., and for the end >> walten). There are also assoc-d ws like: Rus. smerdetþ |I_smerdet$| (smårdi in Bul., to stink), Ger. I_moderig (decaying, bad smelling), Bul. (poss. Tur.) mårsha |I_ma^rsha| (decaying corpse), Per. I_murdar (dirty), and not to forget the known Fr. I_merde (exactly a shit). ( There is also Bul. mråvka |I_mra^vka| 2(a piece of cooked meat; the nearest sim-ly s-ing w. here is I_mravka what is ... an ant 3(not that we make this rel-n but it has arisen smh.)3, where the etym-gy is diff. --- >> I_muravej)2, but this is sim. building like you I_morsel. ) Taking into account that the murders are usually done by militaries it is appropriate to assoc. here the Lat. god I_Mars (who will be ment-d later again) & return for a while to the just disc-d I_martyr, who, I sup., is strongly rel-d to him, & if so then add also: the known Fr. I_marauder, the I_marshal, who has to be from the Marsch-march (but from Mars too, bc. only militaries like to march), Ger. morschig as marshy or crumbling (what is nearly the same as moderig & this may be bc. smo. treads on it), your & Lat. I_mortar (either as a kind of glue, or as pot for grinding, or as cannon), & poss. other ws that fit well in the context.
As far as the usual way for murdering used by carnivorous animals, & humans as the most murderous animals (only that we kill not to eat but just for the kick of it), is cutting of the throat (what, b.t.w., is also present in Ger., in the rel-n btw. their Rachen as a throat and I_Rache as a vendetta-revenge) here may be cited also Lat. mordeo (to sting, incise, cut, torment, eat), sim. Fr. I_mordre, etc. In this way we come to the physiognomy in usually jargon usage as in Rus. I_morda (a face) with interesting derivs like: mordastûj (with big & ugly face), mordoboj (a fight with hitting on the face), or I_mordulja (nearly amorous addressing; it can be put even nicer as mordashechka); this morda in Bul. has become I_mutra (surely under Tur. /Gypsy influence; our etym-sts give some It. mutria but I sup. the source for the It. w. has to be t.s.; b.t.w., there is also synonym for the mutra in Tur., I_surat, what has to be rel-d to I_zurla 2(also Tur. & Per. but zurna)2, what is a boar's snout). Smw. around these ws has to be the Tur. jargon I_muruk (again known in Bul.) for a father, which isn't much away from Ger. I_Mutter, that has given your (etc.) mother; also one interesting Bul. (but not Rus.) w., mårdam |I_ma^rdam|, may be ment-d, which means to move, but in the sense of stirring, like what all life forms do. The phonetic core here is some murmuring that may be issued by a killing animal, or by our mouth (or that of the mother or the father), or a buzzing, but it's also rel-d smh. to Sl. wisdom (>> mudrûjvka |I_mra^vka| 2(a piece of cooked meat; the nearest sim-ly s-ing w. here is I_mravka what is ... an ant 3(not that we make this rel-n but it has arisen smh.)3, where the etym-gy is diff. --- >> I_muravej)2, but this is sim. building like you I_morsel. ) Taking into account that the murders are usually done by militaries it is appropriate to assoc. here the Lat. god I_Mars (who will be ment-d later again) & return for a while to the just disc-d I_martyr, who, I sup., is strongly rel-d to him, & if so then add also: the known Fr. I_marauder, the I_marshal, who has to be from the Marsch-march (but from Mars too, bc. only militaries like to march), Ger. morschig as marshy or crumbling (what is nearly the same as moderig & this may be bc. smo. treads on it), your & Lat. I_mortar (either as a kind of glue, or as pot for grinding, or as cannon), & poss. other ws that fit well in the context.
As far as the usual way for murdering used by carnivorous animals, & humans as the most murderous animals (only that we kill not to eat but just for the kick of it), is cutting of the throat (what, b.t.w., is also present in Ger., in the rel-n btw. their Rachen as a throat and I_Rache as a vendetta-revenge) here may be cited also Lat. mordeo (to sting, incise, cut, torment, eat), sim. Fr. I_mordre, etc. In this way we come to the physiognomy in usually jargon usage as in Rus. I_morda (a face) with interesting derivs like: mordast (with big & ugly face), mordoboj (a fight with hitting on the face), or I_mordulja (nearly amorous addressing; it can be put even nicer as mordashechka); this morda in Bul. has become I_mutra (surely under Tur. /Gypsy influence; our etym-sts give some It. mutria but I sup. the source for the It. w. has to be t.s.; b.t.w., there is also synonym for the mutra in Tur., I_surat, what has to be rel-d to I_zurla 2(also Tur. & Per. but zurna)2, what is a boar's snout). Smw. around these ws has to be the Tur. jargon I_muruk (again known in Bul.) for a father, which isn't much away from Ger. I_Mutter, that has given your (etc.) mother; also one interesting Bul. (but not Rus.) w., |I_ma^rdam|, may be ment-d, which means to move, but in the sense of stirring, like what all life forms do. The phonetic core here is some murmuring that may be issued by a killing animal, or by our mouth (or that of the mother or the father), or a buzzingods (in polytheism), then each of them has his or her functions, and they run into conflicts, what enlivens the situation. In one or another way but there has to be some immaterial power hidden in the matter which causes it to function in the needed way, or, as you have surely heard the sentence: |I_sentences| if Got does not exist, then he has to be invented! I shall dig a little in this stream of thoughts, but if you don't like such philosophizing you may skip the following several paragraphs.
[|I_comments| So let me do this reasoning, and 1st of all: why the good God (in Christianity) doesn't seem a good decision? Well, by many reasons, converging all of them to some logical contradiction, like that God just couldn't be good to all beings, bc. our world (the best possible) is contradictory and one couldn't be good to all (you surely have had many poss-ties to observe this), so that such requirement to God is very egoistic or homo-centered. He might have made our world just for fun (to fill the unlimited time which He has to kill), but we are only one out of million species that He has created, and there are no reasons to believe that He will leave almost all other creatures to perish just to please the humans (or His beloved folk), where the other species (obviously) are more easygoing & behave how He has told them (via the genetic code or otherwise); neither are there any reasons to believe that He will lose His quiet sleep trying to better us (through punishments in Hell, or otherwise), having known in advance that we will not listen to His ws; nor will He be so eagerly interested to hear our prayers, for if He doesn't stand above such egoistic (human) desires He could have hardly been called a god; nor will He try to preserve our souls (which were proven to be bad; or even if some of them are good, but still will never be used to inhabit another body) for ever & ever (even if they are immaterial & don't take place & He has all the place He needed) after we have left the real life; and so on. He couldn't be good and omnipotent, bc. in such case He would have made a life where all the beings (bugs, humans, monkeys, worms, etc.) will be happy forever (like in the paradise), but that was not His goal (to make all living thins, or even all humans, happy); His goal was to make smoothly functioning world. I can well understand that our God has to be good for the purpose of giving us an example, but --- such a God is just too naïve.
Such a Got simply shows that we don't understand that He is not a human being. I will not insist on an exact definition of God, bc. this is very fundamental notion & cannot be exactly defined (bc. to I_define, b.t.w., means to "make it finite"; you know the saying that "to define is to delimit" 2(i.e. to set limits)2, what is sim. in Rus. --- opredelitþ |I_opredelit$|, where predel is a limit ---, and the basic idea here is that the world 2(or the matter)2 is infinite, and when we take smt. from it apart, or decompose the whole, or look at one point, we are usually losing some important characteristics of the object), but you must have some ideas of what God is. I will give here one such draft definition (a la Ben Spinosa) stating that: I_God is some substance (or entity) that is infinite & unlike any material substances, bc. it may be present equally well in all places & in all times but in one & t.s. moment, which substance is undividable (can't be divided in pieces) but exists in the smallest particles (smt. like the I_magnet, which is so called bc. of this magical property; holograms also have this property, though loosing the clarity of image when splitting), and which substance exists forever (& has existed always), it has no cause but is the cause for its (or His, or, then, Her) own existence & the existence of the material world, it really has free will & depends on ntg., and ... but poss. this is enough. From this definition would follow, in particular, that such God can't have any established form or image, or that He may be seen in whatever image He wants to show himself (& His age or sex is of no importance); and being creator of the world He will care for all the living (& not living, inorganic) things (or that He will not care for one single being, but for the life as a whole); and so on. The Christian God has little in common with this idea of God, He has ceased to exist now, the Creation was single act after which He just abides in His "country house" & behaves like a spoiled boy. Well, Christianity exists a long time, hence it can't be so bad, but that's due mainly to the simplicity of the average citizens, and for how long the situation will remain t.s. in the current age I can't say for sure. ( It's true that under the democracy all the media try desperately to turns us to morons 2(>> m.)2 but this isn't so easy now, with all the: satellites, mobiphones, home appliances, computers & robots, virtual reality, genetic engineering, etc. )
On the other hand, the idea for some universe-wide power is everlasting and, although older then the Christianity, is even more contemporary; but the idea of unity of human beings with the other life forms, built into the thesis of reincarnation of the souls, is also modern nowadays, bc. it seems more reasonable and enlivening for the believers. Preferable is also the Islamic lack of exactness in describing of God (He looks like smo. from the 4th dimension), as the uncountable incarnations of the Buddhist's gods are to be preferred, on the contrary to the dogmatic Christian "idolatry"; better is also that they miss some of our "cannibalistic" rituals; or that they set the stress not on the love (bc. people, however you twist it, rel. it to the sex) but on the peace (we shall come again to this); & poss. some other details. ( I am not very exact in the describing of this moments bc., as I have just stressed, the point isn't in the exactness but in the value of the ideas, and let me insert here one remark of Hegel in this line of thoughts, namely that: |I_sentences| the philosophy shouldn't be taken too seriously --- and when such a great philosopher says smt. like this we have to believe him, to see that the philosophy isn't an exact science; and the idea of God is no less general than that of the philosophy, hence it also shouldn't be taken too seriously 2(at least bc. the agnosticism 3(>> gnosticism)3 is often confused with the atheism, & bc. in ancient theosophy all was in one heap)2. ) So that you can see well why the eastern religions attract nowadays even more believers. The Buddhism, f.ex., says that there are 3 major characteristics of the world, namely: |I_sentences| ntg. is perfect, ntg. is constant, & ntg. is separate! Isn't this a perfect philosophy; and where is the good God Who has finished the Creation for 6 days? There is also a Buddhist thesis called I_adavaita saying literally "not to divide" but meaning that there exists just one reality including all --- God or the gods, the unlimited, the everlasting, our world, our souls, etc. --- and it can't be defined, for it can be said only what it isn't, not what it is, and we are part of it (i.e. of God). Or to ment. also that there is no good or bad, all is justified (when you look at it from diff. points)! Or take the meditation --- this medi--metha--messe idea (to be disc-ed later) is simply famous, bc. this isn't just a prayer but a way to understand yourself, then the others, then the whole world (if you succeed to reach the condition of "thought without body").
And smt. more, the Eastern people have smh. felt that our world is incidental and not strictly determined, but its incidentality is what provides for its diversity! Even in o. Greece people have liked often to toss lots or dices (leaving to the gods to decide for themselves) but the Christianity, and later on our modern sciences, state that the world is determinated --- bc. it's easier to think that by t.s. conditions there will always be t.s. effects, but ... you have heard the saying that |I_sentences| "one cannot enter twice t.s. river". Of course here is meant the time, but not only, bc. --- take the casting of coin. One may think (nowadays) that, provided one can calculate exactly the positions of all the atoms & their movements, then he will be able to say which side exactly the coin will fall. Yes but ... no, bc. on atomic level there arises the so called Brownian motion of particles which is chaotic (more precisely, it had to be formulated Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle saying that one can never know in every moment both: the position of a particle 2(its coordinates)2 and its momentum 2(the velocity as vector with 3 coordinates)2 ), so that you can calculate ntg.. Something sim. we have with the sexual fertilization (where even if 2(to put it in Ger.)2 the Spritz & the Spritzforme, are t.s., the results, when there are results, are highly diff. --- though now, with the use of genetic engineering, the scientists may be more positive & judge more determinate, but then, you know, arises the question: should they?). One may say: there isn't a big diff-ce whether one cannot calculate bc. this is very difficult (practically imposs.), or bc. smt. in the core of the things forbids us to do this. Yeah, but it is better if the arbitrariness lies in the heart of the matter, is part of the Creation, is unavoidable; or, to put it with the ws of the probabilistic theory: the necessity is incidental and the incidentality is necessary! And there are no reasons to exclude this incidentality from the Creation, even if the world was created intentionally by one or more gods (i.e. God Himself might have put the casualness in the created world, as it is said about the free will by the humans)! But an incidental world does not fit with the ideas of a good God, or even with the Lat.-Gr. Theos--two (excluding the polytheism of o. Gr* where the gods behaved as silly & naïve as the humans; and Skr. Devi where we just feel awestruck), while it fits well with some big power (indifferent to us), or an arch pendant to fall over us.
So, up to my mind, from the times of Christ many things have gone awry, and people, really, have become worse (as is the common belief in many religious circles), when they need more fables to behave better, and still don't. The creation of this monotheistic religion hasn't made people more thoughtful or less egoistic, neither more happy. So that a return to older Eastern religions (even if not always older, bc. the Islam is younger than the Christianity, & the Zen-Buddhism too, and even not polytheistic, bc. the Islam isn't, but built on an Eastern fundament, more chaotic, less illustrative to the image of God, with less dogmatic paradigms, more tolerant to other religions, not only for selected people, etc.) looks unavoidable, bc. the civilizations are moving with the Sun, from India to Persia, to Greece & Europe, to England & America (they NATO-ed the Atlantic), and then surely to Japan, China, & Tibet --- to close the circle, bc. the Earth is round. ( To put these here thoughts in a more sophisticated way, I will cite one phrase I've read that says that: the Western philosophy 2(what is true also for the religion)2 is "overly cerebral & inadequately addressing the non-rational dimensions of life" --- that's it! ) ]

And with this we shall finish our explans of diff. gods and will close this curly parentheses in order to continue further where a new God (I mean, new for you) is waiting for your attention to be introduced by me.
}





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH |I_URRHCHP|
{
He was so called bc. this is the best poss. name for a god on the whole globe --- hence, in the Solar system too, for sure. Look at the names of the other gods --- they mean smt., but they don't mean all, where Urrh is just all that ... I_urge|s the life! His name is Ger. prefix I_ur-, which means very old (like your I_ere), but also just or right, bc. the ur-things stand near to the Creation (when all was designed good but later the people spoiled this good beg-ing), & that is why I_urteilen means to make a decision, to judge, and then here is also your I_ordeal (Fr. ordalie what is medieval prosecution court). This is also the Ger. cause (I_Ursache), & Scan. Goddess of destiny I_Urdar, & your (it has to be Fr.-Lat.) I_coerce that forces us to do smt. that my Urrh has told (maybe, it can't be said for sure bc. you've forgotten now the verb "erce"). Then --- why not? --- the Rus. mountain I_Ural /Urals (ur + alt, I'll say), & there was also a place called Urr (Haldeian) in the valley of Euphrates, smw. near Babylon, what was the place of birth of the biblical Abraham (so that it is most probable, I think, that the o. Heb* didn't get right Urrh's name and decided to call him Jahve). Surely your I_early is also to be cited here, together with the I_Earl as man of early (poss. up to Urrh?) & renowned origin. ( And let me explain here that your 2(i.e. Fr. & It.)2 I_Count, used as equivalent for other nations' Earls, means that he is who ... counts, of course --- bc. you don't believe he counts, say, chickens; from here are also the county & the I_country --- as ruled by a Count 2(comp. with Graf later)2. Well, that is what the Eng* think, I sup., but in It., where it is Conte /Contessa 2(or in Fr. where they change "n" to "m")2, the main idea may be that of continuity; OK, but let me add that in It. the land-workers are called I_contadino /-a, what, if you ask me, has to be understood as serfs. )
Then we may go to Lat. (Ger., Sl., etc.) I_urna (urn in Eng., a place for the dust of burned ur-parents), or to their ... I_urina what isn't only urine but also sperm (i.e. the genes of older generations); then to Lat. I_Urania (o. Gr. Ουρανια) --- not only as the planet Uranus, this has come later, but as Muse of astronomy, i.e. this is the burning of Creation (Lat. Uranus was god of the heaven in o. Gr.), and here is also the well-known element I_uranium (bc. it has some ur-anima). Then comes the ... geological period I_Jura (Jurassic for you, the time when all had begun to grow fast, to procreate), but the r. has many variations like: Tur. ... I_yorgan (thick blanket), or Asian I_jurta (a tent made out of animal's skins), or Bul. I_jurvam se (to throw oneself fast forward) what comes from Tur. yüryüş |I_yueryuesh| (an exclam. for fast movement --- & I sup. you've been smh. influenced by this r. in the building of Eng. ... I_rush, hours or not), or take also Rus. I_ujut (a cozy place) & I_prijut (a hostel). To follow with: Fr. I_jour (a day, i.e. when the sun shines; or I_giorno 2('dzhorno')2 in It.) & I_journal (daily paper) & aujourd'hui ('ozhurdjui', today), then with Bul. I_zhuri /prezhurja (strong heat), or with the well known ... I_jury (& jurisprudence), what comes directly from Fr. I_jureur (a giver of oath, but also one who ... curses, bc. his ws make "yüryüş" when sp-ing); and then in Lat. we have juratus as a member of jury, but I_jurea as ... some food for dogs (smt. dzhurkano 2(from I_dzhurkam)2 in Bul., or smashed & stirred). In a way, it may be said that the I_Aryan|s, & I_Iran & I_Iraq, are a kind of "Urrhanians", bc. they are old folks, & hot & lively & boisterous; maybe the Teu. name I_Jurgen or Jorgen (-son) also carries some sim. idea.

~ ~ ~

But this is just the beg-ing bc. here are almost all the I_right things, namely: Gr. ορθοσ (right, upright) or Lat. I_orthogonal & orthodox, & Lat. I_ordino (to order in line, to rule or set) or ordo (a line, row, level, etc.), and here is your I_order (& Sl. I_orden in one of the m-ings of the order as sign for deserts) & also the (co-) ordinates (bc. there is an implied order on them), & so on. ( This order of numbers on the axis, b.t.w., is very important part of mathematical education in the schools, & the most difficult one --- bc. the children are taught how to do arithmetical operations but in doing so 2(especially by calculator)2 they lose the order & look at the numbers as if they are icons or pictures; this continues up to grown age for, I'd estimate, 90 % of the people, what is cleverly 2(though I wouldn't say honestly)2 used in setting the prices in the shops, where almost always they are below smt. 2(e.g.: 7.99 or 19.90 or the like)2. ) The right things, however, usually come from the East (with the Sun & the beg-ing; and the Ger* use for the Eastern countries the beautiful w. Morgenländer 2(morning countries)2 ), but in other ws this is the I_orient & the I_origin, or Lat. oriens (rising sun), or I_oriri (to rise), or orior (to begin, to soar high).
Then comes Ger. I_Ort (a place, from here is the I_Kurort-resort), then Tur. orta (a mean or center) & I_ortak (a coworker, camarad), poss. Gr. αορτη (I_aorta, as smt. out of the heart as an important Ort), then old Ar. (& so on) I_ar as a measure for land (khar in Per.) which gives Bul. (also Ger.) I_ar /hektar (in Rus. it's I_gektar) as also the arshin (archaic in Bul. bc. it's Tur. arşin |I_arshin|), or the Eng. I_acre, or Ger. I_Acker (a field, piece of land) and ackern is to work this land, to plough (& in Heb. aker means t.s.). So in this way we moved from the measures of space --- and you may look at the old eastern I_bazaar as build from some 'båzz' (<< busy) + ar --- to the digging & scratching of the earth --- &, of course, here is the I_Earth itself (I_Erde in Ger. --- made by Urrh, isn't it so?) --- and this activity is also very old, bc. there is o. Sl. I_ora (I_orati, which is old bc. it has Skr. ending -ti for verbs), known also in the Blt. langs (as: arti, art, aru, etc.), in Lat. too (I_aro, aratum, are), there was also an o. Irish airim, or Got. arjan (all this m-ing to plough, to make furrow), & here, surely, has to be your I_arable (land) too, which couldn't be explained otherwise (unless you think that it, hmm, is smt. taken from the Arabs?). Here is also Bul. I_ralo (a plough), then our rataj (land worker, archaic), etc. And surely also the known I_art, or I_ars in Lat.(but don't think about the Eng. arse at present) with all its derivs --- & allow me to tell you here one useful Lat. saying, namely: "Ars est celare artem!", m-ing that the art is in the mastery to hide it.
Ah, there is an interesting point --- b.t.w., the w. I_interest comes from Lat. I_terra with the idea of smt. hidden in or under the earth (some tasty radix, maybe), and the terra itself (which may be just another name of Urrh --- who can prove the opposite?) has to have been coined in o. Rome but rel-d (I sup.) to o. Gr. Ταρταροσ (in Lat. I_Tartarus) what is the hell (the under-terra) & from here is your (i.e. Fr.) I_terrible (corresponding with Gr. ταρταρειοσ), but also your tar & I_tarmac (& tarpaulin), bc. in Per. I_tar means black (it has other m-ings too, but mark that in old times the black colour was imagined as a mixture of many colour particles); also tor in Afghani means a fear. And smt. more, Tartarus corresponds very well with ... hmm, with the name I_Tartar (or tatari in Bul., in pl., I_tatarin in sing., or tatar in Rus.), and, I am sorry to tell this, but in Rum. exactly I_tatari is a verb m-ing ... to curse (what isn't so strange bc. in Rus. sim. joke is made with the name of the I_Arab|s where arap 2(not arab)2 is jargon for a bandit; they have also the jargon verb erepenitþsja |I_erepenit$sja| as to behave boastful, which might also be in this "Arabic" sense).
So, and the interesting point (about which I haven't forgotten, I just postponed it a little) is that many contrary notions usually sound sim. (like: mini -- micro, hyper -- hypo, big -- bit, etc.) and here I have to the I_right or righteous things (I_Ort--ordo) to add also the I_wrong or erroneous. This gives us, f.ex.: Lat. I_errare (going usually with humanum est) or I_irren in Ger. (to err for you), your ire (I_ira in Lat., a hate or anger --- you see that one or 2 "r"s are just for distinction but the r. is t.s.), also the I_iron (bc. it is hard), Lat. I_iris (there was also o. Gr. iris) what isn't iris as flower but a ... hedgehog (I_Igel in Ger., what is due to the sharp spines placed on its back, and, b.t.w., in Rus. I_igla is ... a needle; where their I_spina means a back or backbone, like your & Lat. I_spinal m-ing a vertebrae, which has hard vertices or spikes 2(left from the dinosaurs &, poss., the dragons, a?)2 ), but the flowers are here bc. the irises have sharp leaves; & the iridescence (& the iris of the ayes) is also here bc. the diff. colours in the rainbow stick out in sim. way! Here is also the irony (I_ironia in Lat., & irrisis is a derision), and the Rus erepenitþsja may carry this erroneous & sticking-out idea, and, obviously for me (though not so for the etym-sts) must be all the ... I_Irish|men (& -women) or the country Ireland --- to tell you that in Ger. der I_Ire is an Irishman, but die Irre is an error! Well, one can understand the specialists who don't want to state in the open that all Irish are, sorry, Esels (Ger. for an ass or donkey --- from the last, b.t.w., is Bul. jargon dånki |I_da^nki|, what are jeans, denims), though their behavior (as it is well known) is sim.; and so they (the etym-sts) say that the name Irish was based "hidden" on o. Irish Eriu (i.e. I_Eire) with old forms: irise, iriss, Hyrisch, etc. which had to have come from --- would you believe it? --- I_Hiberian, or Iverna, or Inverna, what is, in fact, Spain, but phonetically this were not pretty clear. OK, it surely isn't clear, but it's also not probable, and what is clear for me is that the o. Eriu is just a cry of exaltation (of seeing Urrh, maybe?), & all the irisses & Invernas are just assocs in the heads of the old Englishmen (and, again b.t.w., there are many sim. rel-ns, like e.g.: Turkey -- I_turkey 2(what is bc. of the red meat of the fowl, but, still, it doesn't sound polite)2; Ger. I_Schwabe -- Schabe 2(a cockroach)2; Rus. nemtzû |I_nemtzu^| for the Ger*, where nemoj is ... dumb --- i.e. they can't speak our Sl. langs; etc., to what we shall come again).

~ ~ ~

But let us return to the hard work (aro--ora--arable), bc. when it is done often some particles are produced and they may be the so called I_chronos|ses, i.e. parts of the time (that give us the I_chronicle|s, chronology, synchronizing |I_synchronize|, etc.), which are here bc. the time in Lat. is I_hora, in It. & Rum. is I_ora, in o. Gr. was ωρα, in Ger. I_Uhr is a clock, & here is your hour (Fr. heure, read 'jor') & the I_era, & so on. But, look here, they are just parts of smt., & in some cases they may be even stars --- as it is with the ... I_horoscope|s (Gr. ωροσκοπιον) ---, but this may also be some space --- as it is in o. Gr. χωριον |I_ho^rion| what is a village, or χωροσ |I_ho^ros| what is a space, or χωρισω what is to separate & gives the well known ... I_horizon (bc. it separates what can be seen from what can't be 2(or, rather, the sky from the sea, bc. it is to be seen good only on the sea)2 ). Still, this isn't all, bc. if in Gr. we change "ω" to "ο" then we come to some groups of people who usually play dances (when many people gather together they either sing & dance, or, else, make wars, to what we shall come after a while), as it is in: χορεια |I_horeia| (a group of people), χοροσ |I_horos| (a dance, or a ball) --- from here is Bul. national dance I_horo (stressed on the end, which turns out was horra in o. Heb. too), & even the plural for an human (in Bul.), i.e. people, is I_hora (stressed now on the 1st syl.), what is not Sl. (>> ljudi, in Rus.) ---, then χοροδραμα is ... a ballet, and then come your 2 choruses (I_chorus & I_choir), & the ... I_aria & the I_area. The fact that the time and the space are often confused may be proven also by Eng. ... I_always what doesn't mean everywhere (from "way"), but this is present in many langs bc. in Ger. always is I_immer, what has to be split in: im Meer-sea (a sea is a spatial notion), & in Bul. we say vseki påt, where påt is a way. And let me add smt. about the work, which may have diff. variants like: Ger. I_arbeiten, or Rus. rabotatþ |I_rabotat$|, or Chapek's I_robot|s, or (why not?) the I_Arab|s themselves, bc. they are "children of the desert" (acc. to some etym-gies), but there were Per. I_arabah as a cart, and Ar. I_rabb as a god, master, one who gives sustenance, & you have also heard about the Egyptian God (of the Sun) I_Rah, & about the (o.) Heb. I_rabbi (a priest); though, on the other hand, when one has to do some work he is not very pleased with that, & that is why I_rab in Rus. (Bul., etc., c. Sl.) means ... a slave.
The work, usually, is rotation |I_rotate|, so here is also Lat. I_roto (-are, to rotate), or their rota (a cyclical change), & from here is Rus. (c. Sl.) rota or Ger. I_Rotte (a group of soldiers that can be changed), but also Rus. ... I_vorota what is a door (bc. it rotates around the post!); hence also your I_door & Ger. Tür |I_Tuer| (it I_turn|s around, so count also the turning), & the I_vortex & I_vertex, etc. And other round things, bc. the name ... I_Gibraltar was old & Ar. (I_Jebeltar, with 'dzh') m-ing "a rocky door", & the full m-ing of the r. tor- /tir- /tar- includes: rotation, tension or I_torsion, some high pole, or a hole (from the pole, or, better, the dual image of the pole), then crushing, pressing, & other ideas. So, f.ex.: in o. Gr. θυρα was a door, in Lat. I_torus was a highland or a blowing, but also a marriage & marriage ring (Sacra tori), then the torus is a known mathematical figure (like the saving ring), or take your I_tor as a rock, and sim. Rus. I_toros (big ice block), or their torchatÞ (to stick out or up, what is stårcha |I_sta^rcha| in Bul.), or then your I_torch, or Fr. I_torchere, & so on. Then in Ger. I_Tor, when it's "it" is a door or a goal, but when it's "he" is ... a fool (with an opened mouth, as sign for foolishness); to continue with some additional hints about your ... Tories |I_Tory| like closed, conserved, or Tors in Ger. m-ing (though officially they come from some Irish name). Then there is your I_tire (= tyre, also as a verb) coming poss. directly from Fr. tirer as to pull out or shoot (where from in Rus. I_tir is a booth for shooting with guns 2(the mission being the goal, or the hole)2, also from here is Bul. tire as a hyphen), then come: the I_torsion or torture, the torrent or I_tornado, Lat. I_torso (as "tortured" sculpture!), the ... Heb. I_Tora (as smt. written on a rolled papyrus), the Sp. I_toreador (or torero --- bc. he tortures the poor animals, but also bc. toro in Sp. is a torus and a bull --- confused bc. of the I_Taurus --- << T.), & many others. Ah, but I've almost forgotten about the ... I_tart|s (Torte in Ger., but in many other langs too, even in Fr., where their I_gateau 2('gato')2 is highly mutilated, but, still, has some 'to' left); here are also Sp. I_tortillas, and in Bul. exists the w. I_tor as a ... fertilizer but this may as well be some cow dung (ah, sorry), or be rel-d to turjam (to put into, in Bul., but it sounds like Tur.) --- the etym-sts say it comes from the Scan. God I_Thorr (of the farming), what I personally don't believe, though this God is on the right place here bc. he, surely, is some incarnation of my Urrh!
Then let me say smt. also about the I_car|s (I_carry|ing, etc.), which are known in Bul. (I_karam is to drive, carry, & I_karutza is a cart or I_chariot, though it's not so in Rus.), also the Ger* have the verb I_kehren (to make a turn, or to sweep), where from is their road movement (I_Verkehr), but there was an o. Gr. κορμοσ (a rudder), and Heb.: ker (a turn), I_kereven (to drive), & I_kerme (a rudder, what in Bul. is kormilo, & in Rus. I_korma is the rear part of a ship, i.e. where the rudder is placed). Then may be cited Per. karvan-serai (in Bul. we say karavan-saraj) or karam-serai (a guest-house), and if this might be unknown to some of you there is smt. well known --- the Gr. ... Ικαριοσ (I_Ikarius in Lat., Icarus for you), who has tried to reach the Sun using wings made out of bird's feathers glued with wax but the wax melted & he fell down; let me add also that there is a Tur. kâr |I_kar| ('kjar') m-ing a gain, acquisition (smt. that one has grasped & turned to oneself).
Well, I don't know how you, my dear reader (or my dear readeress --- I have almost forgotten about you), but this karvan-, karam- (karme-) serai brings me to one very important thing --- to the eating --- what is well represented in Rus. I_korm (food for animals) or kormitþ (to feed, usually a baby), or Bul. kråchma |I_kra^chma| (in Rus. it is korchma, a pub), but this is Tur. I_karmak (to feed) or kirma (read 'kårma', food); the etym-sts add also an o. Irish coirm = cuirm (this time a beer), & Lat. cremor (thick sauce, maybe like your I_cream). OK, and how is then to be explained this rel-n btw. the turning & the feeding? Surely this must be some sticking of the throat (or maybe guzzle will be more suitable here?) with many & diff. things, and mark the diff-ce, bc. in Tur. I_karma means mixed, diff. --- but this is the well known Skr. karma what is a Buddhist's principle that all human beings are mixtures of diff. (good & bad) features given to them by the gods; I may add also that in Skr. there was the w. I_sharman m-ing blessed (in "Pantchatantra" is spoken about a personage called Devasharman, whose name meant "from the gods blessed"). But then this is a very big idea, bc., in a way, the karma is all; here is Rus. I_karman (a pocket --- to put diff. things there), what is Tur. karman-korman or karaşik |I_karashik| (mixed), then here is some Lat. I_crumena (also crumin, a moneybag), then their I_carmen (a verse, song, saga or telling, an oath, etc.) or your I_charisma (in pl. charismata, what 2(& the reading with 'ka-')2 tells us that the w. is Gr. --- χαρισμα), or take also Fr. I_charme ('sharm', = to Rus. I_char) & charmant, also an obsolete Rus sharmanka (mechanical music box, laterna in Lat), or Ger. I_Schar (group of people or birds), the ... I_character itself (Gr. χαρακτηρ), Gr. χαρισω, what is to give smt. for ntg. (I_harizvam in Bul.), or their χαιρι what means t.s. as Tur.-Ar. I_hayir (a wellbeing or gain). Ah well, let's break it for a while, to take a breath.

~ ~ ~

OK, now let us continue, bc. in this sense (of χαιρι /hayir-gain-or-pleasure) is Bul. I_haresvam (I like it) coming from Gr. αρεσω (t.s.), & here is also Rus. I_horosho (good, well, usually written on the West as kharasho bc. you are afraid you may drop the beg-ing "h" in Fr. manner 2(what in this case wouldn't be smt. improper)2 ), & their jargon harja (a physiognomy, like your use of the w. mug), which may be traced directly to Gr. χαρη or χαρισ |I_haris| (a charm, beauty), & in o. Gr. this was closely rel-d (in my view) to the ... god of wars Αρησ, who later, in Lat., became I_Mars --- by the mutation I_Ares -- "Mares"! But this is also o. Gr. greeting χαιρε, or Skr. I_hare, usually Krishna (or Am. hi, or Cz. I_ahoi, or Ger. I_heil, etc., but the West has lost the most important sound "r"), and here is the known Tur. ... I_harem (bc. it's kharasho to have a harem, with a Schar of beautiful women's haris there, isn't it?). Still, we have not finished with the r. 'har-' bc. here are Tur.-Ar. I_harami|s (haramii in Bul.), who are a kind of bandits but they are followers of Ares, also one Bul. dialect (from Tur.), harman (a place for gathering of the crop, trashing-floor --- what reminds me about your ... harvest, where the beg-ing is t.s. 2(&, as far as you live on the West 3(as I sup.)3, it may as well end on -vest, am I right?)2 ); then comes the well known Lat.-Gr. I_harmonia (a harmony) coming from o. Gr. χαρμονη (a happiness, state of bliss; but who can forbid me to split it in: (H)Urrh + mono?), or also χαρμη what is --- & that is an important point --- a battle, war, winning (having given your I_harm; poss. also your I_harass, what is btw. haresvam as inverted 2(or perverted)2 love & the harm, unless you confuse it with the harness, but this is still around this r.). And the bliss or harmony is rel-d to the wars from ancient times bc. women just like military men (& men like battles), and, mark, that acc. to the Gr. mythology Harmonia was daughter of Mars-Ares & Venus (Venice), i.e. of the war & the beauty!
And there are also Tur. I_armagans (presents), o. Gr. αρμαγια (a provision with food etc., but we shall return to the food), Tur.-Ar. harç |I_harch| as expences (meant for things that we haresvame-like), together with Bul. I_harcha as to spend, & Rus. (from their South) ... mutton-soup I_harcho (stressed on the end), then the I_cherubs (Heruvimes), I_hormones, the hermetization |I_hermetize|, the Gr. God I_Hermes (Ερμησ), who was son of Zeus (& by the Rom* became Mercurius) & ruled over almost everything --- business, trade, travelers (for he was that who carried the souls through the river Letha in the realm of dead), he was also god of the thieves & bandits, of magic & astrology (we have spoken about Mercurius). The rel-n of the food to the expenses for it, b.t.w., exists not only in the just ment-d harç -- harcho, but also in Rus. I_trata as an expense (or tratitþ as to spend, or terjatþ |I_terjat$| as to lose, with I_poterja as a loss), which is also Ukr. I_tratiti (to spend, lose, give out) or Cz. tratiti, etc. (o. & c. Sl.), though also Ger. archaic Tratte, given from It. I_tratte m-ing an overdue voucher, this for one thing, & for another thing (the eating) is the known It. I_trattoria as a pub or inn (or trattore as an inn-keeper). Here the rubbing (tårkam |I_ta^rkam|, stårzha in Bul., teretþ |I_teret$| in Rus., etc.) or I_trot|ting, grinding (like also in one Blt. I_trnotas = trnots as a whetstone) is obvious (an imit. r.), so that it might be meant that in the pubs we grind our teeth (& the ment-d voucher is then overdue as if being weather-beaten or threadbare), but it might be meant also as an entering (I_treten in Ger.) or stepping there (in Ger. I_Tritt is a step, manner of walking, or even a kick in the ass, figuratively said), what is given from Got. trudan (with o. Icelandic troda, & Eng. I_tread /trod, & I_thread, etc. 2(I may add also the Rus. jargon trahnutþ |I_trahnut$| as to hit 3(even trahatþ as to ... screw in the "other" m-ing)3 )2 ); or one may look in the Lat. where I_traho (tractum, tractere) means to carry, pull, spend, giving the I_tract & the I_track & the I_trace (from the feet of the animal) etc. Here is the Eng. I_treat & Fr. I_traiter too, giving easily (to) I_maltraiter-maltreat, bc. there is your I_threat /threaten (i.e. one is afraid to be trodden upon).
[|I_suggestions| And here I will beg you to allow me to place some more thoughts about the cult to the wars, which is present not only in the "harmonizing battles", there was also a Lat. I_bellum, which obviously is some I_belle thing, but it is given equal to (& derived from) their I_duellum, what (also obviously) is a duel. Or you may take your w. I_military which, surely, is smt. ... very dear to us (>> milûj |I_milu^j|-dear, mild, milk). This is very symptomatic, bc. it is clear that until we stop liking the battles we shall kill ourselves en gross. And if some mills, or even pair of cents, before this might have been observed as a kind of natural selection for bettering of the folks it isn't so nowadays, bc. our strength & power have risen very much. Not only the wars, but also the mass-I_terrorism (rel-d to the Terra--Tartarus), will never cease while we cultivate liking of battles, & we, really, cultivate this --- in all the media of the world every minute goes some action, & not with masked, but with explicit terror in it ---, not just allow the people to have their preferred shows. Of course "money makes the world go round", but you have seen what a "beautiful" beg-ing of the 21st cent. the Am* have had in the autumn of 2001; and, as much as I am displeased to tell it, but the terror attacks won't stop soon! They will not stop bc. people like to fight, bc. the terrorism is an easier war, & bc., on the other hand, nobody tries to fight with the core of the terrorism. What our governments do is to fight with the consequences of the terrorism, not with the causes for it. There are regions of instability where civil wars, or wars btw. neighbouring folks, were fought for cents & mills, but almost noting has been done to solve the cases acc. to the desires of both parts. Or take the initiative not to posses nuclear or bacteriological weapons: it is a very good initiative, but it has to be applied to all countries, not just to the weaker ones. I repeat, many years ago this might have been normal (& the gladiators in ancient Rome have cried in exaltation their "Morituri te salutant!"), but nowadays all "men of the world" have to be ashamed to join the army, & all women have to cease to like macho men (what they, I'm glad to see this, begin to do, though out of other reasons rel-d with the emancipation) --- not that there should not be armies at all, no, they surely have to exist for many more cents, but people have to accept this as some needed but shameful work (like, say, sweeping of streets, clearing of garbage cans, prostitution, or, hmm, going into politics). This might seem an utopia (& it is very like it), but otherwise we will become one police, not state, but world, where everyone will be followed everywhere by cameras (also at home, in the toilets, etc.), & finger prints (& full genetic information) will be taken for all the people (not only for the criminals), & we won't like this much. You have maybe heard that in the 1st years of the production of cars there wasn't compulsive car registration, but later on, when it became obvious that these speeding "beasts" may cause heavy casualties, proper lows were introduced. So that the situation now is sim., and the choice is ours. ]
OK, sp-ing about armagans & haramis I may remind you that there was a ... Great Armada, and may come in this way to the I_arm, where you know that the latter means (in Eng.) a hand &/or a weapon, and I may continue then with other ws like: the armory or I_armour (Lat. arma), armistice, armament, I_armature, etc.; but, on the other hand, this may mean also smt. poor, what is exactly the m-ing of Ger. arm (as an adj., with the idea, probably, of our naked hands; where as noun the hand is der I_Arm). Still this isn't all bc. in Ar. (acc. to the Koran) I_amr (& arm- or amr- is t.s. r.) was a goal, intention, order, work, deed, or will, and this is a widely spread r. (namely I/E. ar(å)-) with m-ing of: to build, make, stick in, put, & other things, what is traced upto Skr. I_irma(h) or Avs. aråma as a hand. From here o. Gr. αρθρον (a joint or phalanx) has arisen, which has given: the I_arthritis, your ment-d art (i.e. Ger. I_Art & Lat. ars), the I_article|s, I_artist|s, etc. (poss. the ... I_theater 2(théâtre in Fr.)2 is: Theos + some ars-art). But there was also an o. Gr. αρμα as a chariot, and αρμενοσ as: decent, well-done, suitable, so that it is highly poss. for the name of ... I_Armenia to be of that r. too, bc. it was known in Ancient Gr. & coming from Per. Armaniya. In the Sl. langs the hand (not the weapon) is slightly modified (in Rus. it is I_ruka) but in Bul. we say I_ramo for the upper part of the arm, & there was Arm. I_armuku as a hand-ankle, & you surely have heard about the God I_Rahma (an incarnation of Vishnu, who was the doer), who must have been very deft with his arms, especially taking into account that Hindu gods have usually 4 arms.
But let me return to the shar- /kar- r. where is Rus. I_shar what is a ball (but it runs, turns, looks diff., like the Earth), then the ... painting in Bul. is I_sharja (now a bit obsolete), and it comes from old times, from some Sumerian shar, and if you may not believe this then you surely have heard about the country I_Shri Lanka (obviously a beautiful country), where Shri in Skr. was the name of the wife of Vishnu (& her synonym name was Lakshmi what leads us to Ger. I_lachen or Eng. laugh, but that is another matter). I may add also the so called I_Sharia law that is used in some Muslim countries and, though we may not like it, it is clear that for the Muslims it means smt. Shri (i.e. beautiful). The Rus* have also the verb sharitþ |I_sharit$| though this is not to paint but to I_search, what is the m-ing of the known Fr. I_chercher (|I_phrases| Cherchez la femme!), but this must be smh. rel-d to the shars-balls (bc. the Rus* use the phrase: hotþ sharom pokati, m-ing that there is ntg. to find, even if you sweep very carefully, but it's sup-d that they throw-katatþ some balls 2(though I can't tell you why --- maybe here lies hidden the naïve idea that if you've lost, say, a coin, you have to throw another one & it will lead you to the 1st)2 ); it is also rel-d to the scratching that accompanied the painting, bc. there is the international w. ... I_charlatan (in Fr., or ciarlatano 2('cha...')2 in It., or sharlatan in Rus., etc.) m-ing --- well, smt. what all the politician are, bc. they usually "paint" the things (synonym to this is Fr. masquerade, what is from another r.); there are also Rus. sharadû |I_sharadu^|, what are pictures or riddles for guessing. And then, why not to cite your I_chart (or Ger. I_Karte), or Rus. chertitþ |I_chertit$| (to paint or draw), and so on? This is rel-d to the Skr. shri & the I_karma bc. the usual way to paint is to use only one colour, but do you know which is the best colour? Well, if you don't know (& don't know ancient langs) then just ask the Rus*, who say krasnûj |I_krasnu^j| for red, & have their Read Square (Krasnaja Ploshchadþ) in Moscow, what is nearly t.s. as their krasivûj |I_krasivu^j| (nice, beautiful), where from krasavitza (shorten in o. times to krasà) means a beauty! But this is a very good colour (bright, as if crying out loud --- bc. of the rel-n to your I_cry) also for the Ger* (I_scharlach) & the Fr* (I_carmine), & the Tur* (<< Turkey), & so on; in Bul. we also say krasiv (for beautiful), but have hubav too, what, b.t.w., is Ger. hübsch |I_huebsch|, what goes back to some o. Asian c. root).

~ ~ ~

Still, for to chart or paint one must also scratch or cut, and I have begun to speak about the food & not finished, hence here comes the special Eng. w. ... (to) I_carve, what is not just a knife (or to cut) but such one designed for cutting especially of meat, and this meat is (what is poss. known to some of the readers) the Skr. I_kravis (raw meat)! But coming from the Skr. and being raw (or crude, in a way) this gives the blood & the cow & the knife in many langs. Such ws are, e.g.: Bul. I_krava (I_korova in Rus.) what is a I_cow (your w. may also be counted here but you have, again, missed the important scratching sound "r"), then Rus. krovþ |I_krov$| (a blood, kråv in Bul., krv in Srb., etc.), then Avs. I_hru (a piece of raw meat), and o. Gr. χραω (to want, need --- here m-ing to eat, I sup.) & is said that from here Bul. I_hrana (any food) might have come. ( On the other hand I sup. our hrana may be traced also to Fr. I_rente, or Eng. I_rend /rent 2(as smt. torn)2, or Sp. I_rancho-ranch, and this, b.t.w., is the 2nd part of the ... I_restaurant 2(or take the It. variant ristorante as more suitable for splitting in 2 ws)2, what is a place for both rest & feeding; as to the 1st part of the restaurant there are: Ger. I_Rast as rest, state of doing ntg., your restoration & Lat. I_restauro, also the rest as smt. left, i.e. restored 2(<< also Christ)2, but these both rs 2(resting & feeding)2 sound sim. & the m-ings are rel-d, so that they may be smm. confused, like in Sl. where 2(though of diff. r.)2 I_gostinitza in Rus. is a hotel but gostilnitza in Bul. is a tavern or pub. ) If we return to the carving (what isn't only Eng., there were o. Ger. karven & Dan. kerven), then this gives also one Bul. w., I_karfitza (a pin), also the ... I_graphic|s, which comes from o. Gr. γραφω (as to scratch, write, or carve), then the I_carcass (which may be jointed with the ... car too), then Fr. chirurgie or Lat. I_chirurgia (you have modified chirurgus to chirurgian & then to I_surgeon), which latter ws have to come from o. Gr. χαρασσω (to cut, carve, sharpen), & this (besides reminding us about the haramis as cutthroats) is in the same heap with the Japanese ... I_hara-kiri (which w. has synonym, I_seppuku, what I dare to translate as "to split myself" --- bc. of Bul. imit. w. pukam as to burst, split 2(but >> pukatþ later for piquant details)2 ).
But this, still, isn't all, bc. Western meat isn't only from this r., there is also Lat. I_caro (a meat) or Fr. I_carne (t.s.), or Bul. I_karnache (a kind of sausage for roasting filled with raw farce), and Lat. I_carnalia (meat shop) or carnalis (= I_carnal), also your carnage (what is Fr.), & the I_carrion (unless you think this is smt. that has to be carried out & thrown away 2(but then the m-ings are rel-d)2 ), and the sim. Bul. I_karantija (tripe & other intestines), then the ... I_carnation (bc. it usually is crimson like blood), the I_carpenter, if you want (bc. he carves the wood), etc. Here is also the known carnival (It. I_carnevale), which comes from late Lat. carnelevarium m-ing: to I_levo (Lat. for to diminish --- from here, b.t.w., you may reach to your ... I_left, or Ger. I_links, or Rus. levûj |I_levu^j|, etc.) the carne-meat! But there is even more to this bc. the r. contains the curve (of the horns of the cow, we've spoken about this) & here are also, e.g.: Ger. Kürbis |I_Kuerbis| (a ... pumpkin), o. Prussian kurvis (a bull), o. Gr. χαραοσ (= κεραοσ |I_keraos|, smt. with horns), Lat. cervus (an elk or deer) & the sim. I_cervix (a neck or throat --- smt. twisted & carved), Lat. I_carnivorus (not bc. these animals have horns, but bc. they eat the carne of other animals 2(usually horned --- bc. if you are a lion you don't need horns but if you eat grass you need smt. to defend yourself)2 ), & even in the Skr. I_carvati meant to chew (where the chewing is like the carving); if you like you may count here also Ger. I_Kurve as a curve, but also in the m-ing of a "bad" woman, prostitute (bc. she has gone awry).
Poss. it wouldn't be bad to shed here a bit more light over the curved Kürbis |I_Kuerbis|, bc. there is Ger. I_Korb as a basket (& if you find time to make a basket & begin to twist the twigs, you'll see that it would become curved of itself. or izkoruben as Bul. dialect), but it has a brother by the Sl* & on the East, namely I_torba (as Rus. southern dialect, Bul., Pol., etc., coming from Tur., Tar., Azr., etc.; the stressing may vary), what is smt. sim., a bag or sack; there was even an o. Rus. torbasû as boots made out of elk's skin (from Yakutian 2(around Kamchatka)2 ätärbäs). And as to the I_Korb there are given: Lat. corbis (= corbem, t.s.), Heb. korb (t.s., from here korbn was ... a prey --- bc. it's sup-d to be put in the bag or basket), an I/G. r. (s)kerb- (to turn, twist, bend, grind), also Lat. (but coming from Heb.) I_corban as a present, which, surely, is the known Tur. (Muslim) I_kurban (religious festivity). ( To the Korb is added 2(by the etym-sts)2 that Ger. phrase:|I_phrases| jemandem einen Korb geben, m-ing to cheat smb., to leave him with empty hands, has arisen from the tradition for young girls or ladies in old times to lower on a rope down the window of a house or castle a basket & to heave up their lover it the basket 2(what brave girls, ah?)2, but when he wasn't wanted they lowered him an old basket without bottom. ) On the other hand this I/G. r. reminds me Sl. skorbþ |I_skorb$| (in Rus., or skråb in Bul.), what is a sorrow (smt. that I_scratch|es us from inside, or twists us like a Korb); then comes (why not?) the I_orbit (in all langs, surely of circular form), together with the heard Lat. I_urbis (a town, city 2(to ment. the phrase|I_phrases|: urbi at orbi, m-ing "to the town & the orbit-world")2, from here is the urbanization); then here is ment-d the ... I_harp (I_arfa in Sl., o. Gr. αρπη), bc. to play it one has to curve his/her fingers like hooks, what can be seen in Lat. harpe (a knife, or curved sword) or harpes (a bird of prey, or a sickle).
In fact, there are other curved & scratching ws on '(å)rk-', like: Rus. I_arkan (a big hook, from here zaarkanitþ is to catch 2(zakacha in Bul.)2, given from o. Gr. αρπαγη as an oar 2(your latter w. might also be from here but it's too short for one to be sure in this)2, or a hook; << also I_arc), Bul. sårp (or I_serp in Rus., a sickle 2(we also may insert smm. parasitic 's' in the beg-ing, like in your surgeon)2, given from o. Gr. κρωπιον m-ing t.s.), or the Malayan I_cris (curved like a sickle knife), or Lat. I_carpo (to pluck, gather, pinch --- to ment. the Lat. phrase:|I_phrases| carpe diem or "catch the day 2(i.e., the happy moment)2" ), rel-d to new Gr. καρποσ (a fruit, smt. to be plucked) and (in my view) to Ger. I_Karpfen (a carp, so in Rus. 2(karp)2, Cz., Fr., etc. --- with the idea that one "plucks" it out of the rivers), and poss. rel-d also to Ger. I_karg (poor, insufficient). ( The Rus. etym-sts I have used give for the carp some Gr. καπροσ as a fish, but I have found it with diff. m-ing, then cite its name in Lat. as Cyprinus carpio, and their Ger. colleagues say it was from an unknown lang. around the Alps or Danube, but a fish or a sea-"fruit" isn't much diff. & we shall come to the Cyprus on other place. ) Then (as s-ing harp-like) come: the I_harpoon (given from Hol. harpön, but they have to have heard it from smw. bc. there were in o. Gr. those mythical harpies |I_harpy| 2(birds with women's heads, &, hmm, as bad as only women can be)2 ), your I_sharp (i.e. Ger. I_scharf, but we may return to this some time later), & the I_scarf (though it usually covers us & isn't really sharp but thin), then the I_shark too (bc. of its teeth), & the Sl. ... itching, forcing us to scratch ourselves (sårbi |I_sa^rbi| in Bul. /serbit in Rus., what leads us to the ... I_Serb|s, but we shall disc. this later again). Or I may cite also Lat. I_acerbo (to spoil, ferment, what may be intensified to exacerbo m-ing to become full of hatred or malice, what gives your I_exacerbate), or (assoc-ly rel-d bc. of its sharp taste) It. I_aceto (& Bul. I_otzet) what is a vinegar (but only Ger. I_Essig or Rus. I_uksus 2(which as if comes from their ukus-bite)2 are, if not very near to this w., then at least sound disgusting).
Then there's also Bul. I_cherpja as to give smt. (a drink or toast) to smb., as a host to the guests, or there is Rus. cherpatþ as to take with a ladle (& the ladle in Bul. is I_cherpak; there's also a town in Bul., Chirpan, christened so bc. it is placed in a deep natural kettle), so that this is c. & o. Sl. (I_tzrpem in Srb., cherpati in Cz., o. Bul. chråpja, etc.). This giving in small portions is rel-d to the I_serp /sårp-sickle (Rus. /Bul.), also to Bul. kårpja |I_ka^rpja| (to stitch or botch, to repair a torn place --- the opposite action of tearing), then to Bul. kårpa |I_ka^rpa| (a piece of cloth, it might be a hand-I_kerchief 2(hence also this w.)2, head-scarf, or a towel; it isn't Rus., though >> I_kirpich), but the r. is old bc. in Skr. I_krpanas was a sword (or krpani was a dagger); going around 'kr-' as I_grind|ing (you use here 'gr-' instead) are Rus.: kroshitþ (to tear in pieces, usually bread, like your to I_crush) & I_kroshka (a bread crumb, but also a small child), as also okropitþ |I_okropit$| (obsolete for to sprinkle, usually with holy water), & others. ( From cherpja as pouring of smt. & sharitþ as to cherchez-to-search 2(or cercare, 'cher...', in It.)2 one may go to one imit-al root for flowing --- bc. the water turns the pebles like balls --- but to this we shall come on shurtja. )

~ ~ ~

Ah, but there is more to be said about ws on 'år-', bc. the Ger*, as you maybe know, have the very important pronoun I_er m-ing "he", and even a heap of ws for professions in masc. ending on t.s. -er (like: Lehrer-teacher, Bauer-land-worker, Schüler-student, Maler-painter, etc.) --- and if this isn't the name of Urrh, then I don't know what is! Bc. er is a man and he has some organ that is very often (well, as often as poss.) used for urging & for many erotic things, so that we come to the Gr. god Εροσ |I_Eros| (= Ερωσ) & to your I_erection --- ah, maybe not exactly yours, bc., smm., it might be the other people's erection that we are interested in, as is the case with the ... eLection, bc. that's how it is: the folk makes the I_election and the politicians get the erection! [|I_comments| This eager wish, b.t.w., to give pleasure to other people, not to oneself, seems to me mainly feminine trait, but it is welcomed under the democracy, so that one may reasonably ask the question: why the women were for so long (until less than a cent.) exempted from their voting rights, when they would have liked it, and this would be just what the politicians usually want --- to have more voters? Really, it seems a bit silly for the ancient politicians not to have thought this matter through, but then ... then the democracy was meant as a way for finding of reasonable solutions, not just as populist humbug (if you'd excuse my spiteful remarks against it, but, on the other hand, you have to become used to such comments bc. they will happen in other places too). ]
But to return to the erotic things where in o. Gr. were e.g.: ερρω |I_erro^| as to move slowly, with shaking from side to side (maybe with this image in our heads we in Bul. use the verb klatja 2(to shake)2 instead of your skrewing, you know in what m-ing), ερευγομαι as to I_erupt, ερευθοσ as redness (bc., you know, there is no sex without smt. to become I_red, or I_rot in Ger., & this is another rel-n to that colour; so that one may even say that I_Eros is: Eh + rot; or er + rot), or ερωθικα was a holiday dedicated to Eros, or ερωτιασ was (my) beloved, & others. In the Lat. you have heard about the particle I_ergo m-ing "hence", but without Urrh, sorry, Eros (just one more incarnation of Urrh) one could hardly have guessed where from this implication comes (& in the Gr. exists a noun εργον as: a deed, work, battle, etc.); then there is the unit I_erg for measuring of energy (of the erection, maybe?); there is the I_ergonomic|s as a science for environmental & working conditions (as results of some ergon-deeds; or how to make it to be ergo better); there is the I_orgasm, together with the I_organ|s for the purpose (in o. Gr. οργανον was an instrument, but it may be of every poss. kind, not only musical), then may be added the organism (Lat. I_organismus) & the orgies (Lat. I_orgia) & the organization, & so on. But sim. (in many cases) to the prefix I_er- is I_re- (for repeated actions), say: resurrection, recursion, etc., and the Ger* use the w. I_Rektion in grammatical sense (of how to join properly the ws in a sentence) what isn't exactly erection but one may as well imagine that this is like threading of the ws on some stick or needle (not to say prick). This can be connected with the right things, via the w. I_direct (what reminds me also the w. I_correct, meant as raised upward), but there are many old ws, like: Tur. (& Bul.) I_ergen (not married man), their I_hergile (a group, or flock of horses), also I_direk (what in Tur. & Per. is a pole).
Still, we are not done, bc. in Ger. very near to the pronoun I_er (or take the building of comparative form of adjs with the suffix -er, what you have also accepted, & what might be viewed as making of the described value more Urrh-like) stays the w. I_Herr (a man, Mister), & in Lat. also exists heres as a I_heir, & in o. Gr. χηρα was a widow, & then comes your I_heredity. In o. Gr. was also the Goddess I_Hera (Χρα = Χρη) & she was a very important one, wife of Zeus (& daughter of Kronos & Rea), but we must not stick to the women here bc. the point isn't in the gender but in the power & productivity, and Gr. χειρ or χειροσ |I_heiros| (in plural χερασ) is smt. m.o.l. equal to the Lat. manus, i.e. an arm, glove, direction, power, etc. The Rus* have their I_her too, though for them this is exactly ... a phallus (& they surely make some fun with the Ger. Herr, whom they call then I_ger by euphemistic purposes, I sup.). I may cite here also the particle "here" (Ger. I_hier; but also her what is movement to me 2(as if I am the Herr, as it usually is understood)2 ), and now we are moving to diff. cries like: your I_cry, It. I_crescendo, Bul. krjasåk |I_krjasa^k|, Ger. kreischen, etc. In this case here is also Lat. I_oro (orare) what is to speak, to plead, what gives the I_orator; then in Ger. I_Rat is the local governmental body (your rat, b.t.w., just scratches the earth), & in Rus. oratþ |I_orat$| is to cry loud (& orava is a group of children, bc. they often orut-cry). But in Bul., Rus., etc., exists one special cry, I_ura ('uraa', I_hurrah for you), that may be heard mostly on parades &/or wars --- & that is what your I_war, in fact, is ---, here is also Lat. I_ursa (a bear, known from the constellations Ursa Major or Minor; in Fr. it becomes ours, read 'ur'), & Tur. (& Tar.) I_aslan = arslan (a lion), & the Turks say also I_ursus what is to be angry, with wrath (ärgerlich in Ger., so that you may as well count Ger. Ärger |I_Aerger| = to Eng. I_anger, too), & in o. Gr. ορνυσ |I_ornys| meant a bird (giving the I_ornithology), & all this is rel-d to some guttural growling (what is the core of the name Urrh). Well, that's also where from the I_orangutan|s have come, & the guerrillas & I_gorilla|s, & Fr. I_guerre ('ger', a war --- to remind you the phrase:|I_phrases| A la guerre --- comme a la guerre, or "In the war it's like in the war"), & Ger. I_Heer (an army), & the I_hero|es (I_geroj in Rus. /Sl.; and in order not to forget about the god Eros let me tell you that in It. heroism is eroismo and heroic is I_eroico), & Ger. I_Herold (herald for you), etc. Even in an isolated (at least in Central Europe) lang. like the Hun. (but maybe they are more familiar with my Urrh?) I_ural means to govern, rule, uram is Sirs (pl.), & the short I_ur is exactly a Herr, master!
But where the Herrs & the Heers are there are also the hordes --- Ger. I_Horde, Sl. I_orda (the "h" isn't important & has emerged on the West around 15th cent.), Tur. orda or Gr. ορδη, & so on, m-ing a nomadic tribe, which in search of pasture often makes armed strokes & pillages ---, the r. coming from Per. Urdu (such tribe abiding in Hindustani, also their camp), & in Tur. I_urdu means an army. This hordes give us the horrors (horrendos in Lat., I_horreur 2('horjo')2 in Fr., etc.), of course, & poss. have given also Ger. Behörde |I_Behoerde| what is an institution but usually warlike one; though it may be said that this w. comes from Ger. hören |I_hoeren| (to hear), where is your I_hear -- ear (or Ger. I_Ohr what is an ear) & Fr. I_oreille (to hear), what leads us back to Skr. I_karna (an ear), but all this is indirectly rel-d to the wars & cries (& the blood etc., bc.: just comp. karna with karma). The idea of the act of hören-hearing & its s-ing, together with the crowding of many people or particles, gives the sim. I_chord what is not only in mathematical sense but primarily as a string (what is a line of "crowded" particles) and this also is worldwide spread --- Lat. chorda or Gr. χορδη, etc., giving also the I_accord, accordance (accord + dance, a harmony), the accordion, etc. But sp-ing about I_crowd|s we have to see that this w. also sounds Urrh- (or Herr- or war-) like, and here is the place for Ger. I_Kraut what isn't exactly a crowd, it's a cabbage or some weed (Unkraut), but I hope you've got the hidden idea, which is present also in Fr. I_croit ('krua', a procreation --- we have spoken about the creation) or croitre (to grow). Besides, you surely remember the country I_Croatia (called Hrvatsko in Srb., what sounds even more warlike 2(rather, throat-cutting-like)2 )? Well, I don't state that all people there are one big crowd, but you know that they have fought (& they have to like it) and this is just the hidden idea behind their name. Here are also all the crashes --- I_Krach in Ger. & the Sl. langs (krushitþ in Rus.) & so on, then Ger. I_Kram (broken things), then I_krank (ailing person), etc. (I have ment-d that there is no creation without some destruction), but let us not dig deeper here. Still, I may add Rus. kudrû |I_kudru^| what is a hair (bc. it is curled), or kudrjavûj, equal to Bul. kådrav |I_ka^drav| or Cz. kudra (o. Sl.) m-ing I_curly, & your w. too ( bc. 'krd-' or 'krl-' is m.o.l. t.s.); there are other Blt. & Scan. ws, but there are also ... the I_curds here, not only in your m-ing of spoiled milk but as name of a tribe (they should be Kürden |I_Kuerden| in Ger., Kurds for you). And if some of you have observed that kürd- is near to your ... I_curse then he/she may be right, bc. this sounds sim. to the war cries, but then you may as well add also the I_cur, for that's the idea of the cursing.

~ ~ ~

Well, I might have finished here with the name of Urrh, but as far as I have already put smm. 'k' or 'g' in front of it, and the book is thick enough, I may continue for a while with the r.(-s) gor- /ger-, but let it be ment-d in advance that there are many ideas in play here, such like: warlike cries, grasping of smt., scratching or grinding of smt. to dust, & in doing this either greatness or grimness may be implied, or also burning of a fire (there are other rs for this but everything on its proper place) & rising of the smoke up, etc. Let me begin here with Rus. gordostþ |I_gordost$|, what is a I_pride (where your w. also sounds sim., but for it better >> Praline), and this might be bc. one thinks that he/she is I_great (hence, add the last w., too), but, better, bc. the proud person heaves his nose or looks up, what is I_gore /nagore in Bul.; or take Rus. I_gora, what is a mountain, & together with this the burning of the fire still remains hidden smw., bc. I_gorja in Bul, (or gorit /goretþ in Rus.) is to burn. In all cases gore is c. Sl., but its m-ing varies &, f.ex., in Pol. gora is a mountain (like in Rus. & most of the Sl. langs) or also a mansard (top flour) or a movement to above (ah, your w. I_above poss. has to say that when you put one thing above some other then it says 'båf' or puff), but in Bul. gore is up/above & gora is a forest & it burns, though not always grows on mountains (poss. it is meant that a tree is smt. high, looked from below), but is rel-d to the burning also via Rus. garþ |I_gar$| or Bul. I_zhar (glowing coals). ( B.t.w., your I_forest, which is also Fr. forêt, is from Teu. origin bc. in Ger. Forst is a kept forest, & Förster is your forester, & has to be rel-d with the burning through the r. of the fire. ) The w. gora isn't smt. unique for the Sl* only, bc. there was an o. Teu. (Prussic) garian m-ing a tree, then even Skr. I_giris (& Avs. gairi, I_gar, or gir) m-ing a mountain; & I shall go also to the o. Greece where, some of you must have heard, was their αγορα (in Lat. also I_agora) what was: their Parliament, or a meeting, or stock of wares (i.e. heap of smt.), in today's lang. it is just smt. bought (but it, still, is not clear whether the point is in the heaping it, or in some crying or in both, bc. αγειρω is to summon, or I_acquire 2(what in turn isn't away from the Gr. w., come to think of it)2 ); there was also an o. Gr. οροσ |I_oros|, what was a forest but also ... curd, & a furrow, & other (shrunken) things.
You may feel that now we as if returned to the orators, but also to some ... boiling or eruption, what allows me to ment. here also Ger. gären |I_gaeren|, what is to brew or boil, but at t.s. time die Gäre is fertilized, rich soil, Garküche |I_Garkueche| is a cheap pub, the short I_gar is cooked or ready or enough (usually used in negative --- gar nicht is "not at all"), and this process of fermenting (in my view) is what rel-s the burning & rising & the guttural s-ing of the root. In Fr. also exist some gar- things, like their well known I_gare (a station, literally used in Bul. too), which was so called bc. this is also a cry to keep off the way (in Bul. we say I_varda, poss. of Tur. origin 2(though there is also It. I_badare as to watch, take care, i.e. to drive away the unwanted; and mark the changing of 'v' to 'b')2, with t.s. purpose), so that here the m-ing of gare has to be of a place where the coach cries smt. to stop; from here the widely used Fr.-Ger. I_garage has arisen; and poss. their garçon |I_garcon| is also in this sense (he waits for smb. to call him with some "gare"-cry; or he is rel-d to Ger. Göre --- >> G.). And then I made one hazardous jump to one Bul. dialect, I_geran, what is a water-well, supposing that this is a place where the water brews, and rising up or falling down is m.o.l. t.s. (thought I), but here I must confess that this turned out not to be the case.
Still, it is interesting to be ment-d, bc. here the crying plays the major role, but this time not of men but of ... birds! What I mean is that in Gr. γερανοσ is what in Bul. is I_zherav (in Rus. it's zhuravlþ) or in Ger. is I_Kranich or in Eng. is I_crane, and you know, that this is both: a T-formed crane (kran in the Sl. & Teu. langs), used also for bringing of water to the surface (Bul. I_geran, though we usually mean the hole, not the shacking stick above it), & the bird that cries so loud (like the Fr. gare & garçon); there is also the known Lat. I_cranium (used literally in Eng.) m-ing a temple, surely (after all these explans) bc. it's sup-d to be the upper-most part of our body. The idea of a bird that in pecking of its food bends down & heaves up its head is so powerful that the Sl* use it in another w., lebedka, what is a heaving mechanism with spools, where lebedþ |I_lebed$| is a swan. ( This lebedþ-swan, for its part, is o. & c. Sl. 2(labod, labud, etc., pre-Sl. olbodå)2 and is given from an o. high-Ger. albiz, then from o. Gr. αλφοσ |I_alphos| 2(a kind of white lichen)2, i.e. as smt. white 2(>> albino; & the 2nd part of the alphos reminds me 3(just reminds, to ment. the next w.)3 about the ... I_phosphor, what means "white light")2, but I don't exclude entirely some pricking 2(<< bodatþ)2 or bending down 2(low, for the 1st syl.)2 of the head, like with the crane. ) Going around imits of cries we come also to your I_crow, which is, besides the main m-ing of one species of birds, also t.s. heaving mechanism, which in Bul. is called skripetz, bc. in Rus. skripetþ |I_skripet$| is to I_screech.
So, and now let us look again to Russia, where exists also the w. I_grozà, what is a thunder, and here Rus. Tsar Ivan (but please, don't say 'Ajvån') Groznûj has to be ment-d, where this alias name (The Terrible in Eng,) was given bc. of his cruelty (he was like groza), though the Bul* think that he was bad-looking man, bc. this is what I_grozen in Bul. means. Well, whether it is a thunder or a deformity of the face isn't a thing to be much chewed, but here may be added also Ger. I_Grauen (a fear or horror), synonymous with their I_Greuel ('grojel'), & sim. with their grau (I_grey or gray for your); and going back to o. Gr. we may find there the w. γοργοσ (fearful, ominous), where your I_gorgeous, surely (in spite of the m-ing, or, better, just bc. of the contrary diff. m-ing) also falls, together with Sl. gretþ |I_gret$| /greet /greja (to shine, warm, heat). In this sense (I mean in the bad sense, not in the gorgeous one) are the mythical Lat.-Gr. Gorgonas, mainly one of them, Medusa I_Gorgona (a demoness or she-vampire, with hawk's beak --- Γοργεον in o. Gr. meant looking like Gorgona); here are also the I_griff|s (mythical monsters with hawk's head & wings, but with body of lioness); & in this (now good) sense is the ... Saint I_George (in Bul. he is a patron of the military men, celebrated with eating baked young lambs in the beg-ing of May); &, then, here has to be ment-d also ... the country I_Georgia (I_Gruzia in Rus.), bc. the Georgians are known all around the world for their bravery & high speed in horse-riding (the so called jigits, >> them later).
So you have seen that this gar- /gra- r. may express some horror of grinding (or, resp., an approval of it), and this is important bc. in Rus. I_gore is exactly a sorrow, what neither grows high (>> grow), nor is smt. I_great (or Ger. & Fr. I_gross), nor burns (well, it might happen smm.), but we still may cry in such cases. In this sense (of Ger. Greuel) is our Sl. grjah (in Bul., or I_greh in Rus.), what is a sin (we shall disc. your w. further on), which is closely rel-d to the Sl. error, I_greshka (in Bul.; the Rus* say I_oshibka instead, from: "oh 2(no)2", or 'ah' 2( or "ach" if given in Ger, which exclam. has given your I_ache; or smt. like your ouch)2, though some Gr. influence might also have been present here bc. οχι |I_ohi| means there "no" --- but the Rus* know well the disc-d r. bc. they say greshitþ, for to sin). In the case of this sin the fire of the hell may also play certain role, but it is not so in: I_grind|ing, or the I_ground (Ger. I_Grund), or I_grasp|ing (or gripping, where, b.t.w., comes the illness I_grippe, known all over the world --- from Teu. griff- or I_greifen, & this in its turn comes from o. Gr. griffs), or the I_grim /grime, what is Teu. (Hol. grimm, Sw. grym, etc., but also Sl., where I_grom /gremit is like the groza-thunder, I_pogrom 2(what is Ger., Eng., Heb., etc.)2 is a destructive invasion, grim is a ... make-up in Bul., etc.). But here is also the well known ... gram (or Gramm or I_gramme), what is traced to o. Gr. where γραμμα (-τοσ) was: a small line, scratch, figure, let., musical note, & other small things, & then here come also many -gram things (like the: anagram, epigram, monogram, etc.), &, of course the ... I_grammar (& that is why I, personally, don't like it much, where the ws are smt. else, they have been invented or accepted by the common people, not by grammaticuses).
As variations of the gram with m-ing of smt. small may be observed also the I_grade|s or I_degree|s. The etym-sts cite here an I/E. r. ghrem- m-ing to kill, or I_threaten to smash (& threaten in Rus. is grozitþ), & that is where from the w. I_crime has arisen, too. To the grasping I may add also Bul. I_grabja (to I_rob, what, b.t.w., is rel-d to the robe in a sense of taking even the last robe), but here deserves to be ment-d also Ger. ... I_Graf (an Earl), bc. he grasps all for himself or holds his people in a fist; then fem. from the latter is die Gräfin (also Grafine), but exactly I_grafin in Rus is a ... I_carafe for water (bc. it holds the water). In this on gr- imit. cluster has to be also c. & o. Sl. walnut, which is I_oreh in Rus. /Bul., gorih in Ukr., orech in Cz., orzech ('orzheh') in Pol., etc., even in Alb. it is arrë (& I would add also Gr. αραχισ |I_arahis| as a sort of nuts), but it's said there wasn't good etym-gy for it, though in o. Gr. αρασσω meant to hit, smash, break; well, if so I may add also your I_grain, & Sl. peas which is I_goroh in Rus. (grah in Bul.), & many other ws.
Still, there are other important things around here which I may initiate with another Sl. w., grad or I_gorod, what is a town (about your w. on some other place), or, if you prefer otherwise, then with your I_girder (bc. in old times all houses were wooden) --- but it is I_greda also in Bul. The r. is old (in Tur. the girder is I_kereste, but we shall speak about this further on ... carrot), and c. Sl. & Teu. & Baltic and has given many ws, like: Rus. I_ogorod (a garden), then your garden (i.e. Ger. I_Garten), Ger. I_Grat (a sharp corner or a mountain ridge) or their Gräte (a fish bone, bc. it both gradi 2(Bul. for to build, here holds)2 the body of the fish & looks like 2 slanting "girders"), Alb. garth-dhi (a fence), also Teu. gards (a house) or gerda (a belt) or your old gyrdan (which has given your gird), what reminds me about Bul. (but not Rus.) I_gerdan (a necklace), then comes one Skr. I_grhas (a house --- where from, eliminating the beg-ing "snarling", you may come to your house, but there is a long way to it & we shall ment. it again), & Avs. gårådo (a cave), etc. But did you get, why a garden has to be fenced or girded? Well, bc. in this way it's clear that this place belongs to smb., sim. as with the towns though they have also to be defended. So that there is more to be added, bc. just fencing is not enough, the fenced thing has also to be watched & guarded, what allows me to ment. also: Ger. I_warten (to I_wait or I_watch) or their Wärter (a guard), or Fr. I_gardien (a I_guard) or garde (to guard, but this was o. w., garde = to-guard, also It. guardare & late Lat. wardare as t.s.; & then count your bodyguard too), or the ment-d Bul. I_varda (or vardja as to guard) together with Srb. ... river Vardar, and others but let me stop for a bit. Bc. the rel-n guard -- I_regard in Eng. just pushes itself out, but that was so also in the Fr. (in o. Fr. was regard /regarder as a look /to l., though there's ntg. in the Lat., so that this is relatively new w.) --- i.e., smt. returns (re-) from our environment to us that guards us (our prestige), or else we return smt. towards what or whom we honour (sending our regards to smb.).
So, and then we may continue with Ger.-Fr. I_Gardine (a I_curtain, where for your w. is said that it has come through Hol. gardijn from o. Fr. courtine, where we come to the ... I_court|s, and the courtesy, etc.), what reminds me about Bul. perde (which has to be Gr., t.s. curtain), or the I_corset used in old times, or the widely spread Fr. (Ger. & Sl.) I_garderobe (your wardrobe --- so that you see that gard- or ward- is the same here), & so on. And not to forget that all human beings (as well as the animals) have to guard above all their hearts and here is Rus. grudþ |I_grud$| (a breast), what is c. Sl. (gårdi in Bul., I_hrud in Cz., gredzi in Pol., etc.), what etym-ly is given as rel-d to Lat. I_grandis (a grand, eminent person) or grandio (to enlarge) where from Fr. grande (& grandeur & grandomanie) comes. You may put here also Rus. (c. Sl.) ogromnûj |I_ogromnu^j| m-ing very big (the beg-ing 'o' is an exclam. & then it is like the Lat grandis), together with your & Fr. I_ogre (or Sp. ogro) as man-eating monster; then the I_grenade|s (Granaten etc.), with the ment-d fruit I_granatum in Lat. (granat in Rus., Granatapfel in Ger., pomegranate for you --- bc. it is like a grenade), etc.

~ ~ ~

And now I shall return for a while to the I_Herr and ment. smt. that looks slightly funny --- Cz. I_herna, for which one may guess that it is like your "john" but only for men, and he would be more wrong than right, bc. this is a place for playing games, what is usually only men's habit. But what I want to tell you with this w. is not that in Cz. a man is called also Herr, for it isn't so (>> muzhik), but to come to the r. gra- /hra- in a sense of a I_game, what is not like the dances, where women also take part (men go to dances too, bc. they do this mainly to find women there). [|I_suggestions| Ah, playing games (for which >> further on game) is solely men's "job", starting from young boys up to a very old age, and if women do this smm., then it is mostly when they have left their ... climacteric period behind. In the games the point is not in acquiring smt., not in the gain (and normally it's even a loss, at least bc. some fee has to be paid to enter or look at the players), but just to win the game, to be above, on top of the other(s), and out of pure speculative or creative view point; to play "game for the game's sake" (& that's why you & the Ger* & the Rus* & other nations, but without the Bul*, use one & t.s. w. for playing musical instrument and playing, say, football or bridge or some other game). This isn't for women, who are more practical beings & do almost ntg. if they will not gain smt. out of this. We shall come to this again in the course of narration but my remark here is meant in order to clear the connection of the games with the men. ] Anyway, in Cz. I_hrach is a player, hrachka is a plaything (what sounds very funny in Bul. where exactly I_hrachka is a ... spit phlegm), & the short hra is a play. We started from today's Cz., bc. here the r. of the Sl. play is to be found clearer, where in some other Sl. langs there is a preceding vowel, like: Rus. & Bul. I_igra, Ukr. gra = igra (& grati is to play), o. Cz. jhre /jhrati, Pol. gra /grach, o. & pre-Sl. jþgra, going (etym-cally) to a Skr. ejati = ijati (to move). The beg-ing 'ej' or the like symbolizes the euphoria of the dances, but it was lost later in many langs and only some ger--Herr (leading us to the guerres) has remained.

So, and now I hope you are convinced that Urrh is everywhere & in everything, and not bc. smo. wishes to believe in Him, but bc. the quintessence of His name is fixed in many 1000s of ws all around the world.
}





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH |I_TRUTHCHP|
{
bc. the ultimate (or absolute) truth can be reached only by a God, and acc. to the Buddhism the God (it doesn't matter who of the gods I mean bc. they don't contradict & fight like the Gr. gods, they just do their part of the work) & the God's truth is 1 & t.s. thing. If we look more precisely to the w. I_truth in some langs we shall see that this is usually a result of some grinding or breaking of the facts or thoughts to reach the gist or core of the things. It is so with your truth, which comes from Ger. I_Trauen (to believe in smb.) or I_treu ('troj', trusty), but it is so with: Ger. I_wahr (true), Lat. I_verus (true, lawful, just) or verto (to turn, direct, change), or Fr. I_verite (a truth) or vrai ('vre', true, real), or your (to) verify, or Bul. vjara (Rus. I_vera, a belief), or Tur. I_veresiye (a credit, reliance --- hence, I may add here also the I_credit, which is smt. very hard, like a rock 2(just comp. Lat. I_credo-to-believe with Ger. I_Kreide-chalk)2, but one can't find it if one doesn't try to crack the nut), & other ws. And let me tell you that for the Sl. people it's clear that for to believe (veritÞ in Rus.) in smt. /smb. one has to check (proveritþ |I_proverit$|) it; but there are many assocs here, like the link btw. Ger. trauen & ... traueRn |I_trauern| (to mourn, what is not present in the Lat., but in Heb. I_troyer is a grief), what has to say (I sup.) that the mourning is a way to show one's regards & credits to the dead person (that one still believes in him /her; or, else, was one of his /her trusty persons).
Then here is also your (to) I_try, i.e. you look for the truth, isn't it? But this Ger. believing is also a kind of shaking hands with smb. (or, better, a I_friction, what gives us the I_fraction|s too), bc. it is the credit (& the credentials) on which every I_trade is based. And let me include here some remarks concerning the I_probability, where you correctly draw it out of the I_probe (some digging, grinding, sending I_Sonden 2(a probe or sound in Ger., coming from the singing, i.e. hearing; & that is why you say that smt. is "sound" m-ing truthful)2 ), where the Ger* say wahrscheinlich 2(seemingly true, in translation), & the Rus* use verojatnostþ (a w. based on their vera-belief), what isn't very scientific (unless you take into account this boring that lurks behind the verification). Also it might be interesting to explain why to "I_believe" is made out of to ... I_leave, of course (bc. how could it be otherwise?), and that is in the sense of the proverbial Lat. sentence: |I_sentences| "Credo quia absurdum." ("I believe bc. it is unbelievable."), or also of the Rus. phrase:|I_phrases| zamnëm 2('zamnjom')2 dlja jasnosti ("let us drop it 2(the question)2, for to retain the clarity"), i.e. let us leave it & just believe, not trying to prove its truthfulness (bc., if it really is to credo in smt., then there is no place for proving it right or wrong!).
Around the Lat. verus or Tur. veresiye stays also Tur. I_dalavera (a gain or business act, a selling, known in Bul. too; sim. to that is also their alåshverish), but what is the rel-n to the ... Am. state Delaware I can't tell you. Anyway, the 1st part (dala-) is smt. long or big, from which on the West only the 2nd syl. has remained (to remind you the Skr. linga from the Introduction), but in the Sl. langs this r. exists (in Rus. dlinnûj |I_dlinnu^j| or dolgij is long, t.s. is Bul. dålåg |I_da^la^g|; also dalak but this is Tur. I_dalak, what is ... the spleen as organ --- bc. it is smt. long), and maybe you have heard about the ... Dalay-Lama known in Tibet (& Mongolia), where I_dalaj is = to the Lat. I_mare (or Ger. I_Meer, a sea, what is rel-d to their I_mehr what is I_more --- though this is a diff. r.) & the sea is a big (here long) thing. This explains the Dalay-Lama as ruler over the seas, & the dalavera as a big vera-business, but I'll use the opportunity to say here smt. more about the Sl. long things bc. their rs are to be found in the ancient langs (Skr., Avs.). So let me cite also: Rus. I_daleko (far away), pre-Sl. dålg, some Blt. tali or talus, o. Gr. δολιχοσ (long), which all ws go to Per. I_darga & Skr. durghas (or dirgas, long --- you must be used till now to this r--l mutation), then, with some changing in the m-ing, we come to Rus. I_dolg (dålg in Bul.) what is ... a duty, an obligation (as by borrowing money), and here we make a link with the Western langs through the known Lat. ... I_indulgentia or indulgere (to indulge), which can be split into: in + "dulg-", m-ing smt. you are allowed to do now, but with the idea of "long hands" --- poss. bc. of this strong wish you have the w. I_longing & the Ger* their I_Verlangen (a strong wish, need), or they also say I_gelingen (gelang, gelungen) for to succeed! After so much explans of the r. you may find out that your ... I_duly has t.s. m-ing (to return the dolg); if you want to stay near to this Skr. drg- r. then I may add also Ger. I_dreist or Bul. dårzåk (Rus. I_derzkij) what is impertinent, with the idea of smt. that sticks out & stirs the others, or scratches them (as in Bul. I_dera, what is o. Gr. δερω m-ing to skin an animal) or in your ... I_derby (match), but that's another matter (as much as Bul. ... drisåk |I_drisa^k| is, what means, I am sorry, a I_diarrhoea 2(which w., b.t.w. & in my view, was so called bc. one empties then his or her bowels twice oftener than usual)2 ).
OK, but let me dig a little more about the shaking of hands, bc. it may be also some friction of bodies, what good friends (or lovers) usually do. This is shown clearly in Rus. drug (or Bul. I_drugar) what is a friend (& a friend is just the person around --- << ander), but in this case the Sl* were better informed & the r. is drug- /durg-, bc. in Skr. (in the Buddhists' mythology) was the name I_Durga, who was the wife of God Shiva & she was known to have many faces (which she alternatively showed), and if a wife isn't the best friend-drug (i.e., she should be) then who is? There is also your I_darling, of course (given from o. Prussian I_Darge), & Rus. I_dorogoj (drag in Bul.) m-ing dear (hence, your I_dear too); there was also Skr. drijate as to take into account, approve, value, & I_drtas ('drþtas', written with a point over the "r") as respectful, so that the r. is old. And here we unexpectedly jump to your ... I_dream (Ger. I_Traum, or Hol. droom), but there is also Lat. I_dormio (to dream), & Rus. drematþ (to sleep or dream), what explains your I_dormitory (as a place where to sleep or dream); I may also come to Ger. ... I_Darm what is a bowel (bc. it is a place for grinding of the food, and it's dark there), but we shall come again to it. In a way, the dream shouldn't be very unexpected here bc. it is some "other life", but the etym-sts are more concrete & they (the Ger*) say that the Traum comes from their trügen |I_truegen| (to deceit), & there was an o. Icl. draugr as a ghost, & so on, till a Skr. druhyati, what was trying to do smt. bad, or Avs. I_drui as a deceit, so that this is the other face of the other person (or thing) --- the deceit. Well, to deceive isn't good, but it isn't always bad, you speak about "white lie", & the ancient Rom* have had the saying: |I_sentences| "Mundus vult decipi (ergo decipiatur)!" m-ing that the world just wants to be deceived (hence, let it be d.) & that is why there exists the whole art, & all the advertisements, & the democracy, etc., but this must be well known.

~ ~ ~

Bc. there is not much left to say about just the truth I shall put here smt. about the "just" --- what is just to the point in a disc-on of the truth, though instead of breaking or rotating, we have here a sim. action of fast movement as in, say, your I_jog|ing (to remind you about Jurassic--jour--jurvam-se). Still, I don't mean exactly this w. but the w. I_gist, i.e. some (quint-) essence, some abstraction, what we have in Sl. ... I_chislo what is a number! Your number isn't so interesting and it says smt. only about the way of making of the numbers --- by "nu" + mehr (more), i.e. they are build by adding of one to every other number; and this particle "nu" may be understood in your m-ing of I_now (but not as time), or in Ger. of I_na (= nanu), or in Rus. I_nu (t.s.), or even in o. Gr. m-ing of ναι |I_nai| (read 'ne'), which primary m-ing now is of yes, but --- you surely don't know this --- s-ing as the widely spread no /I_not (I_nicht, non, ne in Bul., or I_net in Rus., Fr. I_ne for negation of verbs, etc.), & m-ing "yes", so bc. of this it has given the Bul* the chance to nick with our heads & to mean "no"! This is a peculiar thing (& I sup. nobody else will explain it) but it is so, and some rudiments in this sense have remained on the West, too, in your I_nick|ing (what may be rel-d to Gr. goddess of victory Νικη = Νικα, or I_Nike in Lat. --- bc. she is the one who makes our heads nick), or also in to I_node, or in the I_note, etc. (there is also strange usage of exactly ne in It. m-ing "about this or him or her, from this, of this"). ( The explan. of this perverse 2(I don't see why not to say so when it is so)2 Bul. nicking, I sup., lies in the rel-ns with our neighbours, the Gr* 2(though nobody will confess in this --- neither they, no we)2, and what I mean is that we surely wanted to make smt. on the contrary to them, bc. when the Bul* nick they say ne m-ing "no", and when the Gr* nick they say also 'ne' but m-ing "yes". And let me use the place here to ment. also your I_need, what as noun in Ger. is Not, what sounds exactly as 'not' --- bc. you haven't what you need and that's why you need it. ) So let us return to the Rus. (Bul., etc.) chislo what may be rel-d to Rus. chistûj |I_chistu^j| (clear, pure) but that's to t.s. idea, and other sim. ws here are: the known Fr. I_geste (Lat. gestio what means: to do, perform, give will to smt.), or Ger. I_Gestalt (a gist, core, image), or Bul. (i.e. Tur., here) I_dzhaskam (to hit, smash, jog), what may lead us to the jungle & Ar. I_jin (but we'll come to this again on gene).
And as to your w. digit, then this is Lat. I_digitus what is a finger or a finger-nail, saying us that in old times people ... counted on fingers, but this is just on the surface (this is what the etym-sts say) & there are some assocs here in which I shall indulge for a while. One of them is in the rel-n with your w. I_dig (dug) in sense of digging for some hidden notions (using even your nails, ah?), where the r. dig- isn't unknown on the East or the West; more than this, it contains 2 (dual) ideas, this of digging (making of hole), & that of piling the earth up, or heaving of smt., where the latter idea is more wider spread than the former, as it is in: your (& Scan.) I_dyke = dike (to remind you the name Van Dyke too), or in Bul. I_vdigam (or digam, as non literate, m-ing to heave smt. up; though this w. does not exist in Rus., they use only the I_diga-dyke), or in Lat. I_dignitas (a dignity) or dignatio (to prize), or, then, in Ger. I_gediegen (pure, real, but with t.s. idea of enhanced, bc. ge- in Ger. is a prefix). Another rel-n is to the I_digest, what is m.o.l. t.s. idea of our Sl. chislo. But there might be older rs of smt. fast & speeding, going with some knocking, bc. there were a short Arm. ji what is a horse, also Skr. I_jihite is to fly like bird --- bc. it's much easier to calculate with the digits, not how it's on fingers ---, & if you don't know these ws then you poss. have heard about the I_jigit|s (Turkmenian, but also in other Asian langs) who were very good riders; as well as you should have heard nowadays about the Muslim I_jihad (smt. fast and done rush on yüryüş). As far as the I_finger|s (t.s. Ger. Finger) are concerned I may say that they are smt. ... I_fine, of course, like your fish-fin, or It. I_fine (an end), and here are also the ... I_finance|s (as fine ruling, mark this; as much as the w. fine in Eng. means also money to be paid as penalty 2(what surely is a much finer punishment than to be scourged or put in dungeon)2 ), etc.; and if some of you may wonder why the end must be fine then let me say that if it were otherwise, i.e. if the beg-ing was finer & the farther we went the thicker it became, then --- well, then there would be no end (but << also bottom).
A propos, the I_digits are smt. really precious. That was the reason why in old Greece (& before that, of course, bc. the cabalistic is very ancient) the Pythagoreans took the numbers for some signs from the gods and provide each of the numbers with their special m-ing. [|I_comments| And how one may not be awestruck by the fact that, say: the differences btw. every adjacent exact squares are adjacent odd numbers --- e.g.: 36, 49, 64, 81, & so on, and the diff-ces are 13, 15, 17, etc. Or take the famous I_Pythagorean numbers, which were known from before the 1st mill. BC, and that --- I may bet you don't know this (bc. even mathematicians don't know it, as a rule) --- there's a simple way to build (some of) such triples, namely: by taking 2 adjacent odd numbers (adjacent even numbers will also do), then building their reciprocals, & then just adding them (under a common denominator) & taking the numerator & the denominator (for both catheti of the right-angled triangle), so that if you now add their squares you will get another exact square (for the hypotenuse) --- e.g.: 3 & 5, then 1/3 + 1/5 = 8/15, i.e. 82 + 152 = 64 + 225 = 289 = 172 ; or try it with, say, 6 & 8 to get 7/24, i.e. 72 + 242 = 252 ; or with 15 & 17 to get 32/255 & hypotenuse of 257. The smallest Pythagorean numbers, i.e.: 3, 4, & 5, measured with some (arbitrary) unit & marked with knots on a closed string were used in o. Egypt for making of right angle by the building of pyramids! ]

~ ~ ~

Yeah, the I_digits are famous things, they came from the o. Hindus via the o. Arabs, and if you still call them "figures", then let me say smt. about all of them (bc. they are, in a way, the pure truth). The zero is the "woman's" digit, the hole, the missing thing --- where, I'm sorry, the man has "smt." the woman has ntg. ---, and this digit is usually null or I_nula, what comes from new Gr. νουλα (read 'nula'), but the r. is old bc. in Hin. I_nullah is a valley, and then there is also the ... river I_Nile which in its end is mainly a big valley, so that it has to be ment-d here, & I was right about the hole. What concerns especially your w. I_zero, it is traced to the ... I_chiffre (Fr., Ger., etc., or Ar. chifr, or o. Heb. cefir, or Sl. tzifra --- a digit), but also (I sup.) to Tur. sifir what is exactly zero. Then the I_one is resp. the "man's" digit, and taking into account that in Ger. it is I_eins ('ains'), but the prefix ein- is equal to your in-, then this has to say that the one is a thing that enters into the zero --- though this is a trivial notion. Other names given here are: o. Frisian an, en, Hol. een, etc., o. Gr. οιοσ (now it's ενα), Avs. I_aeva, & Skr. ekas. But bc. "one" in Rus. is I_odin /odna (or edin /edna, in Bul.) and there in: eins, uno, ενα, etc., the consonant "d" is missing, but, on the other hand, odin is like brother (or sister, or, how the Ger* say, Geschwister, bc. the sex isn't important in such matters) of your w. I_odd, so let me say here smt. about the odd numbers (bc. one, surely, is an odd number). ( And, b.t.w., the Ger* have one interesting s-ing w., I_Zwillinge (twins), which is funny bc. I think this is due to imit. of some sounds for which we in Bul. say I_tzvilja 2(to produce whinnying sounds, like the horses do)2, i.e. they tzviljat together. )
So, odd might be rel-d to Heb. I_od (what is 7 and will be disc-ed a bit later) but here are other ideas, which you may find comp-ing odd with Ger. Öde |I_Oede| (a desert, or as adverb m-ing empty), or with Sl. I_ad (a hell; or also with Bul. I_jad, what's an anger or trouble, though this is rel-d to I_jam /I_eda 2(to eat)2, but this is in the sim. sphere of thoughts, bc. the odd numbers don't have their twins, where the even numbers have), or also with o. Gr. Αδησ (I_Hades, or Aid in Rus., who was son of Kronos & Rhea and ruled the hell or the under-terrestrial world, & who has to be 2(I think)2 the source for the Sl. ad-hell), or likewise with Rus. I_odnako (but; I_aber in Ger., where from Bul. I_obache, what is t.s., has to be influenced) --- i.e., in all these examples exists some exception, a peculiar thing, that one has not taken into consideration. Maybe also the well known I_ode in poetry (where we sing about heroic & singular moments or people) has to be here; or then, maybe, the element Jod in Ger (I_iode in Fr. or iodine for you --- bc. it "burns" the microbes & causes "helluvial" aches); and then, bc. iode comes in 19th cent., made (acc. to the etym-sts) from some Gr. 'i odes' as violet gas or steam (in result of burning), and ιον in Gr. was the flower violet, then (but don't stick to the colour, it isn't important) I may cite also the I_ion|s (cathions & anions).
But (up to my thinking) there's another approach to the w. odd which is through the ... highest Scandinavian God I_Odhen or Woden, who in Rus. is written as Oden, and there was I/E. r. wodh- m-ing to burn or cause an animation or erection, and this God might be rel-d to the number one (though it's more often for the gods to be rel-d to the number 2), bc. this is the idea of monism --- to cite, e.g.: Fr. I_monde (the world), Ger. I_Mond (the moon), & from here, surely, the I_Monat-month, Gr. μοναχοσ (I_monachus in Lat., also Teu & Sl., a monk), or then the I_monarchy, etc. So, in one or the other way, the Eng. I_odd is rel-d to the Sl. odin, & the desert, & the hell, & Hades, what is a diff. approach (to have 2 ws for odd & even) than in the Sl. & Ger. langs where an odd number is just a non-even one. And let me explain here why it is a habit to send only odd ... number of flowers to a living person (well, maybe not always, bc. a dozen is also accepted, & not in all countries, so that let me say: overlooking the exceptions), & an even one for dead people? It is not difficult, you see: an odd number misses smt., it isn't I_perfect (in a way), and while we are living we always make mistakes, we are sinful, only when we die we became good --- if not for other reasons then bc. we can't make the things worse! This is linguistically reflected in your perfect & imperfect tenses, but also in Bul. ws: svårshen |I_sva^rshen| (finished, done thing) & såvårshen |I_sa^va^rshen| (perfect), though neither the Bul* nor the Western people make this rel-n nowadays (we stick to the customs, having forgotten the reasons).
OK then, let us continue with the other numbers. The I_two is more interesting, and not as w. (bc. we have spoken about Deos-Theos; there is also o. Heb. I_bina, that is also included in many Western ws --- like: binoculars, bicycle, etc.), but as graphical image, what is of major interest for us here, & what isn't given in etym-cal books (for all the digits). So the two is (acc. to me, but I have seen this in some primer-book, I think) an image of ... swan's neck, but do you know why? Well, bc. of the ... I_copulation! And if smo. asks: why exactly the birds had to become symbol of this indecent act, then I have to remind you that in all times they, i.e. the fowls (but the swan is just beautiful & deserves to be used as a source, or to be put in a primary book), were everywhere around us, & they often sing, & all their songs (as beautiful as they are) are ntg. more than a prelude to the following copulation, which also, I've to stress on this, comes (phonetically) from the cry of the hens ('ko-ko')! Here you may take Rus. I_kura (a hen) & comp. it with Ger. I_Hure (a prostitute), or with Fr. I_coquette (what is not t.s., but to t.s. idea; sim. image lurks in Ger. jargon vögeln as your screwing, what, obviously, is deriv. from their I_Vogel-bird), & then here come: all the cooperations & corporations, coordinations, concourses (meant as moving in a common route-course, gathering together) & contests, constellations (& ... constipations too), & so on (to what I may add that in Bul. exists the vulgar jargon I_kopele m-ing, sorry, "son of a bitch", which comes from t.s. Lat. co-, what as sign is written as "&", and you see how twisted it looks). And now I hope the readers (& -esses) will allow me to ment. here also Sp. coño |I_con$o| ('konþo'), what is a hard curse (namely: el coño le tu madre), & although it carries the nuance of I_connect|ion (<< konþ too) its primary m-ing is that of woman's vagina. Ah, and some other names for the two are: Bul. (but it's c. Sl.) I_dve, Ger. I_zwei ('tzvaj'), o. Frisian twa, etc., & Skr. I_dwan (given with "w"), which, if one begins to think, sounds very like your swan = to Ger I_Schwan, what confirms the idea for swan's neck.
Then the number I_three, I'll tell you, looks like ... woman's breasts, what has the idea not of 2 lovers, but of 3 people, a family with a child! Some of the names here are: Sl. tri, Ger. I_drei, etc, o. Gr. τρε, Skr. I_trdyas. There are many ws based on this number, like: the triumph (I_thriumpus in Lat., or θριαμβοσ in o. Gr., what initially were celebrations dedicated to Dionysios-Bakh), then the triumvirate, I_tribute, I_tribune, etc.; & the importance of this number is due, either to the Christian I_Trinity, or to our 3D world, or to the most stable chair or table (more generally to the I_triangle as universal mathematical figure which can tessellate any polygon), or to the love triangles (or to the preferable number of ... coituses in one night?), or to smt. else (or, better, to all this). But there are some other ideas, as f.ex. in your w. three, which is rel-d to the ... I_tree (bc. it isn't exactly dendro-smt. --- >> dent) and I sup. this is caused mainly bc. of the structure of the grass (usually with three leaves 2(I mean, the grass doesn't throw symmetrical pairs of leaves)2, but why I put the grass & the tree in one heap will be explained further on), though it is not only this, & one may find sim. s-ing in your (to) I_thrive (throve, thriven), what is like in the triumvirate. Thrive comes from Ger. I_treiben (to force, set in motion; or Treib what is moving force, or der Trieb what is an instinct, or strong, usually sexual, desire), via some o. ws (like Teu. dreiban as to plant, set in motion; & comp. this with their drei-3), but the etym-sts don't give sufficient explan. of the hidden idea, where I think it is that of some rubbing (like in the trade --- shaking of hands) or stepping over (like in to I_trot, or Ger I_treten), and in o. Gr. there was τριβω |I_tribo^| (& then "β" was read as 'b', not as 'v ' as it is now) as to rub (trija in Bul., b.t.w.) or ruin. Hence it is poss. that the hidden power is due to ... the Holly Spirit as 3rd element of the Trinity, though this isn't very serious. This treiben gives your try & trade (<< t.) & the I_travel (we rub at least our soles), but also the I_travail, what is Fr. w. ('travaj') m-ing just a work (resp. travailler is to work, & travailleur is a worker), so that there's a confusion in distinguishing btw. the Eng. traveler & the Fr. travailleur but one can do ntg. about this. And there is also the ... I_trivial|ity which is such simple thing from old times, when there were 3 basic sciences (resp., exams) studied in high schools, namely: grammar, dialectic (logic), & rhetoric. Poss. the importance of number 3 is the reason why there are 3 (not 5, or 10) feet in the I_yard; and, what is more interesting, I sup. that this might have been the reason for the Eng. I_mile to be about 5/3 of a km (1,609 m.), though in a more sophisticated way, namely that the average distance that one can walk in an hour (5 km) has to be 3 units (of smt.), and bc. of this one such unit is as long as it is (for the nautical mile there are other calculations in effect & that is why it differs, but not much).

~ ~ ~

That's good, but there are other digits to be explained, so that we continue now with the number I_four, which image is a square (with handlebar), what is trivial idea. But there are some interesting things based on this number, which in o. Heb. was called I_gevura and was symbol of power & bravery. On one hand in this name there is smt. ... twisted, bc. there is Tur. I_gevrek (a kind of bun in form of a torus, with a hole in the middle), & also their çeverme |I_cheverme| ('che...', smt. to rotate over a fire, bc. çevre is a circle), which ws are well known in Bul., & in other Balkan countries too. In this sense must be perceived Rus. chervþ |I_cherv$| /chervjak what is ... a worm (bc. it goes with twisting, what may be confirmed by its Fr. name ver 2(& that this is circling << verite or >> vert & verdure)2; some of the Sl* though may think this is bc. it is red 2(I_cherven in Bul., but for this << carmine)2 ), it is also used in technical m-ing, as device for converting of rotation into linear movement. A bit changed this r. is alike Lat. I_roto-, or, better, may be found in Ger. I_werken (to work, do smt.), as also in Bul. (& sim. Rus.) I_otvertka (a screw-driver), or in Bul. jargon chovårkam (to repair or adjust a mechanism). But this isn't the Western spelling of four, neither it sounds like o. Gr. τεσσερα |I_tessera| (4). Well, it isn't, but ... it has to be from there, smh. (say: gevr- /kevr- --> kesr- /tesr-), bc. four (or I_vier, in Ger.) also isn't like the Gr. w. (neither like the Heb. one), but the numbers are Ar.-Hin. & very old & in Skr. the 4 was I_catvaras (read maybe 'chat...'), so that all is messed. Anyway, the Heb. w. (or, better, the Tur. çevre) is like Rus. chetûre |I_chetu^re| (4), or more so like their chetvero (4 people), what is very near to Skr. catvaras too; but it is also not much away from Fr. I_quatre ('katr'). But then, I sup., vier may be ... the 2nd syl. of the gevura (bc. almost all digits are one-syllabic); & from quatre (or quatro in It.) we come easily to the I_square (what confirms our guess about the graphical image), but let us postpone this a bit bc. there are other things to be said at the moment. Like to explain the question: why the Rus* make such big distinction (I should say even "big fuss") btw. (up to) 4 and (above) 5 (bc. they say chetûre chelovekA 2(that's: 4 persons)2 but pjatþ chelovek 2(5 persons --- that's diff-ce in cases, o rather sing. and pl. form)2, and even stranger when counting years, for then they say chetûre goda but pjatþ let 2( where both, godû & leta mean years)2 )? And bc. they couldn't explain this I will do it, but with the help of the ... Ger. lang., where they say vieR for 4 and vieL |I_viel| for ... many! If you wish you could make here a little pause & try to guess the answer (bc., as it is usually known, the point is not what is the answer, but what is the question), and I may prompt you that you have to look at ... your fingers.
Well, I may help you even more: you have to devise some easy way for working with big numbers (greater than the number of our fingers), but ... but you have to be a born mathematician. And for you not to be in an easy position to look ahead I will continue now with the m-ing of 4, bc. this twisted I_gevrek-bun (though not so in Rus., they say I_bublik, like the bubble-gum) is not enough to show the hidden power of the number I_four, which power has 2 contradictory aspects (in the sense of good and bad --- as we have seen that the will gives also the devil). Let me begin with the bad one (to leave the good for the dessert). F.ex., in Bul. we have one Tur.-Per. w. which we have never liked (being 5 cents under Tur. yoke) & this is the w. gâvur |I_gavur| (gjavur or gjaur) which means an unbeliever (in Islam), i.e. smt. twisted, gone awry or away from the right way (like we use kurva for a prostitute), what is an incarnation of the bad power (>> malus too); we use also the w. I_gavrja (se) for to mishandle smb. (to torture or the like). And now I an coming to the good m-ing, expressed by the well known ... governor (Fr. I_gouverner, or Port. governor, or Sp. gobernar, or Rus. gubernator, or Lat. I_guberno 2(to rule, govern)2, etc.), which goes back to o. Gr. κυβερναω (to govern). Hence, here are many ws, like: the I_cybernetic|s (& the cyborgs from SF), the I_shiffres or ciphers (as coding --- bc. of the magic of numbers), the nearly placed cabalistic (>> cabbale), the Fr governess as companion or au pair (who may smm. "gavrit" with the pupils), or also their gouvernail as a ... stearing wheel, or to look in Bul. where gabårche |I_gaba^rche| is a ... thumb-tack, or the obsolete guberka is a big needle; or then (why not?) I may cite o. Heb. (biblical) name Gabriel (I_Gabhriel in Lat., or Gavrailþ in Rus.), which meant "God's man" (God here is some 'Gabr'). There is also Rus. govoritþ |I_govorit$| (to speak), or Cz. I_hovor (a speech), or Pol. gwar (t.s.), etc., which ws may be smh. rel-d to this Gabriel (as an archangel he has to speak, & govern through his ws), though the etym-sts are inclined to think that this is just some guttural sound & say that even in Skr. gavate meant to sound, but we shall dig in this direction further on Hin. guru (a religious teacher, who surely cries much in various ceremonies).
So I think that in the governing the important thing is not some cry but the power of number I_four, what can be proved also through the s-ing of the Gr. tessera, or, better (via the widely used s--t mutation), through their τετραρχοσ (I_tetrarch), who was a big ruler over the world (over the 4 directions of the compass, although the etym-sts say he ruled over 1/4th of the country). Anyway, the four is here bc. in o. Gr. τετραδα was (& also is) a group of 4 things, & τετραδιον was/is ... a notebook (called Heft in Ger.), which is exactly t.s. in Rus. (tetradþ |I_tetrad$|), or then in It. I_quaderno --- what is so bc. this is folded piece (you know, it isn't advisable to say "sheet" bc. this may lead to some confusion) of paper (& even if the number of pages in it isn't 4 it's a multiple of 4); there is also a format called in quatro in Lat. There are also the I_tetrahedrons (in Lat., or τετραεδρον in Gr., a 3D body with 4 triangular faces) & the tetragons (τετραγωνον, a 2D figure with 4 sides, tetragonal for you; in It., b.t.w., quadro is one specific kind of rectangle, namely a picture). ( And when we have some upward raised "(h)edron" it is usually called I_cathedra in Lat., what has given the name of all the cathedrals around the world; & bc. the faces may be very hard 2(like of the crystals)2 the Gr* say εδραιοσ for smt. hard or strong, & in Bul. we say edår |I_eda^r| for smb. /smt. big or strong, but that was not to the main point. Also not to the point here is the following remark about the just ment-d Ger. I_Heft-notebook, namely that 2(as the Ger. etym-sts say)2 it is logically to be rel-d to their I_Haft 2(a jail)2, but 2(in my view)2 it sounds like Tur. I_tefter 2(what is t.s.)2, though some other etym-sts say the latter comes from o. Gr. διφθερα what was a leather or a book, or a table --- anyway, the s-ing is alike; and what concerns the Gr. w., from there has to be the illness I_diphtheria. )
But let me continue with the number I_four, and call your attention to the name of ... I_Caesar (Gaj in Sl. 2(but not a gay, I sup.)2, more precisely he was called Gajus Julius), which may be pronounced as kesarþ |I_kesar$| (as it is in o. Sl.) or as I_Keiser (as it is in Ger.), what isn't much away from τεσσερα--quatre--square, and also fits here bc. he was a big ruler (like the tetrarch). One may say, this was a name --- yeah, that's true, but it's also a title, &, anyway, all names have their m-ings. Also the ment-d I_tessellation is usually done with squares (not with triangles, as I've said before). So that we come to the I_square (I_kvadrat in Rus., but they use also the w. skverþ |I_skver$| for small town-garden, & I_kvartira for a house or suit of rooms 2(you also use the w. quarters, though in slightly diff. m-ing)2, what isn't surprising bc. it comes from Lat. I_quartarius m-ing smt. in form of square; there is also Fr. carrée|I_carree| -square, a sim. kare in Bul., etc.), which, you know, is not only geometrical figure but smt. very hard & good, righteous (though, hmm, it may be smm. also a kind of çevre-circle, but we must not be too hard on the ancient people bc. they have fought for cents 2(or mills)2 to convert the one into the other). Then I may ment. also your I_esquire, who has to be smt. square bc. the latter has come from o. Eng. squire, what was exactly big land owner, or a judge, etc., & the latter was from o. Fr. esquire = esquare, what is now equerre & means ... an instrument for measuring of angles! Etym-cally all these square things come from Lat. I_exquadra = ex + quadra (i.e. smt. out of a square), but without "x" they are easier to be pronounced, as it may be observed also in the I_escadrille or Sp. escuadra or It. squadra, etc.; then in the Sl. langs exists o. I_skverna m-ing a blot, shame (i.e. smt. erratic, squarely-bad --- what is bc. of the right angle), so that we returned again to the bad m-ing.
OK, and now to our question about the distinction btw. 4 and 5 in mathematical sense but using our fingers. Well, in short, Ger. I_viel (& mark that this is not of the r. of more--mare bc. the gradation goes: viel -- mehr -- meist) is opposed to I_vier as if the thumb is used to mark the infinity! As simple as that, but the Rus. form variations are just rudiments (& the Rus. lang. is an old one, with 6 cases as in Lat., with curious ellipsis of the verb "is" like in Lat. 2(they say, e.g.: on --- uchitelþ, for "he is a teacher")2, & with many Skr. rs, etc.). Still, such hidden & forgotten rel-ns with the fingers aren't smt. unheard of, bc.: why then you say: a I_score of years? If you don't know, I'll tell you --- it is bc. you have counted all your fingers, including the foes, then put a score smw., & continue the counting. Or take the Fr*. Why they can't say 70 but say 60 + 10 (soixante-dix) --- are they ... centipedes (I mean, sixty-pedes)? And 80 is for them 4*20 (quatre-vings) --- poss. they just like this "diamond" number 4, as also 16 (what is a power of 4) is 6+10 but 17 is 10+7 (it's the same in It.), & even 96 is 4*20+6+10 but 97 is 4*20+10+7 (or here is smt. with the number 6?). Anyway, they also have their rudiments; as the Ger* have, who, in order to show their "originality", don't say, e.g., twenty-one but "one-and-twenty" (which bad habit was spread in the times of Ch. Dickens also in England), and to show that they are very clever write all numbers up to one million in one w., but this must be well known. So, and with this we finish with the very important number four.

~ ~ ~

The number I_five, then, beg-ing with its image, gives us another surprise, bc. it is ... human's wrist (to remind you your phrase: give me the five). This is right, but not correctly said, bc. this is the idea, and the image is that of a ... I_pendulum (from Lat. I_pendeo what means to hang & shake from side to side --- and that is why you say: it I_depends on, bc. the situation is as if hanged on smt. & it "pends"), and the wrist of the hand is like this too, bc. it easily shakes, it is, as we in Bul. say conversationally, I_pajantov|a (shaky). The r. pend- has come in the Lat. from o. Gr. πεντε |I_pente| (5; & that is why it is pet in Bul., or pjatþ |I_pjat$| in Rus.), what in turn is from Skr. pañca |I_panca| (but read 'pancha'), though with this idea in their heads; to add that in Bul. we know also the w. I_pendari (in pl., of Tur. origin) what are golden coins, but (if you ask me) only the hanged ones, which were worn like necklace by the women on festive occasions (as when they married). But there are more ideas in work here, bc. if you write "5" with short straight lines you will need 5 such strokes (a corresponding number of strokes is used for the numbers: 1, 4, 6, & 8); and there is the additional idea of correl-n btw. ... "2" & "5", which look like inverted mirror images one of the other (if you put the mirror below 2, or above 5), what is probably bc. 1/2 = 0.5 & 1/5 = 0.2 (& I'll tell you that there are enough school children who have problems with the vulgar fractions & especially with this 2). In o. Heb. I_five was called I_tiferet (m-ing beauty or abundance --- I sup. bc. of the human hand) and, if you have not yet forgotten, this sounds like the o. Gr. τεσσερα (what was 4); then smt. sim. (maybe just bc. they are adjacent numbers; or bc. the just explained vier--viel idea was known in older times 2(or, more precisely: bc. the ancient people were forced to find some way to show on their fingers that they have not mastered the counting well)2 ) is left in Eng. (four -- five) or in Ger. (vier -- fünf) or in It. (quattro -- chinque, where the latter sounds a bit tinkling 2(maybe due to the pendari-idea)2, but then 4th -- 5th is there: quarto -- quinto). Here you may guess that your (or Ger.) five (resp. fünf) is again the 2nd syl. of tiferet, and this number is also very good & strong bc. of the old I_pentagram for which was believed (again due to the rel-n with the human hand) that it helped in keeping bad powers away --- & that is, you bet it, the idea that lurks behind the I_Pentagon, & behind the Rus. "red star" as Communist symbol (which we, in Bul., rejected, but are very keen now to be one of the European stars 2(&, of course, all stars, with the exception of the Heb. one, which is built of 2 interwoven equilateral triangles, have 5 rays)2 ).
Then comes the number six but it is so interesting that I will skip it now, till some time in the future. Then the I_seven looks like ... a banner, carried on a post, and if you now know how it is, then you may probably guess why it is so. Well, the idea comes from the Bible (the God's Creation for 7 days) & the o. Heb. lang. where 7 was called I_od (m-ing fame & mystery 2(maybe their Jahve has 7 fingers, ah?)2, but it sounds like 'oh' to me, i.e., as if saying: "Ah/oh, 2(I've finished it at last)2!"), and then eight was I_yesod (where you may think of it like: "yeah" + od). Now here is the place to note that in the Western langs the 7 isn't so highly valued & its name is like variation of that of the 6 (e.g., in Ger. we have sechs & sieben, in Fr. six & I_sept 2('set', & having in mind that the w. ... I_septic means smt. bad, then the 7 must be thought for a rotten number)2, in It. sei & sette, in Hol. zes & zeven, etc.), but this is not the case in the Sl. langs where eight is modification of 7 (like in o. Heb.) --- say, in Rus. we have semþ |I_sem$| (for 7) & vosemþ |I_vosem$| (for 8, what can be split, in my view, in: vo 2(in sense of their vot m-ing: look now, see)2 + semþ), or in Bul. we have sedem & osem (o + semþ), & so on. It is true that 7 is an odd number but I_eight is the most beautiful number bc. it is the 1st (& the only one btw. the digits) 3rd power (of 2), and that is how the people on the West think --- bc. your eight is some 'ej', Ger. I_acht is even more convincing bc. achten as verb means "be careful", or take your I_actual, then Fr. huit ('juit') is like 'juhaa', & in It. it is otto saying "oh, well" (sim-ly in Sw. it's atta, in Dan. otte, in Sp. ocho.). And how is the case in other (than Heb.) ancient langs? Not much diff. than on the West, bc. in o. Gr. the 7 was επτα (but maybe now it's εφτα, at least I have heard it so, what sounds like some 'uf' 2(I don't like it)2, where the 6 is εξι), and in Skr. it was saptà |I_sapta|; sim-ly the 8 in o. Gr. was οκτο (what has gone unchanged to the Lat.), in Avs. ašta & in Skr. aštau |I_ashtau|, what is again 'ah', but also smt. ... I_astound|ing, isn't it? ( Eh, astound is given from o. Fr. estoné, now étonner, built from Lat. ex + tonare-to-thunder, but it fits here & is quite poss. that some sim. analysis may be done in the Skr. )
OK, and so we have come to the I_nine which is not inverted six (though it looks very much like this) but ... smt. around the w. "no"! But why "no", would smb. ask? Well, but it's clear (though nowhere stated, as ment-d before), would answer the author --- bc. the digits end with it. It is so with your nine, or Ger. I_neun ('nojn'), or Sw. nio, or Hol. negen, or Fr. neuf ('njof', what I remember bc. ... hmm, bc. of the soixante neuf, or the pose 69), or It. nove (i.e. ntg., or to begin anew; & I_nono is the 9th), or Sp. nueve, & so on, up to some Tokharian ñu & Skr. & Avs. I_nava. In o. Gr. 9 was εννεα |I_ennea| what isn't exactly "no" but rather a variation of the one (ενα |I_ena|), what explains why the graphical image of the 9 is as it is --- bc. it is build of one small "0" (above) & one small "1" (below); sim. but diff. idea must be hidden in the Sl. 9 which in Rus. is devjatþ |I_devjat$| (devet in Bul, or dziewieč in Pol.), but detþ |I_det$| = devatþ |I_devat$| is to put smt. smw. (i.e.: we wonder where the numbers have disappeared --- which wonder, for its part, comes from the Lat.-Skr. I_Diva-Deva as a goddess).
Mathematically sp-ing this has to be the end of the digits but you know well that I_ten is often taken for a digit. So your w. has to have come from Lat. I_deci- (sim-ly also to Ger. I_zehn), what in turn is from o. Gr. δεκα, what is to be met in many ws like: the I_decade, but also in the ... I_dean (I_dekan in Sl., also I_djakon in church m-ing), the doc or I_doctor (to add that the Rus* use the jargon doka as a master), then the known Ger.-Lat. I_docent, bc. I_doceo in Lat. was to teach (hmm, here also some ... milking comes in play, but for that on its place), then comes Ger. (Sl., etc.) Dock (as place where the ships are to be "doctored"), and Ger. I_decken (to cover). There are also some I_doxy ws like the I_paradox or I_orthodox, coming from o. Gr. δοξα |I_doksa| as: a m-ing, thesis, idea, account, name, reputation, etc. (in the o. langs often one w. has many & diff. m-ings, bc. of some hidden ideas) --- so that the paradox, b.t.w., and mark this, will disappear if we succeed to extend our knowledge in a way that it will include the paradox together with the old doxy. Why this has to be rel-d to the number 10 becomes clear if we treat it as a crowning end of all our efforts, and it, really, is so, bc. in o. Heb. I_keter was the zero, which has to be replaced later with the 10, and its m-ing was that of a crown or wreath. But there is smt. more here, namely that the Gr. let. I_kappa ("κ") was exactly 10th in order (& they used letters for coding of musical notes, so why not of digits?), hence there arises another r. rel-d to this number, which is widely spread in ws like: your I_cape, Fr. I_chapeau, Lat. I_capito, the Capitol, the capitalism, etc. This cape may be ... inverted, and then it becomes ... a I_cup which can contain many things (in Lat. capto was to get, to captivate |I_captive|), but we shall come to this again later.

~ ~ ~

Well, that was the end of the digits, but having said "a" let me say also "b", bc. there are other, & interesting, ideas in some of the big numbers. Let me begin here with your I_thousand (Ger. Tausend), which was o. & c. Teu. (with o. forms like: tusund, dusund, dhüsundi, Sw. tusen, etc.), & the etym-ists say this was a combination of dhüs + hundi m-ing many hundreds, then cite an I/E. r. deu- m-ing to swell, which has given also their I_Daumen (a I_thumb). OK, but there are some things to be cleared here, & one of them is that this is very near to Rus. tûsjacha |I_tu^sjacha| what is again a thousand; another is that this leads us to the known I_dozen, where the latter is, in principle, a variation of two or, more precisely, comes from Lat I_duodenum, what you still use in medical sense (but why there have to be exactly 12 tentacles 2(bc. in Rus. its name means literally "12-fingered gut")2 I can't tell you); the 3rd is that the Daumen surely has given Rus. I_djujm, what is your inch (we shall dig here after a bit), but the r. deu- m-ing a swelling also reminds me about some milking (though I won't even tell you now where to look for this); and the 4th thing is: why a hundred (I_hundert in Ger.) has to sound like a building from their ... dog-I_Hund (you have from here your hound but with somewhat restricted m-ing)? So let us simplify the matters accepting that deu- here is some 'dån', like in the thunder, bc. this is much money (there might be other objects, of course, but we usually think about money), and go to the dogs (eh, not literally, of course).
Nobody tells us what the I_Hund here means, but I remember one Ger. (poss. Lat., translated exactly also in Rus.) saying:|I_phrases| "Wo ist der Hund begraben?", literally: "Where is the dog buried?", and (despite some poss. fable) I sup. people have thought about some treasure (a big dog) or many golden coins (small dogs). Anyway, that is your 100 & 1000 (but >> later tuman). What I wanted to add about the I_djujm is that for the Slavs it's easier to pronounce it in this way, this is also your I_inch (poss. some small measure which you put in what you neasure with it), & this is also Ger. I_Zoll, what (so it's explained) was some small stick (zol), coming from a Lat. I_telonium, coming in turn from o. Gr. τελωνια m-ing a duty or tax (but I shall add that this is also a dividing, about which we shall speak on ... I_tele), what is rel-d to Ger. I_zahlen & zählen (to count & to pay), & also in Heb. I_tsoln means to count. And to tell you one peculiar observation that I have made (surely established earlier by the ancient people), namely that if you take your foot & begin to measure its sole with thumbs (putting a thumb of one hand to the thumb of the other, but width to width, not the length of the last phalanx), then you will need exactly 12 thumbs-inches (really, about 2.5 cm) to cover the length of the sole (from the heel to the big toe). Hence, I think, this has to have been stronger reason for the foot as measure to consists of 12 inches (& you really have to put the thumbs "in"), than the Christian 12 apostles might have provided. ( And they are exactly I_twelve, b.t.w., bc. this is dividable by the 1st 4 numbers; for sim. reasons ancient Babylonians have used positional numerical system with basis of 60 2(bc. this is dividable by the 1st 6 numbers)2; as also the trigonometrical I_degrees are chosen to be 360 and not, say, hundred 2(bc. this is the nearest "good" number to the 365-point-smt. days in an year, & also happens to be multiple of 60)2. )
So the big numbers smm. thunder, smm. not, but they are always smt. beautiful, bc the I_million & the milliard are rel-d to smt. mild /milûj |I_milu^j|-nice (>> them later), and the I_billion to smt. big & blown (>> bonbon), and I shall add also Bul. (which isn't Sl.) 1,000 called I_hiljada. And do you know why it so deserves to be ment-d? Hmm, bc. it just has to be deriv. from our jargon hilja (se), what is to laugh showing the teeth, to giggle! There is smt. eastern here (though known on the West too, bc. this is the cause for arising of Lat. I_hilarious, or Ger. 2(Tyrolean)2 heilaripi 2(exactly hilarious yodeling)2, or their I_heil, etc.), what I bravely state bc. I have occasionally met in a book a Pakistani name I_Naulakha m-ing 900,000, and if we take that the beg-ing stays for the 9, then the 100,000 for those people have to be signified by some "lakha", which obviously (as sound imit.) is a I_laugh. I may ment. also one Bul. dialect, hele (of Tur. origin, with the poss. variation bc. of t.s. m-ing, I_razgele, what is given from Tur. rastgeldi) m-ing "just in time", i.e. "I am glad about this"; razgele stays also around their gaile-trouble, but the m-ing there is of "let this be our only trouble".
Ah, there is another Bul. (this time c. & o. Sl.) w. deserving to be ment-d --- our hundred, which is I_sto (also sotnja in Rus. is a 100; even in Rum. it was suta, but coming from the Slavs), what this time means that ... we just say I_stop (i.e., it is enough)! This is the simplest way to explain it, where the old ws were: some pre-Sl. såto, a Skr. chatam or satam, & Avs. satåm |I_sata^m|, what clearly (after the given here explans) is a sigh of satisfaction (>> satt & satir). The etym-sts say also that our Sl. sto & your Teu. hundred & Lat. I_centum (or Fr. centre, or Ger. Zentrum, etc.) come all from o. Gr. εκατον |I_ekaton|, bc. the last means exactly a 100 --- & I should add then the known Lat.-Gr. I_hecatomb (poss. m-ing smt. like "100 tombs") --- but this is very difficult to believe in. I mean: it isn't imposs. to accept the line 'ekaton' -- katon' -- 'kato' -- 'sto', but this is hardly believable (& for the cent & the hundert to be in one heap is even more unbelievable), so that with one etym-gy only we may get to nowhere, bc. the lang. (not the grammar) is a live thing and there have to be some ideas present in the heads of the people --- for the Teu* the dogs, for the Sl* the stop (not as sigh for directing of the road movement, but as: stay, stand, or the like, i.e. as imit., as some shushing sound), and for the cent some other (buzzing, cutting, &/or extracting) ideas come into play.

~ ~ ~

Oh, yeah, we have finished with your truth, and with that hidden in the numbers (digits), but there is another r. used by the Sl* which is rel-d to the very I_East (bc. it comes from there). This is so, bc. in Rus. the truth is called I_istina, which is o. & c. Sl. (in Cz., f.ex., is jistina) & it surely is rel-d to their (or our, it depends on where I put myself) I_istok what is an output of a canal (or stok what's a sewage), so that it is smt. that flows; also in o. Gr. the truth was αληθεια what again sounds flow-like (>> leak), hence the idea here is not of grinding but of taking smt. out, or of squeezing it (like in the disc-ed history--I_hysteria). A twin brother to the Rus. istok is Bul. I_iztok (which is vostok in Rus.) what is the east, so that we are aware where from the truth comes --- with the rising Sun, from the orient (though we are prone to some confusion --- said as a joke --- comp-ing this with our news or information which is vestþ |I_vest$| /vesti, or izvestija, what sends us to the ... west, literally judging, but you know that the world is round so that this doesn't bother us much). This is good, but in the Koran is said that I_istafa meant to chose smt. pure, truthful (b.t.w., from here has to be the name ... I_Mustafa, but then I would add also the ... I_mustaches (bc. they look as if flowing from the man's face). And bc. the truth is smt. good we, naturally, want it, saying I_iskam (for to want) --- well, this is in Bul., in Rus. it's hotetþ (to what we shall come in another context --- >> hot), but they say isk in judicial m-ing of a plea, also iskàtþ |I_iskat$| for to look (for the truth, presumably), so that this is Sl. --- but t.s. r. exist in Tur. too, where I_istek is a wish, istem is a will, iştah |I_ishtah | is a strong wish, longing (known exactly as ishtah in Bul.); more than this, there were older ws, like the Assyro-Babylonian god of love called Iştar |I_Ishtar|, or an o. Sumerian god with t.s. name.
So, but there is also Rus. ustþe |I_ust$e| (a river-mouth), o. Sl. ousta (now I_usta in Bul., a mouth), Tur. (known also as Bul. dialect) usta m-ing this time a master (what is in sense of the origin, the truth, or we look him in the mouth; from this they have made their ustabaşi |I_ustabashi| (stressed on the end) for a big master or ruler). Then there was an o. Prussian austo (a lip), Lat. I_ausculum (= osculum, a mouth or a kiss), your I_estuary what is our ustþe, o. Hin. I_osthas (a lip) or Skr. as = asan (again a mouth, but if you like you may think of your ass, I can understand this), Avs. osta (also oh, t.s.), an Irish just a (t.s.), an o. Icl. oss (a river-mouth), Blt. uosta (the last), Lat. os (oris, for a lip, but I_ossis is a skeleton 2(and the hole has to be rel-d to the bone like dual image)2; also ostium is a river-mouth or an entry 2(where from must come the name of I_Estonia bc. it is exactly in the Finnish Gulf)2 ), & so on. Clearly, here is your I_east (Ger. Ost), Ger. prep. I_aus & your out, Lat. ausosa as modification (or v.v.) of I_aurora (morning light, >> also ardeo; this is I_zora in Sl. but the latter may be traced to very ancient times bc. there was an Egyptian god I_Oziriss 2(of the Sun & the under-terrestrial world)2, & a Persian god I_Zoroaster 2(smm. called Zartusht or Zarathustra, so that in him not only the zora-aurora is hidden but also the usta-mouth)2 ); or take the islands I_Azores, which are not much away from Africa, or the mineral lazurit, etc.; or we may look in o. Gr. where this morning light was εωσ |I_eo^s| = ηωσ = αυωσ, but let us not go to the directions of the compass now.

~ ~ ~

OK, but the truth is usually writen or spoken, so let us look how this is done in diff. langs. [|I_suggestions| Ah, maybe it will be suitable to tell you in this place about my classification of the humans acc. to their rel-n to the truth, what I do in 3 categories (what, b.t.w., is an interesting approach bc. usually the number of categories is a power of 2, say 2, 4, 8, etc.), namely: a) such who live for to search the truth; b) such who prefer to invent different kinds of lies instead; and c) such who leave the question of truthfulness out of their interests at all! The 1st category forms a very small part of the population, probably around 3 -- 5 %, mainly scientists or born philosophers; those who look for lies instead of for the truth are maybe about 10 -- 15 % and they do this bc. have grasped that most of the people prefer to be told beautiful lies & vehemently avoid the truth when it doesn't please them, or these are people forced to do so bc. their business requires some kind of lying; and the vast majority, about 80 % or more, live their lives as it pleased them, not bothering at all about finding the truth, i.e. if smt. pleased them then they take it for truth, but if it doesn't please them they simply say that it isn't true. If only we all could have looked with opened eyes at the truth (when we know it or have the feeling that smt. is true; but when we don't know it 2(what, in fact, is almost always)2 then at least to search for it), if we didn't have felt insulted or even debased when someone tries to tell us the truth, oh, it would have been very nice then, this would have spared us many troubles in life, but, alas, only born philosophers can follow the ancient slogan "Know thyself!"; or smm. people who have been insulted & debased many times in their lives can also react reasonably, but then: should we all be 1st punished & degraded in order to behave reasonable? Well, I am afraid that we should, or at least till now we have proven that we should, & the only progress made in the human history is that we have devised religious institutions to do this debasing to us, instead of to wait for the life to teach us to know ourselves, but we shall come to this point again. Anyway, to look for the truth instead of for our pleasures, i.e. to find pleasure not in the pleasure as such but in the reasoning & judgment, was ever observed as a kind of ... perversity (what surely is so, as far as such behavior is an exception of the rule); but, on the other hand, this isn't so bad bc. life isn't easy, am I right? Or, to put it otherwise, the natural behaviour is the unconscious one, as all the animals behave; they have instincts (as we also have) but they don't reason. I can't say that people on the whole are silly & moronic bc. they aren't, up to such extent, or bc. in the instincts a good portion of truth about life is hidden, but in many cases we have to distinguish btw. natural (as lower level of intelligence) & reasonable or intelligent (as higher level), bc. we call ourselves Homo Sapience, don't we? ]
So, and now let me come at last to the writing, what in most cases is rel-d to some scratching, like in: Eng. I_write, also in I_scribe, what is Fr. (I_ecrire there is to write) & Lat., and in Rus. (Sl.) there's an old w., skrizhalû |I_skrizhalu^| (usually of the history), m-ing documents, papyruses, or also in Ger. I_schreiben (t.s.); though the latter is scratching if one reads "sch" as 'sk' (as you do this in "school"), but if you read it as 'sh' (as it has to be done bc. it's so in Ger.) then we come to the flowing out, or, to be more precise, to the ... I_piss|ing. In a way, this shouldn't be smt. unexpected bc. for smt. to flow there has to be some crack (comp. Eng. I_flow with I_flaw), & schreiben may be very well rel-d to Bul. (but of Tur. origin, not Sl.) I_shurtja m-ing to flow, or to Lat. (to) urinate (<< jurvam), but this idea is better expressed in the Sl. langs where in Rus. to write is pis`atþ |I_pisat$| (pish`u, p`isheshþ), where to piss is p`isatþ (p`isaju, p`isaeshþ), then the instrument for writing is called pisetz, and a letter (as correspondence) is pisþmo |I_pis$mo|, where the other "instrument" is pisþka |I_pis$ka| (or I_pishka in Bul.). The pissing, surely, is world-wide known, at least in Lat. & Fr. (pisser in Fr. is to piss, but you have to know this bc. of the I_pissoir), and this, obviously, is rel-d to the Lat. penis, hence to the Eng. I_pen /pencil too (bc. you know the phrase: to put more lead into your pencil). The idea for this (albeit vulgar) is also natural --- pissing on a sand or, even better, on a snow-covered ground (what is just ... a pleasure, I'll tell you, but let this remains our secret) --- but such observation couldn't have been done by a woman, so let it be said (even in times of emancipation), that there are some things in which the men are made much better than the women. Ah, and not to forget to tell you also how this s-ing have been chosen --- by pissing (I'm sorry to repeat such ws so often but at least I am doing this on proper places) over an extinguishing fire (hence in very olden historical times), when smt. like 'pss' was/is to be heard (&, again: how could this have been done by a woman?).
But around the pissing, are other interesting ws, like: the known Fr. I_piquant (where, I'm again sorry to tell you, but I have read that in old times the medics used to taste the ... urine, bc. they have not had all this modern equipment for analyses), then the Eng. I_pickles (pöckeln in Ger.; in Sl. we go from the salty water of the mare-sea & say marinovatþ |I_marinovat$|), or Ger. I_pinkeln (what is a "decent pissing", like the children or women do it, i.e., as you put it, to pee), but then here is also the known I_pike & (to) I_pick (remember: flow -- flaw), bc. the piquant things "pick" at one's tongue. Then here is also the ... I_pink colour (a Dan. pinke is given), but why this has to have such "pissed" m-ing will be made clearer later on ... moron. I would like also to tell you about often used Bul. (actually Tur.) w. I_pich, but this also will be left at present. Instead I may add that with the pike as smt. sharp & used for picking or pricking is rel-d the Eng. ... I_pie, which w. has several (though rel-d) m-ings as: the bird I_magpie (bc. it picks whatever finds & gulps it), minced meat (as if done so by some bird), the smallest Hindu coin (= 1/12 anna, which in turn is = 1/12 of the rupee), & others. For the mincing >> also pappo, & the magpie in Lat. was pica, coming from the Skr. where it was I_picas; the etym-sts give from here also Ger. I_Specht ('shp...', a wood-pecker, though I sup. it is also rel-d to their I_Spatz 2(>> S.)2 ). Widely sp-ing, the r. 'paj- /pie-' (& let me remind you that when smt. is put in single quotes it's to be read as in Lat.) may have other m-ings but they are usually of smt. small or poor or I_pious, as f.ex. the obsolete but beautifully s-ing Rus. w. painþka |I_pain$ka| (a meek, well behaving child), used also as I_paj-malþchik or -devochka (for boy or girl), which is given from Finnish /Estonian (also Sw. & Baltic-Ger.) pai as mild, nice; but there is also another I_paj /pajok in Rus. (c. Sl.) m-ing a part (of smt.), a share, which was well known on the East (in Crimea, by the Tar*, by the Turks, etc.) exactly as pai with t.s. m-ing, so that both Rus. pajs have to be (smh.) rel-d.
There is the Eng. I_pea too, & in o. Gr. was παισ |I_pais| ('pes'), also παιδοσ or παιδ-, as a child, what, besides the I_pedant (as children's teacher), has given the well-known, hmm, I_pederast (παιδεραστησ; shorten in Rus. to pedik 2(but the 2nd part, which in o. Gr. was rel-d to the god Eros 3(I sup.)3, fits very well in Rus. bc. rastlitþ |I_rastlit$| there is to smash, like a bug, & it really is so bc. I_tlja is a flee, & I_tlen means smt. decaying)2 ). But there are other ws on ped- in o. Gr. (& around), like: πεζοσ ('pezos', going on foot, pesha in Bul. or I_peshkom in Rus., hence put also your I_pedestrian), πεδον (an earth, ground, a plain), its twin πηδον (the flattened part of an oar), πεδη (a rope put around horse's legs, shackles), Bul. I_pedja (pjadþ in Rus., a span as the distance btw. stretched out thumb & little finger), new Gr. πηδοσ (long jump) or πηδω (to jump), Tur.-Per. (& archaic in Bul.) peş |I_pesh| (bottom border of a dress), some Dorian pos (a foot), the I_pedestal /podest or I_podium, the I_pedal|s of the bikes, the Sl. prefix or prep. I_pod (under, or also earth, ground, but we shall come again to this), etc. So that the Eng. I_pie is just smt. small (& small things are not erect, they lie on the ground) or chewed, and it may lead us to your I_piece (which will be ment-d further again), which is given from o. Fr. piece, Port. & Catalonian pesa, Sp. pieza (what reminds me that is Rus. /Bul. pþesa |I_p$esa | /piesa is your piece, though only in musical sense), It. I_pezza (what reminds me one Bul. jargon, I_zapetzvam 2(se)2 m-ing to stick in the way not wanting to move aside, what turns out to be Lat. bc. in It. they have the w. I_peccator as wicked, sinful person, also you use I_peccable smm.); then there is the petition (I_petitio in Lat. is a plea, & that this is smt. small has to be clear from Fr. I_petit used as font in printing), then poss. the w. I_peculiar means smt. pecked (or to be pecked, bc. it's smt. dirty or isolated), etc. ( I may mention, just as curious w., another strange Bul. jargon, I_izpedeptzvam, m-ing to find a way, to deceive smb., to give smb. what he/she deserves, where we have 'iz' in the beg-ing 2(out, from)2, then comes the pedi /pedik, & at the end is smt. like our I_ebane /ebvam 2(to f#ck)2, what will be disc-ed further. ) There is also Rus. spider pauk (I_pajak in Bul.), or It. I_pagliaccio (read 'paljachcho', a clown, called in old Rus. pajatz, where from, I think, our spiders have come), though the latter isn't small (we shall return to him), but is, still, rel-d to the mean & lowly placed things. But in this way we jumped much aside from the writing.

~ ~ ~

Now let us go a bit faster to the I_read|ing, what, in fact, is Ger. I_Rede (a talk or speech), & this is a kind of ordering (Ordnung in Ger.) of the lets &/or the ws in rows-sentences (& you maybe know that in the Ger. this ordering is not so easy as in the Eng.), but this is known also by the Fr* bc they have their I_redacteur (an editor, you write it redactor, but the w., if you ask me, can be split & explained as "actor of the Rede"). Or take one Bul. dialect, redim (stressed on the beg-ing, as to tell smt., where the official m-ing of I_redja is of to order, put smt. on its proper place), or also a bit older verb I_rekvam (to say), which corresponds perfectly with our I_reka what is a river (i.e. the ws just flow out of him), or then Rus. rechþ |I_rech$| (rech in Bul., o. & c. Sl.), what isn't to ... I_retch, surely, but not much away from that bc. it is alike Ger. Rede (a sp-ing, words). I mean, your retch is an I_oriri--origanum building (Lat. for belching, accepted in Bul. as I_origvam 2(se)2, or in Rus. as rûgatþ |I_ru^gat$|; there is also a herb rigan in Bul. which in Lat is I_origanum & was maybe meant good for cleansing of the throat), where our (acc. to the etym-sts, but it doesn't fit good, if you ask me) is some I_rhyme (o. Gr. ρυμη) or Rat (<< orator) but not a phlegm, which is I_hrachka in Bul., though the latter, surely (for me at least), corresponds with our rech-sp-ing. Well, your I_speech (i.e. Ger. I_Sprache, what is a lang.) corresponds, in fact, with the I_spit, but you have to know this, to feel it smh. (unconsciously), where the Sl* will be very angry to be told what I've just told you, and, still, in Bul. we have the w. I_sprihav m-ing touchy, easy inflammable in speech (i.e. sp-ing like a German?!).
And do you know with what the Fr* rel. their I_parlez (to speak) or the It* their parlare (t.s., & in this way giving all the I_Parliament|s, of course)? Well, this is again some belching imit. like in the artificially made w. I_abracadabra in Lat. & o. Gr., which is given from some Gr. αβρακασ as some deity (which w. I couldn't find anywhere; I found only an o. Gr. αβρα as beloved slave women, what has to be some I_bravo-brej exclam., what is near to their & Lat. I_ambra 2(amber in Eng.)2 ) & poss. coming from o. Her. where dabar meant a word, but we shouldn't indulge too much in etym-gy in cases of imit-on. For me this is just some 'bår-bår' as we in Bul. say, or pljampam as jargon verb, or plem-plem as the Ger* put it, or I_blah-blah for you. In short: parl- should be taken as more civilized, version of 'bår(l)-'.
More interesting is to turn your attention now to the peculiar rel-n btw. the I_beard (or I_barb /barber) & the ... I_barbarian, bc. it is so in almost all langs (in Ger. Bart /Barbier & Barbar, in Fr. barbe & barbarie, in Lat. barba & I_barbarus 2(= barbaricus)2, in Rus. I_boroda /bradobrej 2(o.)2 & I_varvar(in), in Bul. brada /bråsnar 2(or o. berberin, what just has to be rel-d to the I_Berber tribe in Africa)2 & t.s. varvarin, & so on) and surely comes from ancient times. I sup. this rel-n has arisen bc. of the widely accepted view that a decent man has to shave his beard, but there's also an additional touch due to the frequent bleeding during the shaving & the known tradition to use the barbers for all the dirty work of: pulling out of teeth, cutting of veins to bleed, or putting of leeches. On the other hand, the beard has to be rel-d to the muffled sp-ing bc. it hinders clear pronunciation (or it was believed so), hence we come to the barbarians, who are so called bc. they can't articulate properly, they just emit cries or children's I_babble. But this is an ancient rel-n bc. in Bul. we have the jargon I_baraba m-ing a tramp, scoundrel, bandit, or a friend (bc. he is our man), for which is given an It. baraba --- but I don't believe in this bc. it has to be of Tur. origin ---, & then there is also the Tur.-Ar. greeting maraba (or I_marhaba, heard in some places in Bul. too), where these 2 ws correspond very well! But this isn't all, bc. there was one bad guy in the Bible, I_Barabbas, who happened to be caught by the authorities exactly on the eve of that Eastern when our Christ was arrested & bound to be crucified, & the known Pontius Pilatus asked the folk gathered there to chose (an ancient democrat, ah?) which life he should save, & you know what was the decision of the mob then, so that if this Barabbas wasn't the perfect barbarian I don't know who else can be such. ( We shall come to sim. ideas again on heathen. )
Ah, maybe it would be interesting to rel. to you one etym-cal fable (I don't know whether it is true but this is very probable) about the I_beta -- I_vita problem in the Gr. lang., bc. the let. "β" was read as 'b' in o. Gr. but is read 'v' now (& that is why they call it 'vita' now; also the Gr. "η" was before 'eta' but is now called 'ita'), & bc. of this a big confusion arises btw. the Sl. & the Western langs in many old ws (like: Babylon -- Vavilon, the just ment-d varvarin, Byzantia -- Vizantija, etc.). This is due to the making of Cyrillic alphabet in the 7th cent. (i.e. in new Gr. times) & choosing the sim-ly looking "b" for our 'v', where on the West you use the old pronunciation. So, as the fable goes, smb. has asked the question about how it has to be said, beta or vita, & there was thorough searching done in the old papyruses, & a verse from one Hesiod was found where the Beothian (an area in Gr.) sheep said exactly "βη" --- & one can never make a sheep to say 'vi'! So that the question was correctly answered but this changed ntg. bc. nobody can teach the Greeks now to return to the behavior of their ancestors; and then, bc. there can't exist a lang. without the sound 'b', they were forced to chose some combination of lets for it & write it now as "μπ", what looks just silly.
Now about the reading, where (excluding the Eng. reading as being Ger. sp-ing) the common idea on the West is of plucking, what is meant with Ger. I_lesen (to read, but also to gather or pluck), and the deriv. I_erlesen isn't "already read", but chosen, elected. Here the Sl. variant is also interesting bc. we say I_cheta (in Bul., or chitatþ |I_chitat$| in Rus.) for to read, but rel. it with Rus. chtitþ |I_chtit$| (in Bul. we reverse the syls saying I_tacha, so that the rel-n could hardly be found staying in one lang. only) & that means ... to honour! But this rel-n is strong bc. in Bul. we say also pochitam for to honour (I_pochit is an honour) & prochitam for "to read", and the idea here is like the Ger. view of choosing. Smt. more, when we have found an erlesen-chosen group (usually of people) we call it I_cheta (read 'chetà' in Rus., but 'chèta' in Bul. bc. 'chetà' for the Bul* is 1st pers. sing. of the verb to read), and an even number is called I_cheten (in Bul., but it's c. Sl.) bc. one may imagine units of such number as going in pairs. On the other hand we confuse the reading with the counting using in Bul. t.s. chetà (or I_smjatam, as grammatically correct) & the Rus* just put an 's' before --- schitatþ |I_schitat$|; here are also diff. Rus. reports or calculations (like: otchët |I_otchet| 2("ë" is always read as 'jo', but the 2 points above are usually economized & the let. written as plain "e")2, otschët 2('s-ch')2, uchët, etc.). The etym-sts give tacha as approval from tak m-ing: so, well (though I don't think this is the bottom line here), & for chtitþ (what means t.s.) say it is c. Sl. (like Cz. chtu, etc.; & chestþ |I_chest$| is an honour, pride); here comes also the pure quality (chistûj |I_chistu^j| in Rus. or I_chisti in Cz. etc.), which idea I expressed before (<< I_chislo-number), but they go back to a Skr. I_cetati /cittis (poss. read with 'ch'), what meant: to think, follow, find out, or to Avs. chisti as a thought or knowledge; then for the Sl. cheta-group is given very nearly s-ing Irish I_cethern (t.s.) & Lat. caterna (sim.). I may add that here also the ... sieve may be put in play, bc. there was an o. Sl. chåto & it may as well be used for choosing (of the bigger grains), but we shall return to this later, on Lat. I_cito. And the last touch, the ... combing, what is I_chesha in Bul., chesatþ |I_chesat$| (or raschësûvatþ in Rus. 2(again 'ras-chjo...', this isn't Ger. "sch" read 'sh')2, where from a comb is raschëska), etc., bc. this is again a kind of selecting, but we shall return to this in some other place.

~ ~ ~

Ah, I have to say smt. also about the saying or talking. The Eng. (to) I_say /said surely has to be from Ger. I_sagen, where the latter has a twin sägen |I_saegen| what is to I_saw (with a Säge-saw), so that the m-ing is cleared (of scraping, rasping), but the r. is old & here is the known o. Icl. I_saga (with derivs like: sage, sagacious, poss. the sago-tree 2(I'm not sure)2, & others); there might be other secondary rel-ns with (to) see & the sense, but we shall come to this on other places. Your I_talk, though, is a diff. r. (not Teu.) where the idea is that of the known (Lat.) I_discussion, where we make small morsels or tidbits (kås |I_ka^s| in Bul. or I_kusok in Rus., but for now you may rel. it with the Eng. cut) of the problem, & although it may seem strange t.s. w. exists by the Rus*, namely I_tolk (a sense, gist) or "tolochþ" |I_toloch$| (to crush, crumb, cut) and from here (po-) tolkovatþ as to disc. smt.. In Bul. we don't have this Rus. tolk but have one archaic w., I_tlaka, what was gathering in the village (mainly of women) to do some common work or just to talk (as women always like to do), & in Rus. there is also the w. tolkatþsja (to knock or bump into others, from here I_tolkuchka is a ... flee-market), & also (smw. from the southern Republics of former USSR) the w. I_tolmach (a translator), what has to remind you (I hope) about the o. Her. I_Talmud (their Bible), or also talmuz (acc. to the Koran), what is a pupil (in a church-school), so that this r. is also very old. B.t.w., it is interesting to ment. that in Eng. "I_understand" you look under (the matter), in Ger. I_verstehen (what is t.s.) they look around ('får' = per-), in It. (Lat.) I_capisco they put a "cap" (above the things, cover them in order to grasp them easy with a hand), in Fr. I_comprenez the idea is sim. to the It., & in Rus. ponimatþ |I_ponimat$| they as if heave (podnjatþ /podnimatþ) the problem (though there are other ideas, like Bul. I_razbiram, what is rel-d to razbivam 2(to split or break)2 ); where in Eng. I_explain you take the core out (ex-) & throw it on the table (plane).
Still, there is another Sl. r. for (to) say, where is Bul. I_kazvam (also 2(da)2 kazha), or Rus. I_skazka (a fairy tale) or skazanie (a saga) or I_ukaz (a decree), etc. The r. is old (I_kazati, kazhå) & c. Sl. (Cz. kazati as to show, Pol. kazac as to read, teach, or preach, Rus. I_kazhetsja as "it seems", Rus. kaznitþ |I_kaznit$| as to ... punish, execute 2(becoming nakazvam in Bul., but kazniti in Srb.)2, etc.), & as you can see from this examples the bottom line here is not of seeing or saying but of showing. And now, let us look around the globe for smt. similar. I sup. here may be ment-d, say: Tur. I_koz (a strong argument, a proof; exists also in Bul. 2(koz)2 or in Rus. 2(kozûrþ |I_kozu^r$|)2 as a trump in the games of cards), or the very sim. c. Sl. I_koza m-ing ... a goat, i.e. smt. that jumps & pricks (hence the koz may be viewed as smt. that hides big power in itself & may unexpectedly show itself and jump --- >> again koza much later); then comes the ... I_Cossack (I_kazak in Rus. & Bul., kozak in Ukr. & Pol., & so on, c. Sl. &. c. Eastern 2(Tar., Turkmenian, Kirghizian, Kazakhian, etc.)2 ), which primarily m-ing in Sl. was of a valet, vassal, but in the Eastern original this meant a free man, tramp, i.e. one who shows everywhere, who likes to jump where he (not "she", to be sure, at least not in those times) wants, or to show off (like a wild koza-goat); in this heap have to be also the I_Kazakh|s who live in a steppe, like the Mongols.
But then (scratching thoughtfully my head --- this helps in many cases, I'll tell you) --- I come to the conclusion that here has to be the known ... Lat. I_causa (cause in Eng. 2(<< noster for Cosa Nostra)2 ), giving your "I_because", of course (be + cause), also I_accuse (ac + causa), as much as I_excuse (ex + t.s.). Though the only other sim. thing in Lat. is their I_casa, what is a house & has primarily to be rel-d to the cutting (some enclosure, we shall come to this), it may also be smt. that shows from wide distance --- i.e. the cause (together with the casa) should be obvious, & one is accused or excused of smt. that shows (or smells bad, like a shit, if you'll pardon my ment-ing such ws), but alas, in many cases we just don't want to look at the causes (& prefer to be attracted by the effects). Then from the causa (for some unknown reasons) the 1st syl. has disappeared giving Ger. I_Sache (a thing, object, cause, purport, law suit) together with other Teu. ws (like: o. Ger. sacha, Hol. zaak as a case, Sw. sak as a law suit, etc.); some etym-sts sup. that also Fr. I_chose (a thing or case) might be from here, giving in turn Eng. (to) I_choose /chose, but I have some doubts about this. For the Rus. skazka-tale a Skr. I_kachate (to appear, to shine) is cited, what (in my view) is a perfect match for the Rus. I_kazhetsja-seems; then they give also: Skr. akachya (I saw), Avs. akasat (t.s.), Skr. cakshas (a shining), also o. Per. I_chasitan (to study, or teach), and conclude that from here maybe Lat. I_casta (& your cast, etc.) might have come, but I again allow myself to doubt in this (I should rather derive Bul. jargon I_chaktisvam 2(to understand)2 from chasitan, bc. this is smt. clicking, like in the Ger. I_sagen, or in your I_chat, than to place in foreground for the casta the idea of showing & teaching, instead of separating).
But there is one more r. for sp-ing by the Sl*, namely Rus. govoritþ |I_govorit$|, what is a guttural imit. & we have already said smt. about it (<< g.), so that here we shall continue from the eastern I_guru. In o. Gr. γοοσ was a cry, in Rus. I_golos (or glas in Bul.) is a I_voice (where the latter, b.t.w., is vox in Lat. but sounds like the Eng. war), in Irish I_guth was again a voice, etc. (& there's a diff-ce btw. 'gul- /gål- /gol-' r., and 'gvr- /gbr-' or 'chvr-', so that is why I separate this from the governor--four cluster); there is also smt. with a prefix, Eng. (what is Lat & Gr.) augur /I_augury as a prediction, and from here the I_inauguration (swearing of the new guru-President in) too. But then I may as well add also Rus./Bul. I_guljaj what is a big eating & drinking (a spree or blast, as you put it), what is in one cluster with Fr. goule what is ... your I_ghoul, of course, & also their variety goulèe |I_goulee| (m-ing now the blast), what is given from Ar. I_ghul (a ghoul --- bc. when one takes part in such guljaj-blasts, then after that one looks really like a ghoul). Then in Lat. may be found I_gula as a throat or a gulp (I_gorge in Fr., so that you may count your gorge too), then there's Eng. I_gulch (or Bul. gålcha as to scold), etc., & even in Skr. I_galas was a throat (so that the Sl. golos-voice should come directly from there). Here is also Rus. I_glagol (o. Sl. for a verb, & glagolitþ is synonym for govoritþ-to-speak), but also Lat. I_calo (-are), what is t.s. as Eng. (to) I_call, & there are many sim. ws like: o. Norw. kalla (a cry or call), Rus. koldunþ |I_koldun$| (a magician, woodoo, or guru), then some Blt. kalba (a tongue) & kalada (a noise), but this is interwoven with some other ideas (>> calamity) bc. I_calduna in Lat. were ... intestines, tripe. I may ment. here even the known Hun. ... I_gulyash (goulash in Eng., popular dish with cow meat as main ingredient), which primarily m-ing is of a shepherd (& gulya is a flock), what is to be explained with the idea of the cows moving like ghouls here & there (as also guljatþ in Rus. means, besides to gulp food or drink, also just to walk).
Together with the Sl. I_golos goes Rus. I_gorlo (Bul. gårlo, a throat) or Ger. I_Gurgel (t.s.), & Lat. I_gurgulio (a gulp), & Eng. I_gutter or gulch or (to) girgle, & Rus. gorlastûj = Eng.-Fr. I_garrulous, & many others. The r. being sound imit. it's only natural that it is so widely spread, but I dig here with such pertinence bc. exactly from this cluster has to be your ... I_girl, coming directly from Ger. Göre |I_Goere|, what is garrulous boy or girl (what The Ger* call a Bangle 2(i.e., smo. just begging to receive a bang, b.t.w.)2 & you --- an urchin). Well, this isn't very correct etym-cally, bc. for the girl are given old I_gyrela or gürle, then o. Teu. göre, & is said that it has arisen in 13th cent. & was poss. based on some humorous ideas, but they don't say of what kind exactly. So that I have to explain it to you, bc. the point is that Göre is usually applied to Bangles-boys, and when you say "girl" to a woman you don't mean at all that she is garrulous, do you? What I mean is that there is a kind of gårlo-throat, though this isn't exactly the throat but rather smt. like a ... gutter (or comp. it with Tur. göl |I_goel|, what is a puddle), smt. that is placed farther more down than the throat is. In short, this is what you call a slit (& rel. it to the slut, or v.v.) --- that is it, however sorry I am to tell this to you, my dear readeresses; but, on the other hand, you have to be warned that there are many examples for sim. views, to which we shall come on: madam, missis, daughter, sister, & others.

~ ~ ~

Ah, let me say smt. also about the signs (bc. they often show us the truth), but let me begin with the interesting Balkan w. shamandura (in Bul., or şamandira in Tur, or σημαδουρα = σημαντουρα is Gr.), what is a buoy in the sea. The 2nd part of it (-dura) has to be smt. like your (Lat.) durable, so it shouldn't bother us now, but the shaman /seman is what has given your semantic|s, which surely is Lat.-Gr. (exactly σημαντικη as the science for signs or chars, coming from σημαδι as a sign, target, characteristic, prediction; or from σημαια, what is a banner or coat of arms), & then here are many ws, like: Rus. (o. & c. Sl.) I_znamja (a banner) or I_znak (a sign) or znanie (a knowledge, & znatþ |I_znat$| is to know, we shall come to this later again), then your sign & significant & It. I_signore (marked with special sign, sup-edly from the gods) & the signature etc., then the I_semaphore (also Sl.. semafor, m-ing literally "symbolic fire" built from σημα + φορε --- >> pharos), & others. But this was on the West, and on the East there is the known I_shaman (a magician, guru, one who understands the signs of the gods, a Buddhist monk), which is known in the whole Asia (even by Evenki-Eskimos, I'll tell you) & is given from Skr. chramanas --- though I don't believe much in this etym-gy bc. it "smells" of charming things, sounds a bit diff., & the point is in the sign; besides, there was a very old Babylonian (Sumerian) God I_Shamash.

So, and with this we finish with the truth & the rel-d notions bc. nobody can grasp it in its absolute fullness.
}




IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH {} AND THE LIGHT |I_LIGHTCHP|
{
and I have to say here smt. about the light in diff. langs, and about some other rel-d things, bc. the I_light (in Ger. I_Licht) is also light (I_leicht in Ger.), and it flows & pours, gives the ... I_lake|s & the laugh (Ger. I_lachen), & the songs (Ger. Lieder), & the I_luck, & many long things, also the lying (I_legen in Ger.) together with the "other" lying |I_lie| (lügen |I_luegen| in Ger.), & the giving of birth, & the special art of lying by making of children (I mean the I_love), & the I_liberty, & many other things. Let us begin with the light as lightning, where we have, f.ex.: o. Teu. I_luckis (a torch), a Lithuanian laukas (an animal with white spot on the forehead), o. Gr. λευκοσ |I_leykos| (shining, white, pure) or λευκον (white, or an egg-white), where from the I_leukocyte|s are --- this is given as I/E. r. leuk- (to shine or glow) ---, but also Rus. I_luch (Bul. låch, or o. Sl. louch, m-ing a ray), where from luchina is a torch. Then also: Lat. I_lux (a light, glow; or luceo, what is to shine), what now is the unit for brightness, but here, surely, is the luxe (I_luxury), then Lat ... I_Lucifer (who may be the Satan, but he is that who carried the light, & this is a w. composed in o. Greece), or their I_lucerna (a candle or lamp), giving Fr. luzerne (known also in Bul.; alfalfa in Eng.), which is named so bc. its flowers have the form of candles (though the etym-sts say this is bc. it has shining seeds in what I doubt), & the town Lucerne, of course (a shining town), & the state I_Luxembourg, etc.
But here is also the I_lamp, & your (to) I_loom (though it has slightly diff. m-ing, not like Bul. I_lumva what is to begin suddenly to burn), & all I_luminous things, & many other variants like: an Irish I_loche (a lightning) or lunhath (a light), or an o. Icl. I_log (a glow or fire), or an o. Arm. lois (a light) or lusin, what is = to the It. I_luna (the moon), or your lunar & the lunatics (there is also the c. Sl. luna), the Fr. name I_Louis (the King-Sun), & ... some animals that (their hide or eyes) may smm. shine, like your (Lat. & Gr.) I_lynx (Luchs in Ger.). Possibly the latter is the reason for Lat I_lupus (a wolf) to sound so, which w. is near (bc. they are alike-looking animals) to the I_vulpes (= volpes, a I_fox), which in o. Gr. was αλωπησ |I_alo^pe^s| (alike the lupus-wolf but being fox), and there was o. Prussian lape (again a fox), & in Rus. I_lisa is the fox where volk is the I_wolf, but you see that lisa is near to the lupus (what is a wolf) and volk is near to the volpes (what is a fox), so that the names are permutated but the animals cast some shine. For the wolf, in fact, sound-imit. of the barking of the animal comes in foreground (smt. like your "woof" used for dogs); but there might be diff. ideas mixed bc. smw. around the lamp & lumva--luminous things has to be also your I_lump as chunk of smt., or also Ger. Lump as a scoundrel, bad guy, or I_Lumpen as a mop, thorn cloth, where from the Lumpen-proletariat comes (but such people usually like to burn & destroy, to make things to lumvat), or their Lümmel |I_Luemmel| as a simpleton, etc.; these diff. cases might be united with the idea of shining (clearly visible, separated, also as bad examples), but not always & not very satisfactory.
With the lisa also not all is clear (for the etym-sts too) & there (in my view) some rel-n with lestþ |I_lest$| (lþstitþ) -- List is poss., where the 1st in Rus. is to flatter or adulate, & the 2nd in Ger. is a slyness or cunning (sim. to Rus. kovarnûj |I_kovarnu^j|, what, b.t.w., has to be from the r. of your cavernous). Anyway, the fox is cunning animal (I_listig in Ger.), what was known from olden times bc. in Lat. vulpinor meant to behave artful or cunning. Then your name I_fox is t.s. as Ger. Fuchs (read 'fuks', but you shouldn't be upset bc. it has ntg. to do with your to f#ck) & comes from a Got. I_fauho, what is built around the sound 'fuh' (giving your I_fur, of course), but which was originally 'puu' in Skr., where I_pucchas was a tail (only as last part of the animal body, I mean), but, mark it, this has given also the Sl. w. I_puh ("h" is to be read, a feather 2(or I_Feder in Ger., what sounds sim.)2, but more precisely a down). The latter w. is near also to Rus. buklja (or Pol. pukiel or I_pukla), what in Fr. is I_boucle (a downy thread, a spiral) & may lead us to some Lat bucca or buccula (a cheek), where we have the image of smt. like a ... I_bug (or I_buchka in Bul., what is a small lump) or a I_bean, but that is another matter. More likely this 'puu-' is like breading out, or like spitting, bc. in Ger. I_Fluch is ... a curse, what we in Bul. call I_psuvam, & as your I_curse is rel-d to the dog-like I_cur, in such way our cursing is rel-d to our dog I_pse (not each dog, but a bad one, a cur). If you like it (though, to say that you don't, you have to read it 1st) I may put here your --- ah, I am sorry, my dear readeress, I did not mean exactly yours but the Eng. --- jargon I_pussy, what surely is rel-d to the Sl.-Skr. puh (bc. of having also the m-ing of furry cat), but some pissing ideas have to be also in play, as much as a rel-n to putta (>> p.; or << pizda). And in order not to leave you with bad feelings from this paragraph I will ment. also one beautiful Rus. (poss. not c. Sl.) w., I_opushka, which is applied only to a forest & means its border; but to understand why this has to be rel-d to the Sl. puh you have to imagine the forest or the grove as some big beast, & then the opushka will be exactly its fur.
But this was a slight jumping aside, so let us return to the light-I_Licht & cite also Rus. lûsûj |I_lu^su^j| (or Ukr. lisij or Cz. lysy etc.) what means ... bald (-headed), where we again see the light (that shines on his, poss. her, temple or occiput); sim-ly to the boucle but with a whiff of shining in the m-ing I may add also Rus. lokonû |I_lokonu^| what is a hair (in pl.), i.e. = Eng. I_lock in one of its m-ing (where the other m-ing as smt. for, or the action of, closing comes, if you ask me, from the lake, to what we shall come very soon on loch). Then, bc. when the light comes we may see the things (to squeeze that in o. Greece they thought even that the light went from the eyes to the object, not v.v.), here is your verb to I_look, but the idea in the looking is of throwing (or casting) of smt., what is well represented in the Sl. langs, e.g.: Cz. I_luciti (to throw, hit in), Pol. luszyc (a sim. thing), o. Rus. luchitþ (to cast, known from one o. phrase: komy Bog luchitþ, m-ing "to whom the God gives"; but also otluchitþ |I_otluchit$| as anathema out of the church). There was also an o. Prussic laukut (to search, what has given your look), then in Lat. loco (-are) was to place or put (or give a loan), where from is the known I_locus (with pl. loci) not only in the mathematics but as a point or state (in a hierarchy), there was also o. Gr. λευσσω (to see), & so on, up to a Skr. I_locate (to see). In this sense are also: the I_locomotive (bc. it changes its locus while moving), Ger. I_Lotse (Rus. lotzman 2(sim. building as the boatsman)2, who you call a ship-pilot; and we shall come to the Lot some time later), then the Eng. & Lat. (etc.) I_locust (bc. it changes fast its locus, & is long), then the (I sup. known) Tur.-Ar. ... I_lokum (elastic gelatinous pastry, named also Turkish delight), etc.
As smt. moving fast I may put here Rus. I_lihoj (= lihij) what is very fast or brave man (lihoj parenþ is a brave boy, hero), but there is smt. more that lurks here, bc. in Ukr. t.s. w. means ... bad, unjust (going to Ger. lügen |I_luegen|), & in o. Sl. lih meant bad, mournful, redundant (what is I_lishnij now, or izlishen in Bul.), together with the m-ing of brave (what is a strange combination), & in Cz. lichy is redundant, odd, or empty. Etym-cally the redundancy is traced to some o. Gr. αλλοτριοσ (foreign) or λειψανον (a residue, a trace), what is possible bc. in Bul. exists the w. I_lipsa (smt. missed) what is your I_lapse (& the Rus* have also the w. ljapsus what is exactly Lat. I_lapsus), but this had to have given Lat. relinquo (to leave) what isn't at all clear (in my view); where if we keep in mind just the fast (as lightning) movement (a kind of pouring --- >> litþ) we may have all the redundancy & the emptiness & the bad things that we want to reject, bc. there was also an o. Gr. λαιλαποσ m-ing a thunder or deluge. Smt. more, there is Bul. (also pre-Sl.) w. I_ljut what is sharp taste (that of pepper or curry), known also in Rus. (ljutûj) but only for big cold (the Rus*, b.t.w., don't make any diff-ce btw. sharp & bitter tastes 2(what is only natural bc. they don't like the both things, even their beer isn't properly bitter, but also bc. both feelings are achieved by the hindmost tongue's part)2 ), as also in many Sl. langs (like Cz. or Pol. I_luty), & in Rum. (lute), what means sharp taste but also fast or deft, also in Lithuanian (lutis), what was a tempest, & I can see smt. of the kind even in Fr., where ... I_lutter is to fight, where the consolidating idea is again that of some fast movement or sharp quality (though >> also lud-crazy).

~ ~ ~

Now let us move to the I_long things bc. in the Sl. langs we make the trivial parallel btw. the ray of light (I_luch) & the ... bow of an arrow (I_luk in Rus. or låk in Bul.) & even with the plant onion (again I_luk in Rus. & Bul., luk in Cz., & so on --- what is bc. of its long leaves when it's green); I may add also Rus. lûko (or I_liko in some other Sl. langs) what is a bast (a fiber, or inner bark; one of the m-ings of Lat. I_libra is t.s.) where we have t.s. idea of smt. elastic & long. Or take Rus. I_izluchina (o. luka) as a turn or meander (& the beautifully s-ing I_lukomorje as a sea-creek), also Bul. I_ljuspa (Rus. I_sheluha) as a peel, thin shell, Bul. låkatusha |I_la^katusha | for going in meanders, one special kind of dried sausage called I_lukanka in Bul. (try it, if you find it smw.), etc. This isn't only Sl. but also c. Teu. r., bc. here are also, f.ex.: Ger. I_Lauch (an onion) & I_Laub (all leaves of a tree or thicket), Eng. I_leek, o. Prussian lunkan (= liko), & so on up to a Skr. I_luncati (it has to be read 'lunþkati') as to peel or pluck (shelushitþ in Rus.), or likati = rikati (but mark this equivalence of 'r' with 'l') m-ing again to pluck, squeeze, or chip. When the r. is so old there is ntg. surprising that it is known worldwide so that we come now to the elastic (Fr. I_elastique) things like: Rus. (& Sl.) I_list (a leaf of a tree, or a sheet 2(but never, a shit, right?)2 of paper), or your I_list (or Ger. I_Liste, or It. lista, etc.; 2(there was also an o. Prussian laiskas as a book)2 ), or even (to) I_listen (the idea, I sup., being of smt. that drops --- comp. with your eavesdropping), or I_least, or I_last --- bc. it's like a leaf-list, but also bc. it weighs & bends down, what in Ger. is I_Last (a weight; there is also a Gewicht-weight in Ger., where we again have bending, but that's from another r. & with the idea of the balance for measuring of weight).
Or take Rus. I_lestnitza (a stair /-case), or Ger. I_lassen (to I_let, or I_leave, hence include also this 2 ws), or I_leisten (to try hard, or to show an example), or the (Fr.) I_lassitude, or Bul. I_lastik (an elastic string), or your ... I_lass (as having, if you ask me, a flexible or I_lissome waist!), etc., which ws could be traced to Lat. I_lassus m-ing tired, weary. But don't think that this is all bc. here is also the known Sp. I_lasso = lazo, Bul. I_loza (a wine plant 2(I_vinograd in Rus. where there's t.s. idea of winding coming from the Lat. I_vino)2 ), then Rus. lastû (artificial fins), your (to) I_lean, Bul. I_lanshen (old, from the last year, used mainly for snow, a bit obsolete), the well known I_line, etc., etc. (there was some Skr. lestus as a heap). The r. here is very fuzzy (lect- /lact- /lax- /lat- /las-) & in this way we come now to the ... milk, but in Gr.-Lat.-Fr. m-ing, i.e. Fr. lait ('le', a milk), with many derivs (like lactic, I_lax, etc.), or Lat. lac (a milk), then lacteus or lactarius as smt. made with or out of milk, or their I_lacteo as to I_lick (what is lakatþ |I_lakat$| in Rus., or I_lecken in Ger. 2(where comes the "popular" cursing: |I_phrases| "Leck mich am Arsch!", which I will leave without translation)2 ). Here is also the lac /I_lacquer for painting (Gr. λακκη), & (to) I_leak, & the I_liqueur (bc. it's good for licking --- if you don't know, why), & your (to) I_like smt. (for t.s. reasons), & one sort of candy called in Bul. lukcheta bc. they are good for I_lutchen (Ger. for to suck, what is sim. to lecken 2(though in Bul. we poss. think the name comes from our I_luk-onion but this seems strange for a candy, if you ask me)2 ), & the I_lace, & the I_latex, & the ... I_lecture (smt. like a soap-opera, or the ment-d Tur. I_lokum), & the I_lackey (bc. he 2(I won't even think about saying "she")2 licks the asses, I sup.), & the I_lack|ing (smb. has licked the whole thing; but it's also sim. to lapse), & Lat. lacrima (a tear) & lacrimonious, & so on. This lax--lait r. is Gr. but it is in a slightly diff. form there (though the idea for smt. elastic with this s-ing exists in o. Gr. where λακτισω was to tread, step over), so the w. for milk was namely γαλα |I_gala| (= γαλακτοσ) what has given our I_Galaxy (the Milky Way), but also the known Fr. ... I_galanterie & the galant (I_gallant in Eng., like milk!), the I_prophylactic (to make it work as if in milk), the I_laxative things & the I_relax|ation, Rus. lokotþ |I_lokot$| (an I_elbow --- an elastic thing, like your w. which splits in: some "el" + bow), poss. the I_lap (smt. lapses, or it is like a ladle), & so on.
Well, and about the w. milk, or Ger. I_Milch, or Rus. I_moloko, etc., I may add that this is based on the 'ml'-noise when eating smt. tasty --- like Eng. (to) I_smack, or Ger. schmäcken |I_schmaecken| (also Rus. smakovatþ), where is Ger. Schmäcker (smo. with fine taste, though in Bul. the m-ing is that of a charlatan), but this is o. Per. (Iranian) I_shmak with m-ing there of a demon or spirit (so that we in Bul. stay nearer to the original). But I wanted to tell you about the milk and here is also smt. old bc. there was an Ar. I_mleh m-ing good, appropriate, then comes o. Gr. μελι |I_meli| as a honey, or μηλον as an apple, though the fruit has vastly "grown" later to become your I_melon (and, maybe, it will be interesting to add that doubling "λ" to μελλον gives their ... future --- what has to be rel-d to the biblical apple, bc. our future was very well planned, had Eve not eaten that forbidden fruit, what has led us to the current state of affairs where our future isn't rosy); there is also a double-meli thing in Lat --- a I_melimelum (a kind of sugary apple). Rel-d (smh.) to the milk have to be also: Rus. molòka |I_moloka| (a sperm gland of the male fishes), Ger I_Milz (a spleen), their I_Malz (a malt, for making of beer), the Melasse (I_molasses), or Fr. I_melba, then the Gr. ... Muse of theater I_Melpomene (also the name I_Melissa), the I_melody, etc.; & of course Rus. milûj |I_milu^j| (nice, dear) together with your I_mild (which is Ger.), & Sl. milostþ |I_milost$| (a mercy), & other derivs (also Ger. I_schmelzen 2(to I_melt)2 is rel-d to the malt 2(& your w. to melt)2, but we shall speak about this on malus, what caries another idea).

~ ~ ~

So far so good, but let us return to the licking, bc. when doing so we often become happy, or I_lustig in Ger., and the latter is from their Lust what is a wish or carnal desire accepted literally by you (& in Bul. prelåstjavam |I_prela^stjavam| is to seduce) --- there is no way not to mix the sex here, especially beg-ing with such beautiful let. like "l", but we shall come to this later ---, and this is a I_Laster (a Last-weight but with m-ing of a sin, a wicked thing), so here is also your I_lewd & I_lechery, what (together with a Got. lists in sense of licking, & our disc-on about the Rus. lestþ |I_lest$|-flattery) offered me the guess that it isn't impossible for the island ... I_Lesbos to be put here too (but I don't know how it's about the town Lisbon). Well, the last isn't sure, but when one licks for a long time then he/she may make ... a I_loch (you remember the Loch-Ness monster?) what in Ger. (Loch) is just a hole but it is rel-d to their I_Lache what is small pool of water (a pond) and a I_laugh too --- what is due to the common idea that when one falls in the pool the other people around laugh at him. Then in Bul. exists the w. I_ljohman (of Tur. origin, the splitting in syls is obvious) m-ing an oaf (what may be bc. he always falls in the mud); or to add one more Tur. w., I_lakirdi (again known in Bul. 2(lakårdija)2 & Srb.) as laughing & dancing, entertainment; then may be cited Rus. lëgkie |I_legkie| (read 'ljohkie') what are generally the lungs (in pl., but also as adj. lëgkij is light as not heavy --- exactly as the Eng. usage of lights; this kind of light is lek in Bul.) & they, really, are an airy tissue; then in Bul. is known the w. I_lek what (besides the ment-d m-ing of airy) is any medicine (as substance against an illness), which in Tur. (& Ar.) is ilaç |I_ilach| ('ilach', what probably is: i(l) + lach, i.e. anti-loch, in a way 2(unless it's rel-d to your I_ill, i.e. v.v.)2 ), and lechitþ |I_lechit$| in Rus. is to cure. ( And let me say here that a doctor of Med. in Rus. is I_vrach what sounds very archaic bc. vrachevatþ is a ... witchcraft, hence they say vrachiha for a doctoress bc. they feel that I_vrachka 2(what is grammatically correct building of fem.)2 has to mean a witch 2(& it really is so in Bul.)2, but they know very well the w. lekarþ for a doctor, which is o. Sl., only they don't like it; in Ger., on the other hand, such Rus. kind of doctor is Kurpfuscher what is a charlatan, where the real doctor of Med. is I_Artz, what is sound imit. of some ... 'hråtz-kråtz' & this is sim. to the explained before kravis--carve--graphic, i.e. he should be understood as surgeon. )
But we have done well going to the Ar. world bc. in Bul. exists also Per. & Tur. I_leke (you see that it sounds like lick /leak) what is a blotch, or shame, or a mean, dirty person; from this r. is Rus. I_luzha (a puddle; or luzhajka as a meadow) or Bul. I_lokva or Cz. louzhe (t.s. puddle); or your I_lake, of course (what may be rel-d also to o. Gr. λουω m-ing to bate or wash; count also Fr. lac or Sp. I_lago as t.s. lake), or even the I_deluge (if we take de- apart). Still, there is more to be said bc. in Hin. (poss. Skr.) I_lota is a water pot (rel-d to the flowerI_ lotus), in Ar. lot or I_lut is a lake or sea (& the name of Dead-Sea in Ar. is Bahr-Lut, where the 1st part is smt. sharp or hard or bad bc. it is present in the w. I_bahar what is a kind of pepper), and this is where from Ger. I_Lot (a plumb) comes, & your I_lot & the lottery too (i.e. this is smt. that is thrown in the water, or a die to be tossed, bc. --- well, your surely have heard about the biblical personage Lot 2(whose wife got bad luck /lot looking backward)2 ); here is also your I_lag, & I_log, etc. ( In It. I_lottare is to fight, but it isn't Lat. so that it isn't pretty clear what is the rel-n to the loch-lake, most probably they think that the lottery is a kind of fight with one's lot-fortune, and translate this idea to other fights. ) This is the place for the I_luck, too, bc. this is a good ray-I_luch but also a good lot, & even with the idea of some 'gål-gål'-ing of I_gulp|ing or I_gluttony (here, b.t.w., may be ment-d your I_glad, and then Bul. I_glad 2(I_golod in Rus.)2 what is ... a hunger 2(i.e. we want to make 'gål-gål' but there's ntg. to gulp!)2; and Eng. I_hunger then 2(which is exactly Ger. Hunger)2 maybe says that you want some ... I_Huhn-hen, or have an appetite of a I_Hund-dog --- I don't know for sure). Etym-cally luck(y) is from Ger. Glück |I_Glueck| (a happiness, or your I_glee) or their old ghelücke (& there are several sim. ws in Ger. like: glucksen, schlucksen, or I_schluchzen m-ing to swallow, hiccup, or cry), but you have to know that this guttural 'gh' sound is much cherished in the Arab world, so that the r. has to come from around there (the etym-sts can't say where from exactly). A sim. idea to the luck as good lot may be found in the known also in the Eng. Tur. w. I_kismet, which is built of: kis- (read 'kås', mark it) + met-, where the 1st is like your cut, & the 2nd means to throw (metatþ in Rus., but >> meteor); and, b.t.w., in Bul. when wishing smb. to be successful in smt., say in fishing, we say na |I_sluka (bc. we, & the Rus* too, have the w. I_sluchaj m-ing an occasion, happening).

~ ~ ~

Well, when we have reached to some sound imits, and keeping in mind the fast speed of the lightning, we surely have to come to the crying & pouring of sounds or liquids (or whatever) but mostly in the Sl. & Teu. langs as e.g.: Rus. litþ |I_lit$| /letþ (to pour), or lajatþ |I_lajat$| (to bark), or Ger. I_Lied (a song), or their I_Leiter (your I_leader, but also as a conductor in electrical m-ing, & if fem. then this is an ... extendible staircase), where from comes your I_lead as metal (bc. it is easily melted; but the lead also "leads" us to the center of the Earth; this was o. Teu. leitðjan). Then also: their I_Leier (a I_lyre), I_laut (what is I_loud in Eng.; & Laut is a sound or voice; then lauter means pure, perfect, i.e. as if poured in a form; I may cite also your I_eloquence here), then Ger. I_Leiden (a sorrow, suffering), then your I_lane (& the ment-d line), the suffix I_-leinen in many Scan. names or Ger. -lein (for diminutives), the plant I_Lein (lën |I_len|, read 'ljon', in Rus.) what gives your I_linen, etc. Then the I_lion itself (I_lev in Rus., leo(n) in Heb., & so on), bc. of his growling (smt. like 'lhau' 2(& that is why, I'll tell you, the Rus* say that the dog laet 3(I_laja in Bul.)3 --- they think that he 3(or she, but it's not just to think of an animal as "it")3 is a lion --- but well, you maybe think t.s. about the ... I_lark, ah?)2; though otherwise this is another rel-n to the w. I_laugh, which is also o. bc. in Tur.-Ar. I_laf is a chat, which usually comes with a I_muhabbet 2(eating & drinking --- poss. to have-I_haben smt. in the mouth)2 ). Yeah, but with the lion goes also the Sl. hunting (lov, lovitþ |I_lovit$|; & comp. our lov with the lev), the lion's (or of some other animals) I_lair, & this was known in o. Gr. too, bc. λεια or λαια was a hunting and ληισ was a game animal; and if one may wonder why the Lied for you is called I_song (bc. these are diff. rs) so let me add that in Skr. I_singh was exactly a lion (& a singh "sings").
Of course here is the lying |I_lie| & I_lay|ing in almost all langs (let me give them in Ger.: liegen & I_legen, but it is an I/E. r. lie-), your I_low, but also ... the I_law (in Fr. loi, read 'lua', what means 2(in my view)2 that it is smt. laid m.o.l. low but that should not to be stepped or jumped over 2(unless you are a lion, ah?)2 ), then the I_lawn (which, judging by its writing, has to be from law, but the m-ing tells us that it's from low 2(actually it's derived from the land 3(Ger. I_Land, o. Fr. lande)3 but the idea is t.s.)2; going back to the Rus* we may find their ment-d luzhajka-meadow, which you may comp. with the I_luzha-puddle). ( The lair, in fact, comes from the laying, and when λεια was hunting then maybe the copulative meaning of lay /lain was meant as hunting girls or dams. ) Then may be cited your I_lee (-side), then Lat. I_lectus m-ing a bed (like Sl. I_lozhe; & comp. this with the I_lounge), then in o. Gr. λεχοσ meant a ... flower bed (which in Bul. is I_leha), & also λεχωνα |I_leho^na| was a pregnant woman (bc. she has to lie down on a bed-lozhe), & so on. Here is also the loyalty what is Fr. I_loyal, & is said that it comes from Lat. I_legalis (lawful), but you see that the m-ing is not exactly of smt. legal, but of smb. who lies low in our feet (though the Lat. legal is a twin with Bul. 2(c. Sl.)2 lezha /ljagam as to lie down, i.e. the legal things lie down, as I've just said). And mentioning before a while the Rus. letþ as to flow reminds me to come here to your widely used w. ... I_let, bc. it might have been given from Sp. I_lasso &/or Ger. I_lassen (with the idea of: to let the tiredness-lassitude be gone), but this is also a flowing, allowing (hence, add I_allow too) of smt. to be laid, and it corresponds well with Lat. I_littera, Fr. lettre, or your letter, which (especially in Lat.) is not only a let., but a sign or order too, i.e. smt. left (hence, count I_leave & I_left too), together with the idea of a small quantity (so that comp. it with gramme--grammar), what has to give also your w. I_little.
All this is good but ... but not all that lies or flows is good bc. you know the w. ... laic, which is from Lat. I_laicus & means a non-scholarly built person. The etym-sts say that there was o. Gr. λαικοσ coming from the nearby λαοσ what was a big population. Well, laos might be smt. poured (it sounds sim. to chaos, b.t.w.) & we have heard about the country I_Laos (where, surely, live many people) so that this might have been enough for the negative m-ing (you know: populace, plebes, etc. --- when there are many people they can't be from the elite) but this isn't enough for the author for many reasons. One of them is Ger. I_leider (regretfully, it's a woe) which they often use, but which is equivalent to I_schade what rel-s with your, I'm sorry to say it again, shit; then is their I_Leiche what is a corpse, or I_Laich what is a caviar; then I may remind you the disc-ed I_lapsus; then comes your ... I_lavatory (bc. Lat lava isn't smt. good, the Fr* still want to laver-wash it); or take Lat. I_latro what acc. to a dict. means to bark (Bul I_laja), but this is again the pouring bc. this w. gives the I_latrine (or at least it look so); and, finally, in Bul. we know very well the derogatory Gypsy (poss. Skr.) I_lajno what are exactly the faeces (well, in sing., i.e. again a shit)! So you may well imagine now what is the hidden m-ing of the w. laic, or of leider. This is very old r. & in o. Heb. I_lajla was a night (smt. black), but the negative & positive m-ings easily change places and Lajla is a known name in the Ar. world (what should have given the Western name I_Dalila = Dalida). The Gr. & Christian holy oil or balm called I_elej (in Rus., from Lat. I_eluo, elui as to cleanse, wash, or oil) is smt. good, but ελλειμα in Gr. is a lapse, defect, or a lie; then Bul. (I sup. Tur.) I_elek (a sleeveless jacket) is smt. good (it makes us elected, though << election if you have forgotten with what it is rel-d), but the I_elegy is a mournful thing; or also to lie in bed isn't a bad thing, but to lie to smb. is not a good behaviour, and this parallel exist in almost all langs (say, in Ger. it is I_legen -- lügen |I_luegen|, in Rus. is lezhatþ |I_lezhat$| -- lgatþ |I_lgat$| 2(or lozhþ |I_lozh$| is a lie as the opposite of the truth)2, in Bul. lezha -- låzha, etc.); we shall see sim. polarizing of the m-ings further on Leute.

~ ~ ~

OK, the Ger* say liegen for to I_lie and I_fliegen for to I_fly (or take also your I_flow -- fly), what isn't surprising bc. this is really a very fast movement, hence here are also: Ger. I_Flotte (a I_fleet, a navy), I_Floss (a I_float), Flosse (a fin), then your I_flood, fly, I_flea, to flee or to float, & so on, even the ... I_floor (why not?), & the I_flirt (with the idea of flying around, like a bee). Surely here are also the I_flowers, bc. they also "flow" (i.e. grow, rise), or, as the Fr* say, I_fleur (a flower; resp. fleurir, read 'fljori' is to blossom), or fiore in It., what comes from Lat. floreo (to flow, or to shine, what has caused the town ... I_Florence to be named so; or also the I_fluidus 2(liquid, smt. flowing, giving your fluid)2 or I_fluor 2(a stream)2, giving the element fluorine; or then also Fr. I_fuir, as to run away or flee), and in Bul exists the jargon fljortza for pompously dressed girl (it has to be directly from the Fr*); the Ger*, for their part, say I_Blume for a flower, what sounds a bit better (imitates better the opening of the buttons), and how the Sl* say will be disc-ed further.
But some people, e.g. the Sl*, don't like to say 'fl' and prefer 'pl' instead, so that here are some Rus. ws, like: plûtþ |I_plu^t$| (to float), or I_ploskij (flat), or ploshchadþ |I_ploshchad$| (a square), or I_plita (a I_plate or I_plank), or I_plotnik (a carpenter, bc. he works with planks), or their I_plecho (an upper arm, but it's meant the spatula which is flat), or plevelþ |I_plevel$| (a weed; poss. rel-d to plevatþ |I_plevat$| 2(to spit)2 ), then the I_plut (a charlatan --- bc. he stirs the water, and is poss. rel-d also to your I_plot 2(as a secret plan)2 bc. ... bc. of the god I_Pluto 2(of the under-terrestrial world)2, who is the Roman equivalent of Hades), or platitþ |I_platit$| (to pay --- I sup. with the idea of slapping the money on the desk; your 2(to)2 pay, b.t.w., is Fr. I_payer, which might have been rel-d to the space but in form of the ... paysage, to what we shall come later, or else as some small part, for what << paj), etc. Then I may cite some Bul. ws, like: I_plakna (to wash or cleanse), I_pljokvam /pljokna (a jargon for to drop down & burst, I've met it in Am. as to plonk), placha (or plakatþ |I_plakat$| in Rus., to cry with tears), the plakat (a I_placard, c. Sl. 2(not that it's really Sl.)2 ), I_plat (a tissue, cloth, it isn't Rus.), I_planina (a mountain --- also not Rus., but it isn't also a correct w. bc. it has to be from Fr. I_plateau), & so on. This "pl"-ing, though, isn't only Sl. bc. there are also: your I_plan (a 2-D scheme) & plane (bc. it flies on the principle of the plain surface of the wings) & I_plain, & the I_plaid, & the I_plot (here with m-ing of a plan on the plain), & the I_place, also the (or to) I_plant (to stick a seed or seedling in the earth), etc.; or it may be cited Ger. I_Platz (a place, square) or platzen (to burst --- & that this happens fast may be proved by their plötzlich as sudden, rapid), or I_plaudern (to chatter), or I_Pleite (a bankrupt), etc.; or take the known Fr. I_plage ('plazh') as a beach (bc. we like to pljokvame-plonk there & don't move at all; the Rus* stress this even more saying pljazh), & so on. This r. surely exists as well in the Lat., where planus is a plain, planto is to plant (it's preferable to plant on planes, not in mountains, isn't it?; but there is also the idea of to plonk the seed), etc., what has come from o. Gr., where: πλατεα was a street or court (& comp. this with your floor), πλατεια was a square, πλατη was a plecho-shoulder-blade, πλυτοσ was washed (& in Bul. plitåk |I_plita^k | is shallow); even in the o. Skr. I_plutas meant floating, & plutam was a stream or river. In It., for their part, the let. "l" often happens to mutate to "i", so that from here we come to the ... I_piano (bc. this means also a floor or plane surface 2(and they live on their pianos)2, & here it 2(the piano)2 is meant mainly as wooden board 2(if you don't count its legs)2, as also that it issues low volume of sounds 2(there are some more ideas to which we shall come later on placeo)2 ), and also to their (& Sp.) I_piastras (m-ing small plates); as to the "l" -- "i" changing in It. there might be added also, say: the just ment-d fiore-flower, or pianta-plant, or piatto-plate instead of some platto, & others.
To this I will add also the Sl. flying which in Rus. is letatþ |I_letat$|, so that it differs from the West. The etym-sts cite here some Gr. ληκαν as to jump what looks like a good guess but I think I have smt. better; though before this I wish to squeeze here one Rus. jargon, legavûj |I_legavu^j|, what is a cop or informer, coming from their legatþsja m-ing to hit like horse, with the hind legs, what fits well with the Gr. ληκαν; then we may go also to the known I_league|s, I_ligament|s, etc. (which may be viewed as some long /lang- things). Also is said (by the specialists) that there were expressed m-ings about the equivalence of I/E. rs lek- & pet-, bc. in Gr. πετω is to fly, & πετεινοσ is a cock (I_petel in Bul., petuh in Rus., so that this is also Sl.), & in Skr. I_patati was to fly, but in o. Sl. it was letati --- what is an interesting observation bc. the rs are entirely diff. But what I have in mind as version for our letatþ is easier to grasp & this is the rel-n with the ... mythical river Ληθη (=Ληθα) or I_Letha in Lat., which has given also the derivs: lethal (lethalis in Lat), or lethargy (I_lethargia) --- bc. we can't really fly, only our spirits can do this (or when we are dreaming, but the dream is said to be a preparation for the death, so that it amounts to t.s.)!

~ ~ ~

So, and now let us return to the ray-I_luch & explain: why the East & the West differ here so much. The point is in this r--l mutation which should be natural for the Eng* & the Ger* but sounds strange for the Sl* where "r", really, reverberates. Anyway, in Skr. the shine was I_rocis & the light was rokas & this is where from o. Gr. ρεω |I_reo^| (to flow or shine --- to remind you the sentence: |I_sentences| "Παντα ρει, παντα κινειται.", or "Everything flows, everything changes.") has come, giving later many ws on the West like: your I_ray, Ger. I_Reihe (a line or queue), Bul. raje (striped matter), Rus. I_rjad (a line; it's o. & c. Sl., in Cz. is rad, in Pol. rzad), also Bul. I_rejs (a bus --- bc. it goes on a given line 2(and, hmm, let me insert here a small remark about one Rus. inclusion of an Eng. w., I_lajner, m-ing a linear ship, but we in Bul., obviously, associate it with the ment-d lajno 3(or with lajnar what has to be a shit-man)3, bc. we use the Ger.-Fr. variant marshruten for going on a given march-route)2 ). Then I may continue with Rus. I_rejka (a lath or rack, long piece of wood or metal), Bul. exactly I_reja (se) as to soar, your I_reed (looking like rays), Ger. I_Rad (a wheel or bicycle --- bc. of the radial spokes, I think; from here is their I_gerade what means: exactly, just, or a straight line), then the I_radius, surely (which in Fr. is rayon), & the rajon /I_region or, when on a larger scale, the known Ger. I_Reich (a state, but it is sup-d that this is kingdom of light & sun; or as adverb means wealthy), or then the Sp. name ... I_Reymundo (what is meant as king of the world-monde, here the rays are synonym of the king /-dom), also all the I_right things, though not those directly based on ordo- or er(ect)- smt. but on Lat. I_rectus (right, erect) or Ger. I_richtig, also I_recht (sim. to the last, but more like just), your I_raid (as an effort to apply some order; and Ger Reede, or Rus. rejd, as place for parking of ships), then the I_radio, the I_radium, the I_radar, etc. (<< also I_Rede).
Here is also Sl. I_raj what is our I_paradise (we'll come to your w. too) where the mental image is that of Ger. I_Reich, but, on the other hand, in Bul. we know one mournful w., namely I_raja, what is Tur. for a I_pariah, or proletarian, or slave, so that here naturally arises the question: what common thing may exist btw. the paradise & the most deprived people? Well, the point here is in the ... direction of the rays --- if you are in the beg-ing of them, i.e. in the center, if you are the sun, then this is smt. very good, but if you are in the end of the rays (what, surely, is not correctly said, but I hope you are not all mathematicians to weigh my ws very strictly), then this is smt. bad (in this sense is also Bul. I_rednik, = to Rus. rjadovoj m-ing an ordinary soldier, whom you call 2(not much justified, if you ask me)2 a I_private 2(bc. he is, in fact, deprived of almost all)2 ). So, and if now we chose to look at the good points then the Sl* are very glad hearing such syls bc. they say rad & radostþ |I_radost$| what in Rus. means "I am glad" & a happiness or glee (to stick to one r. in Eng.), what surely is so bc. the Poles (as I've just ment-d) say rzad (read 'rzhad') for the I_rjad-ray (what is exactly a happy ... horse-neighing). But there is also Rus. I_raduga m-ing a rainbow (& who can't be happy seeing it?). And also your w. I_red, bc. this colour is very loved one, it is rot in Ger. but in Rus. exactly I_rot is a mouth, i.e. the lips, which are red, & your I_rather has to be ment-d here (I sup., but also as variety of right); & then goes (acc. to the etym-sts) an o. Teu. I_raudoz, coming from a Lat. I_rufus, coming in turn from a Gr. ερυθροσ, & the latter in turn from a Skr. I_rudhira, all m-ing bright red colour, as a I_ruby. And then (& why not?) also your I_ready --- either as smt. very beautiful (most probably of red colour), or in a state for smiting (of the iron), or as well ordered, or the like. The etym-sts say there was Skr. I_radh as to accomplish, & also an o. (but still existing) Sl. radetþ as to take as good example, to follow, but all is meshed (bc. radh is in the sense more of Reihe-rjad, & the 2nd w. is in the sense of your glad; but maybe we are glad bc. of seeing, again, smt. red, or, else, ready?). And don't forget that there was also a very o. Egyptian ... god of the Sun called just I_Rah.
So far so good, but when we turned to the happiness I may add also that in Skr. & Avs. was exactly I_ray with m-ing of wealth & happiness, rati as to give (as present), & I_ras or räs as wealth (a dough, as you put it), where the sunshine rays are hidden at the bottom of all these ws. From here we easily come to Lat. I_rex (a king), then to the I_republica (rex 2(here meant as ruling)2 + publicum), or I_res (what means many things like: a thing, theme, point or fact, cause, contents, the world, etc.; I personally may rel. the latter to one Bul. w., I_rjazka, what is a streak or scratch, though we shall speak about this on ... I_Reis), or to Fr. I_roi ('rua', a king) having given your I_royal & the -ties, then to the I_reality & the ... I_reel (bc. in the reality all rolls in cycles!). And then: why not to remind you the name ... I_Israel (poss.: is + some ray); and the interesting Eng. pair: I_reach (given from an o. Teu. reiken or reikjan, what now in reichen /I_erreichen m-ing t.s.) & I_rich (i.e. he /she gets everything)? Well, and your I_paradise is Fr. paradis & o. Gr. παραδεισοσ, where the latter may be split in: para- (what is a prep. with many m-ings like: by, from, around, etc., giving, e.g.: Lat. I_per 2(as in "per cent")2, Rus. I_par 2(as damp air)2, the I_parallel things, the I_parachute, & many others) + poss. some disc or sphere; this splitting may not be very exact, but it isn't so important bc. the original w. was Skr., I_paridaeza (& the splitting has to be done there). But there was a name (poss. an alias) Firdousi (author of a large Per. poem Shah-Name) which is said to have meant "paradisical" (&, really, it has t.s. consonants "prds", if you change "p" to "f", imagining the 1st let. to be Gr. "φ"). ( There remains also the w. Eden to be cleared, but this will be done some other time. )

~ ~ ~

OK, and now let us return to the light & lying, and add smt. about the I_love, or more precisely about Ger. I_Liebe, which is also Sl. (in Rus. ljubitþ |I_ljubit$| is to love); or take your (& not only) I_libido, or your liberty (Fr. libertè |I_liberte|), the liberals, Ger. Lieberei (from Fr. I_livree, a livery), & others. Officially the r. is given from Lat. I_libra = liber, what is a book (& libellus was a book-store, or a letter), but then: it seems a bit strange why a book has to be free, in some m-ing, or very loved? The idea (as I see it) has to be that of the ... water I_level (where the water flows free & light, so that I may site then also o. Gr. λιβασ as moisture or water, what is to the point here bc. now it is to be read as 'livas'; << also litþ-to-pour), what explains your (i.e. Lat.) Libra (as a constellation, & as a pound sterling, bc. in Lat. this was a pound --- as weighted with some scales!); the Sl* call your Libra lira (just as they call so the It. I_lira, which has to carry t.s. m-ing). In this sense the book-libra (which in Fr. mutates to livre) is smt. opened to everyone (like the water level), but I have said that the libra was also a bark, fiber, what is rel-d also to the making of I_paper (even in olden times when there were I_papyruses --- and the last w., b.t.w., has to be rel-d 2(in my view)2 to one ... children jargon, I_pappo, what in Lat., as also in Bul. nowadays, means some food, but given by the papas-fathers; i.e. the paper 2(resp. the papyrus)2 is some chewed 2(or good for that)2 mass); after this explans is poss. that also the I_fiber might be some mutation of libra. Here may be added also the beautifully s-ing Ger. w. I_Libelle (which is, in fact, Lat. libelle), what is an insect living around rivers (we call it water-horse, & you --- dragon-fly), but also a water level & the instrument for finding of the horizontal level (we use here the w. nivelation, from Fr. I_niveau, read "nivjo').
[|I_comments| Well, the liberty (or the freedom) is a good thing, but it's also a very cavernous topic, bc. more freedom for one of us turns to less such for some other, and the best we can do (allowing more freedom) is to tighten the control for those who may have it (the desired freedom), so that in a near future all persons will be filed smw. with their finger prints, DNA-information, possessed fire arms, property data, and what else will be needed (say, sexual orientation, political views, etc.), & I won't be surprised if all people will be even permanently monitored (through some implemented devices, like the cell-phones) & it will be said that this is done for their own protection --- but however you turn it this is moving to a police state & diminishing of liberty. Or one may take another view to the problem, namely that more freedom in one place (say, in buying many & cheaper things, whenever one wants) turns to less freedom & even slavery in another place (say: in order to have enough money for these beautiful things, one has to be enslaved on the place of his /her work, either by monotonous & unpleasant work, or by the fast rhythm of making money &/or career, or the like), & this for one & t.s. person. In short: one has to pay for the freedom and very often it doesn't pay, but one, still, wants it badly just bc. when the situation allows more freedom we, silly creatures that we are, 1st want it & then regret our immoderate wishes! Or one more approach to this topic: for whom is the liberty of greater advantage? I should say for the stronger, isn't it? Bc. he, who is stronger, he will conquer the weaker, so that the liberty is a good thing for him, but for the weaker one it isn't so. For the weaker there are only 2 poss-lities: either he unites with some other weak persons & by doing so he /she unavoidable restricts his or her freedom in some aspects but gains in others, more important aspect, or, then, he willfully abstains from the desired freedom. That's it. In this way the problem reduces to the right judgment which we, alas, still don't have, generally sp-ing. But when we can't judge right then we, I mean the weaker one, are, & will be, if you'll pardon my expression, screwed by the rulers, whoever they are. ]
Anyway, the r. of liberty (as smt. beautiful & cherished, or smooth like the water level, or elastic & durable, etc.) is very old & coming from the East or from the Arab world, where we may find at least 3 countries containing it in their names, like: I_Libya (in the Middle East, Livia in Rus.), Liberia (in the western part of Africa), & Lebanon (or Livan in Rus., lying immediately to the Hebrews). Truly, Liberia & Lebanon are newly named, but there have to be o. rs there telling smt. to the people, & I sup. that the so called I_Levant (the Near East or the eastern part of the Mediterranean coast) is a phonetic twin with the Liebe-r.; as also the Tur. w. I_levent (a young & healthy man) has to be here (bc. we love him). From here we, surely, may go back to the I_lion, at least bc. in those places there were lions in old times, & the lion is a known symbol of liberty (& we in Bul. are not more satisfied now with having just one lion on our state's coat of arms but have put whole 3 at once). Let me ment. also the well known Eastern name I_Lee = Li (to say ntg. 2(well, not exactly ntg.)2 about the Heb. Leon). So let me name this view to the liberty eastern one (bc. I will shortly ment. other rs) & continue further on.
And there, really, are other ideas with which to continue, bc. Ger. I_Liebe surely is rel-d to their I_Leben (what is a life), as much as there's Eng. I_love -- life rel-n (or live -- leave, b.t.w., i.e. I exist until I am present); your I_liver has also to be here (as a very important part, & a tasty one, of the human body), which isn't exactly yours but Ger. I_Leber (where from their Leberwurst comes); & the Fr. I_lover too, though this isn't your lover bc. it means to twist (in a circle or spiral). Well, it isn't, but it has to be rel-d, bc. you know (don't you?) that in love-making some twisting is always to be expected. As also Ger. I_Leib (a body, or stomach, bowels) is here. And smm., when one's love is very twisted, then it becomes --- what'd you think? Ah, it becomes a I_libel, of course.
So, and poss. (at least I think so) here has to be ment-d also Sl. hljab or I_hleb (o. Sl., even leb as Bul. dialect), what is a bread (with the idea that hleb(en) is good for Leben; there was also o. Rus. labaz as bread-shop); and I wouldn't be surprised if the Ar. ... I_leblebie (chick-peas in Eng., but they are twice 'leb') is also in this cluster, bc. it is a good food & they cook it & make dishes with it. Etym-cally for the hleb is given some o. Ger. hlaifs (what reminds me the sim-ly s-ing w. I_loaf, to which we shall come again in another context; in Ger. it is I_Laib as t.s.), or an o. Icl. kleifr, but ntg. about the Leben is said. Yeah, but I may say smt., namely that Leben is very near to their I_kleben (to I_glue) & here comes also Rus. kleitþ (t.s.; & I_klej is a glue there), or Bul. I_lepja (t.s.) --- m-ing that the dough is sticky, like your I_clay, but such is also the life & the love (&, as some put it: |I_sentences| life is "an infectious decease passed on through the sex"). Or I may cite also Ger. I_Leim (a clay or glue), or o. Rus hljabþ |I_hljab$|, what isn't a bread, no, but is to t.s. idea m-ing a sticky bog, or then Rus. (Sl.) klëtzki (a kind of dough nuts), which have to come from Ger. I_Klotz, though this is a log for splitting of wooden branches (but the splitting is rel-d to the reversed act of sticking!), & then here fits also the sim. Bul. (da) klåtzna |I_kla^tzna| /klåtzvam (to cut).
As far as I have already changed the r. a bit to 'kle-' I may continue in this direction for a while & mention also your ... I_clerk, & then the clergy & the clerics, which come from Lat. I_clericus, which is o. Gr. κληροσ; and if some of you now wonder why I relate this to the I_kleben-gluing I have to tell you that the latter Gr. w. meant a lot-fate or a heritage, i.e. smt. that (in my view) sticks to us from our birth. As a kind of variation of this may be observed also the ecclesiastical things (ecclesiastique in Fr. or I_ecclesiasticus in Lat.), which come from o. Gr. εκκλησισ as to address the public (or εκκλησιασμοσ as to call a meeting), what is rel-d to Lat. I_calo-call; but even if so this has also the m-ing of sticking together or of to I_collect. I sup-d here has to be added also the known Fr. ... I_eclair (as filled with smt. sticky inside), but it is given from ex + clarus (i.e. smt. shining; though this may be an additional idea bc. it, really, is sticky). But then there's smt. else, Rus. klepatþ as to accuse smb. innocent, or also to smudge, what in Bul. is klepam, what is o. Sl. I_klepati & c. Sl. (Cz. klepati, Pol. klepač, etc.), with primarily m-ing of to smite (i.e. the hammer smashes the surface so that it looked like glued), what tells us that the m-ing of kleben may smm. be changed to knocking, what has to be so bc. there is a Rus jargon I_stukach as a sneaker (what, obviously, is from stukatþ-to-knock, but he/she also smears or smudges other persons --- i.e. this is t.s. idea expressed in another r.); poss. also Bul. jargon I_kljopam as to gulp, eat much, has to be here (bc. the r. is t.s.), in a sense that one smudges his mouth, or throws into all the food, or wastes it.
If we now return to lep-, then I may add smt. more, bc. in the Sl. langs this r. has another m-ing, namely I_lepa in Srb. means a nice-made thing, used usually for girls, resp. lepota is a beauty (& some of you might have heard about the pop star Lepa Brena), but this is rel-d to the above-ment-d things through the gluing, and then in Rus. lepitþ means to make smt. (a statue or a pot or a mug) out of clay (what isn't exactly like Bul. lepja-to-glue, but the phrase lepnoj potolok in Rus. means decorated ceiling, hence this is t.s. sticky leb- /k(h)leb- r.); there is also an o. Sl. w. I_dostolepen m-ing well looking or well dressed person (I_dosta in Bul. is: enough, much --- poss. from sto /stop, << them). If you think this is only Sl. then you are in error, bc. we may find στολη in o. Gr. as a habit (in sense of clothing; you know the w. I_stola /stole too), but here we have to work with syls and sto- results in the end in your I_stay (i.e. the στολη sits on us as glued --- like your use of the I_suit). And as to the gluing on le- /kle-, it has older rs (we shall come to them again, but I'll keep it at present as a secret where), bc. in Skr. I_lepas was an ointment, or lepayati was to oil or spread, which was = to limpati, what, obviously, gives the lymph (Lat. I_limpha = lympa m-ing a moisture).
Either bc. of the gluing, or bc. of the shelling (for in Rus. lupitþ |I_lupit$|, or ljushtja in Bul., is to shell, say, sunflower seeds), or bc. of both (i.e. both actions are opposite ones so that they may as well be signified with one r.), or bc. of the destructive ideas hidden behind the I_lupus-wolf (for t.s. lupitþ in Rus., or lupam in Bul., is to hit, give a blow), so whatever the reasons but here has to be also ... the I_leper /leprosy, which is Lat. I_lepra /lepre, coming from o. Gr. λεπρα /λεπρη, m-ing t.s. disease (also λεποσ = λεπισ was a skin or shell, & exactly λεπασ was ... well, not the Skr. ointment but naked cliff --- i.e. its "lepis"-shell has fallen down). Here have to be ment-d also Sl. I_lipa & Ger. I_Linde, which both mean t.s. as your I_lime (in the m-ing only of lime-tree, but the other m-ings are also rel-d with the lymphatic idea; comp. also lime with Ger. I_Leim-clay), and these ws are here either bc. of the tea (made out of the blossoms, which tea is a bit sticky --- lipkij in Rus.), or bc. of the honey (or bc. of both); and coming to your lime I have to add also the world-wide known I_lemon (which may be sour, but is juicy). In o. Gr. I haven't found the lymph but there are, f.ex.: λυπη = λυπα as a sorrow, mourning, what has to call the picture of dripping tears (to remind you the weeping willow with down-falling branches), and in Rus. t.s. lipa means also a forgery (i.e. this is smt. bad, in which we have stuck up to our ankles); then λιποσ was fatty (i.e. the tallow just drips out of him, or sticks to him; and it's better to say "to her" bc. this is the usual case); then λυμοσ |I_lymos| was a hunger (this time his /her saliva drips). Then here, though also rel-d with the long things, are: Eng. I_limb together with to limp (as smt. that sticks to or out), I_limpid (in order not to forget about the dripping juice), and surely the Lat. I_limit (as elastic tie that may be expanded as far as the "Lime" allows this).
But it turns out that on lab- /lep- /lib- I might have started in Lat., where I_labia = labium is a kind of mouth (I sup. you know where it is to be found), & from here we may come to Ger. Labe = Labung = I_Labsal, what is a wide-m-ing term for taste- or carnal- oriented pleasure; or take their laben as eating, wolfing, having big pleasure; or Bul. jargon I_lapam (to eat fast, to gulp); or Ger. I_Lappen, though this isn't to have some kind of kef but means officially just a ... mop! Well, Lappen means smt. diff., but not much, bc. it is meant smt. torn (& with stuck-out parts), like a I_palm, or a wrist with the fingers (which palm, b.t.w., in Rus. is kistþ |I_kist$| and corresponds well with their I_kust what is a bush; in Bul. it is I_kitka what means also a bouquet; & your palm uses t.s. idea, being both, a tree & a wrist), and then Fusslappen is the lowest part of the foot, its step (& they use to say:|I_phrases| durch die Lappen gehen, what means to sink like water through a sieve --- hence Lappen is a known jargon there for the palm of hand), and this is like Bul. I_lapa (a jargon for a hand), with the help of which we lapame (eat). The Rus* don't say exactly lapam (though there exists the jargon lapa-hand), but they have their I_lapsha (a noodle, said to have come from Tar. laksha, small pieces of dough), & also their (obsolete) I_lapti (in sing. lapotþ, the simplest woven bast-shoes --- to be put on the Fusslappens).
Or take then o. Gr. λαπαθον which is exactly I_lapad in Bul. & means a kind of green wild (might be cultivated too) weed with big (bigger than a wrist) leaves (in Eng. it should be monk's rhubarb, an alternative to the spinach). All this has to be rel-d to the labia (as mouth), & there was also o. Gr. λαπαθοσ (nearly t.s. as the lapad), what was ... a wolf-trap (like a mouth-hole, if you ask me), & λαπαρα |I_lapara|, what was a stomach (& λαπαροσ, what was ... a diarrhea --- surely bc. of much lapane-gulping). Maybe it is right to put here also Lat. I_lapis (a stone of any kind, even a meteor); and if one will say that a stone isn't a hole, then let me correct him or her, bc. it is, in a dual (as I've ment-d this many times) sense, i.e. a stone may make holes if it ... I_slap|s us (on the head)! This slapping (often done with lapas-hands) is called hlopatþ in Rus., or I_klopfen in Ger., where from come, e.g.: Ukr. hlopiez & Bul. I_hlape (what is a boy or, better, an urchin 2(&, to confess to you, that for a long time I thought this was the Eng. bangle but it turned out it was the Ger. I_Bengel as urchin, what is m.o.l. excusable bc. your w. has t.s. imit-al basis, here of some tinkling of brass, like in Rus.-Fr. I_braslet-bangle)2 ), or Rus. I_klop (a ... bed-bug --- as if begging to be klopft-slapped), or their cotton, which is I_hlopok (bc. the seeds open with a bang; in Rum. it's I_bumbak, & in Tur. 2(& Bul.)2 I_pamuk; from here we may reach to the ... eastern I_bamboo); or take Ger. I_Klappe (a valve), or their I_Knabe (a boy, apprentice, helper, etc., giving your I_knave --- this may be imit. of the flicking of a whip), or their sim-ly s-ing I_knapp as short, tight, strained, where may be added also Bul. & Srb. (but not Rus.) kanap as packing-thread, or Rus. I_hlam (a garbage), etc. --- but let me don't dig more in this sound-imit. direction.
Still, there are more ws, bc. in Bul. I_hlabav is unstable (i.e. not properly stuck in the hole-I_labia), in Lat. labes is a rolling down, slump, loss, & labo (-are) is to shake or doubt, hence here is the well known ... I_laboratory (where people crash or bore things, smt. flows, or they analyze smt. --- << annalis), as also the I_labourist|s (& bc. your labour in It. is lavoro it doesn't matter much whether the r. is labo- or lavo-; even rabo- will smm. do, as in the Sl. rabota-work 2(<< rabotatþ)2 but there the ideas are diff. & rotation isn't t.s. as sticking smt. into holes). Here must be also your ... I_label, bc. this isn't just a tag, but has to be understood as smt. good (for Labsal-ing) to be labeled at all; or then the Leibguarde (used to preserve the I_Leib, known in Rus. as leibgvardia), & surely many other ws (the Ger. etym-sts give an o. Teu. liban for the Leben-life, speak about I/E r. (s)lei- m-ing sticky or muddy, & rel. this to their I_bleiben 2(to stay put)2, but this isn't very good 2(in my view)2 bc. the last may have come from: be + lay). However you turn it but the sticking is present, through some elastic fibers (comp. with the Fr. I_lait-milk), but also some hole(s) & boring & twisting are to be expected. Well, and bc. we speak about the love, & ment-d the I_Leim-clay & the lymph, then I may as well lead you to the Gr. ... let. I_lambda ("λ") which symbolizes the human being! This is so bc. it looks like figure of a man (or poss. it's better here to say "of a woman", bc. it has, hmm, widely opened legs) with slightly lowed head (so that, if it's a woman, she says "yes", she agrees to what some other man's "letter" wants), so that this is, in fact, life-love let. (& in the Cyr. alphabet, b.t.w., it looks nearly so as in the Gr. alphabet, & as capital lets they look just t.s.).

~ ~ ~

Ah, it's time to finish this (so called) chapter, where we have observed many light, lying, loving, etc. things, together with their rei-equivalents, but having spoken about the liberty it is appropriate to tell you here smt. about other, not Liebe-based, rs for freedom. One r., obviously, is your w. I_free coming to us (looking in the nearest surroundings) from Ger. I_Frieden (a peace, freedom) or from their I_frei ('fraj', free), where is also the deriv. I_zufrieden (happy) --- where, I think, it might be interesting to tell you why the Ger* use so often their prefix or prep. I_zu (made in Eng. to "to"). Well, this is (acc. to me) bc. of their ... I_Zunge, what is a tongue, which is very often used for kissing (in Bul. exists even the jargon I_tzunkam for kissing), hence they have even "kissed" the freedom, and thereafter have all the reasons to feel happy. ( B.t.w., smt. sim. to this Zunge -- tzunkam rel-n may be found in Bul. btw. I_bliznak as a twin, & I_blizha as ... to-lick 2(or blizko as near)2 ) So this kind of freedom surely is sound imit. & has old roots in the ancient langs rel-d usually to the flying & rotation, e.g.: Bul. hvårkam |I_hva^rkam| (to fly; pronounced illiterate as 'fårkåm'), some Asian (around the Pamirs) I_farfar (to rotate or turn), Rus. porhatþ |I_porhat$| (to fly), Ger. I_fahren (to go, travel) & I_Ferkehr (a traffic, voiced m.o.l. like 'fårkå'), your far (away --- from Ger. I_fern), Fr. I_fiacre (a kind of car), Lat. I_fortuna (where I would like to cite one piquant Lat. proverb 2(so that the ladies may jump over the next 2 lines)2, namely: |I_sentences| "Fortuna non penis, in manos non retos.", where I will explain only that the last w. means to grasp or get smt.), one Per. measure for length called I_farsang (about 5 - 6 km), poss. the Arabian I_safari, & so on (<< also rotate). There are many ws here but more interesting seems to me to cite your (to) ... I_freeze, in packet with Fr. I_friseur or friseusse (frise means there: curled, round), or, then, the architectural I_Fries in Ger. (a frieze). This may sound strange at 1st sight but there are meant some curled fibers, that might be frozen (or look as if frozen), & the etym-sts say there was an o. I/G. r. preus m-ing, mark it, to freeze or to burn (bc. the feeling, or the ache, is t.s.!), and in Lat. there may be found I_pruina as freezing or snow, & I_pruna (nearly t.s.) as glowing coal or heat; also in Skr. was some prushva (smt. sim.), & in Bul. we have the verb pråsvam |I_pra^svam| (se) for to burst, or I_prishka (prûshch in Rus.) for a small blister, what shows well the sound imit. (here 'prr').
OK, but there is another r. for freedom used by the Slavs, namely I_svoboda (very o. & pre-Sl. --- sveboda). And what has this to mean then? Well, I don't want to generalize more then needed so you may judge for yourself, but this is rel-d, in short, to smt. ... own --- svojo /I_svoj in Rus., i.e. we wish to grasp smt. (in Bul. we have the jargon I_svivam as to pilfer, to steal "what is badly laid" 2(as the Rus* put it)2, where the official m-ing of this verb is to shrink). More precisely there was an o. svobåstvo (it would be better to write it as 'svob'stvo') = sobåstvo m-ing: my person, or another one, & the Sl. r. svob- was = to svoj-, what leads us to the Skr. where I_svas was my own, & I_svayam was "only" (hence, I sup., it is even poss. to split svoboda in 2 parts 2(bc. boda, or bodatþ |I_bodat$| in Rus., is to prick or goad)2 & to plead that the ending increases the m-ing of the beg-ing svoj-own). But this r. is known in other langs too, in the domain of relatives, say: Ger. I_Schwieger -sohn /-tochter /-eltern, etc. (a son, daughter, parents, etc., in law), Bul. svekår |I_sveka^r| /svekårva (svekrovþ in Rus. for the latter, what is mother in law; & mark that this may be decomposed 2(if one wishes)2 in 2 parts bc. krovþ |I_krov$| is a blood, as ment-d), or even Lat. I_socer (smt. sim., but the s-ing is a bit diff.). In this sense is also the Sl. marriage --- svadþba |I_svad$ba| in Rus. ---, & (in Rus., but they are c. Sl.) I_svat, I_snoha = svoha, & I_shurin (in Skr. svalas), are diff. relatives; there are also some o. Teu. ws like swes or sweis (my own); & in Avs. the r. was changed to hva- giving I_hvaetu as smo. of the family, or hva as to get hold of smt., what is --- believe it or not --- exactly t.s. in Bul. or Rus. (I_hvashtam /da hvana, or hvatatþ /hvatitþ).
Citing this o. Teu. swes reminds me about one country, I_Sweden (or Schweiz, or Shvetzia) which might be here bc. of the Sl. (here Rus.) svidnûj |I_svidnu^j| m-ing smt. very cherished (bc. we have already svili-stolen it 2(from svivam, although in Bul.; or take then Bul. phrase svidi mi se, what is to be stingy about smt.)2, i.e. we 2(more precisely, they)2 have made it our 2(i.e. their)2 own). I think this is a good idea, if the Swedes have minded this, but one cannot be sure, bc. their name stays very near to I_Swiss (or I_Switzerland /Schwitzerland, resp. Schweizer or Shveitzaretz for the people there) and the last may be rel-d to Ger. I_schwitzen (to I_sweat --- i.e. they are hard workers; & the sweat may be in this heap as smt. indisputably own, also cherished bc. is a symbol of our efforts or work), or to the I_sew|ing (shija in Bul, shitþ |I_shit$| in Rus. & I_shveja is a sewing girl there, but the r. is old, bc. in Lat. it was suo 2(suere, sui, sutum)2, there was o. Teu. siujan, etc., & then a Skr. I_sivyati --- i.e. the Swiss are fast & dexterous, what is to t.s. idea). But this I_swish|ing sound (& comp., if you like, shitþ with the Eng. shit) may come simply from the winds that blow there (or, for the sake of fun, they may happen to be also big gossips, bc. that is what Ger. I_schwatzen means); officially the name of Schwitzerland is said to have come from the town I_Schwyz placed in the middle of the country, but nobody tries to give an etym-gy for this name. On the other hand I_shvejtzar in Rus. means ... a porter (where shvejtzaretz is a Swiss), but this is due to the opening of the doors (i.e. it is a land of hotels, a tourist paradise), what doesn't exclude some influence by the o. I_svas-own r. (i.e. a Swiss might be meant as a head of staff, what fits good with our svidnûj). But the Swiss alone are not very consecutive, bc. their older name was I_Helvetia (in Lat., in order not to fight about the name bc. they speak several langs there), what has to be derived (in my view) from the ... I_half, in sense that they are half Ger* & half Fr* (but >> also ... apple). I personally am more inclined to choose the wind-idea, but this sviden (now in Bul.) touch is just nice. There might be other rel-ns for ws for relatives in general (like I_socer -- sauce 2(I'll clear this on socius)2; I_Schwieger -- schwer 2(hard, difficult)2, or with schwanger 2(pregnant --- this has to be from the verb I_schwingen 3(schwang, geschwungen)3 m-ing to brandish, throw, i.e. smb. has waggled smt. before her)2, or with I_Schwan 2(a swan --- i.e. the svoj-person is smo. flown to here)2, or with Schwanz 2(a tail, for doing of the swishing)2, or with schwarz 2(black)2, etc.) but they are dubious & not to the point so we shall leave them; though at the end may be added that the Sl. I_svat & svadþba |I_svad$ba| are well rel-d to our ... I_svada, what is a quarrel, bc. those who love themselves they often quarrel, as we in Bul. say.

Yeah, that is all for now (though there is another r. for the ligth 2(Sl. svet)2 but it would be better to explain it on another place), so that with this I am closing these big brackets.
}





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH {} AND THE LIGHT {} AND THE WISDOM |I_WISDOMCHP|
{
and it surely wouldn't be wise to miss the I_wisdom, so let us begin. This r. has come in the Eng. directly from the o. Teu* bc. even in today's Ger. I_wissen is to know or can how to do smt. (& das Wissen is a knowledge 2(& if you decide to split the last in: know + ledge, getting in this way a m-ing of smt. placed on the edge /ledge of what is known & what isn't, you wouldn't make an error, bc. that is where most of the inventions are usually made, b.t.w.)2, or Wissenschaft is a science). Further, der I_Weise is a wise man, & die Weise (fem.) is a way or method (that's it to be wise --- to find a way 2(out of the difficulty)2 ), but also a ... melody (bc. you must be wise to find a good melody; at least from the times of o. Greece the music was viewed as intellectual activity, like the sciences 2(bc. was ruled by a I_Muse)2, & you still use the verb muse in sense of to think); from this r. there's also the Eng. I_witty, & other derivs. But not the Teu* have given the original of the wisdom to the world, the Slavs have also smt. sim., the before-ment-d vestþ |I_vest$| (in Rus.), what is a message, & o. Sl. vedatþ |I_vedat$|, what is to know (& we even name our let. 'v' 2(which looks like Lat. "b")2 vedi --- we begin our alphabet with: az, buki 2(& that's why we call it I_azbuka)2, then vedi, glagoli, etc., what is near to the Gr.: alpha, beta, (called now 'I_vita')2, gamma, etc.).
But there are sim. ws in Lat. too, e.g.: I_video (to see, to understand), or I_visio (the ability to see, also some appearance or phenomenon; & let me remind you here the sentence: |I_sentences| "Veni, I_vidi, vici!", or "I came, I saw, I won!"), or I_vita (a life, but it is smt. wisely made; & let me cite here also the saying: |I_sentences| "Vita brevis, ars longa est.", i.e. "The life is short but the ars-art endures for long."; also to ment. your vital /-s), or their viso (to see, where from comes the phrase|I_phrases| at prima vista, or your-Fr. I_visage, or the w. I_obvious 2(smt. like: oh, I see it)2 ), also your I_witness (what differs in m-ing from ... witless, but is of t.s. r.), etc. We may continue with Rus. I_vid, what is a I_view, but also species (of animals or fruits), Ger. I_wisieren (to look or approve a document, say, foreign I_visa|s), your I_vestige & the old I_vestal|s (we may see them, or at least some people think so), your ... vest (why not? --- bc. it's a vital thing for a man, makes him look good; but also bc. it is curving around us, to what we shall come next), or, then, the I_vestment (as a long vest, ah?; or, better, the vest as shortened vestment), & the investment (m-ing therefore to put smt. in the vest-pocket, maybe?; or to send smt. to the west? --- well, I sup. to put smt. to turn over & to give a good turnover, what, again, sends us to the circle), or the vestry (as place for vestments 2(though usually not for investments)2 ), etc. I may also advise you to put here your ... I_advice, bc. it should not have come from the w. vice but has to be from the vision (though you see that the m-ings, obviously, are mixed bc. ... --- in short: bc the vice is vital, & a twisted thing).
One may say that we started with the wisdom & reached to the seeing & the life, what are diff. things. OK, they are diff., but rel-d, bc. it's wise to distinguish the things (about what we shall come on kennen & sortir) but in many cases it's useful to unite them; besides, there's also one important Ger. w., their I_Wesen, what is: a being, gist, core idea, character, manner, & all this, m.o.l., is the life as such! There is also Sl. vjaz (vjazþ |I_vjaz$| in Rus.) as a kind of sycamore (knotty tree; << s.), or vjazatþ as to ... knit (striken in Ger.), or vjazkij as sticky, or Bul. våzel |I_va^zel| (uzel in Rus.) as a knot, what is, all, in the sense of Wesen; but if you are still in doubt about this I may cite also one o. Japanese w., I_wasan, what is their ... mathematics (we shall disc. this science later on), though not as applied science but rather as an enigma, guess, or quiz (what is again smt. twisted). I may continue with one Cz. w., vaz, m-ing a neck, which is a winding thing (there was also o. Prussian winsus again as a neck), but then here, surely, is the vine or I_vintage, & your I_verse (Fr. vers), & Lat. I_versus (not just giving the phrase |I_phrases| vice versa but also m-ing: an imprint left after a plough, a line 2(or, better, a curve)2, a verse, or against smt. /smb. 2(in judicial m-ing)2 ), & others. Ah, but from the verse comes, surely, the ... perversity |I_perverse| (what is a widely spread thing, & not only in sexual m-ing bc. every human 2(& not only human)2 being tries to make some distinction btw. him- or her- self & the other people 2(or folks, or animals)2 ), as also the I_Universe & -ity, & so on. As far as "s" easily mutates to "t" (& "r" in many Western langs may be dropped) this gives the vito- & vidi- things, which are not only knotty & curving & grasping our attention, but also split or divided in 2, what may be seen, f.ex., in your ... I_fork (it's from Lat. furca, but you may start from, say, the verse, or << werken-to-work), or in Lat. vito, what is to make a turn (or even their vitta, what was woman's head-cloth in Lat. --- bc. it curls around the head); I may rel. here also Eng. vital with I_vitiate and you can't explain the m-ing of the latter as spoiled or corrupt without the ideas of curving or twisting (it is smt. so vivid that has bitten in itself). There are also Rus.: vitþsja |I_vit$sja| (to curl around) or vitievatûj (curling), or vitatþ |I_vitat$| (= obitatþ |I_obitat$|), what is to I_abide, live, or habituate (I_habiter in Fr., & you see the sim-ty of abide & habit & Fr. 'abitè' with obitatþ --- what is bc. there is some circling around or a repeating). Or also (why not?) o. Rus. vitjazþ |I_vitjaz$| (a hero, good looking man), or the Eastern I_vizir (visirþ in Rus., prime minister who wisiert-sees to the papers), & others.
Seeing that this r. (vis- /vit-) is so widely spread it is normal to expect that it was present in the old langs, and, really, there was Skr. I_vittis as a knowledge, also Avs. I_visti (t.s.), & surely the name of ... this lang. --- I_Avestan, coming from their sacred books called avestis --- must have been from here. But, sp-ing about life, it is smt. rising, going up (or also down), & you have seen that vici in Lat. is to win, & here is the I_victor /victory, & when smb. vitaet he often does this in the clouds, which are high in the sky. And as to the going down, there is Rus. visetþ |I_viset$| (Bul. visja, Pol. wiesec, etc.), what is to hang down, here is also Rus. I_ves (a weight), & their I_visok ('v`isok'), what is a temple (above the ears) --- bc. there, either the hair is bent down, or the ears (like by the dogs); but this, still, means also high, bc. vûsokij |I_vu^sokij| (or visok, read 'vis`ok', in Bul.) is exactly high! This hanging down isn't only Sl. bc. here may be put (if you ask me) also your I_vicinity (which is Lat. bc. vicina there was a fem. neighbour), & which means around us simply bc. smt. ... was placed too high & then it has bent & fallen down, bc. of its ves (or at least I sup. it has to be so, bc. it's obviously t.s. r., & there is Sl. exactly I_visinà m-ing high in the sky).

~ ~ ~

Well, but here emerges one sound-imit. cluster (you see that all is mixed), which I may start with Ger. weih- ('vaj-'), bc. I_weihen now means to sanctify (& in old times weihs was a saint), what vajkane, as we in Bul. say (i.e. your I_wow) has this m-ing bc. the sacred things (we shall come to this again) in ancient times were usually rel-d to some ritual preys. So in Ger. now exists die Weihe not only as a sanctification, but also (in older times) as a prey, what is given as I/E. r. (wey-) m-ing to hunt an animal, what can be confirmed also by Lat. I_victima, what isn't a victor (or -ess, as I would have put it), but a prey, victim; ah, let me add also that der I_Weih in Ger. is a kind of kite (a bird of prey --- & he vitaet in the sky). Yeah, but this, still, is rel-d to the Lat. I_vita-life, bc. smo. (either the prey, or, then, the victor) cries smt. like your I_woe (or Sl. I_voj, what is a loud cry). To produce wow- /woe- like sounds isn't exactly a wisdom & this is a small diversion from the point (to which we shall return soon), but let us remain for the time being around the weight-I_ves, bc. this may be rel-d to Ger. I_wiegen & there are some interesting moments here. More precisely, there are 2 verbs wiegen in Ger., where the 1st is regular one with forms wiegte, gewiegt what means to shake, & the 2nd becomes wog, gewogen (= also to their wägen |I_waegen|) & means to weigh, but they are rel-d to each other through the ... bar of the balance (which shakes to the one or the other side). Here Ger. I_Waage (a measuring-scale) has to be ment-d, which w. explains your I_wage (the payment that was "weighted" to you), & gives me the opportunity to cite their proverb: |I_sentences| "Erst wägen dann wagen!", saying: "First weigh it & then act!". This is so bc. wagen for the Ger* is to try, find courage (I_Wagemut), where is also the ... I_vagabond (Fr. & Lat.), one Bul jargon, foga (fast moving or acting person), your vagary & Fr. I_vague, Sp. I_vaguero (a muledriver), Lat. I_vagus (not stable, vague, traveling --- like in the chaotic Brownian motion of particles) or vagor (vagari, where from is another Bul. jargon, vagaretz, what is smt. indefinable 2(you may think, f.ex., of hot-pepper)2 but it usually happens to be put, I beg your pardon, in smb.'s ass).
As far as we have already gone a bit to the side I may ment. also the known Lat. I_vagina (smt. vague, isn't it?), the tendo- etc. -vaginitis, poss. Bul. I_bjagam (Rus. bezhatþ |I_bezhat$|) m-ing to run, Ger. Wagen (your I_wagon, or Fr. voiture-car), Ger. I_wackeln (to shake or go unsteady), & then Ger. I_Weg & your I_way (bc. that's what Weg means). But do you think your I_fog (or foggy) is smt. different? Or Fr. I_vogue (a big name, popularity, haste), what you have also accepted but in a more restricted m-ing of fashion-mode. Then, what would you say about Ger. I_Vogel what is a bird; or also their I_Woge (a wave in water)? Or your (to) wake (I_wecken in Ger., what corresponds with I_wachen 2(to stay I_awake)2 & I_wachten 2(to watch or guard some place)2 ), what was an old I/E. r. (weg-, read in your manner of "w"); there was also a Got. wakjan (to stay awake), Lat. I_vegeo (vegere, to stir, excite, inflame, initiate), surely giving all the I_vegetable|s (some "vego" for the table, but if seriously, then in Lat. was vegetatio as to excite, & vegetabilis as enlivening), etc., going to a Skr. I_vajah ('vazha', I sup.) as a haste, strength, power. And then, if we return to the Ger. I_wiegen--wägen |I_waegen|, I may ment. also Rus. w. otvazhnûj |I_otvazhnu^j| what is brave, courageous, & what may be split in: ot (from, out) + some vaga- (in the Ger. sense) --- with the remark that if the Ger* 1st try to estimate carefully the situation, the Sl* sup. that such person 1st acts, & then may, or may not, begin to think (like the vagabond). Here is also Rus. vazhnûj |I_vazhnu^j|, what has to be exactly the core of the otvazhnûj, but it means an important one (what, on the other hand, is very near in its m-ing to the Skr. vajah); or there's also Bul. vazha as to be fit for smt., to count, be of value.
So, and if we return to Sl. visja-hanging-down may be cited a Per. avez or avext with this m-ing, what isn't away from your "I_away" , bc. if smt. hangs (or rises up, as I have said) then it isn't exactly on the way, i.e. it is away. It is poss. that the known Tur. ... I_fez (Muslim head-wear) has also to be ment-d here (as smt. winding or hanging), although it might be smt. festive (Ger. I_Fest as a holiday, or It. I_fiesta as smt. sim.), to what we shall come later. But it turns out that the Lat. vici--victory was in o. Gr. ... 'nitze', i.e. the Goddess I_Nike (Νικη) --- & why, do you think, comes here this strange mutation? Well, it shouldn't be difficult: it is bc. of the graphical images of the Gr. let. "ν" & the Lat. "v", which look very sim.; but if the r. is older than o. Gr. then there the o. Gr* must have been the people who have mutated it (bc. of not having good let. "v") & then the Lat* have restored it to vici.
On the other hand (& don't bother, please, which one in the order of hands this one is), I have to add a pair of sentences more about Ger. I_wiegen (or Wiege, what is a cradle), bc. it gives also their I_weich (soft, mild, tender) & your sim. I_weak (easily to be bent down), what moves us to Ger. I_Woche what is your I_week, so you see that it just has to be weak! And if smo. asks: why the week is so weak, then I can explain that it is meant as smt. small (like Ger. I_Tag, what is a day, what corresponds well with Rus. I_shag m-ing a step, & with some tick-tack 2(of the Sun going up & down)2 ), where the I_year is ... well, it's smt. good & big, for which you say smt. like "yeah", & the Ger* --- their ja, i.e. I_Jahr! More than this, a sim. image lurks in Rus. I_god (I_godina in Bul., a year), which corresponds with godnûj (or I_goden in Bul., fit for smt., valid), as much as Ger. Tag may be rel-d also to their I_tauglich (again fit, but for more details >> I_Tugend). ( In Fr. there is ntg. interesting here bc. the week is I_semain 2(beg-ing with "s" it might be rel-d to the number 7 but this isn't sure, it is rather rel-d to their demain-tomorrow)2, it's poss. that the ending means smt. mine, or of given domain, but this also is questionable; although the last thing might not be so questionable if we go to the It. where tomorrow is I_domani, and it should be poss. to be split, I sup., in do + mani with the meaning that while 2(do in Bulgarian, untill)2 you just wave with the hand-mano and it will come, being so near --- but this isn't very serious and, in all cases >> also maham-wave. )
Ah, but I may be more precise about the Sl. year bc. there are several ws here: one is the god /I_godina, which is c. Sl. & is given from Ger. gültig |I_gueltig| (good, fit, appropriate 2(but I am not so convinced in the direct Ger. influence here bc. there are many Sl. ws like: Rus. goditþsja as gültig, Bul. I_sgoda as an occasion, choosing the right time, Rus. ugoditþ |I_ugodit$| as to please smb., Bul. I_godezh as a wedding 3(bc. the partners are matured & ready for, hmm, copulation)3, etc., so that poss. here we have just common ancestors with the Teu*)2 ), but it is rel-d also (in my view) to the going (I_hod in Rus., Bul., etc., is a step or manner of walking, or hod in Cz. is a throw, what is smt. sim., though the size of the steps may vary very much bc. I_hodina in Cz. is only ... an hour). Then the next w. is Rus. I_let (used now for 5 & more years, I've ment-d this; it is o. Rus. & church-Sl., also Pol. I_lata) which corresponds with the flying (<< letatþ; there's a Rus. song about how the years fly by, or flow like river, what is an old simile); and another more name is Pol. & Cz. I_rok (again an year). But with this rok not all is clear bc., on one hand, it may be rel-d (I sup.) to your I_rock (given from an o. Eng. rocque, o Fr. roche 2(now roc)2, then Sp. & Port. roca, also an It. & med. Lat. rocca or roccia, but the final etym-gy was unknown), bc. the year is smt. hard & big; on the other hand there is exactly t.s. I_rok in Rus. (also Ukr. rik, o. & pre-Sl. rokå 2(in o. Sl. ws the let. 'å' at the end is like your dumb "e" & must not be read)2, just not Bul.), what is a ... fate or destiny or fortune (we not always make diff-ce btw. fortune & destiny), & this may fit with your rock bc. a I_fate (comp. it with fatal) is like a rock in which all our wishes crash, but for the year we have also the saying that it rolls down like a rock (or boulder). The etym-sts say that the rok-fate comes from the "saying" (<< rekvam-to-say, or >> I_porok-sin 2(here in sense of what was written or predestined to us)2 ), & we, really, have many sim. ws, like: I_srok (an interval of time, i.e. when it was promised), I_obrok (also zarok, a bet, but here it's from our I_ruka-hand), I_urok (a lesson), I_prorok (a prophet), & others, what seems very probable; but at t.s. time we (in Bul.) have the saying that "A said word is like a stone thrown." so that the ideas are messed.

~ ~ ~

OK, let us return to the wisdom & cite also Ger. weiß |I_weiss|, what is your I_white, and you know that the white colour is that of the I_wisdom (white hairs, & in Bul. we say star 2(starûj |I_staru^j| in Rus)2 for old, but this is exactly the Eng. I_star, surely, though we shall speak again about stars), but this is also a pure colour (i.e. there's ntg. to make it dirty). In Ger. this colour corresponds with I_waschen (wusch, gewaschen), what is to wash (to make it white), & in some way with your I_wide too (one can see wide bc. the sky is clear), & surely with the ... I_water (I_Wasser in Ger.). Still, the latter is interesting also in another aspect bc. it corresponds perfectly with ... "what" (resp. with I_was in Ger.), & this is simply a sign of wonder (what a beautiful thing the water is; in Ger. exists also the w. der Weiher as small lake, where the wow-imit. is obvious). It turns out that this is world-wide idea bc. the Fr* say I_eau (just 'o' 2(maybe it has to be given as "uo" but I don't bother with such details, at least bc. it is difficult to show them)2, to remind you about eau-de-Cologne), the Latins said I_aqua (all their questions begin with qu-; or, to put it in another way, the aqua is such a place where live those animals that quack or say "qua-qua", i.e. the I_frog|s 2(where the latter is again a question-cry --- comp. it with Ger. I_Frage, a question!)2 --- & then, say, the I_aquarium should be a "qua-qua-room", isn't it?), and the Sl* say I_voda, what is rel-d to o. Ar. I_wadi (as much as your water is) but may also be said that it is smt. like "vo(t eto) da!" (i.e. "what a thing!"). I may translate, in this sense, the Lat. aqua in Bul. as "ah kakva (hubost)!", i.e. "ah, what (a good thing)!", & add also your w. I_quiz, & (why not?) the verb to I_acquire & the acquisition (&, then, the requisites) with the idea that the frogs, like also (generally sp-ing) the women (sorry, girls), speak in a high (& quacking) voice in order to attract attention (i.e. to acquire the desired man or thing) --- bc. that is the purpose of this questioning.
Yeah, but, still, there is one more "wise" thing in Ger., namely their I_Waise, what is an orphan. So what has to be the idea here? The etym-sts say that this is Ger. & Hol. w. only (with o. forms: weise, weiso) & rel. it to the I_Witwe (a I_widow) citing an I/G. r. weidh- m-ing to separate. On the whole I may agree with this (to add that especially the w. widow may be some shortening from "without"), only that I think at the Witwe & widow is better to look at as variations of the w. wife (to what we shall come in its due time); but, nevertheless, they don't explain the idea, which is, again, in the view that the white colour is smt. clear or (here) separated, which idea we can find also in Bul. I_sirak /sirache (Rus. I_sirota) m-ing t.s. orphan, but why the main idea here (in this new r.) is sim. will be explained further on serum. This adds to the m-ing of the wisdom the capability to distinguish btw. diff. things (in Bul. I_vadja is to take or pick smt. out, just like by digging to find water-I_wadi, or to I_vidi-see smt. better); but the wow-/woe- imit. still remains.

~ ~ ~

And now let us go to your I_think|ing, what is Ger. I_denken (dachte, gedacht), but the main idea here is of some ding-dong (of the brains, or whatever one has in the head --- bugs, noodles, or the like). Still, this ding-dong may become also a ... I_dung, isn't it? And your dung (bc., if one has said "a" he has to say also "b", am I right?) comes from Ger. Dünger |I_Duenger| (old Dung) with t.s. idea of "smt.", that coming out of the --- ugh, you know where from it comes --- & falling down through the hole in one of those older toilets with only a hole but without a water (unless you leave some of your own) says just "dung". This "smt." is not restricted to the human body only & may be also an I_excrement (some kind of cream, you see) produced (bc. this is a kind of production), f.ex., by a cow (giving in this way the thing which some of you call bull-shit, but I shall not call it so for euphemistic reasons 2(and, b.t.w., an I_euphemism, acc. to me 3(bc. otherwise it starts from the happy exclam. eu-, which is o. Gr. ευ- 4(like, say, the ευθανασια-I_euthanasia, coming, for its part, from the god of death, Thanatos)4, but which looks better in its Tur. variant as kef)3, so an euphemism is to call smb. a person, when he 3(or she, surely)3 is just an ass --- but that's another matter)2 ). Having chosen such piquant theme for disc-on I may (if you allow me, my dear readers), put it in a poetic line, say, as follows:
|I_verses|
"Ding-dong, ding-dong, ding-dong --- dung!",
That's a tune I once have sung ---
Just for fun of old and young.

So I think I have made myself clear enough and may continue more seriously with this ding--dong--dung (or tinkling |I_tinkle|), turning your attention to the way the Ger* mutate I_denken to dachte (there is some 'ah' in it) keeping in their minds a praise or devotion to this beautiful (Urrh's) creation, our I_brain|s (for which you say just 'brej' or I_bravo). Bc. there are many dinging things (i.e. the I_thing too), more interesting of which, maybe, are Rus. ... denþgi |I_den$gi|, what are their money. In other ws they are just some I_thin|ned plates, where is also your tin, what isn't (I mean, as a r.) the chemical element Pb. (I_Blei in Ger.; marked so bc. of Lat. I_plumbum, where from comes also your plumb) but a can made out of thinned piece of metal, which tin for cans is called I_teneke in Tur. (& in Bul. tenekija). Acc. to the etym-sts I use there were: o. Rus. tenka, o Tar. täñkä (i.e. 'tenþke'), a Cossack tenga, & so on up to a mid.-Per. däng |I_daeng|, Per. danag, or o. Per. δανακη (given with Gr. lets), which ws surely were meant not as paper money (which are Chinese invention) but as (golden or silver) coins. They add also some Asian tamga, what in Tur. is I_damga (& in Bul. damgà), what is a stigma (usually on the animals, but also as a blot), & think this is diff. etym-gy, but it has to be with t.s. idea (of smiting or making of some I_damage, though we shall come to the latter again).
On this place I think it's good to insert a small paragraph about some I_tender things (being "dunged" many times, I sup), like: your w. (as delicate, but also as an offer for smt., or as a tender-wagon 2(you've to see, why)2 ), your (to) tend & the tendency (which are Fr. & Lat.), then from here the verb I_attend (to assist in the "tending"), then also Bul. casserole which is tendzhera & is Balkan w. bc. in Gr. is τενζερεσ & in Tur. is I_tencere ('tendzhere' --- as if it is a small tender-wagon, or v.v.), or the I_tenant, or Fr. tendre ('ta~dr', as tender-delicate) or their attention, etc. Or I may cite Lat. tendo (-ere) as to pull, expand, swell, have a desire for smt., where from, surely, comes the I_tendon, or their adverb tener (tender, soft), or the I_tenor-voice (again smt. tender), or also Rus. tenþ |I_ten$|-shadow, & other ws.
Now, having come to this dam- /dan- r. I have to add also Ger. Dank (or as verb I_danken), what is your I_thank, but this is directly rel-d to the verb I_think, at least bc. in Ger. I_Gedanke isn't a thank but a thought. Yeah, but danþ |I_dan$| in Rus. is a present, or a tax, smt. to be given to smb. (hence we have to say "thanks" to the people bc. we owe it to them, it's the least we can give them), the same is Bul. danåk, also It. dono, or I_donner in Fr. is to give, and this is a very old r. what may be seen citing just Per. dan as a I_stock (the latter, b.t.w., or more precisely any commodity, in Bul. is exactly I_stoka) or some thing. If smb. wonders, why this syl. sounds so tinkling even when we give smt., let be said that this is so bc. we like to throw the money (don't we?) on the table (or on the barrel, as the Rus* say) just to show off. And bc. this is an often used syl. (or bc. of another reasons) it mutates also to dar- (in Rus. I_dar is a present, i.e. nearly equal to danþ), what may be seen in o. Gr. δωρον (a present or bribe) or δοροσ (a bag, made in those times out of animal's skins --- for presents or stocks), but the r. is older, bc. in Ar. I_dar was a house, a place (you've heard about Dar-Es-Salaam, don't you?), & in Skr. I_dharma, acc. to one source, was justice or truth --- but all this is in sense of smt. given by the gods; like also the name I_Dorothea (Dorothy for you) means dar-δωρον from the God-Theos. On the other hand, acc. to another source, dharma means internal human structure, lawful order, or our duty in life, our personal code of behaviour (i.e., this is smt. like the w. constitution in Eng., which may be used in legal aspect, or as physical nature, or as character trait). In other ws, dharma is smt. that stays in our guts, what can be seen well in Ger., where I_Darm is exactly a bowel!
But if one may think that this is out of place here let me say that it's on its right place, bc. the Darm, resp. the dharma, may be meant as some bag (for the food), or as place for tasty "gifts", or where the food is ground (like the truth), or as center or core (again like the truth --- bc. in Rus. the bowels 2(more precisely, the I_belly 3(the latter, b.t.w., saying us that this is a I_belle thing)3 )2, are I_zhivot, but in Bul. t.s. w., as I have ment-d it, means a life, i.e. the bowels might be viewed as the center of life; & they, really, are a core bc. in Bul. they 2(the belly)2 are called I_korem, what, obviously, is from the core); then (come to think of this) the just ment-d Eng. I_gut|s are smt. ... good (though rel-d also to the Lat. gusto). There is in Rus. as if a deriv. from this r., I_darmoed, m-ing a lazy person who "darom estþ" (just lies & eats & does ntg.), & I sup. it correl-s with the Darm too (such person being looked at as one big Darm); there is also an interesting saying in Rus. --- daru rad --- what means that I am glad bc. of the present, & although rad (I am glad to) is a diff. r. (rel-d to the red colour), it's interesting with this reversing of the w. dar; also the above phrase is read alike from left to right and from right to left (you call this a palindrom, as, e.g. "navy van", or "Madam I'm Adam", but it's very difficult to find such pieces in Eng. 2(bc. of the inappropriate for you Lat. alphabet)2, where in Bul. I've reached up to whole sentences with 30 & even more chars).

~ ~ ~

Ah, we shall continue with dar- /dan- /dat- r. (especially with the latter), but let me put here some remarks about your ... I_gift, bc. it surely (for, how else?) is the Ger. Gift, but this means there ... a poison! And it has to be t.s. also bc. in Ger. I_Mitgift is a dowery (I_mit = I_with --- &, b.t.w., bc. I've wondered for a long time, why is this strange mutation here of "m" in Ger. to "w" in Eng., I'll tell you my guess: I sup. this is bc. of the disturbing influence of t.s. Fr. I_avec 2(what in turn is smt. around via & avion)2 ). So how this double m-ing of the gift is to be explained (bc. the etym-sts say ntg. 2(except that your w. were built from "given", but that's an obvious guess)2 )? Well, it must not be a difficult question & we may find some illustrative examples in olden times, say, in the story about the wooden Trojan horse, or in the parable with the apple of Eden, m-ing that not each gift is smt. good & may turn smm. into poison for the recipient. [|I_comments| And I will not ment. here that the gift of democracy turns out to have for my country (Bul.) more the Ger. m-ing --- bc. we are living nowadays (about 2005) 3--4 times worse (taken on the average for the population) than we have lived under the totalitarian ruling, and this 15 years (not just 2--3 years) later, what makes about 5 times worse than if we have remained under t.s. ruling, bc. even totalitarian governments evolve (comp., say, Russia in the 20-ties & the 30-ties, in the 50-ties & the 70-ties, & so on), and the prognosis are to reach the European standard of life in about 35 to 50 years (if the dear Europe will stay on t.s. place but "she" will not 2(and with the entering in the European Union Bulgaria automatically become the last country there as regards the living standard)2 ), and nobody really believed before in the highly spoken by the ruling Communists ws about the death of capitalism & that we shall go ahead of the capitalists (more exactly we used to say that: the capitalism goes to its inevitable demise but we shall ... surpass it; or that the capitalism is like a pear, or a medlar, or a melon, & it's palatable only when is overripe --- what, of course, is true), but we were wise enough to "believe" in the power of centralized ruling, preventing people to fight one against the other, & forcing them to work for the society (even with the risk that those on the top of the social pyramid may not always rightly see what the real needs of the people below are), & so on. I won't ment. this --- did I mention it? --- bc. it's obvious. ]
Good, and now let us go to the dat- r., where are: Lat. dato m-ing to give, or I_data (-orum) m-ing a present or giving, or dito (to enrich, enlarge, copy), or I_ditto (smt. from t.s. thing), or also Rus. datþ |I_dat$| (or davatþ /davaj, to give) & sim-ly in other Sl. langs, or I may lead you even to the Skr. where datta was smt. given (exactly your data), &, f.ex., the name Jadschnjadatta (in Ger. writing) meant "from the prey given" (you may comp. the beg-ing with Ger. I_jagen, what means to hunt). And here, of course, comes also the date or I_datum in Lat.(surely saying us that the date is smt. given, established), as also the I_Dative case (Dativ in Ger., datelþnûj in Rus.). ( Ah, b.t.w., your another m-ing of the I_dates has come by shortening of their scientific name, Phoenix dactylofera, m-ing smt. Phoenician, more precisely the palm-tree that bears them, which palm for you is a hand & the tree in question, but this is an old idea bc. δακτυλοσ in o. Gr., & then I_dactilus in Lat., meant a finger; from here, of course, comes the dactylography or daktiloskopie, and from here we may go also to the I_tact, the I_tectonic|s, & other sim. things, but this isn't very interesting. A bit more interesting may be that in Rus. the dates are called I_finiki 2(exactly smt. Phoenician)2, & in Bul. they are I_furmi 2(poss. bc. eating them one has to spit the fruit stone & by doing so one says 'fårr'; this also rimes with our 3(from Tur. origin)3 burmi 3(in pl.)3 what are nuts, in technical m-ing)2. ) So, but it turned out that here may be added also the ... anecdote (which is Fr. I_anecdotes & Lat anecdota, in pl.), bc. this meant smt. unpublished & has come from o. Gr. ανεκδοτοσ as t.s., or also as non-married woman, i.e. not yet given to smb., & the beg-ing αν- as negation was to be taken apart, so that we are leaving with some "εκδοτοσ" in sense of giving; but then here comes also the ... I_edit|ing (Fr.-Lat.) bc. the last sounds sim. and in Rus. (Sl.) izdatþ /izdavatþ is to edit or issue (resp. I_izdanie is an edition or journal, izdatelþstvo is a publishing house, or in Bul. izdatel is an editor) what splits in iz + datþ, and then, comp-ing with your w. edit, I sup., it also has to be split in Lat. in: ex + dato (or dito).
Then, sp-ing about giving of smt. & citing Rus. danþ |I_dan$| (or danåk in Bul.) as a I_tax, we may extract some moral about the ideas of the taxes in diff. langs. So, f.ex., the Sl. tax is like making a 'dånn' on the head (<< done--tun-tat), where your (i.e. Lat.) tax is rel-d to the ... I_taxi, of course, & the ... taxidermist |I_taxidermy|, who fills the animals' skins with straw --- just in t.s. way as the state fills its "throat" (if you'll pardon my jargon 2(some people say "pardon my French" but I can't allow myself such frivolity bc.: what would then a Frenchman, or a -woman, think about me reading this book?)2 ) with money; t.s. has to be the idea also behind the I_taxonomy (as putting diff. cases on their proper shelves, i.e. filling of the shelves with items). This filling here is of the kind of stuffing or shoving, like in your I_tack, and is given as coming from late Lat. taxo (-are) m-ing to touch, appraise, or blame, or from sim. tactio, what is a tactile feeling, but it is rel-d also to the well known ... I_tango, bc. in Lat. tango (tetiti, tactum, tactere) meant to touch or probe (what shouldn't explicitly mean that in tangoing one has always to shove smt. into smt. else feminine --- sorry, girls --- but some sim., & more decent, idea has its rights for existence bc. I have heard one "poetical" simile that to dance tango is like to "grind a peanut 2(or, better, Ar. leblebie 3(<< l.)3, bc. its nut is a bit harder)2 btw. 2 navels"). In this way it turns out that the tax doesn't differ much from the Sl. mental picture for a 'dån'-hit on the head, but there are some nuances, & I may add also Ger. I_tasten (to feel with fingers 2(but don't think for now about the ... testicles, that may, too, be felt with fingers, bc. there the idea is more profound)2 ), or Lat. I_tastatura (a keyboard), or your I_taste, or the ment-d Gr. dactilos-finger, etc. Or take also Ger. I_Tasche what is some bag, but ... exactly the I_testicle|s in Bul. (ah, well, think about them if you like) are cynically called I_tashak, tashatzi in pl., just bc. of the Tasche-scrotum in which they are placed (& the I_scrotum in its turn is so called, either bc. it is smt. hidden 2(bc. to hide in Bul. is I_krija /I_skrivam, or skrûtno in Rus. is not openly, hidden)2, or bc. --- hah, hah, bc. men often I_scratch it 2(or them, if you mean what is in the Tasche)2, what phonetically is of t.s. r.); then I may go even further back to Ar. & Per. I_tas as wash-basin or cup (poss. bc. the simplest tas 2(also I_Tasse in Ger., what is again a cup; or tas in Sl., what is this time a wash-basin and a pelvis)2 are our 2 joined palms), but let me stop here bc. we are going aside.
And now, look at the Ger*, who say die I_Steuer ('shtojer') for a tax, but das Steuer for a steering wheel! If this view point, that the taxes are a kind of wheel (& a mild thing, bc. it's fem.) for steering of the state (& your 2(to)2 I_steer, of course, is Ger. Steuer) isn't a very good example for the high social feelings of the Teu*, then I don't know what may serve as good example in this sense. [|I_comments| And then it shouldn't be surprising that the social payments & pensions were introduced in Germany by a person called Bismarck, Otto, von, who surely was not a Communist! I mean that, well, it's a good idea if everyone competes with the others in his or her life, bc. this is natural & useful for the evolution of the humans, but it's not good when smo. just has to starve, no matter why. This is a socialism in a wider sense (or at least a social care, but I think that's the core idea of the socialism) & one need not necessary be socialist to see the obvious --- namely that when the earth (i.e. the farming) is not more the major source for existence & prosperity of the populace, then there has to be smb. who has to care about those without means for existence (in the towns); and if those to care are not the wealthy ones, then: who else? As simple as that, as you see. ] So that was about the taxes (though there is smt. more to be said shortly on census). And, one more thing: what we say when we have to take or to give smt.? This is also interesting, as an additional idea, bc. the Sl* say davam (or datþ |I_dat$|) when giving smt. (daj is "give" in imperative), but, on the other hand, we say ... I_da for yes, i.e. we want this dan- /dar- thing (& who doesn't?). The Ger* also make a sim. rel-n when they have to give smt., i.e. when smb. takes smt. from them --- they say then I_nehmen (to take), what sounds like the Sl. ne/net, what is your no/not (i.e. they don't want anything to be taken from them, what is also natural).

~ ~ ~

Now it is time to look more precisely at your knowledge, i.e. at the verb to I_know, what send us directly to Ger. I_kennen (kannte, gekannt, to know). But I may tell you in the beg-ing that here all is messed & there are several ideas, some of them going to the Skr. In Ger. kennen is a twin with können |I_koennen| (konnte, gekonnt), what is your I_can (could) & has given the Ger. König |I_Koenig| (King for you), but you know about the other can where smt. may be put (a beer, or cat food, or pork meat, etc.), so that there might be the idea of some container where from we take smt. (to what we shall come on sorting); or it might be the idea of some clicking ("know" sounds like your I_knot, but I ment-d the whip knut /I_Knute, and there are also yours: knead, knit, I_knob, knag, knack, etc.); or there might be some buzzing (to what we shall come on Rus. znatþ |I_znat$|); or there may be also ... the gene (in form of the I_knee), etc. The Ger. etym-sts give for kennen-to-know Got. kannjan, o. Eng. cennan, Sw. kaenna, etc., what was rel-d to können-to-can, what in turn was from Got. kunnan, what was c. Ger. coming from an I/E r. gen(å)- m-ing to know, distinguish. Yeah, this might be so, but this is the gene, & when we come to syls then they may have diff. m-ings & what rel-s these diff. m-ings is out of interest for the etym-sts (bc. it's mainly guessing, but that is what I am doing here --- guessing the hidden ideas).
And what about the tin I_can|s; or Ger. I_Kahn m-ing a boat? Well, here the old ... I_khan (acc. to me) comes into play, & Ger. I_Hahn (a cock) or I_Huhn (a I_hen), & Lat. /It. I_cantare (to sing), & Eng. I_cant as insincere boasting with being very religious (i.e. one only hits the bells), & other things. About the "cantaring" hens I think you have no objections (there's also a chan in Bul., which is exactly Tur. çan |I_chan| as a cow-bell 2(& if it was written can in Tur. it had to be read 'dzhan' & would have meant a soul, or my beloved, dear one)2, which might be traced to a Skr. I_kankanas, what was a circle or circular jewelry 2(but I'm sure it had to tinkle)2; there may be added also Bul. I_kambana 2(here the 1st syl. is interesting)2, what is a bell). This you surely believe, but why I ment. here the o. khan (Tur. han, or Tar. kan, also Mongolian, Bul., etc.)? Well, bc. this is not only the ruler, this is also the big house (like Per. I_hane), or an inn (of the kind of old karavan-serais), some kind of hole (like the Kahn-boat), & from very o. times it was God's commandment to invite the guests in your home (especially if it's a wealthy one); or, for that matter, to invite the clients into the shop, for which purpose the owner (or a specially assigned boy) calls in a loud voice. Ah well, you still didn't get the idea, did you? You shouldn't have guessed it bc. you don't know that in Bul. I_kanja means to invite (& this verb isn't Rus., hence it's smt. Eastern). And now it begins, bc.: how you usually invite guests; I mean with what? With a drink, isn't it? But drinks are brought in pitchers, which are called again kani (I_kana in sing., what is also Ger. I_Kanne, or your tin I_can); & then I may as well ment. the known Sp. ... cañon |I_can$on| too, which is like one big Kanne! And there was the Biblical Canna (in Galilee) & it happened so, that our Christ turned exactly there some kana-pitcher with simple water into wine, being invited there to marriage feast (having ntg. to give except to show some magic). So you see that there are enough "cans" to take this for a coincidence; but I may add also that in I_Panchatantra (a known Skr. saga) is spoken about one I_Ganesha, who was the king (the boss) of the royal cortege, i.e. he was who invited the quests!
To emphasize the tinkling (& that is where your I_tinker comes, too) of the kan- r. I shall add the Eastern (Tur., Ar., Egyptian, etc., known also in Bul., Pol., Ukr., etc.) I_kantar, what are the measuring scales (Ger. Waage), but in Ar. this was also a weight of about 45 kg., where the idea of the bar of the balance was also in play bc. there was o. Gr. κεντειω as to stick, sting, or make a hole (& κηντεμα as a prick or an end); & the very scale of it was called κεντηναριον, becoming later in Lat. I_centenarium. OK, but after O. Greece we get from here the cent (<< also I_centum), what I don't think has to be directly rel-d to some tinkling (bc. the numbers don't sound, they are abstractions), & better rel. this to the center (of the bar), or to the circle, or to the essence of counting (>> Zensur shortly), or to smt. else (bc. Lat. I_deci comes from o. Gr. δεκα so that the cent might be highly mutated from the 2nd syl. --- in order to get rid of the m-ing of de- as a prefix). If we now return to the r. kan- I may ment. also Ger. I_Kante (a border, ring, or end) which is given from a Lat. canthus, but you see that this is both: near to the Skr. kankanas-circle-or-bangle, as also is a twin with Lat. cantus (what is a song). More to this: in o. Gr. κανθαροσ meant ... a bug-scarab (I_scarabeus in Lat.), but in Rus. it is I_zhuk bc. it buzzes (zhuzhit, from zhuzhatþ |I_zhuzhat$|, you know that the Slavs prefer livelier sounds like 'zh', to the western 's/z'), so that the Gr. w. also must buzz. And it does, really, but in Bul. name of one ... herb called I_kantarion (Lat. centaureum, also from o. Gr.), which has another name, zvåniche, which obviously (for the Bul*) buzzes bc. zvånja |I_zva^nja| is to buzz (to make 'zåzz'; zvenetþ or zvonitþ in Rus.).
It is poss. that here is also the town I_Canes (some kana-pitcher, I sup.), then may be added Bul. dzhanta (which is Fr. I_jante, 'zha~t'), what is the metal ring on which the tires of the cars are put (bc. of its "cantaring" when hitting 2(though this is very near to your jaunt where the main idea is diff. 3(<< jour, >>jungle)3 )2 ), or also a Tur. I_canavar (read 'dzhanavar'), what is a beast (meant as a being, with can-'dzhan'-soul). Or, if we retain the kana but instead of singing add some bubbling sound (bålbukam |I_ba^lbukam| in Bul. is to leave bubbles or to boil) we may come to the god of fire, I_Vulcan (Lat. Vulcanus; but not Gr., at least bc. in such case it must have been with "β", i.e. read 'Bulkan' in some Sl. lang. what isn't the case 2(the Gr. equivalent is Hephaestos in Lat.)2 ), what has to rel. with their vulgo as common, in a big amount (>> vulgar, vulva). And then: what about your I_cane (Lat. I_canna & o. Gr. καννα) as that reed growing around rivers (where from the I_canvas comes)? I mean, why is it here when it can't be used for making of pitchers, neither buzzes? Well, going mills back adds some unavoidable confusions here or there, & I think the point now is in the ... connection (to recall you the bar of the kantar-scales; then in Rus. the cane is kamûsh |I_kamu^sh|, what may be rel-d with the ... comet --- >> it), so that for that purpose << I_centaur; very near to the cane is not only the Kahn-boat but also the I_canoe, which is given as coming (via Sp. & Fr.) from Haitian & Caribbean langs, so that this r. is really worldwide. I would like to ment. here also o. Gr. κανων, what is not your (Lat.) I_canon but: a stick, spindle, string, or ruler, i.e. the church canon is so called (beside the sonorous idea) bc. in it the sounds (or voices) are connected! Smw. here is also the I_cannon; poss. the ... castle I_Kent too (as smt. eminent from the r. of kennen), then the towns I_Bashkent & I_Tashkent (where bash is like your boss 2(<< baş-head)2 & in Tur. taşkent is given as capital city 2(& I sup. only tash may be meant as some tas-cup in which all important things are gathered)2 ).
But then I may say smt. about the I_canine|s too (where from the Canaries Islands come, as it is well known), though I am not quite sure why one has to rel. a s-ing container with the teeth of the animals (bc. this has to be the main idea with the dogs). It might be rel-d smh., say: they gulp big pieces of food (invited or not; canned or not), or they bell loud (or people cry loud seeing them), & the sound has to have given the cause for naming of the canaries |I_canary| & this is where the confusion with the dogs (in the ment-d islands) comes from, or a tooth is like a spear, as much as the cane-plant is. The most probable rel-n for the canines (we shall speak about cats & dogs on some other place), in my view, will be with Bul. I_kanara what is a big rock (like a tooth), & surely with the ... biblical I_Cain, who was the bad son, who had eaten like a dog the belle son I_Abel (Avelþ in Rus.); with this parable in mind we in Bul. say, if smb. is very scared & cries loud, that he cries I_kanski (what has to be correctly put as 'kainski'); with this idea has to be built also the known Fr. I_canaille ('kanaj', a bandit). OK, let us resume that, maybe, the I_khan was the man who I_kanja-invites people, who for that purpose sings or cries (like a hen?), has a big I_hane-home, gives refreshing drinks to his guests in kani or I_can|s, etc. And if he uses such "cans" then he poss. can well tell what to take out of them --- & with this we come to the idea of sorting.

~ ~ ~

Bc. to I_sort (or I_sortir in Fr., or sortieren in Ger., what clearly 2(bc. of the ending in Ger.)2 is also Lat., & so in many other langs) is to take smt. out, to select or pick the better sort (or find the way through the door-sortie, in Fr.), & the point is to know well what to take (otherwise you will have an ... asortie). Smm., however, we "sort" some not very decent "things", what we are used to do in the ... sortir --- I mean here that the Rus* use the w. I_sortir as synonym for toilette ---, but this process, really, is a kind of sorting (of the liquid from the dense, I beg your pardon, faeces), where the fishes, f.ex., can't do that (they are not so "intelligent" as the mammals are). And having this picking, or taking out, or emptying of some "cans", ready in our minds, we go now to the Lat. w. I_census. Well, there's ntg. bad in the counting of the population, nor in the censures, but the point is that here not the tiny cent lies in the basis of the counting but this taking out (of the good or bad elements; & that is why to censure in Eng. means to reprimand), or squeezing of smt. valuable (bc. census in Lat. was also a tax --- so you see now the Lat. view to the taxes), & there was o. Gr. κενοσ |I_kenos| as empty, devoid of, or κενοω as to empty or destroy (there was also a Lat. cassus as empty, but it isn't obvious that this is from the kan- r., it is rather from the casting). To the census I may add also Ger. (Lat.) I_Zensur as an examination mark, & Sl. ... I_tzena what is a price (some quintessence, major feature of the object 2(b.t.w., the w. I_quintessence was built in Lat. around their quint-5 bc. Aristotle in o. Greece had sup-d that the ether 3(smt. that carries the basic ideas of the things)3 may be looked at as fifth element, 1 + the 4 classical "elements": earth, water, air, & fire)2 ). But there is that peculiar moment, that by "emptying" the ancient people have understood usually the ... bowels (hence the ment-ing of the sortir /sortir was all right here), bc. in Bul. is well known the Tur. jargon I_kenef, what is again a toilette (& for us this w., being Tur., doesn't sound so decent as the Fr. w.)! This kenef is poss. Ar. but well acclimatized also in o. Gr., where may be cited (besides their κενοσ as empty) the known kseno- prefix (like the ξενοφοβια |I_ksenophobia|), which stays for smt. alien, or strange, unneeded thing (bc. smt. is taken out of the whole & it looks exceptional; or v.v., bc. it looks exceptional it has to be thrown in the toilette, ah?).
So that this taking out is one of the core ideas in the knowledge & the sorting (this is the idea of decomposition of the whole, scientifically sp-ing), & we have not to be bothered much about some toilette assocs (though it is good to know about them 2(or, as we in Bul. smm. put it: |I_sentences| The educated person is a clever head --- put him even in the toilette & he'll find what to eat there!)2 ). But there are other ideas (as I've already ment-d), bc. in Lat. I_cognosco (-ere) is to understand, to grasp the m-ing (where from is the known sentence: |I_sentences| "Cogito, ergo sum.", saying "I think, hence, I exist."), & here is your (in fact Lat.) I_cognition (connaissance in Fr.) & recognition, but this, surely, is based on your shorter w. I_cog (so that this is the clicking & working of the thought). But this is also the I_know|ledge, bc. co- in the beg-ing is for uniting (<< Hure about the copulation) or grasping (& there was Lat. nosco = cognosco), so that it remains only some 'g', 'gn', or 'kn'. More precisely, there was an o. Eng. I_cnawan & o. high-Ger. irknâan (m-ing both to know), but they sound very near to Bul. I_uznavam (to know, to get information); then might be cited an ... Alb. I_njoh (again to know, & you must feel here the new thing), then a Got. kann, some knan (t.s. m-ing), an Irish I_gnath (a known thing), etc., what they (the etym-sts) reduced to one Skr. r., where from also Sl. znatþ |I_znat$| (to know) comes (what shall be disc-d after a bit, but it sounds significantly diff. from 2(to)2 know). The clicking in the knowledge is better to be observed in the Gr. lang., where was the w. γιγνωσκω, what has given Lat. cognosco, what is given as I/E r. gno-/gne- (so that I was right about ment-ing the knot before); & especially your w. knowledge was earlier knowlache /-leche (but why is this "funny" ending 2(from laugh-lachen)2 isn't clear). And a pair of ws about the new things: this, surely, is a widely spread I/E. r. (say: Ger. neu 2(read 'noj')2, o. Gr. νεο, Sl. 2(Rus., Bul., etc.)2. novûj |I_novu^j| /nov /novi), & I think it comes from biblical times, bc. you have heard about the "guy" I_Noah, who is said to have made the arch, that has saved the animal's population (& the vegetation, I think), & in this way produced some new world (or v.v., Noah was named so bc. of the existing old r. for new things, for he populated the world anew); this is also rel-d to the disc-ed (re-) naissanse & to the geneses & the genes (which give the new life).
And how is it with the Sl. (Rus., etc.) znatþ |I_znat$| (to know) & znanie-knowledge? Well, here the link to the Skr. is nearly obvious bc. there was I_janati (to know, poss. read as 'zhanati') there, or jñayate in Passive, also in Avs. zhnatar was = to Rus. I_znatok (knowing, clever, man), & in o. Sl. znati meant again to know (<< also semantic). So you see that the 1st let. varies up to the utmost & that is why it's so difficult to link znatþ to I_cognosco to your (to) know. In o. Gr., though, there were more ws, like: γνωσισ |I_gno^sis| (a knowledge, or investigation, intelligence), γνωστικοσ (knowledgeable, in fact, scientific 2(as a method)2 ), γνωστοσ (a known person, or a relative), where from is the used in philosophy I_gnosticism (resp. gnoseology). But here is also the ... I_gnome, bc. γνωμη in o. Gr. was (& is) a brain, mind, spirit, γνωμα was a feature of smt., νοεμα is a thought or mind, & this gnome is nearly = to the invisible gene, but of the I/E. r. gno-. There might be observed another ideas, as, e.g., a rel-n to the angle, which is γωνια in o. Gr. (having in mind that the clicking of the thought is like making turns from the straight route), or a rel-n with ... the fire (but for this >> ignition), or to the Sl. thought.

~ ~ ~

Well, let me explain then how the Slavs think, bc. this isn't entirely unknown on the West and in o. Gr. In short: here the point is in saying not 'gn-' but 'mn-' --- as simple as that! But this isn't very clear, so let me make it clearer, especially bc. we use 2 ws: I_um (o. Sl. oum) & mûslþ |I_mu^sl$| (in Rus.), where the 1st one are the brains (just a brain is mozåk in Bul. or I_mozg in Rus.) & the 2nd one is the thought, but the verb to think is dumatþ |I_dumat$| in Rus., what is a bit diff. Let me begin with the um where I'll spit it at ones --- this is the Skr. I_ohm (in fact, om, in Lat.), the saint Buddhist's syl. (the 1st one of 6 in a short prayer to Shiva)! In a way this is natural, bc. when we think about smt., or don't know what to say at the moment, we say smt. like ahm, or 'åm' (in Bul.), or hmm /hem /hm /khm, but you don't count this for w. where the Sl* do (& f.ex., umnûj |I_umnu^j| in Rus. means clever, thoughtful person). There are many ws on the West remained from this syl., like: I_amen, I_omen (don't bother much that the m-ing is diff. bc. it is meant as smt. from the gods where we just gasp at it; and ment-ing the gods let me remind you the highest Egyptian god I_Amon, usually -I_Rah), then also Lat. I_mens (a mind, thought, feeling), or mentis (to think), or mentio (a speech or talk), or mentior (to ... lie, deceive, imagine --- i.e., he thinks too much), or Fr. mental & mentalitè |I_mentalite| (a behavior, feeling, way of thoughts, etc.), or your I_mind & to mean (Ger. I_meinen, though this is rel-d also to their I_mein as your mine, but it is usually the speaker who thinks & wants to take whatever he/she can put his/her hands on), or --- why not? --- the widely used suffix I_-ment (also -mentieren, like dementieren or lamentieren in Ger.-Lat.).
By the way, there is a peculiar rel-n on the West btw. the I_mens-mind & the herb I_mint, the latter being also a place for fabricating of money. This is so bc. the mind is smt. invisible (like a vapour, spirit, or aroma), & sim. idea is hidden in the making of money (there were not paper bills in olden times, but the coins were made out not only of gold, hence their face-value was not always = to the used material). For example, in It. mente is the mind and the herb is I_menta, but in Fr. the herb is menthe, & in Lat. it is menta or mentha. In Bul. we have the jargon mentardzhija used usually for politicians (surely, what else could you expect from the democracy?), or I_mente (stressed on the end) used for faked alcohol or money bills or the like, & you have (not that we haven't) your Parliaments where the people parlare much in order to produce big amount of menta-mint, or make a bit I_parlamah, as is said on the Balkans, what is probably Tur., but at t.s. time this is a very good pronunciation of the Fr. w. I_Parlement (& if one, i.e. each nation, in its own way, makes fun out of this highest democratic institution, so it has to have some major drawbacks 2(or bugs, to use the jargon of computer programmers)2, but that's another topic). As to the I_money, this is from Lat. I_moneta, which is used exactly so by the Sl* and meant there a coin & the place for making of them, but they are not only mint and the idea of a common equivalent (hidden in Gr.-Lat. I_monada) comes also in play. The herb, however, was in o. Gr. μινθη = μινθοσ, what is a bit diff. from μνημη = μναμα what was a I_memory (a remembrance), and from this r. is also their goddess I_Mnemosyne (Μνημοσυνη) of the memory (mother of all Muses), as much as (I sup.) is also Lat. goddess I_Minerva (equivalent of the Gr. Athens). Here is also your I_mnemonic|s, Lat. I_amnesia, & so on, and there are 'mn'- ws also by the Baltic peoples, like: aumno (a reason or mind), I_aumenis (a memory), omenis or omena (a feeling), etc., but all this isn't exactly the Sl. um, it is rather our mûslþ |I_mu^sl$|.
The Sl. I_um is the Skr. I_ohm but we may find smt. sim. by the ... Muslims too, where in the Koran is used (as I have read) the w. I_ummat m-ing the brotherhood of believers in Islam. This is an interesting w. & I may split it in 2 (syls) where the 1st one is our um, & the 2nd one is smt. twisted & complicated (I state this here as fact, but it will be explained further on I_matt), so that this m-ing fits very well in the context. Not that the Turks use the w. um now, bc. they say I_akil (akål also in Bul. as archaic), what was o. Ar. w., namely in the Koran I_akala meant a pleasure (physical or spiritual, rel-d, I think, to the Gr. καλο as smt. good 2(which waits to be disc-ed)2 ), but this doesn't prove that this r. was unknown some 3 to 4 mills back; they have also the w. masil ('masål') exactly as mûslþ-thought, judgment (what in Bul. may be heard in pl. as I_masal|i m-ing smt. interesting or piquant). And, b.t.w., the I_Muslim|s or Moslems are called mjusjulþmani |I_mjusjul$mani| (in Bul., but that's Tur. w.) hence I suggest that this name must also be split --- this time in: masil-mûslþ + man! Although this sounds strange for the Western people I find it highly probable, bc. the w. man goes back to the Skr. (we shell disc. it in the future) & the beg-ing doesn't look like coming from their I_Moses, or Mojsey in Sl., or Moishe for the Hebrews (who just change all "s" in the Ar. ws to "sh" & are very proud with this --- e.g., instead of Salaam 2(or Saljam)2 Allejkum, they say Sholem 2(or Shalom)2 Aleihem; in old times they had even invented the w. I_shibboleth just to distinguish from the foreigners who'll pronounce it with 's' 2(poss. bc. it is near to Gr.-Lat. Sybilla or I_Sibyl)2 ). And, again b.t.w., from this I_salaam, what in Ar. signifies the idea of peace & prosperity, comes the I_Islam (is + salaam), though in Bul. salam is just ... a sausage, but that's entirely diff. thing (rel-d to our salo 2(a fat)2, probably, or else to the salt (it is salame in It.), & to guess why this confusion may have come >> later solum); this idea has to lie also in the name of the ... I_salamander|s (salam + some ander), bc. they were believed to rebirth in fire (i.e. they have already reached the salaam state); also the ... town I_Jerusalem is some 'jehuu' /'jerihuu' + salem (not to ment. the cigarettes Salem); we shall come again to this on Salve or psalm. Even smt more, I am highly suspicious that the Eng. ... I_sell must be ment-d here, bc. the etym-sts give o. Teu. (this r. has disappeared from the current Ger.) sellan /sellen, o. Frisian sella, o. Norw. selja (to give away, not explicitly for money), o. Irish selaim (to take) & Got. I_saljan (to offer sacrifice). They didn't go further back but I find that this is exactly the idea of peace & prosperity --- exchange of goods, also with the gods.
So, and now let us come to the mûslþ |I_mu^sl$|, which is misål in Bul., I_mysl in Pol. & Cz, mislþ in Ukr. (there even the let. "M" is called mislite), etc., what (with the exception of Bul.) is one-syllabic verbalized 'mn-mn', around the o. Gr. μυθοσ (a I_myth, of course) but with the m-ing of μνημη. On the other hand, this is nearly synonymous with the Rus. dumatþ |I_dumat$| or Bul. duma (a w.), or Ukr. dumka (= mislþ), or Rus. I_Duma (their Parliament --- a place where people have not only to speak but to think thoughts). Still, it is interesting why there has to be such thunderous s-ing in the spoken ws (or thoughts), so that I think we rel. this to the I_dim (in Bul., or dûm |I_du^m| in Rus.), what is a smoke & etym-cally comes from o. Gr. θυμοσ (a w., thought, or a smoke; in today's lang. it's an anger, but this carries t.s. idea), what in turn is from Skr. I_dhumas. Other alike s-ing ws are, say: Gr. θυμιατο (the I_thyme used in churches), or Ger. I_Dampf (a smoke or vapour), hence the idea of the duma is that of a spirit (& the latter, b.t.w., in Lat. is I_spiritus 2(also spiro means there to blow)2, & before that was an o. Gr. w., but --- a peculiar thing --- in new Gr. σπιρτο means not only alcohol, but also ... safety matches --- bc. the fire gives smoke, &, then, the smoke goes in I_spiral|s).

~ ~ ~

OK, but when I_mozg is a brain let me explain this w. too, bc. the m-ing is sim. to that of mûslþ, & the s-ing is not much different. It is c. Sl. (say, in Cz. is mozek) & comes also from the Skr., where majjan or I_majja was a brain or spinal cord, or from Avs. (o. Per.) where it was I_mazga, what is a perfect match for our w. But here are several ideas put into play: one is for smt. central & highly appraised (in Bul. smajvam 2(se)2 is to wonder, or I_omaja is a charm or delight, or omaen is charming, what is in the sense of your brain--bravo; >> also mayor), an another one is for smt. foul or decaying or sinking, bc. in Skr. I_majjati was to sink (& in Bul. I_maja se means 2(not very literate)2 to linger), & also near to this are placed some small & buzzing things (>> I_mosquito, massacre). I would like much to link here ... the town Moscow (I_Moskva in Rus., early Moskova), either bc. it's placed on a low plain around a river with t.s. name (hence in the core lies the river, not the town), or bc. it is a big center (capital from o. times), but the etym-sts say ntg. of the kind & are in some doubts (there were some o. Cz. moskva as a dry grain, but this leads us to nowhere), so let us take this for a hypothesis. ( The mosk- r. with a decaying 2(or sucking all from around)2 m-ing may be found on the West too, though in slightly distorted form of Ger. I_morsch 2(decaying, marshy in Eng.)2, or their I_Morast 2(a marsh, but << Marsch)2, or your I_marrow 2(as bone substance, what in Ger. is das Mark so that << M.)2, although here other ideas are also mixed & the r. goes to mash-, like in the I_mushrooms, but this is sim. ) But then: what about the ... I_mosque (Islamic church; though there's another name, namely Ar. dzhami 2(in Tur. it's written as cami, but in Eng. it has to be I_jami)2, used also in Bul. as dzhamija)? Another etym-sts say also ntg. about the hidden idea (except that it was Fr. mosquee, It. moschea, '-sk-', & Ar. mosgid), but I find it very natural to think it is meant as smt. like a mozg-brain for the believers; & it sounds like Moishe-I_Moses (so that the latter might as well be a holy man with great mozg). In fact, there's also the name mechetþ |I_mechet$| (in Rus.; or meszet in Pol.) for a jami, which was Tur & Ar. mäscid ('mesdzhid') & Tar. mäčit |I_maechit| ('mechit') where also ntg. is said about the hidden idea, but I sup. (bc. the name of Moses doesn't seem to be here in play) that it is rel-d either to the messiah (to be disc-ed) or (more probable) to the throwing /casting of some rays --- from the r. of Sl. metatþ |I_metat$| (o. mechitþ).

~ ~ ~

So far so good, but the Sl. w. for wise is mudrûj |I_mudru^j| in Rus, or mådar in Bul., or mondry in Cz, (i.e. it's o. & c. Sl.), & although not much away from the r. ment- this is smt. different. Here the originals were: Skr. I_medha (a thought or reason) or I_mandhatar (a righteous person, i.e. wise, in a way --- & think of "an" as of Fr. nasal vowel, i.e. just 'a~'), Avs. mazdra (wise, thoughtful), or their I_mendade (to remember); I would add also the ... I_mantra (a verse to remember, poss. bc. it is thought for smt. wise). From these old ws smt. has left also by the Teu*, where in Got. I_mundon was to see, in o. Icl. munda was to aim (even in Alb. mund meant to can, be able), what are all diff. aspects of the wisdom. ( In fact there is also your 2(i.e. Lat.)2 I_mandate /-ory, what fits well if the obligations here arise bc. this is a righteous deed, then there is also Ger. I_Mund, what is your I_mouth, if it's meant that when you open it you have to say smt. carefully though, & if not --- you better keep silent 2(what may be so, bc. mündig is to be of age, & I_Vormund is a guardian)2; but, on the other hand, it may not be so, bc. the mandate may be rel-d to the ... I_mandible that opens & closes and in this way nears us to the I_pendulum 2(how it is with Bul. archaic I_mandalo m-ing smt. like pendulum (>> mandala too); or take your 3(to)3 I_mend)2, & the I_mandates, really, are for some periods 2(& then have to be "amended")2, & the Mund is simply an orifice-I_Schlund that says 'ma' 2(>> mama for details)2 or gives 'mn'-sounds, so that I will leave this as it is. The things are meshed &, anyway, it is a bit away from the disc-ed mudrûj. )
But when we omit the let. "r" (what we usually are not used to do, bc. the Sl. 'r' is a hard one, but we may do it for some special reasons) we reach from mudrûj |I_mudru^j| to the w. mudû |I_mudu^| what in Rus. means, I beg your pardon, testicles! This sounds peculiar, as if the man thinks with his testicles, but he very often does so, so let us have a closer look. The contemporary rel-n is with your muddy (or just mud), what is o. Teu. mudde (a bog) or in today's Ger. müde |I_muede| (tired), and the image of these "tired" hanging balls (bc. the phallus, oh, it isn't tired 2(that is, when it isn't)2, where the testicles simply looked tired) is not at all bad. The Ger. etym-sts say there was an o. Icl. I_modr (& you see how near this is to mudr-), but rel. it to Ger. mühen (to try, make an effort), what I don't think stays well bc. in this way we miss not only the "r" but also the "d", & this obviously is some mooing imit.; though it might be true bc. the m-ing fits. ( Hmm, b.t.w., this Ger. Mühe |I_Muehe| 2(an effort)2 has to be in close rel-n, I sup., with the small Tur. church-clerk called müezzin |I_mueezzin| 2(mjuedzin in Bul.)2 --- bc. in the Islam they don't have I_bell|s 2(another belle thing)2, & this person has to go up & down the minaret, up & down, up to 6 times a day, what is a hard Mühe, and this in order only to imitate with his voice the 'dzin-dzin' of the bells. )
Anyway, the Rus* say mudnûj |I_mudnu^j| for moving slowly (what has t.s. m-ing of müde |I_muede|), & in o. Rus. were w. muditþ equal (mark this) to medlitþ |I_medlit$| (also o.: zamouditi, mouduti, måditi) m-ing to move slowly (in today's Rus. medlenno is slowly). Maybe this rel-n is due to the fact that the thinking is usually a slow process (& that is why the people like actions & thrillers, not serious works of fiction), hence the testicles are stuck here with this idea of smt. slow & sunken, but this is fixed in the langs bc. mudû |I_mudu^| is o. Sl. (mudo, mådea) & c. Sl. (in Bul. mådo, in Pol. mada, etc.), & it was known also in the Lat. where I_madeo (-ere) was to make wet or flowing, & then, if we go back in the time, we may find an o. Gr. μαδαω as to flow or decay, & finally a Skr. I_madati /madate as, well, not exactly this, but drunken. Etym-cally müde is given as coming from the known Lat. I_modus (though >> m. again) & is said that Shakespeare used I_moody as pensive (i.e. not in the right mood), where I should add also that in Bul. umoren (tired, from I_umora-tiredness, saying us that we are nearly mortus) & umeren (moderate) are real twins, but this is diff. idea, of the center-medi --- it might be rel-d philosophically, stating that to be wise is to be moderate, but let us make this distinction here (bc.: to be wise means also to distinguish). The moderation is smt. else, & bc. of this is said (in one etym-cal book) that mådo has not to be confused with some o. Gr. μηδεα (used by the very Homer), what was, I beg your pardon, a vagina (as some middle point; scientifically spoken it has to be termed as homological |I_homology| thing 2(corresponding, not sim.)2 to the penis).

Well, there are other rs rel-d with the wisdom, like the known Fr. raison, or your sense (Ger. Sinn), or the intellect, but they are put in other places, so let us say bye-bye to this theme, for the moment.
}.





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH {} AND THE LIGHT {} AND THE WISDOM{}. HE WAS IMMENSELY POTENT |I_POTENTCHP|
{
Yeah, it is good to be I_potent (isn't it?; especially omnipotent) but you have to be warned that this is rel-d, smh., to the well known Lat. ... I_putta or puta (or would for you the Fr. I_putain, 'pjuten', be more appropriate?) & this goes mills back to the old Skr. But let us begin. In Bul. we also say I_putka (but not in Rus., << pizda, though), & in Lat. exist also the medical name I_pudendum used in Eng. too, but nobody tells us where this r. comes from, & when it's so then I must tell you this, namely that, acc. to the Buddhism, there was once (upon a time, ah?) a demoness I_Putana (read 'Puutanaa', to be more precise), who was such bad woman that God Krishna have felt simply obliged to fight her & eventually to kill her (I sup. bc. she didn't want to promise to better herself). It is poss. that I_putta may be split in 2 (pu-ta), where the 1st syl. is, obviously, a spitting sound (pooh, pfui, tþfu, or the like; << Teufel-Tüüfü), &, really, in Bul. Putana sounds like 'puu ta-(ja zh-)ena' ("pooh this woman"), i.e., she was an object deserving to be spit upon, but we shall not dig in this sound-imit. here & will look at the r. put- now! Bc. that is how the r. has to sound, & that is what your verb to I_put initially meant (to stick smt. in some place where this is easy to be done); if you take this smt. out, then you I_amputate it, or if you tear it in pieces, or put it in another suitable place, then you I_dispute it, & so on (say: repute, compute, impute, etc.). This is also your & Fr. ... I_pot /pottery (making of some artificial putta, isn't it?), hence the potency /I_potent turns out to be exactly the capability to "fill the pot", & poss. to the brim! And one god is so omnipotent, at least viewed through the eyes of a woman, bc. he can fill her "pot" so well, that there could be no doubt about him being really a god.
There might be some coincidences with the I_putta, like: Ger. I_Putte m-ing a figure of Amour (Cupid for your, or Cupidon in Fr.-Lat.), or their die Pute as a ... turkey (if "she", or der Puter if "he"), or your ... I_putty, but I don't believe much in coincidences. Judge for yourself: Pute /Puter is named so (obviously) bc. of the spitting sounds that these fowls give out, but the spitting lurks in I_Putana too; the Putte-Cupid is the god of copulation, & a copulation without a putta (I beg the gays btw. my readers to excuse me) is usually a masturbation (& the I_Cupid is also rel-d to the copulation through the cupola); & the putty, well, you know that this is some sticky substance that has to be pressed with fingers (or, what is more actual here, to be I_pat|ted), it is like a small soft bread (or bun) for which there are diff. but m.o.l. sim. names around the world, like: I_pitka in Bul, I_pizza in It., or I_pida in Tur., so that the ws fit in the context. I would squeeze here also the powder, but mainly in Ger. (I_Puder) or Sl. (pudra) form, as good basis for the pudendum (as pot for grinding of smt.); and It. I_pudore , or even pudicizia, as shame (having, or, then, thinking about, a putta, I sup.). And, b.t.w., there are other synonyms for putta-girls like: your I_slut (rel-d to the slit & the slot m-ing a crevice of a kind), or your broad (as smt. wide, meant either literally or in moral aspect), or Ger. I_Nutte (sim. to putta--Putte but mutated on the basis of Lat. nuda-naked, I sup.), or It. I_puppa (initially a doll, or cocoon), your tart (as smt. sugary, but also with the idea of pizza--pitka 2(& in Bul., if one tries to build grammatically correct diminutive form from pizza he has to say ... pichitza, what sounds very funny bc. this is also diminutive of I_pichka, what is just t.s. as I_putka)2 ), or Ger. I_Flittchen (built around the flirt, but this is the idea of the butterfly --- I_peperudka in Bul., to what we shall come later), & so on. ( I may even generalize a bit the diminutives for fem. gender in some of the langs and ask the question: why are they so chosen, with what might have been they rel-d? Say, in Bul. they are built with the suffix -chka 2(e.g. uchenichka is a school girl, rabotnichka is she-worker, etc.)2, in Rus. with -itza 2(e.g. uchenitza and rabotnitza for t.s. Bul. ws 3(though >> also Miss)3 )2, and in It. fem. is usually built with -trice 2('triche', when masc. is with -tore; f.ex. operatrice is she-operator, suonatrice is she-player of some musical instrument, etc.)2, and in Bul. this may be explained that uchenichka just has ... pichka-putta, or rabotnitza has tzitza-tit, and the operatrice has in turn piche-putta, or is like ptiche-bird; and even Ger. suffix -chen is often pronounced as '-shen' and this is smt. like Bul. -chka. Well, this isn't very serious bc. I explain the ws only in Bul., but it is funny, and, then --- who knows what was in the heads of the ancient people? )
But let me continue, bc. here is also the ... I_boot (in all of the m-ings), or I_botte in Fr. (a boot, in the main m-ing of shoe), or Sl. botushi (in pl., boots with ... ears-ushi?; or just botû); even Ger. I_Schuh, what is again a boot but from diff. r., makes there rel-n with I_schieben (<< s.) or I_schubsen (to I_shove), so that I am not making an elephant from the fly. Then may be cited also: the Fr. I_boutique (known in many langs), Bul. verb I_butam (to shove), Bul. budka or Ger. I_Bude (= boutique; where, I don't know how this is in Germany, but in Bulgaria all school-boys make a big fun from the phrase: to say budka with "p", what must be pavilion, but everybody thinks about the putka-putain), or also Fr. I_boute (a barrel or trunk), or Rus. obutþ |I_obut$| (to put the boots on, made of: 'o + but') & obuvþ |I_obuv$| (a boot), or --- surely --- Ger. Boot, what is your I_boat (the Noah's arch was a boat-boute), & their I_Bote, what is an ambassador (where I would say that either he was sent with a boat, bc. in o. times there ware no airplanes, or, else, he is nabutan-shoved there; from here Botschaft is an embassy), or the often met Fr. pot-pourri (as smt. mixed like in a pot), etc. I am highly suspicious that the fem. gender for your ship (bc. in all books that I have read the ship is usually "she"), & this in a lang. with no genders for non-alive things, has to cause the mental pictures of some entering into it or boarding it or the like (& do not try to convince me that this is bc. of woman's figures on the noses of old boats, bc. in Ger. das Boot & das Schiff are neutral; & if you were so kind to remind me about these 2(galleon)2 figures, then from their usage will follow only that these pictures in the heads of naval people are coming from very old times).
So let us return (for a while) to the I_pot, where Tur. I_poturi (in pl.) deserve to be ment-d, bc. they are special Muslim pants with fallen down bottom part, as if they go with a pot on the bottom (what is a very useful thing, especially if you are a woman &, on the contrary to the current habits, don't want that smb. looks at your I_putta when you bend down to do some work on the fields or elsewhere), but they have also the w. pot as a swelling or a small boat with shallow bottom; then in Sl. I_pod is an often used prep. (or prefix) m-ing under, or a ground, if used as noun. We may come from here to the I_boil|ing (Fr. bouillir 2('buili')2, with je-I bous 2(just 'bu')2, etc.) & the bowling & other swellings on bo- /bu-, but let us see what we may find on po- /pu-, what is an imit. of making of bubbles or popping smt. (say, laying eggs). Here are, f.ex.: the known Lat. I_populus (a nation) giving the population, or their I_polis (a town, directly from o. Gr. ρολυσ, what is smt. long, or with many parts, thereafter also a polis-town, but this is also the prefix poly-, though this r. is slightly diff. from pot-), or the I_police (smt. unavoidable for a polis, alas), or the shortly ment-d It. I_puppa (a doll), or then Ger. Puppe (what is a doll and a cocoon of an insect 2(& this rel-n, b.t.w., exists also in Rus. where the doll is I_kukla, and the cocoon is kukolka, the latter being also diminutive from kukla)2 ), or I may remind you the I_popcorn|s & the pop music (what is shortening from popular, but that's also smt. for the populace), then comes your I_pub (which may be, again, shortening from public, but also a kind of "bubble" --- >> kabak), then in Rus. publichka is a public library, where in Bul. such public house is normally understood as full with putta-prostitutes, & so on. Then around the popping & the puppa is Rus. I_pah (a belly, or smm. genitals), or also Bul. påp |I_pa^p| (pup in Rus., a navel). Sp-ing about pop things may be added that, at least up to my mind, this shouldn't be smt. good, bc. what has been driven to the surface is, usually, ... some foam or froth, smt. stinking or foul, but the people just like such things (>> also kefir).
As far as we are sp-ing about I_pot|s I would like to use the place to ment. that in most of the Sl. langs this is rel-d to some scratching (of the earth), bc. in Bul. they are called grånzi |I_gra^nzi| and in Rus --- goncharnûe isdelija, from I_gonchar, the man who makes them (where also some I_gonja-running comes into play, i.e. the turning of the pottering wheel), though this may not be very interesting, or not unless I add that by changing of gr- to gl- we come from the grinding /scratching to the material for making of the pots, named I_glina in Rus. /Bul. (what isn't much away from your I_clay, of course). Then I may add your fruit-I_pod too, bc. it looks like a small pot, but in Rus. (Sl.) we have also smt. sim-ly s-ing, namely our I_plod, what is a fruit (which w. has ntg. in common with the Western fruit-root). I think pod -- plod is an interesting rel-n, though etym-ally the pod is given with unknown origin (from 17th cent.), where plod is given from Lat. I_plentus (plenty), rel-d to the I_plebes-people, what is o. Gr. πληθοσ |I_ple^thos| (a tribe, group of people), i.e., this is the procreation & multiplication (but >> also ... plumb fore more details). Still, we are not done here bc. there was Lat. I_pottus, or It. potto, etc. (officially given, strangely why, as with unknown etym-gy?), then o. Gr. ποτηρ, also church-Sl. I_potir, all this m-ing a cup (a kind of pottery), what I find very natural to rel. (at least) to Lat. I_patera, what is one special sacred cup used in religious ceremonies.
This Lat. I_patera surely (at least for me) has to be rel-d to the well known I_pater (a father or grounder), who is also the church-papa pope & Rus. I_papa (a I_father; where the latter, b.t.w., is rather a person placed farther away on the genealogical tree), or Ger. I_Pate (God-father), or Lat. I_patris (in pl., senators in ancient Rome, called also patricians). Patr- may easily became part-, but let us not digress to this now (or, if you want so much to change the m-ing, then << papyrus or I_pappo, where the father gives the 2(chewed)2 food), bc. more important for me is to cite one Skr. I_patera, which meant, this time, not a cup but a ... crutch, a stick to support smb. straight by walking, what is exactly the m-ing of Bul. archaic I_pateritza! One may take this for a coincidence but it isn't, bc. the I_pottus--patera-cup, the papa-father, & the pateritza-crutch, serve all to give us support (in live); and this r. is old, bc. there was o. Gr. πατηρ (or new Gr. πατερασ) & Skr. I_pati /pater (given also as pitar) as a father, what was I/E. r. 'påter-'. In this way we jumped from the I_putta--pot to the pater-father, but the things are smh. rel-d --- at least bc. the father uses very often this special woman's "pot" --- & I shall jump even more in the m-ing to the ... Sl. body, what is made out of plotþ |I_plot$| (or plåt in Bul., c. Sl.) m-ing the flesh (& blood), where the point isn't in smt. flat, but in smt. that becomes plenty, gives I_plod-fruits. The etym-sts give also some Blt. I_pluta, which in Lithuanian means a skin, but in Latvian means a body, layer, or skin, & then I may add also Bul. (Sl.) verb I_pleta (to knit --- as making some kind of skin), & it is difficult to explain this swelling without the ideas on pot--putta here.
Ah, this I_putta --- I just can't resist the temptation to make one more effort to raise your educational level adding smt. about the man's ... I_foreskin (I_Vorhaut in Ger., or krajnjaja plotþ in Rus.) which in Lat. was called exactly I_praeputium (bc. is placed pre-before the thing in question). You know that the Hebrews & Muslims are very strict about cutting it away, but you poss. don't know why this is so? But I don't intend to go here in long explans about their Jahve, resp. Allah, who is so ... silly that can't distinguish His own followers from the other men (& then: what about the women? --- why isn't it required for them to cut, say, a small portion of their left ear?). I don't have this in mind, bc. there are many prejudices in each religion, but in most cases they are reasonable, i.e. the question is not how people have to be forced to do smt. good (even being fooled), but why it is good for them? Well, the question so put, it shouldn't be difficult to answer it, it is bc. of ... the sand! Bc. when you lie on the sand doing what usually is done in such cases then some grains of sand are just bound to enter the "connection space" (btw. the praeputium & the putta, to put is scientifically), & if for the woman this may just enhance the pleasure then for the man it isn't so, these grains may cause infections & swellings & make the man incapable to do his part of the play. As simple as that.

~ ~ ~

OK, but bc., I am sure, some of my readers will still not believe me about the rel-n putta -- potent I may change the r. and ask you another question, namely: what is the closest rel-n for your w. I_feel /-ing? Also an easy question --- with the ... I_fill /-ing. of course, bc. you can't feel well until smt. (a stomach, the brains, your house, etc. --- it depends on the kind of pleasure) is filled to the top. So is also in the sex. [|I_comments| And here I just can't restrain myself from some remarks about the filling and emptying, bc. these are 2 opposed processes, but both of them may bring us pleasure, though in diff. ways. The filling is the slowest act & there the pleasure isn't so explosive, being extended on a longer interval of time, but when it comes it satisfies us in a more profound way (no matter whether we are sp-ing about sex, or about gaining of some knowledge, or about sparing of money to buy a house, etc.); whereas the spending is almost momentous but gives us greater pleasure (though we are feeling a bit exhausted after this --- again no matter whether this is in sexual m-ing, or you have taken some important exam, or have given the money to buy the house or whatever it was). So if we come now to the sex, the man's & woman's part there are diff. (these "small diff-ces" that will never make the woman really equal to the man but that's another matter), and the woman (bc. of the thoughtfulness of my Urrh, mark this) not only fills "smt." but also empties smt. else, hence she feels both these processes, she is better constructed as "pleasure machine" than the man! If this can give you, my dear readeress, some feeling for justice in life, then I am glad having been of a help for you. ] So, and very near to this feel -- fill rel-n is the ... fool, but we shall leave him for some later time.
But if some of you think the picture looks so only in Eng. then they, surely, are in error, bc. in Ger. Gefühl |I_Gefuehl| is a feeling, from fühlen (to feel), and füllen |I_fuellen| is to fill (&, f.ex., a Füller is a fountain pen, Fülle is abundance or plumpness, Fülling is a tooth-filling, etc.). There is smt. more to this, bc. in Ger. Erfüllung |I_Erfuellung| (translated exactly with t.s. m-ing in Rus. /Bul. as ispolnenie /izpålnenie) is your I_performance, and I don't know what is more correctly put --- whether to start from the form as you (i.e. the Fr*) do, or to look at it as smt. that fills us with emotions. Smt. sim. one may find in the ment-d Ger. Glück |I_Glueck| (a happiness), what, in addition to the luch-ray, is rel-d to the gulping, filling of the mouth & the stomach. Such is the case also with the well known Lat. I_gusto, where from comes Ger. I_degustieren (in Ger. verbs the ending -ieren stays always for Lat. ws) or your & Fr. I_gustation ('gustasio~' for the Fr*), and there is Rus. I_gustoj /gusto (gåst /-o in Bul.), m-ing thick, dense. If you still didn't get quite well while gåst has to be smt. gusto, then imagine a field with some crop on it. In Bul. we use also to say (as a jargon) that smo. is gåst with smb. when they maintain good rel-nships.
To be even more convincing I may ment. also Ger. I_wohl, what means good (like your I_well, and you maybe have heard the often used Ger. "Ja wohl" as OK), what obviously is rel-d to their I_wollen (to will), what is Lat. I_volo (volui, velle), then Fr. vouloir, etc. in other langs; or take Lat. volens m-ing (free-)willed or fortunate (where from is the phrase:|I_phrases| volens-nevolens, which is exactly so in Sl. 2(volju-nevolju)2 & means: whether you want it or not). There is also I_volo (volare) in Lat. what is to fly or soar, where from is the Fr. I_volant ('vola~', a steering wheel of a car, in Bul. it is also volan, but in Fr. it means also flying, what has to be so bc. we all wish to fly); and there is also Lat. vola as a ... hand, i.e. it is the instrument for accomplishing of our goals; I may cite also Sl. I_volja as a I_will, & we may come again to wollen on another place. Ja wohl, but here is also Ger.-Lat. I_Volumen (a volume), & when the volume satisfies us we (i.e. the Ger*) say that it is I_voll (I_full for you); you, for your part, make the obvious rel-n btw. I_well & ... (to) I_swell (the last being poss. built from "it's well"); & in Rus. (c. Sl.) uvelichitþ |I_uvelichit$| means: to add, enhance, increase, what may as well be built as: oh + "well", though we have our Sl.: I_velik /velikij /velki /etc. as great (& velichie as greatness; or to add also that in Bul. the Easter is called Velikden 2(with den = day)2 ). Then there is the Eng. I_content both as volume and as glad, happy; and there is our Sl. I_dovolen /dovolþnûj (Bul. /Rus.) or zadovolen m-ing happy, contented, what again says us that we can have (whatever we wanted) in abundance (at a volja-will). Yeah, |I_phrases| ecce homo, as the Rom* have said, we can't be well until we are full.
Still, bc. the Ger. lang. isn't much away from the Eng. (i.e., in reversed order), let us look for a while by the Sl*, where the feeling is I_chuvstvo (& chuvstvovatþ is Rus. for to feel; nearly t.s. is in Bul.), & it is rel-d (in my view) with the hearing, what is I_chuvam in Bul. The Rus* haven't the last verb, but they have smt. better --- their I_chutko, what means compassionate, with feeling, also chutþ |I_chut$|, what is a small amount of smt., just on the bottom verge of feeling. And I_chuvam in Bul. is used also as dialect for ... keeping animals, what I think is again in the sphere of feelings. ( On the other hand there might be smt. else, & old, in play here, bc. I have quite accidentally found that in ... Afghani I_chucha is a small animal or chicken, or even a child, so that this might lie around Rus. I_kucha, what is a heap; there exists also one rarely heard Bul. dialect, chuchvam 2(se)2, m-ing to squat & squeeze oneself in some crowded place; and there is also Bul. & Rus I_chuchelo as a scare-crow. This r., when with 'k', is widely spread in the Sl. langs 2(like: Ukr. kucha, Pol. I_kuczki, Bul. kupchina, Cz. kuche, etc.)2, & in the Blt. too 2(f.ex., in Lithuanian I_kaucas was a pine cone, & kaukara was a hill)2, what 2(in my view)2 is a variation of the kåt |I_ka^t|-corner as smt. separated 2(to what we shall come smm.)2, though the etym-sts go here to the highness 2(Got. hauhs, now I_hoch, as high)2 but this sounds diff. Even if the kucha isn't on its right place here, with this moving aside we got at least where from the ... I_Caucasus 2(Caucasian mountain)2 has to have come. As the oldest w. here is given a Skr. I_kulam, m-ing a folk or a flock, but this, again, is a bit diff. in its s-ing. )
Anyway, if I_chuvam in its use for animals isn't very representative, as a dialect, then there is the beautifully s-ing Rus. w. chajatþ |I_chajat$|, what is to care much or to yearn, & then nechajanno is unexpectedly (where the latter has ntg. to do with their ... I_chaj, what is the tee which comes from the name of I_China 2(though I, personally, suspect that here the name of ... I_Ceylon is more suitable bc. on the Far East they prefer 'tz' or 'dz', what might have easily become chaj; & as to the name of China: all nations have mutilated its name, so that for you it is read 'Chajna', for the Ger* is 'Hina', & for the Slavs is Kitaj, what is better bc. it's nearer to the o., from the times of Marco Polo, I_Kathai 3(in Ger. version, or Cathay in Eng.)3 )2 ). In Bul. may also be found smt. sim. to the Rus. chajatþ, but we use this in negative as I_nehajno, what is carelessly, clumsily, or: az ne haja, what is "I don't care". The o. ws given here are: a Skr. I_cinoti as to heap, or place, or gather together, & Avs. I_chayeti as to choose or want, what is a very good match for chajatþ. This isn't exactly a filling (in fact, the rel-n I_chuvstvo -- chuvam /chutþ |I_chut$| is enough to illustrate the point), but it is also not much away bc. we form here some groups, stick one to the other; & when I have given these o. ws, so let me add also Sl. I_chin, what isn't your chin, that's for sure, it is mainly children's desk, & from here a rank in an hierarchy too (bc. they are officers of a kind & have to behave, like in the schools), or also I_chinno is to have appropriate behavior, to act decently, or I_chinovnik is an employee. This 'ch' here surely is o. & Eastern, & I would have preferred to add here your ... I_child (exactly the Eng. w.), but officially it is given from the r. kin- /cin- leading us to the gene (>> g. later). ( Yeah, but the put under pressure Sl. chinovnik-employee reminds me about It. I_impiegato m-ing exactly the same, and the idea here has to be similar bc. piegare 2(what in Bul. is pregåvam)2 there means to fold, bend. )
( I am trying not to be very boring here, otherwise for the child are given: a Got. kildhei as a womb, in I_kildo as to be pregnant 2(but you may be sure that the killing has ntg. to do here)2, Dan. kuld & Swiss I_kalder as posterity, what has become later cild & cildre --- but not only are such explans tedious, this also bends to Ger. ... I_Kalb 2(a calf)2, and to site just Ger. I_Kind 2(exactly a child)2 is preferable for my purpose. Starting with the let. 'k' it may be traced to the Skr. I_kulam, but I suspect that the o. Eng* have carried with them some liking to the sound 'ch', & have had some vague & rudimental idea about chajatþ--chayeti--chuvstvo, or else have 2(smh.)2 heard that in ... Tur. çoluk |I_choluk| /çokuk is again a child 2(& çelebi |I_chelebi| is a man, Mister)2, & in o. Sl. 2(in Bul. as dialect)2 exists nearly t.s., cheljadþ |I_cheljad$|, with m-ing again of a posterity, or I_chado /chedo as a child. Here the rs & m-ings are utterly mixed, & we shall come to smt. sim. again but on Rus. I_chelovek-man. )

~ ~ ~

A filling with purpose of feeling may be seen also in the r. of your satisfaction |I_satisfy|, which is based on Ger. I_satt ('zat', sated or satiated), or on an o. Prussian satuinei (sim.), or on Sl. (c. & o.) sit /sût |I_su^t| /syty /etc. (= satt), or on smt. Blt., or we may go to the Lat. & cite their satur (sated, or satis as good, enough), where from satisfatio means satisfaction. We may go even to the o. Gr. where ατοσ = αατοσ, was unsatisfiable /sateless (bc. of the beg-ing "α"), & so on up to the Skr. where I_satori was a satisfaction in the Zen-Buddhism, & sati were called the widows who ... wanted to be burned alive with the body of their dead husband (bc., believe it or not, but this was their eager wish, & they were highly opposed when the Eng. authorities forbade them to do this); also I_sat was the 3rd sacred Skr. syl. (ohm, tat, sat) m-ing: sated, satisfied, goodness. ( There is a great Skr. poetical book, Bhagavad Gita, or "The Song of The Blessed One" 2(but the song stays in the end, this agitating |I_agitate| I_gita, where the blessed one has to be built from the ment-d Baga /Bog-god)2, and there it is narrated about 3 gunas-qualities, namely: the I_sattva, the illumination, the truth, but it is meant the satisfaction of the wise person; then the I_rajas, the passion or fervour 2(>> raçel |I_rachel|)2, that we are eager to get but this is not reasonable; & then comes the I_tamas, the darkness & dullness, which corresponds pretty well with Ger. I_dumm as silly & Sl. I_tuman-fog 2(>> t.)2, or also with Eng. I_tame 2(meant here as silly or dull)2. )
But with what, do you think, is this r. rel-d? Well, with the I_sow|ing, which was I_sato (-are) in Lat. (to sow), or säen |I_saeen| in Ger., or setþ |I_set$| /sejatþ in Rus. (c. & o. Sl.), & so on (or also with the I_sew|ing what sounds sim. not only in Eng. but also in It. where sarto 2(and comp. It with Skr. satori)2 is a tailor). On the other hand this is also the I_sit|ting & I_stand|ing (I_sitzen 2('zit-tzen'; a beg-ing "s" in Ger. is usually read 'z' 3(when it's followed by a vowel; and if followed by "t" or "p" it becomes 'sh', i.e. 'sht' or 'shp')3 )2, or I_setzen, & stehen 2('shteen')2; resp. sestþ |I_sest$| & stojatþ in Rus., etc.), what is given as I/G. r. sed-. Here is also the I_saddle (Sattel in Ger., zadel in Hol., I_sedlo in Rus., etc.), & your I_set (as verb or not; with all its derivs), & Ger. I_siedeln (or I_zidam in Bul., to build a house, you use the Fr. w. masonry), & the Sumerian (before 4--5 mills) temples called zikurat /zigurat (I_ziggurat in Eng.), like the Babilonian tower (put one above the others rectangular prisms becoming with the height narrower, what from some distance looked like a rough pyramid; this may be a kind of I_zigzag, but even if so, then this, again, is some zid-masonry); poss. also Egyptian goddess of harvest, I_Izida (wife of Oziriss) has to be ment-d, this one bc. of the sût|I_su^t|--I_satt--satiation (there is a peculiar rel-n to Bul. izjadam as to eat out, but here we have prefix & I can't be sure it was so in the ancient Egyptian too).
In this way we have come to the ... I_seed, which is I_seme in Bul. (o. & c. Sl.) or Samen in Ger. or I_semen in Lat. (not only as a sperm, but also as a seed or genus), & I_sammeln in Ger. is to gather or pick (some seeds, maybe); or we may look in the Tur., where I_zam (= zammi) is smt. added, appended (& comp. this with Ger. Sammlung as a collection, or with Versammlung as a meeting or conference; or with Bul. I_vzemam or Rus. vzjatþ |I_vzjat$|, as to take) & I_zaman is a period of time. This last w. is often used in Tur. with m-ing of: the time is short, or God forbid; they say also often aman-zaman m-ing: it's enough, I don't want it, but only I_aman means the said & zaman just added to the m-ing, though it fits good. ( Aman has to be genuine Tur.-Ar. exclam., but there is smw. in the Bible exactly the name Aman 2(in Sl. writing, maybe in Lat. it will be Amman)2 & is stated that he was a very bad Prime Minister by King Artakserks, & once decided to kill all the Hebrews 2(the fable says, bc. of some girl Esphir)2, but at the end he was hanged by the good Artakserks --- so that you can see from what ancient times the Heb* and the Turks & Arabs cry aman. ) So, but sammeln means, in a way, to sum (Lat. I_summa, or sumo as verb, known in all langs; here, surely, is the deriv. to I_consume in Eng., meant as getting many things together & for 2(or in)2 ourselves, but when smt. is consumed or consummated then it is gone 2(consummatum est, in Lat.)2, as our life, sooner or later, does), here are also the Semites (& anti-) & the Tur. ... bread I_semit (known in Bul. but archaic), then the I_sesame from the fairy tale (= susam); here is the Pol. ... I_Sejm (their Parliament) too, meant as cream (rather, semen) of the society, also your w. I_same (i.e. from t.s. seed 2(in Fr. it is même but I can't tell you why they begin with "m")2 ). Or also the Lat. prefix I_semi- (like in the semiconductors) what has m-ing of a half of smt. (i.e. the seed is meant as one half of the living cycle, mark it), or the I_similar|ity, or the I_symmetry, or the I_simplicity with all the simpletons & simplex things (to remind you the exclam.: |I_sentences| "Oh, sancta simplicitas!" --- which, really, is sacred & must be tolerated, as I personally had many opportunities to observe 2(though the sad fact is that this become visible in Bulgaria now, when the democracy got the power, not under the totalitarian rule)2 ).
So you see that the I_seed is an enormously large notion, it may be: t.s. or unique, single or manifold, simple or mixed, the whole or the middle point, in the space or in the time (bc. I_semel in Lat. is once or at once, also I_semper is always or every time), alone or with the others (bc. when one is alone he/she wants to mix with the others), finished or just as an idea, etc. But we are not done bc. here is also the family in the Sl. langs (as product of the I_semen, e.g.: semþja |I_sem$ja| in Rus. or semejstvo in Bul., etc.), & other Sl. ws, like: Rus. sam (in person) or samûj |I_samu^j| (t.s., but also the most 2(good or bad)2 ), or Bul. sam (alone), I_samo (only), & samota (a solitude). And also (though the r. is a bit changed) Rus. seredina as a middle (or I_sreda in Bul., what is a middle & also an environment, mark this dualism), then their (Bul., etc.) I_sredstvo (a tool, resource, or means) & from here posredstvom means: via, with, using some method; or there's Bul. sreden (mean, middle) & I_sroden (sim., of t.s. I_rod-genus), & sim. ws in other Sl. langs --- bc. the mean (not as bad, there the idea is diff., but as middle) is a very fuzzy notion & the sredstva-means in many cases include the seed, & the seed is in the middle of life, etc. ( This fuzziness of the middle point is a curious thing but it's a fact, and I'll tell you that there are many school children who, being told in a mathematical task that, say, 2 persons have together 100 dollars, etc., not listening to other details 2(bc. it's difficult to grasp all at once)2 come to the wrong 2(but strong)2 conclusion that each one has by 50 dollars --- so they think that "smw. in btw." means exactly in the middle; the reversed situation is also common but that is bc. we don't like to be always precise, where choosing the very middle point is a proof for our innate wish for ... symmetry &/or equality, where in life this is rarely the case. )
If we now return to the I_semen, then it is given from I/G. r. sem- m-ing: one, simple, but also common, and the oldest w. here was Skr. I_samah as equal or t.s. (the etym-sts give here also Gr. I_homo|- but I don't believe in this much). Then we may come to the very name ... I_Sanskrit (where I initially thought that this is just smt. sainted, but there's more than this), which were to be decomposed in: sam ('samþ', not exactly san-) + kr + ta, where the last is a suffix, kr is to do or work (some scratching; that is what I_Krishna, an incarnation of I_Vishnu, usually does), and the interesting for us sam meant together (what, if you ask me, is a perfect match for Ger. I_sammeln). In this sense I would add that the saints are so sainted bc. (not only with this idea, >> also sinij) they are gathered or, better, plucked or chosen carefully. ( And to squeeze here also an explan. of the Buddhist I_nirvana = nirwana, what is the idea of pacifying, in accordance with the whole nature, which is derived from nirva as to extinguish, where the latter might have been split in turn in: nis + va, the 1st one m-ing out & down of smt., suspending, slumping 2(nearly t.s. as Rus. prep. niz /I_vniz m-ing down)2, and va meant to blow 2(to say 'bah' or 'bumm')2 --- i.e. this is the art how not to do boom-boom! )

~ ~ ~

So you have seen now that all these I_semen--I_satt--satisfy--set--sit--etc. ws contain sounds that suggest some squeezing |I_squeeze|, like in: your (to) I_seize, or I_cease, or Lat.-Gr. I_systole, or Bul. I_stiskam (to squeeze, szhimatþ in Rus.), or Lat.-Ger. I_Stanza (a paragraph), or Ger. I_Stamm (a tree trunk, tribe, or group of bacteria) or I_Stempel (a I_stamp) or I_stumpf (blunt), etc., so that we may easily come to the sacred things, and to the Gr. ... I_satyr|s & the satire & even to your ... Saturday! Did you get it, m.o.l.? Well, when you squeeze smt. too much it's t.s. as to cut it off, but from the Eastern r., sac(r)-, & t.s. picture, for good or bad, is present in all I_sacred things & sacraments, bc. in Lat. I_sacro was to sanctify, honour, or respect --- what is due to the old heathen rituals of slaughtering prey animals (but I should add that much of the killing in human history, too, is done for certain religious reasons, hence, this rel-n still isn't outlived). Nowadays this seems a strange way to show one's respect before the omnipotent powers, but it is fixed in the langs, so that let us dig here a little. Let me begin with the I_massacre, which is mas + sacre (Fr., i.e. sacred things en masse, mark it!) & isn't a good thing, but it has (in my view) an Eastern (known also in Bul.) twin, ... I_musakka, what is baked in an oven mixture of minced meat (nowadays meat-farce is used, but in old times this was exactly "massacred" meat) & potatoes (with fried onion & tomatoes etc.), covered to the end with whipped eggs & yogurt so that it burns a little at the top.
Juxtaposing a Fr. w. with a Tur. one I want to say that the r. sac- is o. & widely spread, like in: Lat. I_seco (-are, to cut, though, I'm afraid, mainly ... the praeputium) or I_saxum (a rock, but it has to be a sharp piece of stone, bc. it meant a stone-knife, too), or an o. Icl. sax as a short sword, or the known sect (I_secta in Lat., what meant there: a way, rule, action), or Ger. I_Sack (a bag, but you also say sack & it has to be meant as smt. I_secluded --- hence count this w. too). Or, then, the I_Saxon region in Germany (either bc. it is a secluded area, or bc. the Saxons often brandish their swords 2(your I_sword also has to be here but the r. is mutilated; and if so, then also some Alb. shat may be ment-d, bc. this was a gardening pick; but then << also I_siktir)2 ), then the ... second (Lat. I_secunda, t.s. in the Teu. & Sl. langs), surely (bc. it is smt. small, like a scratch or cut with a knife), or Rus. sechþ |I_sech$| /seku (to cut, & as noun this is a battle or massacre) or I_sekira (an axe), or the Eastern I_satrap (title of a ruler but for the Sl* this means a thug or tyrant), & others (there was a pre-Sl. seko). Or also Tur. I_saksi (saksija in Bul.), what is a ... flower pot (where the idea is that of the sack, though I don't exclude some sacred nuance, too, bc. the Eastern people like flowers very much 2(bc. they are rare there in the deserts)2 ), but they have also sekirci ('sekirdzhi' = to sekira-axe), & so on (I'm sure smt. of this r. has to be found in the Skr. too). ( And one inclusion, bc. the Turks use also I_balta as an axe 2(& the I_axe, if we don't think that the beg-ing "s" was just dropped, has to be viewed, I sup., as sound imit. from 'hak')2, which is baltija in Bul., and with slight mutation we find in Ger. their I_Beil 2('bajl')2 m-ing the same, as also Eng I_bailey 2(mostly as Old Bailey --- the place where heads may easily be cut off)2 and bailiff 2(but this may as well lead us to the baj--beg --- << b.)2; around this is also their knife, biçak |I_bichak| 2("bichak")2 & it serves not only for cutting but for pricking, too, bc. I_bicha in Bul. is usually understood as to ... screw smb. 2(though >> later I_obich)2. This may not seem interesting for you, but that is bc. you didn't have thought about the ... I_Baltic See, which looks like made by some enormous axe-balta! )
And now to the I_satyr, who was o. Gr. Σατυροσ, where the capital let. is bc. he was a god, partner with Bacchus & often confused with him (the main satyr was the god Pan, but we shall come to him in a while), & if written with small let. then he was just one of the many satyrs in the traditional chorus in o. Gr. comedies (also some kind of monkey 2(in o. Gr.)2 ); but at t.s. time the I_satire was σατυροι, where a chorus of satyrs had also to be present, so that they went usually together. Yeah, but in Tur. (& from there also in Bul.) exactly I_satir (though read 'satår') is again an axe or hatchet (sak(s)- or sat- is m.o.l. t.s.), & the Turks (or the Arabs) are not such people to steal ws from the Gr* (they may take some modern western w., but not from the Gr.), hence the o. Gr* have heard this w. from smw. on the East (they wouldn't confess this act, I am sure 2(as much as they call the Turkish coffee Greek coffee --- if you visit Greece you'll hear this)2, but it has to be so). And I hope you don't doubt that satir & satyr contain t.s. idea of sticking or cutting (satyrs look like goats, you know, they have horns & smt. else, masculine & pricky 2(in Bul. we have the jargon pråch |I_pra^ch| for a goat, used also for men, what comes from pråchka |I_pra^chka| what is a twig, but this is nearly t.s. as your I_perch --- >> perçem for sim. ws)2 ); besides, there is also the ... planet Saturn (I_Saturnus in Lat.). And I hope that you may well guess what in this planet is axe-like--- the ring, of course, which easily may be taken for a double-bladed axe (with invisible handle).
So, and now it's easy to explain your I_Saturday as the day of the Tur. I_satir, isn't it? Well, there was Lat. I_Saturanlia, what was a holiday dedicated to their god Saturnus, (more precisely a whole week, beg-ing on 17th Dec.), but this is in t.s. sphere of thoughts --- eating, drinking &, sorry, screwing, what is otherwise called I_Bacchanalia. If some of you may still be in doubt about ment-ing here the sex, so let it be said that in o. Gr. σατυριον was some plant used as aphrodisiac, & σατυριαω was to have a painful erection (a term said to be used by the very Aristotle); you may comp. this also with the things ment-d a little before on I_satori-satisfaction. To resume: the Eng. Saturday doesn't seem to be a very moral w., where the Ger* (except the main usage of I_Sonnabend for Sat. & I_Sonntag for Sun., which are derivs from the joy-giving Sun) say I_Samstag for Sat., what literally means "day for meetings" (with friends); the Sl* use here Heb. I_Sabbath (Subbota in Rus.), and we now don't work on Sats & Suns (I sup.) in order not to conflict with the Heb* (bc. their holiday is Sat. and that of the other people is Sun., so that to take 2 days out in a week was a Solomonic decision).

~ ~ ~

OK, and now let us look more closely at this satyr I_Pan, bc. he deserves it. Let us take 1st the syl. pan- (o. Gr. παν-) or panto-, which means smt. total or widely spread but on which many other things depend, or also their παντοσ, what is the world or the universe. Here are, f.ex.: the before-ment-d Gr.-Lat. pantocrator (a major ruler), the adj. pandemic (o. πανδημια, smt. worse than epidemic, applied to the whole nation or, now, to all nations 2(there is also the term endemic, m-ing "nowhere else")2 ), the I_pandemonium (πανδαιμονιον 2("αι" is to be read as 'e')2, a gathering of all demons; a helluvial noise), I_panegyric (Pan + ... guru-cries, a?), πανδαισια (a fullness, smt. in plenty), πανακεια, becoming in Lat. I_panacea (also in many other langs), which has given one Lat. panaca (a cup, presumably full with panacea), Bul. (archaic) I_panitza (a cup or plate), & your I_pan (bc. one may put diff. products there & make a tasty dish, say, a pancake --- in Ger. the pan is Pfanne, so that your w. has to have come from there, but the god Pan hides smh. in this Ger. w.). Then may be cited also: the pantomime (a performance only with mimes), the I_panther (panthere in Fr. & other langs --- as smt. pan + terrible, or just around the pan-, or from the path 2(>> panthas)2 ), or Fr. ... I_pantoufle (also Bul., a slipper --- bc. one can go everywhere with it, i.e. with them), or one Bul. w. (surely from the Gr.), I_panta (a ... door-hinge), or to remind you about Gr. I_Pandora (the 1st woman, to whom god Zeus had given one box with all the evils of the humans & said that she should never try to look in it, but she, being a woman, opened it just to cast a glance there, & in this way released all the evils, that still plague us). I thought for some time that also the ... pants (i.e. Fr. pantalons) have to be here (bc. they keep, say, our ... I_loin|s, or are good for everybody), but it turned out that they were from It. I_pantalone, which w. was from one comic (from popular operettas) personage, Pantalone, named in turn so bc. of their San Panteleone, who was patron saint of Venice. ( Yeah, etym-cally this may be so, but don't think that now I reject my version, bc. nobody can be sure that this saint was not named so bc. of the idea of Pan & of some lion 2(if not of loins; but this confusion is easily explainable, bc. both, the lion & the loins are soundly rel-d to liegen-to-lie 3(<< lion, lair)3; even in Rus. I_lono means a I_lap, or the "bosom" of nature.)2. )
Do not think, though, that this is even the half of all the pan-ws, or even the half of what will be ment-d here, bc. I may continue with: Gr. Παναγια |I_Panagia| (the God-Mother in new Gr.), or παναγυρι (a fair, what is I_panair in Bul., & says us that this is a place where everybody comes, or everything is to be found), or παναιρι (nearly t.s., or exactly t.s. as the latter Bul. w., but this time it's a basket or big 2(usually woven)2 plate 2(for bread)2, that in Lat. becomes I_panarium, in Fr. panier, in Eng. I_pannier, in Bul. paner, etc.), but here is also the well-known Lat. I_panis as a bread (it has to be known from the slogan: |I_sentences| "Panem et circenses!", or "Bread & circuses!" 2(and, b.t.w., our Bul. democratic rulers have remembered very well about the circuses, the bad thing is that they have entirely forgotten about the bread, though this is another matter)2 ). There is also Fr. I_panaire (read 'paner', in Gr. manner), what is smt. made out of bread and a panair-fair, what is an interesting rel-n, of the fair with the bread --- either bc. there all is to be sold, resp. found, or bc. the bread is the most important food, but the pannier-basket rel-n with the panaire-fair-or-bread is very strong one. Then the short I_pain ('pen') in Fr. is a bread (which is pan in Sp.), or smt. in form of bread, or bread-winning, but you have to feel now that this is smt. painful (i.e. the bread begins to taste bitter) --- bc. of your pain, which is Ger. Pein (read 'pajn'), or Fr. I_peine (though we shall come again to this w.), which all ws mean a pain or sorrow (& from here has to be your I_penalty, taken directly in Rus. as penalþti, but used only as football term). I may cite also Ger. I_panieren (sinking smt. in whipped eggs 1st, then in bread crumbs, & then frying it in a pan), or the I_pandischpan-dough (παντεσρανι in Gr., "food for gods", figuratively). After all these ws I wouldn't be surprised if the ... patina (Fr. I_patine) too, that covers many metallic (mainly copper) things, has also to be ment-d here, bc. there was a Lat. patina = patena as a plate, & one may imagine that the patina covers like with a plate (or, else, that the plates were made, in o. times, out of copper).
But one may ask: where is the promised god Pan here? Well, he is in all this ws, bc. he who gives the I_panis is the pantocrator, or just I_pan, acc. to the Poles (a Mister, resp. pani is a Missis); t.s. is the situation (only the r. is diff.) in Tur. where the masters are called çorbaci |I_chorbaci| (read exactly as Bul. chorbadzhi), what comes from their çorba (again I_chorba as archaic in Bul.), what is a soup; sim. is also Rus. (c. Sl.) I_gospodin /gospozha (a Mister /-ess), what comes from our gospod-god (& what, if you ask me, looks strange nowadays, bc. this is idolatry, to see a god in everyone, but, on the other hand, why should the Slavs be wiser than the other folks around the world?). As to your I_Mister, it has to be obvious that this is the I_master, or Lat. & Ger. I_Magister (or Magistra if she; you haven't these ws but have magistrates, what etym-cally is t.s.), or the heard Fr. I_maitre ('metr') & maitress, or Rus. master /Bul. I_majstor, & this is also the ... I_mistery (of ruling), hence, add also your I_mist. ( We shall come again to this r. on major, but very near to the maitre sounds one Tur.-Ar. w., I_medresse, what is religious school to a mosque --- bc., I sup., the students will be big masters after finishing it. ) So that Pan is a god & Master & the bread (maybe also the butter) & many other things, but ... but he is, of course, also the I_penis! You see: we put the panis in our mouths (& often t.s. is done with the ment-d "pen"), the god I_Pan (Παν = Πανοσ in o. Gr.) was the power on which the whole nature depended (& the penis is the organ on which the existence of the whole genus of humans depends), Pan was the main satyr, son of the nymph I_Driopa (& I sup. she was named so bc., hmm, just loved to do this "opah-opah" at least 3 times in a row) & the son of Zeus, Hermes, & he was born with goat's feet (i.e. he was the devil in the pre-Christian times) & long beard (&, you bet it, smt. else long), & all the nymphs were simply crazy for him (just as nowadays half of the population wants eagerly to catch the "pen" in question, & the other half boasts with having it always ready). And, besides, the penis makes in Lat. a good pair with their I_pinus, what is your pine (& Fr. pin & It. pino etc.).
Yeah, all the nymphs in o. Greece (& the surrounding parts of the world, I sup.) just loved this frivolous "guy" & died to hear him playing on his pipe called I_siring (but you may be sure that, although the latter r. is diff., the image of the pipe 2(b.t.w., called in Bul., not very literate, I_duduk, what in Ger. is I_dudeln, where from is their Dudelsack, what is a bagpipe)2 & some branch-twig 2(for making of the pipe)2 & the ment-d pråch-goat connected smh. in the heads of the people in old times 2(& in new times too)2 ); although he was, frankly sp-ing, an ugly person, &, for his part, preferred to live in the forest with the goats (& the nymphs, that's for sure) instead of to go to some palace on Olympus & drink ambrosia there. To put it otherwise, in the antic times, & up to a pair of cents, they distinguished 2 I_Pan|s: the big one, who was symbol of the ever itself renewing nature, of the life & vitality, and the small Pan, who was a part of the big one & who (or it?) busied himself mainly with the sex (bc. without the sex there is no life --- that is in order not to wonder why I put this here, on the potency), so that he/it become later exactly the Lat. I_penis. We have spoken here enough about the big Pan, so let me add now smt. about the small one. From the latter comes the well-known w. ... I_panic, bc. his "pen" shouldn't be literally small, and young girls (even not very young, & even not girls but barbed Greeks) were simply afraid of him. He was very fond of making jokes, & known for this wide away of o. Greece, up to the old ... Britons, bc. that is where from your w. ... I_pun has to have come (bluntly saying it: your pun has to mean to show one's penis to smb.), & then your I_fun may be a variation from here!
Well, you may be sure that the etym-sts don't say exactly this, they give for the pun It. puntiglio ('puntilþjo') m-ing a small point, & rel-d the fun to I_fond, to what I would say: yes and no! Bc. the I_point (Fr., & read there 'puan') is a good guess, but it is I_Punkt in Ger., punkt in the Sl. langs, & I_punctum in Lat. (& means there a point or a prick), the latter coming (or v.v.) from the verb I_pungo as to stick or prick (& count here also the I_punctual|ity), but ... who can disprove that pungo was rel-d in Lat. to the Pan--penis (with the idea that this is just a prick with the prick; you all surely have heard the phrase: "to put more lead in your pencil"; and in Bul. we have the jargon punt, what is again some joke-fun, & neally identical with It. punto as a point or stitch)? And I_fond might be rel-d to the making of wind with some I_fan (>> phoenix), though the actual rel-n (as I guessed later) is with It. I_fondere as to melt (melting with feelings); but the point is that I don't accept the fun as melting with emotions, this m-ing of smt. loving fits with fond but contradicts (& not to the contrary, for to be taken as rel-d 2(as I have ment-d that, bc. of the cycle, contrary notions often are rel-d)2 ) with the fun, what is smt. egoistic & near to the coarse jokes of Pan (causing panic anger in many people); in other ws, if the fun is from fond--fondere then you have changed its m-ing (with some ideas). Ah, and let me tell you at the end of this pan- r. disc-on, my guess as to: why exactly this phonemes have to signify the totality in o. Greece. I sup. this is bc. of the ... 5 fingers of our hand (<< pjatþ) with which we can do all, and this is so bc. this number sounded in Skr. as panch (bc. this is the beg-ing of the name I_Panchatantra, translated as "The Five Books").

~ ~ ~

So, and now, being on the tune of potency, I may put here some paragraphs about the I_major- r. (not bc. it is the most important of all the rs, but bc. it contains the w. major). We may call it also I_May- r., and this may, not only as month but as possibility, or, more precisely, your I_maybe, comp-d with Bul. mozhe bi (Rus. I_mozhet bûtþ, etc. in other Sl. langs) struck me 1st to the thought that this has to be smt. coming from wide away in the time and the space (bc. the Bul* have never had in old times smt. in common with the Celts). Then I looked what is given about the month, which is Maj in Sl. & Mai in Ger., & found out that it was I_mayo in Sp., maggio ('madzho') in It., I_majus in Lat., & so on (in o. Gr. they have had diff. calendar, but even there was a month μουνυχων 2('munihon')2, which lasted from 15 of Apr. to 15 of May), & now some ... I_magic jumped to the surface, bc. May is, really, a magic month when all the flora "florates" becoming green. Then it was easy to give to the may-syl. m-ing of some fast movement, of turning or swiping, like in Ger. I_machen (to do), or in Bul. maham (mahatþ |I_mahat$| in Rus., to swing or wave, like a bird with its wings, but in Bul. it means also to move or throw smt. away), or in our mahalo (a pendulum), or in our (i.e. again Bul.) I_majna, which primarily m-ing is of "go to hell!". Yeah, but it turned out that this was not exactly Bul. (or Sl.) w., but o. Gr. μαινα (now it has to be read 'mena', but in o. times it was pronounced as you see it), or t.s. Tur. maina, m-ing to lower, as opposed to viru, what was to heave (we shall come to this r. shortly), hence the Bul. majna is meant in sense of "move away". We have also another m-ing of majna as jargon (from smw. around our town Plovdiv) for a buddy or chum, but this is from Ger. I_mein (your mine or Fr. mon or Sl. I_moj etc.), from their often used phrase mein Herr (what is equal building as the known Fr. I_monsieur), what is smt. diff., but it (mine), still, is rel-d to t.s. fast movement, though this time it is directed to us (instead of in the opposite direction), bc. mine is what I can grasp, lay my hands on it! ( And if smo. may think that I use too often the Bul. lang., which in no way may be counted for very spoken one 2(us being only about one per mil from the world population)2, so let be said that this is not just bc. this is my mother lang., but bc. my country simply lies on the threshold to the Orient and this gives some very useful connections with the Gr. & Tur. & Ar. & Per. langs, as well as with the Sl. rs, &/or the Teu. ones. )
But let me continue. You have seen that the 3rd let. here isn't strictly fixed so that the r. may vary as maj- /mah- /mag- and here may be ment-d also: o. Bul. megdan, which must be t.s. as Per. I_majdan (central place in a village where all can be gathered fast 2(when announced: "maina to the majdan")2 ), then Gr. μαιταπι (also Tur.-Ar. I_maytap & Bul. majtap, a joke --- this has to be understood in sense of a fast & clever remark, a repartee 2(bc. I_tapa in Bul. is a cork stopper, plug and the r. is very old & Eastern & an imit. --- comp. with your I_tap)2 ), or Sp. maña |I_man$a| ('manþa', a deftness or cleverness) & mañana (a morning, or tomorrow, in a short time). Or again smt. Gr., μανοσ as thin, rare, what leads us to the known Lat. I_manus (but we shall speak about this on man), then your ... I_mayhem, poss. Ger. I_Meissel (a chisel), & of course the I_major (with all the major things, also in musical m-ing) & the I_mayor (I_maire in Fr., taken directly in Rus. as mer) & the I_majesty (these are all high-ranking persons brandishing some sword or scepter), & the ment-d master--I_Magister, & the magic, etc. The oldest w. here has to be the cited in the beg-ing of the book Skr. I_maja as an illusion, magic (it's the exclam. maj-, smt. like "why" in Eng.), which w. is directly present in Bul. (from Tur. & Per., I_maya) though with the m-ing of an ... yeast (but it, really, is some magical substance with which the dough grows fast, like the greenery in May does; with this idea, I sup., has to be also the Fr. I_mayonnaise), but this is also o. Gr. μαγεια (<< I_Magen), or Lat. I_magus (more, faster --- the Olympic slogan), & there was also in o. Greece one goddess Maja. ( There are also the I_Maya|s, but they are not from the I/E. lang. group so that we can't be sure 2(I mean, they shouldn't be here unless we sup. that in very o. times some people have swum over the Atlantic, or gone through Bering Straight)2. )
Here may be added more o. Gr. ws, like: μαιμαω |I_maimao^| (to eagerly want, rage, boil with feelings), μαιμασσω (to strongly want), or μαομαι |I_maomai| (to investigate scientific, or to search 2(as a special kind of desire)2 ), but this leads us directly to Ger. mögen |I_moegen| (mochte), what is to like, with primarily m-ing of to want (there was a Got. r. magh- having given some old I_magus as, this time, a boy, son 2(>> son)2 what has 2(I should say)2 highly degraded in its m-ing giving your ... I_maggot); but this is also the (shortly ment-d) Sl. I_mozhet / I_mogu (mochþ |I_moch$| as infinitive in Rus., or moga in Bul. --- from here is our strength or power 2(moshchnostþ in Rus., or I_mosht in Bul.)2 ). In this way we returned to our major topic here, the potency & the I_power (the last comes etym-cally from the potency but was mutated highly and, I sup., this was done with the idea of some blowing), where your w. "much" comes in play, which is Sp. I_mucho (>> later muchacho), & Lat. I_magnum = to o. Gr. μεγασ & m-ing smt. big, & Sl. I_mnogo (much), & Ger. I_Menge (a big amount), & so on, up to the Skr. where maha was big or great, what you must believe me bc. this is where the I_maharajah has come (some big 'radzha', where the latter has to be rel-d to Fr. I_rouge & Rus. radostþ |I_radost$| 2(<< r.)2 ), as also their mahatma (what now is a honorable title, but earlier it meant a world's ghost or heavenly superman).
The Ger. I_Menge is given as c. Teu. (with o. ws: menigu, manec, manag, o. high-Ger. manecig, Swedish mangen, your I_many, etc.), here's also their mengen (to mix, giving your 2(to)2 I_mangle as to cut 2(where from we may go to the I_manger, where the food is mangled)2 ) & your I_among, but the interesting thing is that what is much may easily become a little, or v.v., bc. in Bul. månichåk is very small, what sounds exactly as manecig, what was big, and there is also Ger. I_Mangel, what is a lack, poverty! Here I can either propose to you to look at Menge-much as composed of many Mangel-lacks, or, else, to call for help Tur. (also Bul.) I_mengeme what is ... a vice (of the kind that holds tightly the things), with the use of which the much can be squeezed to become a little. I say this bc. I am trying at 1st to be as concise as poss., but there is another m-ing of Mangel as an ... iron for pressing of clothes, which is given from Lat. I_manganum (what was o Gr. μαγγανον), what was an ancient machine for breaking of town or castle walls, i.e. this is the I_magic power (in o. Gr. μαγγανευω meant to make a magic), what gives also your: magnanimous, the element I_magnum (Mn), the I_magnet|ism, the Earth's I_magma, etc. ( To add that the specialists give Mangel-lack with unknown etym-gy; and about the Rus. I_mnogo is said that it's c. & o. Sl. & rel-d with Teu. ws, but I would say it easier --- it is some "mn" 2(m-ing good, well, << mleh)2 + I_ogo 2(Rus. exclam. of wonder, oho in Bul., or "oh" in Eng.)2, & I shall add also that Bul malko 2(small, a little)2 is rel-d to mnogo, as is also Lat. I_malus 2(to be disc-ed)2 to their magnum. )
From here we may reach to the I_maze & the I_amazing things, bc. they are rel-d in their m-ing with the magic, though the etym-sts give here the splitting: a + mas (it was some Dan. mase as: I am busy with smt.), i.e. the stupefying here comes from the many things that one has to do, what is psychologically well motivated, but one can never be pretty sure bc. all is messed. We shall speak about the mass--mix--middle r. (I_mesja in Bul. is to mix) and about the movement to other places, so let not distract us here with this; though I may add smt. more, namely, that your I_most is Ger. I_meist (with t.s. idea of the I_master) only here the imit. is not of wondering cry but of squeezing. In this sense there are other ws to be cited, like: Ger. Most (= to Bul. måst |I_ma^st| as wine or fruit juice), but this is, more generally, the Sl. Particle I_naj (m--n is an often mutation) for building of superlative form (i.e., exactly your most), and also Ger. Mus (a thick fruit sauce or cream, taken directly in Rus. as muss), what is of t.s. r. as Ger. müssen |I_muessen| (must, i.e. here the eager wish is minded), or take your I_mess (here is from the mixing), & many others. The Bul. måst in this m-ing is absent from the Rus., but it has another m-ing equal to Rus. mestþ |I_mest$|, what is a revenge (to what we shall come on metatþ |I_metat$| & meteor); there is also Ger. I_masten what rel-s (smh.) with your I_mast, but means for the Ger* ... to feed animals, make them fat, & this is sim. with Rus. mazþ |I_maz$| (a cream or unction) & Bul. mas (a tallow), but we shall come to this on ... mastodons.
Maybe it would be good to say here smt. about the ... I_monkey, bc. it is majmunka (as diminutive, the correct w. is I_majmuna) in Bul. (but not in Rus.), & the latter is correct bc. it is I_maymun in Tur. & μαιμου in Gr. (but only in the new lang.), & the point is that neither in Bulgaria nor in England live monkeys (& your etym-sts are in doubt), so that these ws have come from wide away (in the time & the space), and you, you naughty Eng. boys & girls, have missed an entire, & the most important syl., the 1st one! And do you know why you have done this inexcusable mistake? Well, for one thing bc. you haven't though about the importance of the r. may-, but for another thing bc., and I am highly suspicious about this (though I can't prove it, but nobody can, neither prove, nor disprove it, it's a matter of personal estimation & taste), so you have cut the leading syl. bc. you have wanted to rel. the monkey to the ... I_monk|s, of course! But this is, I should say, a vulgar way of thinking, bc. the monk is the o. Gr. μοναχοσ (<< I_monachus), and he comes from their μονασ, what is the one (i.e., secluded living person). Not that monk--monkey is smt. unheard of, bc. there is the order of I_Capuchin|s (who are monks, but also a species of monkey), and there the cap comes into play (or the hood, capuchone in Fr.), &/or they (the monks) shaved their heads (as much as our Communist leaders wore short head-cuts) in order to show their abstinence from all human pleasures (or in the reversed order --- forcing one to wear short or zero-number cut in order to feel him- or her- self humiliated, as it's done in jails and is still a rule in armies), but this is not correct. ( There are other names for monkeys in diff. langs, but they won't be touched now. )

~ ~ ~

OK, let me squeeze here some remarks about the viru-heaving, bc. this is also rel-d to the potency & the man's "pen". There is Bul. I_virja (to lift up or raise), your & Lat. virile (or Fr. viril), Lat. I_virilis (masculine, like a grown man; or just vir for a man --- maybe not very decent but up to the point), Rus. I_verh (Bul. vråh, a top; or Rus. vverh, what is up or above), & others; but this is not only raising &/or sticking into smt. (I_zaviram in Bul. is to stick in, shove), this is also the greenery (bc. it grows up), like Lat. I_vireo (being green), what is exactly I_vireja (to grow, exist, procreate) in Bul., & there's also the known I_virus (bc. it se zavira everywhere; in Lat. it meant: a slime, sperm, smt. stinking), or the variety virulent (Lat. I_virulentus). But this was, m.o.l., in direct m-ing, where figuratively this gives Lat. I_virtus (a virtue or strength, what in many cases turns out to be just boasting & sticking our breasts foreword but that's how we are made), or the ... I_virtual things (hence, the virtue from old Lat. times was observed as smt. virtual, not real!). And in order not to think that this is entirely men's quality I shall cite also the virginity & Lat. I_Virgo, resp. the name Virginia (& if some of you like to think that what sticks out here are the ... nipples of the virgin they won't be in a big error, I sup., bc. when in Lat. virgo was a virgin, then virga was a branch or stick, smt. navireno-heaved-up, hence the sticking out hasn't vanished; comp. this with the I_dignity --- << dig). Here is also the known It. I_virtuoso, and the I_vertex & I_vortex & the vertebra, etc., but we have already ment-d them.

~ ~ ~

Ah, I want to finish this chapter, but the power & I_strength (the last w. isn't so interesting being just smt. straitened, like the string) in the Sl. langs is called also I_sila, which was even pre-Sl., and I have the presumption that this has (smh.) to be rel-d to your ... I_silly --- with the idea that the strong person is usually silly! Well, the etym-sts can't support this hypothesizes (they never ask themselves such questions as not strictly scientific), but I shall try to convince you in this, and use the opportunity to add many new ws, of course. [|I_comments| And if one of you may ask: why the strong one must be, as a rule, though not always, silly, then I have to say that our intellect (we shall come to this later) is smt. new (measured in evolutional units of 1000s of years), it is a poss-lity (to find a better place under the Sun), but it isn't secure, it may lead to some gain, after some time, but it may also not lead to this, where the strength gives at once the desired (or nearly desired) results; and, besides, the action gives us satisfaction, so that to be silly isn't very silly --- from the point of view of nature (& of my God Urrh.) --- it just isn't appropriate for humans. ] So let me begin here with our I_sila, for which are ment-d some rel-ns to Blt. & Teu. ws (Lithuanian siela, = to Ger. I_Seele 2(a I_soul)2 ), but I don't believe in this picture (a strong soul, smt. virgo-like), bc. I don't find this typical for the Sl*, & bc. the Blt. langs may be used as a connecting link with the Teu* but not to serve to find originals for our ws, & bc. there is another idea hidden in the Seele, & bc. of other things that I shall ment. now. That is why I propose to you to take it for granted that we have to look for some power of the r. sil- and go to the Lat., where can be found: the w. I_silex m-ing smt. hard, or a stone, what has to be known, bc. that is where from the silicates & silicones have come (I_siliceus in Lat. means made out of silicate), also I_sileo, what means to be silent (we shall dig here a bit after a while, but you know that to be silent in many cases is appreciated as high as gold), and silvesco, what was to become like a tree, bc. I_silva meant: a tree, park, or jungle, or big amount of smt. (what is meant again as smt. hard like a stone; also silvestris meant: wooden, wild, or coming from the steppe).
From here has to be the known Fr. I_silage as food for domestic animals (used all around the world, but the Sl* pronounce it in Fr. manner, 'silazh'), bc. it makes them strong, isn't it? This w. has to be Fr. (look at its ending) though I couldn't find exactly it in Fr. dict. (as it turned out bc. it was ... ensilage), but I found silo as the place for keeping of grain (it is given from Sp. silo, m-ing there gathered vegetable mass), & also the w. I_sillage m-ing: ... a speed, velocity, or the water-current going out of ship's propeller, or mainstream of ore, so that this is again in the sense of our Sl. I_sila-power. ( I would add also one Tur. 2(& Bul. as archaic)2 w., çelik |I_chelik| 2(chelik)2, what is the steel & it is very strong, but we shall come again to this w. ) And what about your I_silly? Well, it was before seely m-ing a weak person, one who has to be pitied & commiserated, coming from a Teu. saeligo m-ing a wide amount of things like: hilarious, happy, poor, sacred, blessed, innocent, or to be pitied. It has to be clear that this misch-masch (a mixture) of m-ings is due to the Christian religion (I don't know how exactly you put it in Eng. but there is in Church-Sl. a sentence from the Bible saying: blessed be those who are low-spirited --- i.e. who are oppressed in some way, what, b.t.w., is socialistic view), but it is strange nowadays to think that a poor & I_meek (the latter, again b.t.w., has to mean one who says only 'mee', like a sheep or young goat) person has to be blessed & deserves to be hilarious, so that for every m.o.l. reasonable man (including also the women) he (or, else, she) looks just silly. But you see that we have here connection & mixing of contradictory ideas, so that this silly person may be such, either bc. he/she is socially weak but morally strong, or it can be otherwise --- physically strong & mentally weak. One may also think that his head is silvesco-d or siliceus. So or otherwise, but the m-ing of the Ger. I_Seele was highly mutated, bc. originally it was rel-d (in my view, to put it clearly) to the I_see|ing (some people sup. they can see the soul, or, at least, it is pictured smh. in religious scenes), or to the sea (of psychic phenomena). Etym-cally it is given from I/G. r. sec-, though this time not as cutting but as seeing, locating, marking, where are also: Lat. I_secui (a track) & Skr. I_sacate (to follow --- though, mark, that in one Bul. dialect, or in Macedonian, I_sakam is to want), hence here is the I_sequence (as if the o. Teu* have used the Buddhist idea of reincarnation), Ger. I_Sehne (a sinew or bow-string), their I_Sinn (a m-ing), etc., but I'll tell you why this time the ment-d r. means not to cut (<< sekira) but to sea --- bc. one can see what is inside only when he/she makes a cut (or, else, when divides it from the other things), as simple as that (but we shall return to this).
So, but together with the just cited Lat. silvestris as wild, living in the woods (<< dikarþ), there is their I_silanus, what is ... a fountain (bc. the water goes out of it with big force); I will ment. also the nearby placed Ger.-Lat. I_Silvester (the last day of the year), though it is given as named by the pope Silvestrus (in the 4th cent.), i.e. this is a coincidence, but then his name has to carry the m-ing of the disc-ed root. From here we may easily go to Teu. I_Silber (your I_silver), which was Got. sil(a)bar or silabr, also Heb. zilber, but as o. Prussian w. it was sirablan, what leads us smoothly to Rus. I_serebro (Ukr. sriblo, Bul. srebro, etc., also o. Sl.), & smt. in the Blt. langs too (as Lithuanian sidabras). It is said that this should not be from o. Gr. συβεροσ = συβαροσ bc. this was an iron, but I am not so sure here --- for one thing bc. in those old times many notions were mixed, & for another thing bc. it depends on the kind of ore. You see that the w. silver sounds like the I_silva-forest, & it's a power-giving thing, & there were some people called ... I_sybarite|s who were immensely wealthy (& not with iron, I think). Besides, there is some ... gathering or grasping here bc. I_bera in Bul. is to pluck or pick, but don't thing this is only Sl. bc. here are also your ... berries |I_berry| (>> Brot), i.e. the silver ore may be plucked like berries; but the I_sila-power has not vanished from the Got. silabar-silver bc. here is also the ... I_syllable, which is Ger. I_Silbe (with 'z', as usual)! And the Silbe (coming from an o. Ger. sillabe, & before that Lat. syllaba 2(a syl. or a verse)2, & before that o. Gr. συλλαβη 2(a link or a phoneme)2 ) is smt. concise & strong. In this connection I may ment. also: o. Gr. συλλεγω as to gather or call together, then συλλειβω as to merge (I_slivam in Bul., c. Sl. --- << litþ-to-pour), or συλαω, what was to grasp or take (surely with sila), or συλον (the rights of ownership or submitting), or συλευω (to deceive, etc.). And if you still have doubts about the Sl. I_sila-power I may add also the known ... syllogism (Lat. I_syllogismus, o. Gr.συλλογισμοσ, introduced by Aristotle & m-ing there a reasoning, calculation, method for producing of true statements --- a silna-powerful logic); in o. Gr. this is near to the r. sym-, m-ing together (<< similar); and the last touch --- from Gr. mythology, where was a god called I_Silen (Σιληνοσ = Σειληνοσ), who was son of Hermes (or Pan), permanent companion of Bakh, & usually shown as fat old man, cheerful & drunken, what is exactly our initial idea.
To fill the picture I have to explain also the shortly ment-d Lat. I_sileo (to be silent). This is widely spread (your or Ger. I_still, though the Ger* read it 'shtil', Lat. I_silencium or silencio, Rus. shtilþ 2(without any wind)2 or I_tishe 2(be silent, or, impolitely said: shut up)2, the latter is o. & c. Sl. but known also in some of the Blt. langs 2(tykas as silent)2, & so on up to the Skr. 2(tusnim)2; I sup. also the Fr. I_style, no matter that the m-ing differs, has to be here), what may be rel-d to the I_sila-power, bc. when smt. is frozen (<< freeze) it is hard, unchangeable; though this s-ing, widely sp-ing, is imit. of saying 'sh(å)t' (what explains one of the m-ings of the Eng. still as distillation equipment, which isn't exactly silent but hisses). The style may be explained not only as smt. silent or frozen, but also as smt. before which we have to be silent (&, b.t.w., the best criterion for smt. really nice & perfect, for a chef-d'oeuvre, is when there ntg. can be, neither taken, nor added, to it, so that we have just to stay silent & look at it --- what, unfortunately, isn't the case when we love smb., bc. the 1st thing we want to do in such cases is to change the subject of our love, what proves that this wasn't love at all, but a mere wish for possession!). But if in the w. style the frozen state isn't obvious it becomes so in Fr. I_stylo (a fountain-pen), what comes from Lat. stilus = stylus as writing pen, but also as a stick or stem, what is o. Gr. στυλοσ m-ing t.s.; and I am right about the freezing bc. in Lat. stillo (-are) is to drop, & I_stilia is a drop, a small amount (where from directly comes their destilo, in pair with the aqua destilata).

~ ~ ~

With this we are almost done here, but let me include at the end a paragraph about Lat.-Gr. I_sophia, what is a wisdom or cleverness (σοφια was, & is, a wisdom or science, and σοφοσ was an expert, wise, clever, well-balanced or -disposed). I allow myself to put this here, not only bc. I am born in I_Sofia (the capital of Bulgaria), but bc. this r. hides the idea of reaching our goals using not power but our brains --- for to be I_sophistic|ated means to be capable to look at both sides of the things (say, to speak for half an hour pro smt., & then use another sim. portion of time to speak contra the matter in question). This idea has smt. Eastern in it, but this is also a very scientific approach; smt. of the kind says your w. gentleman (<< also finance). Here is ntg. much to say bc. exactly on soph- there are just varieties of sophia, so let us look on sof- & think, what could be the main idea, why are the ws called so? Well, there are not much ws here either, namely there are only: the (known everywhere) Fr. I_sofa, & your I_soft things (like the modern now software). So where's the wisdom here? I should say: in the sofa or the softness (or in the Gr. σοφια, though not exactly in the town Sofia), for to be wise is to behave gentle; not t.s., but smt. sim. we have with the w. ... I_divan, either as a soft furniture, or as Tur. governmental institution (which has to be, smh., rel-d to the o. I_Diva). Etym-cally for soft is given Ger. sacht (still, meek, slow), but I sup. a better w. is Ger. I_sanft (soft, mild, kind, friendly), and around the latter are their I_Samt (a suede), but this is a confusion (>> chamois), & I_Saft (a sauce of juice), what sounds better bit is an imit. It might have been an imit. in o. Gr. too, or there might be smt. older than this, or the known ... I_Sophocle could have explained it better, but let us not bother more with this and put here the final point of this chapter.
}





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH {} AND THE LIGHT {} AND THE WISDOM{}. HE WAS IMMENSELY POTENT {} AND MADE THE TIME & THE SPACE |I_SPACECHP|
{
But if you think that I will explain now what the I_time is I've to disappoint you, bc. nobody could do this, up till now. The ancient people have thought about some particles (chronosses, as we have disc-ed this on horoscopes) & this idea lies at the bottom of your time (Fr. temps), or temp, or I_temper (both, as temperament, & as tempering of steel), or of Lat. I_tempus (a time or epoch, to remind you the sentence: |I_sentences| O tempora, o mores!), or of the ... I_temperature, for that matter, where the particles are the atoms, or of the I_tempest (not only as concentration of particles but also as if this is .. superlative of some adj. "temp"), or of Fr. les ténèbres |I_tenebres| (a darkness, only in pl.). To explain this better we have to go to the Slavs, where we shall find their tþma |I_t$ma| (in Rus.), as darkness (I have said that the colours also were viewed as some thickening of particles), but also as multitude (f.ex., narodu tþma means a big crowd 2(narod is a nation)2 ), or also their I_tuman, what is a fog, or the shadow, which in Rus. is tenþ |I_ten$| or senþ |I_sen$| (I_sjanka in Bul.). Then here is also your I_team (or Ger Tiem, also Sl.), as much as your (to) teem, may be added, what is in the sense of the tuman-fog; or also the ... I_temptation (bc. there is smt. hidden, say, in our blood, that urges us to do things for which we know that they are not to be done). We shall see sim. ideas in the Rus., as also in the Teu. time after a while, but now let us proceed with other ws on tim-, bc. tþma /tåma is o. & c. Sl. (Croatian taman, Slovenian tåmån /tåmna, Cz. I_temny, etc.), but there was also an o. Irish temem (again as dark), & all these ws are exact copies of Tur. /Tar. I_tuman m-ing the fog-tuman, but also the ... number 10,000, or of Avs. I_dunman as a fog. Here has to be ment-d also the Gr. incense θυμιατο (<< I_thyme), bc. the smog is like fog & it's blackish, and then Tur. I_taman (also Bul. dialect), what this time means: much, enough (<< gusto for a sim. idea).
In this way we have come to Sl. I_temja (in Rus., or teme in Bul., o. & c. Sl.), what is a head-temple, where it's dark, & it hides our thoughts (& temennoj is smt. rel-d to the temple, but tëmnûj is dark), though the etym-sts give here an o. Gr. τεμνω m-ing to cut out (in sense of separating or thinning). On a 1st sight this is smt. else, but it isn't much diff., bc., for one thing, this corresponds with Ger. I_Scheitel (a teme-temple) what is rel-d to their I_scheiden (to cut or abandon), &, for another thing, we can see a dark place only bc. it is separated from its surroundings, what may be seen again in Ger., where I_Schatten is a I_shadow (& this is a cutting bc. it is imit. of some 'shåt'). Hence, this tim- /tem- r. might mean cutting, but this is in the sense of taking smt. from the continuum, what does not contradict with the idea of crowding of some particles (or people), and then here, surely, is also your temple, which is Ger. I_Tempel (but only as church) & Lat. templum (a place to gather together) & Heb. templ (a place for worshipping). Rel-d to the Rus. temja has to be also Tur.-Ar. I_temennah (temane in Bul.), what is their traditional greeting (touching of the head with a hand & then bending down the head); I am highly suspicious also about Tur. temerrüt |I_temerruet| (temerut in Bul.), what is to behave obstinate (in a way, isolated or closed, dark), what leads us to your I_temerity (from Fr.), even if this means a courageous act; there was Lat. temerarius too, as not thought through, incidental, coming from temere (an occasion), and I sup. this may be again with the idea of some darkness (bc. our future is always dark for us 2(& we are acting as blind people, especially in social matters, but let us not digress to this now)2 ). Jumping again to the Sl* I may add their old I_sonm, what is a crowd or flock (or big group of insects, where the buzzing is unmistakable), what may be looked at as variation of the senþ |I_sen$| /tenþ |I_ten$|-shadow, but, beside this, it gives the Sl. dream (son in Rus., sån |I_sa^n| in Bul., san in Srb., etc.), m-ing, obviously, the crowd of images buzzing in our heads in sleep; but this turns out to have been known also on the West bc. of Fr. sommeil ('somej') as a dream, & of Eng. I_somnolent, what surely is Lat. (bc in It. il sonno or sogho is a dream).
And now about the promised Sl. time which is I_vremja in Rus. (vereme in Ukr., vreme in Bul. 2(though we confuse it with the weather)2, etc.), what is rel-d to the ... string (verëvka in Rus. 2("ë" is always read 'jo' there)2, vråv |I_vra^v| in Bul.; or take Rus. I_vereteno, what is a spindle), & from here the etym-sts go to a Skr. I_vartma (a path or road) & the Lat. verto-to-turn, i.e. to the rotation (vårtja in Bul.; but, on the other hand, closely rel-d with this Skr. vartma-road is our Bul., & this time not Rus., vårvja |I_va^rvja| as to go). Smt. sim. (but of a diff. r.) have the Ger*, who call the time I_Zeit ('tzait'), & at t.s. time the verb I_ziehen (zog) means to pull. This is clear, but I would like to use the place here to add some other sim-ly s-ing ws (though having ntg. to do with the time), like, say, the I_cigarette, which is world-wide spread (Tur. sigara, new Gr. τσιγαρα, Fr. cigare, Eng. cigar, Ger. Zigarette, also Sl., etc.). I am ment-ing this here bc. I thought initially that the cigars /cigarettes are smt. elongated (bc. of ziehen), what is true, but the etym-sts are more definite & give as original w. Sp. I_cigarro, comp-d with their cigarrA m-ing a ... cicada (small chirping insect), what has to say that the point is in the s-ing (but the cicadas have an elongated body so that I also was right). And as to the w. ziehen, there a Got. tinhan is given, what has to leads us to an I/G. r. denk- as to pull, or to Rus. tjanutþ |I_tjanut$| (t.s.), but this is also some I_thin|ning (about which we have spoken); it might not be pretty clear why Ger. 'tz' has to become Lat. 'd', but this happens (I mean that the Ger. 'tz' usually becomes 't' for the Celts, with the classical example: zu --> to), and here, if we go to the Lat., we may find there the verb I_duco (ducere, to pull or lead, read in Lat. 'dutzere' but in It. 'duchere'), what has to remind us about the I_Duce Mussolini.
Then about the ment-d with the cicadas chirping or neighing, it is still present, together with the long things (the very sound 'tzii' is elongated & bothering), so that I sup. here Bul. I_tzigulka (a I_violin) has to be ment-d, which says 'tzigu-migu' for us, or 'vaj-vaj' for you, or issues scratching sounds for the Rus* (bc. they call it I_skripka, where skripetþ |I_skripet$| is to I_scrape), but we must also not forget (o.) Ger. I_Ziege, what is a goat (either bc. it jumps, or bc. of the cry, or bc. of both things), for which an Arm. tik (as goat's wool) is cited. ( B.t.w., this Lat. viola /violin emits such annoying sounds that justify the m-ings of derivs like: to I_violate, or I_violet 2(colour --- I should say, "violated" reddish)2. ) At t.s. time very close to the Ziege are the ... I_Zigeuners ('Tzigojners', in Ger., also Sl. --- tzûgane in Rus. 2(about the name Gypsy we shall speak on another place)2 ), and their name has to be decomposed in some 'tzi' + ... the river Gang (properly called Gangaa in Hindu); nobody says what this syl. exactly means, but it has to be smt. scornful (<< sick), & from there the Bul. tzigulka has to have come. On the other hand, I may add also smt. (o.) Gr., their ζυγωτοσ (joined together, connected), or ζευγοσ (a pair), or ζυγοσ (a I_yoke, what is Ger. I_Joch, Lat. I_jugum, resp. It. giogo, 'dzhogo', Rus. /Bul. I_igo 2(only in the Gr. they begin with "z")2, etc., up to Skr. jugam 2(<< also I_jagen)2 ), what has given your (i.e. Lat.) I_zygote (a fertilized gamete 2(to which w. we shall also come)2 containing 2 merged cells). When we look at the last r. not with "z" then the ... I_yoga /joga deserves also to be ment-d, what in Skr. was I_jogah & meant a path, way (i.e. a I_jog|ging), as also the I_conjunctive mode (resp. congiuntivo in It., etc. bc. it is Lat.). And with this (<< also ora) we are done with especially the time.

~ ~ ~

OK, and now let us take a look at diff. time intervals, such as, say, the I_day. Your w. is Lat. I_dies (a day or a term; from here nundinae was a market-day bc. it happened each 8th day 2(it is said smw. so, though in my view this has to be the 9th day --- comp. the beg-ing with Ger. neun-nine. --- Ah, the point here is that the It. don't know how to count even today, for they count the step on which they stay for the first!)2 ), and nearly t.s. is Rus. denþ |I_den$| (den in Bul., etc. in other Sl. langs, again a day). Smt. sim. exists in o. Gr. too, namely their δεν = δε, but this is particle for negating put before the verbs, and whether this has smt. to do with the day will be made clear in the next sentence. When we go back in the time we may come to a Skr. I_dinam (again a day), which is derived from their dan as to burn, also ni daghas m-ing summer time is cited, i.e. this is when the sun shines, so that the Gr. δεν-negation (or Western, mostly Fr. & Lat. prefix I_de- 2(as in: denomination, declaration, deviation, etc.)2 ) may as well mean that smt. has already burned, gone out. Clearly from the day are the ws: today (& Fr. I_hodie, what is t.s.) & I_yesterday, also Rus. I_segodnja (read 'seVodnja') what is today (built from sego-this dne); it isn't pretty clear, though, what "yester" in Eng. means, at least at a 1st glance. I sup. (that the o. Eng* have sup-d) that this is some "yes", i.e. the day has already gone (at least bc. in Fr. it is I_hier, & 'ier' sounds again as yes, what in its turn has to be from It. ieri m-ing t.s.), but the etym-sts give it from Ger. I_gestern (t.s.). As s-ing this is convincing (in many Ger. dialects "g" is pronounced as 'j' 2(what you write as "y")2 ), but it, still, isn't clear (at least to me) whether some Sternen-stars (I_Stern, read 'shtern', in sing., but this is Lat. aster) were meant, & that is what I would prefer, or we must start from the gesture (Lat. gestio) as smt. gone fast away, or the o. Eng* have combined smt. using also the Fr. hier. ( It is also said that gestern is c. Ger., f.ex. Hol. gisteren, what was I/G. r. gh(d)ies, & bc. here the Lat. dies is present, where in "gester-/yester-" there's no day 2(the o. Teu* have "eaten" it, taking the stars from the foregone night for more important element)2, so, I sup., you have added a "day' to the beg-ing part. )
Anyway, let us go further. About the Ger. I_Tag being a step (of the Sun) we have already spoken (hence, your tag may also be rel-d to this Ger. w.), though, as you see, it isn't much away from the Skr. daghas; but changing the 1st let. to Rus. I_shag we may as well go to Lat. pag- and cite, e.g.: their I_pagina (a I_page as section, also in Fr., etc., & don't bother that the m-ing varies), or your (Lat.) pageant (a carnival), or the very I_pagan (pagano in Sp., etc.), or then the known Fr. I_paysan (a villager, what is also an often used jargon for simpleton) --- all this in sense of some movement, though this time in the space, or in the I_paysage-landscape. And when one "paginates" in this way in the open it often happens that he or she finds some I_paganus things, like ... mushrooms, where from Rus. adj. poganûj |I_poganu^j| is given, what for you is poisonous (so that the I_poison too, has t.s. building --- from paysan!), or as noun poganka is poisonous mushroom. Or one may stick some "pags" in the earth, bc. in Lat. I_pango (-ere; & count this as nasal vowel, 'pa~', if you don't want to change the r., or, else, you may rel. this to the disc-ed pan- r.) means: to stick, set, plant, etc.; in this sphere of m-ings turns out to lie the known pact (I_Pakt in Ger.) in sense of corner-stone in the rel-ns btw. people, but also the small I_pack (poss. for taking when walking in the country?; or it is meant as some 3D-enclosure); & then, come to think about, why not to put here also the ancient Hindu (& Malaysian) ... I_pagodas (bc. they were built exactly like corner-stones around the paths)?
If you are in doubt about the pact I may ment. also the Ger. variety I_Pacht, what is a special kind of pact, namely for leasing of land to paysans-farmers to I_pango-plant smt. --- bc. who owns the land doesn't bother to work it, and who has to work the soil in order to earn his or her living doesn't own it. [|I_comments| This, b.t.w., is the reason why Bul. agriculture after more than 15 (and even more) years of transition to democracy is still underdeveloped, bc. the former owners of the land wanted to receive back their nationalized by the Communists land in real borders, but they, living for years in towns, have forgotten all about farming & have never thought about doing it by themselves, so that in this way many big parcels of cultivated land were simply botched for more then a decade. And I don't want to say here that the land shouldn't have been returned to the owners, but they might have been handed some certificates for how many acres & what exactly category they have, where the actual land might have been left still in state's hands & properly used & some commissions paid to the owners, though allowing them to sell it out; and only when 2(i.e. if)2 one was not satisfied with this situation & wanted to farm the land alone, just then to give it in real borders, but those who own it now have to be forced to pay some taxes if they don't use it acc. to its category --- but, well, it just have not been done in the proper way, bc. ntg. is done in the proper way in Bul., as much as I am sorry to say this. ] Ah, and what I wanted to tell you is that from this Ger. Pacht has to have come one Rus. w. for farming, working the land, namely pahatþ |I_pahat$| /pashu (resp. paharþ, now obsolete, is a farmer), though this isn't away from the pastoral r., which will be disc-ed shortly.
Sp-ing about pages & pagodas, I think here may be ment-d also Rus. I_pogoda (pronounced 'pågòda', unstressed "o" in Rus. is read always as smt. btw. 'a' & 'å', like in your "but"), what is a weather. Here (I haven't found in the dicts good etym-gy so that I may only guess) we may take apart po- as prefix (m-ing: step by step, around, or just smt. to change the m-ing) & then << I_goden-fit (there are many varieties like: sgoden 2(appropriate)2, ugoditþ |I_ugodit$| 2(to satisfy)2, I_godina /god 2(a year)2, etc), i.e. this is smt. good but one has to wait a little, & exacly pogodì in Rus. means "wait a little"! On the other hand, one may start with the Lat. pag-, again in the sense that one has to wait (for the Sun to move, or the like). Or, on a 3rd hand, one may rel. it diretly to the Hindu pagoda as smt beatiful. The niceness of the Rus. pogoda is obvious also bc. the adj. pogozhij (what is deriv. from pogoda) means always good weather (no matter that the pogoda-weather may be good or bad, as it happens), so that this is an interesting Rus. optimism, in contrast to your uncertainty about your weather (to which we shall come shortly).
Now let us finish with this burning day-I_dies-den-I_dinam. There is smt. sim. by the Turks, namely their gün |I_guen|, what is a sun or a day, from here günes is the sun, and güney is south. Yeah, but you also have the w. I_gun, though it means smt. else, so it's natural to ask us, whether there is smt. that rel-s these both ws. The etym-sts give about the gun some o. gunne, gonne, Eng.-Lat. gunna, & say that this was probably diminutive from the fem. (Teu.) ... name Gunnhilda, which was to be split in: gunnr + hildr, where both ws meant a war; they add also that to call guns with maiden names was common tradition in old times (giving as example a gun in Edinburgh palace from 15th cent. called Maggy). I agree about the women's names of guns, but, look here: hildr (& m-ing a war) has to be near to your kill (& keel, or with a let. "q" --- Fr. I_quille), but they say ntg. about where from gunnr comes (so that it might be older & Eastern; as an imit.). OK, and I may add also It. I_oggi ('odzhi'), what again burns (>> ogonþ |I_ogon$| for this) & is a day, namely today.

~ ~ ~

So, and now about your I_weather, though it isn't correct to look at it as smt. temporal, but as far as we in Bul. use one & t.s. w. for the weather & the time, & have already ment-d here the Rus. pogoda-weather, then let me explain your w. too. Etym-cally this is Ger. I_Wetter (t.s.), but also Rus. (c. Sl.) I_veter, which now doesn't mean a weather but a ... wind. The r., obviously, is sound imit. of the blowing of the wind, what in Ger. is I_wehen & in Rus. (Bul., etc., c. Sl.) is vejatþ |I_vejat$| (or take Ger. Weh as an ache, pain, sorrow), and, as far as the imit. is as old as the world, it isn't surprising that in Skr. I_vatas was a wind, or vati /vayati was to blow, & in Avs., too, was vata as a wind, & exactly I_Watte in Ger. is a ... cotton (which is easily blown by the wind). Then I may add that in Ireland feth is an air, where the last reminds me about the Teu. & Sl. elves called Feen (I_Fee in sing.; this is written as your fee, but the latter is variation of few); with sim. m-ings are also the ws: I_ephemeral, effusive, the ether (Lat. I_aether & o. Gr. αιθερ; & from here the ... I_eternity), etc., & going in this direction we have to come to your I_air, but this r. is slightly different. So that we have to return to the I_wind, which in Lat. was I_ventus, where may be cited also: your vent /-ilation, Sl. I_vint (a spiral or a screw), your vintage (& Rus. I_vinograd as wine plant), & many things that wind up or down (so that the wind not only blows but goes in spirals).
But the hidden m-ing of the I_Wetter-weather is also in the possibility for some events --- hence your I_event is also here --- to occur, i.e. you (& the Teu*) look at the weather as smt. unstable, it may go I_avant (as the Fr* said, or forward; or avanti in Sp., etc.), but it is adventurous |I_adventure| (what is ad + vent-). Bc. of the wind the Ger* build ... I_Wand|s (walls) & the Eng* put I_window|s in their rooms (or the Fr* use fenêtres, which are Ger. I_Fenster|s or It. finestra-s or Lat fenestra-s, where the idea is t.s. but the r. is a bit diff., fen-); and bc. of the Wetter the Ger* ... make bets, bc. your I_bet is Ger. I_Wette (& wetten is to bet)! The Sl*, for their part, say I_obet, what is a fair promise, a pledge, & instead of the bet (but only in Bul., bc. the Rus* use Fr. pari) say I_bas; or there is also the w. I_bjas /bes, resp. besitþsja /besnovatþ (if you see smw. the 'þ' char. then the w. surely isn't Bul. & has to be Rus.), used when one is very angry. Usually the Wetter for the Ger* isn't good (the wind blows there often), & their wettern means to have a storm (or to quarrel, or to curse), but this is twin with wüten |I_wueten|, what is again to be angry (Wut is an anger); on the other hand, poss. bc. in England it often rains, you /they say ... I_wet when it does so. But the uncertainty, besides the betting (though this is usually one & t.s. thing for the Celts bc. they, as far as I could have grasped it, like to bet always when smt. is uncertain), remains also bc. of the near rel-n btw. the weather & the question I_whether! ( Frankly sp-ing, with Bul. bas-bet not all in clear & maybe here are interwoven several ideas, bc. besides the said things there might be also some hitting on the breasts 2('baa' or 'bah')2, but it might be some I_buzz|ing too, for there is also our Sl. I_basnja 2(smm. in Rus. also pobasënka)2 m-ing a fable, which has to be here 2(where with your w. I_fable the idea is diff., it has to be rel-d to the ... spinning of fibers)2. )
OK, and then: what about the I_seasons? But here I mean not the w. season (which is o. Fr. seson 2(now I_saison)2, Port. & Sp. I_sazon, & Lat. satio(n), & has to be split there (so it's said) in: satus + I_zone m-ing time to sow, to put seeds in the earth, bc. the 1st is Lat. for to sow 2(<< sato) & the 2nd is o. Gr. ζονα = ζονη, known worldwide as zone 2(though in o. Gr. it meant also a belt or ring)2 ). So I didn't mean this w. but your I_summer, I_winter (you may bet that this is from the wind), spring (obviously the weather springs), and autumn (which, bc. of the spring before it, now falls for the Am*). The summer (I_Sommer in Ger.) is also obviously from the summing of the bees & other live forms (Summer in Ger. 2('zu...')2 is a buzzer, or summen is to buzz), but there might be interesting to ment. that for the Slavs this s-ing is sign for coldness (hot things should have 'zh' in them) like in Sl. I_zima, what is exactly the winter, where is said that there were: o. Prussian semo (= zima), Skr. I_heman ('hjeman', in the winter) or himas = hemantas (a winter --- to remind you the I_Himalayas), or Avs. zya- /zim- /zimo (a winter, cold weather), & o. Gr. χειμα (t.s.), & Fr. hiver ('iver'), & Arm. jmern ('dzhmern', t.s.), etc. (& for the equality of zum-, 'zhå-', 'båz-', & 'bråm-' << I_zhuk). So that it leaves only the autumn, which is given from o. Fr. autompne (now automne, 'oton'), what is Lat. I_autumnus (an autumn, & from here used as symbol for the whole year, being the best of the seasons bc. of the gathering of crops); just autumo in Lat. is to name or approve (as we approved also the year --- << Jahr), so that it is advisable to look now a bit back & compare autumo with the ... Tur. I_taman as plenty, enough. The Ger*, for their part, name the seasons as follows: Winter, Frühling |I_Fruehling| (the spring, from früh what is early), Sommer, & I_Herbst (the autumn-fall), where only the latter has to be commented, namely that it corresponds well with their I_Erbe what is an inheritance, heritage, so that the Herbst is, again, the best of the seasons, but --- an interesting moment --- from this Erbe is given Sl. ... I_gerb (a coat of arms), bc. it may be inherited (though, if you ask me, here Ger. I_gerben as to make or paint leather has to be the source bc. that is why you say "coat"; & from here is the flower Gerber).
And now let us cast a glance by the Slavs, where the Rus* say: zimà, I_vesna, I_leto, osenþ |I_osen$|, & the Bul* say: zìma, I_prolet, ljato, esen. That we say 'zzå-' in winter I've already ment-d, but the other ws are not so obvious. The Rus. vesna (Pol. I_wiosna, etc., o. Sl., just not Bul.) as a spring may be rel-d to veselitþsja /vesëlûj (to have fun /be merry or cheerful) but these are, m.o.l., free assocs. The official etym-gy cites Lat. ver (-is) as a spring, o. Icl. I_var (t.s.), etc., going down (the etym-cal tree) to the Skr., where it was I_vasantas, what is a perfect match. OK, but there are some remarks I would like to make, and one is that from the r. var- /ver- it is easy to come to the ... I_variable & diff. varieties bc. in the spring all changes very fast (though one may accept this as rotation). Then there is a nearly obvious rel-n with Fr. I_vernal (spring time) what is (again) bc. of the rotation (moving in spirals, like winding plants do), but this is slightly away from the Skr. vasan-; from here are also other Fr. ws, like: verne (a pine tree --- bc. it's ever green), I_vert (raw, fresh, green, playful), or I_verdure (a greenery), what easily leads us to the I_vertical things (though << verto again), & what can explain why I_vernacular (Fr. vernaculaire), also as a dialect of a lang., means native (i.e. raw, not yet properly grown or established). Here you may << I_vireo /virus, and I may add also one Rus. (c. Sl.) w., vëdro /vëdrûj (vedår |I_veda^r| in Bul.), what is fresh; etym-cally this is given from vedrò as a barrel (meant full with water) & rel-d also to Ger. Wetter, but I sup. this fits better with Fr. vert.
The o. & c. Sl. I_leto has 2 m-ings: the one is of the summer, & the other is for the whole year (where is meant that the summer is the best part of the year). If we start with the leto-year it may as well (to my mind) be rel-d to letatþ |I_letat$| (letja in Bul.), what is to fly (<< letatþ); even as season the flying may have its saying in sense that the weather is then so good that one feels like flying. If we start with the season, though, I am almost convinced in what is officially given smw., namely, that suitable parent for our leto (I_lato in Pol.) is Lat. I_laetus m-ing plump, fat, wholesome, happy, etc. (i.e. again the best season); it leaves (mysteriously) the exact rel. to Fr. l'été (= le été |I_ete|) as t.s. season, but I sup. their summer has to be smh. rel-d to their verb être |I_etre| (to be, namely, is/ist/est --- bc. this special chick above the "e" is for missing of some former char, here "s", i.e. it was "estre" before, but we shall return to this verb at the end of the book), what is a sim. idea of rel-n of the summer, this time, to the existence. However it is, both m-ings may be joined via the idea of swelling & procreation (<< leha--λεχωνα); it is strange, but in some etym-cal dicts there is only guessing, & (to my view) not very convincing. ( Ah, let me squeeze here the so called Indian summer in Eng., which is tzigansko ljato 2(Gypsy s.)2 in Bul., Altweibersommer 2(old women s.)2 in Ger., and babje leto 2(female or grandma s.)2 in Rus., what turns out to be translation from Ger. )
Bul. I_prolet-spring has to be build as pre + I_leto, bc. it's before the summer, as if it announced the summer, and in some areas of Bul. it was called proljatoska what says exactly this (also in Fr. it is I_printemps where the beg-ing is read 'pre~', & the -temps are not interesting here; sim-ly in It. it is I_primavera 2(only the Lat. ver isn't enough for them)2 ), & that is why I left it after the leto-summer (though it may be rel-d also to the returning of the birds from south, what in Bul. is prelitam, or in Rus. perelët |I_perelet| 2('pereljot')2 is a fly from one place to another). On the other hand, bc. pro- & let- are widely used syls in Lat., I shall use the place to add some other ws starting with the ... proletariat (Lat. I_proletarius), or, if you want, with their proles, what means a child, posterity, gender. This is a good approach, bc. the proletarians (in Ger. shortened to Prolets) were so named (but not in the times of Marx, no, that was in the times of Emperor Servus Tulius) to signify the fact that they were used only to give a I_prolepsis (an expectation for increase in population), that was used for soldiers (or to give later birth to soldiers, if they happen to be girls); this w. explains also your I_prolific (& its derivs). The Communists have paraphrased the w. proletarius to labour slaves, & I see no obstacles to make one more paraphrase, namely: Proletarians around the world --- proliferate!
[|I_comments| And, b.t.w., they would have proliferated, had there not happened that the industrial revolution vastly decreased their number, and what really increases, or at least continues to take a big chunk of the world's population, are those working in diff. services (say: education, cleaning, transport, tourism, medicine, banking, etc.), what is prevalently good than bad, though I, personally, don't find good a situation which gives rise to many avoidable professions (like f.ex., brokers, or house-cleaners, when there is vast number of useful home appliances, or prostitutes, when their work is such that every woman may provide it, or drivers, for sim. reasons, etc.). What I want to say is that, making our life easier and freeing many people from various tedious & monotonous operations which had to be done before, we employ as much people in some other areas, where the work is again monotonous & can't satisfy the requirements of our souls for enjoyable spending of our time. All this, of course, provides working places, but it doesn't seem to be a movement in the right direction (in fact, it isn't a movement at all, it is trotting on t.s. place), even if the proper movement (when each one will try only to improve his or her abilities, & to amuse him- or her- self with interesting & creative work) looks like utopia; and it looks so, I'll tell you, bc. reaching the level when one begins to work not for money or not to make career but just to be useful to the others & to have reasons to like his- or her- self, so reaching this levels one begins simply to wonder what to do & does ntg. useful --- bc., with our imperfect souls (however one defines the soul), we want just more & more quantities, instead of new qualities! ]
Well, and after disc-ing enough the prolet and the Prolets, there leaves only Rus. osenþ |I_osen$|-autumn (Bul. esen, Pol. I_jesien, etc.) where in my view (the etym-gies are, again, not clear & not interesting) the point is in looking for ... some shade, which (as I have ment-d it) is senþ |I_sen$| in Rus. (as an o. w., or I_sjanka now in Bul.) or tenþ (in the current lang.)! The beg-ing may differ, bc. in Rus. it's 'oo', in Bul. 'ee', & in Pol. 'jee', but we are all glad that the shadows have come at last.

~ ~ ~

Yeah, but the I_space remains, & many things rel-d to it, & although we have spoken about the continuum (<< c.), I have to say smt. at least about the directions of the compass, and about the big & small things, and not to be bothered too much saying smt. about the matter as such, what will be the theme of the next chapter (bc. all is mixed, as I've already said). Let us begin with the space, what is Fr. espace ('espas') m-ing an interval of space or time, what is from Lat. I_spatium, what has sim. m-ing but also that of a walk, & from the latter comes the verb I_spazieren in Ger., what is to walk. Here is also the space /shpatzia on the keyboards, your span, what is (o.) Ger. I_Spanne (or It. spanna, or o. Fr. espanna, etc., but given as Teu.), what surely leads us to the ... country I_Spain (in Sp. España, in It. Spagna read 'Spanþja', in Sl. Ispania, in Lat. Spania), and: do you know why is this so? Well, bc. this country looks like a span (it is on some distance from the other part of Europe), or, more precisely, like the thumb of the right hand (turned with the inner side to us & bent down); and then, if we count the islands Sardinia & Corsica for phalanxes of the index finger, then Italy happens to be exactly the middle finger (& I don't know what you think about the middle finger, but for many folks it 2(with the 2 adjacent fingers curved)2 is a sign of the phallus; bc. of this sign all folks, as far as I know, use the index finger when showing to smt., no matter that the middle one in longer). Then I may continue with Ger. I_Spatz, what is ... a sparrow (bc. he jumps making some spans), & the I_spatula, which is Lat, but also Ger. (Spatel) & Fr. (la spatule), etc. on the West, where on the East, i.e. by the Slavs, we have put in the beg-ing the Fr. article (!?) what gives Rus. /Bul. I_lopata or lopatka. With the idea of dividing the space (what the spatula, in fact, does) may be ment-d also Ger. I_Spalt (a crack or crevice), & your I_split|ting.
Surely other "space"-ws may also be found, but let us not dig exactly in this form but try to enrich the m-ing of the r. suggesting some sound imit. 'påss' (like if the air is going out of one's mouth, or of blowing of a wind not blocked up by anything), and then, dropping the usually not very stabile prefix "s" from the space (as the Fr* have done to form their I_pays, what is in pl. & means a country; << also paysan & pagan), we may come, on one hand, to your ... I_peace (via your I_piece, what is a small portion of smt. & may be observed as variation of the w. space), and, on the other hand, to the western ... I_bazaar! This shouldn't be a bad idea bc. the peace varies as follows: pais in o. Fr. or I_paix ('pe') nowadays, pace in It. & Lat., I_paz in Sp., etc. starting with Lat. pax as: a peace, quietness, mercy, collaboration, peace treaty, giving also the known I_pacifist|s. When you comp. pace-peace with the space it isn't difficult to get the idea for some free movement, what is to be affirmed also by comp-ing the Sp. paz-peace with t.s. Tur. (known in Bul. too) I_paz as a hole or crevice, or with Rus. pazuha (Bul. I_pazva) what is a bosom, so that we are ready to look now at the Tur. I_pazar, which is Rus. bazar, Bul. pazar, your bazaar, etc., coming from Per. bazar, & a bazaar, surely, is a big space. Here may be ment-d also one sim. Sp. w., pasar, m-ing to carry, also as transport vehicle, where from comes the phrase:|I_phrases| no I_pasaran (it shan't go, I disapprove it highly; only pasaran is given in the dicts as a throat, what is an orifice, passage). But there are many ws around the bazaar, like: Bul. pazarja (se) (to bargain), I_pazja (to guard or watch --- the bazaar, or some other space ---, what in It has mutated to badare--take care, << b.) & pazach (the person who does this, a watcher), and this has to be Tur. bc. there is their I_pazvant (a guard), & then your I_pass & the passport (to pass at the port), & the passage & the passant, etc.
This really is a very big cluster bc. here are all the ... I_pastoral ws, which I may start with smt. tasty --- why not? --- namely with the Tur. I_pastirma, which is read (& written in Bul.) as 'pastårma', but you prefer to name it pastrami (dried fillet usually of goat-meat), which now may be a delicatesse but originally was everyday food of the pastirs (I_pastir in Bul., I_pastuh in Rus., pastouh in o. Sl., a I_shepherd 2(where your w. is built from: sheep + herd, & the latter is Ger. Hirt)2 ). But then, surely, the pastors have to be ment-d, bc. they were looked at as herdsmen of the uneducated folk (& comp. I_folk with I_flock, b.t.w.), & if we look in Lat. there I_pastor means both, a pastor & a pastir (or pastio is a I_pasture; also in Sl. I_pasa /pastiis to graze or lead animals to pasture). OK, but the Rus* use pëstrûj (påstår |I_pa^sta^r| in Bul.) for motley, of mixed colours (say, a bouquet, or a meadow), and this w. has also to be here, though the etym-sts don't rel. it to the pasture, they just give a Church-Sl. påstr, Pol. pstry, etc. (there was also Blt. paisas as a blotch), then a Gr. ποικιλοσ (again påstår), and Skr. pechas (a colour or form) or Avs. I_paesa (t.s.). I will not quarrel with the specialists bc. for me it is clear that this 'pa(s/ch/sh)as' is the Sl. pasa, but mark that in olden times this meant a colour or form (>> forma), i.e. smt. that enables us to see the space! But then, do you see a big difference btw. pàsha (a pasture) & pashà (what is the well known Tur. I_pasha)? Bc. I can't see it, hence the pasha is the Eastern equivalent of the Lat. pastor-pastir (well, chronologically it is v.v.). And then, staying to this r., could you guess when the people usually pasa-feed themselves on a big scale, I mean on which holiday? I would say: on the Heb. I_Pascha (Pasha in Rus., read 'pas-ha'), what was their old holiday dedicated to the fleeing from Egyptian slavery, which coincides with your I_Easter (which, obviously, says that this is smt. taken from the very East) bc. it was then when the (sup-d) Christ was put on the cross & died & rose from the tomb. Or, for that matter, what would you say now about the ... pastries |I_pastry| & the I_pasta|s?
So there are many ideas involved here. For one thing this is a moving here & there, like in Lat. I_passus, what is a step, motion, where the imit. 'p(å)ss' comes in effect, and this might also be some sound to attract attention bc. the phrase "take care" in Ger. is I_pass auf, what has to have given the Sl. ... danger --- opasnostþ |I_opasnost$| in Rus. For another thing the animals chew the grass & this has influenced the application of the r. also for human food like in Lat. I_pastillum (a small bread or bun) or pastillus (a pill or tablet), or the known It. I_pasta. For a 3rd thing this might be a digging or turning of the soil like in Lat. I_pastino (to burrow, dig, paw), and in Rus. I_pestnik is a fist or a slap, pestik is a stamper to grind, say, nuts, or also a I_pistil of a flower, and, a curious thing, they have the obsolete pestovatþ, applied usually to children, what is to foster or teach them (surely with slaps 2(bc, as I have come to the conclusion: the less intelligent one is, the lesser is the effect of other alternative ways for teaching him, her, or it 3(if an animal)3 to behave, so that the more he /she /it justifies the applying of brutal force)2 ).
And there is a 4th thing, namely the patience & slowness of the flock, as in Lat. I_patientia (a patience), what has given the solitaire-game (called also passiance), the I_passive|ness (together with the Passive Mode), the I_passion (not so much human as animal trait), & the patients (who, via the eyes of the ancient Romans, were not so ill as bound to be patient); there was also Lat. I_patior (passus, I_pati) as to endure, suffer, where is exactly t.s. I_patja (or patila) in Bul. as to suffer (resp., troubles or worries). Or we may take Rus. pûtka |I_pu^tka| /pûtatþ, what is to show cruelty & cause pain, though this is closely rel-d to the experiment (opût |I_opu^t|) & Bul. questioning (I_pitam), but this isn't smt. unique for the Sl* bc. sim. ideas exist in the interrogation or I_inquisition; besides, a major part of the worries happen usually when we are on the road, so that this is rel-d also to the I_path (to be disc-ed), & to the special I_putta-hole. It may look strange why together with the suffering goes the I_passion, but the latter isn't a glee or mirth, this is mainly sexual feeling, or smt. slowly affecting us & animalistic, so that behind this w. lurks the flock of animals on a pasture. ( I may add also one small parallel with other langs about the rel-n passion-desire-lust -- patience-suffering, where in Rus. 2(Sl.)2 the 1st is strastþ |I_strast$| & the 2nd is I_stradanie, and in Ger. the 2nd is Leid /I_Leiden 2(though you may << L.)2 & the 1st is I_Leidenschaft, so that, although of entirely diff. rs, the rel-n is obvious, and I sup. it has to exist in other Eastern langs. ) From the passion comes the compassion, what is exactly the Lat. phrase cum patior (with passion, or commonly experienced passion, or, maybe, that we can't be compassionate without having suffered before); here's also the I_sympathy (again common patila-troubles, bc. we go on sim. paths). Still, I may add one more aspect, the unpleasant feeling, or even puking, when seeing these filthy animals /beasts --- like in Ger. I_petzen what now means to give smb. out, to sneak, or their Pest, what is a pestilence (Lat. I_pestilentia or pestis --- this may be due to another imit., this time of spitting 2(<< I_pse-cur)2, but it is rel-d to the pastoral r. of påstri-motley meadows bc. in Lat. I_passum meant: down, to the ground, or to perish); and then here has to be also the well known I_pessimist.
But the pasture is a big space and it may be smm. empty, like in the Sl. desert, which is pustûnja in Rus., or also I_pustoj is empty, or t.s. Bul. I_pust, also pustosh, & other Sl. ws, but this is not only Sl. bc. in Ger. I_pusten is to blow or to pant (& the pustûnja is Wüste) & in Sw. pusta was again to blow or inhale panting, & there is the known Hun. I_pusta (where horses & cows move about & where only grass may grow; this Hun. w. is given as coming from the Sl* but I don't believe much in an exact etym-gy for an imit. w., & in a country with such specific lang.). Here is also your (to) I_push, coming from Fr. pousser ('pusè', a young stem) or I_poussee (a pressure, hitting, whack), given as being from Lat. I_pulso (to press, hit, break, etc.), what has given also your pulse; even the Rus. particle pustþ |I_pust$| m-ing "let it be" may be ment-d (<< possible), & their I_pusk, what is a start, initiation (or I_zapusk is a launching of a rocket). Then here is Bul. I_pushek, what is a smoke, & the Sl. gun (I_pushka in Rus. is a big gun but in Bul. this is a rifle), & Tur. I_pusu (an ambush; from here is one Bul. hunting jargon, pusija, as place where to hide & wait for the animals to come to be shot), or also their puşt |I_pusht| (know in Bul. as pusht, what is a mean boy, badly brought up, like a vagabond), & a Lat. I_pustula as a pimple, &, of course, all the pistols around the world (say Fr. I_pistolet, which in Ger. becames "she" 2(I sup. bc. of the hole)2 ). There is also Ger. I_Piste (Bul. too) as a track (for skiing or running), & the Sl. plump & precious things or girls (I_pishten in Bul. or pûshnûj in Rus., from here is their pûshka |I_pu^shka| as a kind of bun, smt. well swelled while frying), & this is traced back up to a Skr. pušjati |I_pushjati| or pošati, what meant to procreate (or pušam, what was plump-pishten, or well endowed, as you use to say for girls).
You see that the Lat. pulso seems much "perfumed" where the ancient r. was push- /pus-, which is applied also in the Sl. I_piss|ing (on the West too, but, say, Bul. I_pishka or Rus. pisþka |I_pis$ka| as only-pissing penis 2(bc. is used for small boys only)2 is nearer to the old r.). But Tur. çiş |I_chish| ('chish') as to piss is also here, what may become 'chush' or 'shur', bc. in some of the langs around the Pamirs I_chushka was a small tube, & in Bul. exactly t.s. w. is a pepper-pod; sim. is the case also with Bul. water tap or fountain called cheshma (in Srb. česma), which is Tur. çeşme |I_cheshme|. In Bul. we like also to say 'chush' to an ... ass (meant as animal here), or at least there is proverbial saying about this (meaning as sp-ing rubbish, & to stop doing this), & I wondered for a long time why we say so, especially bc. in Rus. t.s. (again) chushka means an young ... pig, but it turned out (after looking in etym-cal dicts) that the right calling was 'tzuj' or 'tzuh' what was known in many Southern Republics of the former USSR, where from the chushka, being also tzujka, has come. So that this was not a shout restricted to asses or horses only, but used also to other animals, what the Rus* (mainly horse-drivers) name tzokatþ jazûkom (to click with the tongue; it may be also with the hoofs), or also shchëlkatþ |I_shchelkat$| (to smash, click); but if so then here is also Ger. I_zuchten as to keep animals (& comp. this with the ment-d Bul. chuvam), where they subconsciously feel that this is smt. debasing bc. the deriv. Zuchthaus is a reformatory house (or jail). We may come to sim-ly s-ing ws on other places (bc. the imit. is world-wide) so let us stop digging here, more so bc. we jumped aside from the space.

~ ~ ~

The Ger. space, on the other hand, is I_Raum (& räumen is to make space), what is build on the basis of some scratching sound (when taking away all unneeded things & clearing the ground), or of a booming sound in an empty hole (or as a growling destined to drive the others away, to protect our ground), & here is your I_room (resp. I_roam as to go through a Raum), Sw. rum, Got. rums, o. Icl. rumr (spacious), or Lat. I_rus (a field, land, village, giving your I_rustic), what is traced to an Avs. I_ravah as a length or space. Having come to this I may cite also Bul. raven or Rus. ravnûj (o. Sl. ravþn), what is smooth, even, equal, and may be looked at as smt. extended; from here I_ravnina is a plane, & in Bul. we have the archaic ravàn, what is Tur.-Ar. I_rahvan m-ing a smooth, even trot of a horse. And this is all that can be said here (there's also the ment-d Ger. Platz-square or your place, but we've disc-ed this r.; there's also the Umwelt, what is the environment, but this goes from Welt = world & we'll come to this on another place). But I may say then smt. about the Sl. space called I_prostranstvo, what is m.o.l. your (i.e. Lat.) I_prostrate & prostration! Here we also scratch a bit, but we do not only this, we fight and win, putting the enemy in a prostrate state. More precisely, in Lat. we have I_prosterno (to send smb. down, destroy, or win), what has given your prostrate & Bul. prostiram /prosvam (t.s. like in the Lat.), or also prostratus (thrown in front, cast down); from here is the known (mainly by the Ger*) cheering I_prosit, what has to be understood not only as to be healthy, but as to be strong enough to win, to succeed in prostrating the enemies (also prosten is to drink a prosit-toast to smb.).
And now an interesting rel-n emerges btw. I_prosterno & the ... I_prosthesis, where the latter has come from o. Gr. προθεση (an aim, purpose, or in grammatical sense a prep. that supports the main thesis, or an artificial appliance to keep the human body fit & erect), in short: the prosthesis helps us not to fall prostrated down! The let. "s" here is parasitic on the West (also in Fr. it is proStese), but in Bul., being near to the Gr. original, it is proteza (also in Rus. is I_protez), so that, though in o. Gr. this was smt. to prop the thesis, from the Lat. on it was rel-d to their prosterno. But even more interesting is the rel-n of all this to the ... masc. gland, prostate (which helps us, I mean, the men) to prostrate every met woman (if she doesn't disagree much). This gland comes also from o. Gr. (προστατησ) but meant there, beside this, also a father, head of a family, defender, guardian, resp. προστασια was a defense or guardianship; it is known all around the world (Lat. & Teu. & Sl. I_prostata), & here, really, the let. "s" isn't parasitic. Of course here has to be ment-d also the ... prostitute (I_prostituta in Lat.), &, living in times of emancipation, a new w. prostitut (-us) has to be coined, I sup. Now, though it seems strange, here deserves to be squeezed a remark about Bul. I_prostak, what is a simpleton (& prostotija, is a simplicity), what comes again from an o. Gr. w., προστυχοσ (a simpleton, mean person) or προστυχια (a simplicity); this isn't only Bul., in Rus. I_prostoj means smt. average or simple, but they use another w. for the prostak. These o. Gr. ws are long & it is useful to ask us the question: what rel-s the προστασια-defense with the προστυχια-simplicity? Well, this shouldn't be difficult bc. you know that from ancient times the weak-minded people were treated with care by the populace and I have given here some examples (<< cretin & sila), but here a slightly diff. nuance is shown, namely that not only is the simplicity sacred, but this is what props the world, keeps it fit (like a prosthesis)!
[|I_comments| Ah, if you know how much I would like to see smm. a society that will not be governed by προστυχοσ-es, but alas, there were many proofs in the human history forcing me to accept this for an utopia! And I don't mean by this that I support the Platonic idea that a state has to be governed by philosophers. No, this shouldn't be done, at least bc the state's economy has to be ruled by specialist in a given area, not in all areas, how the philosophy boasts. But what I especially don't like in the democracy is the fact that I call vulgar censorship, or what other people (as I have met it) call the tyranny of popular ignorance! That is the worst of all tyrannies, bc. even when the people are not really governed by themselves (bc. they only appoint & reject their rulers, and plebiscites are rarely performed) the common masses usually (not to say always) succeed to force their (vulgar) views about many things. All that happens in this world (& I don't suggest, that there has to be some other world), looking in a long run, happens bc. people like it so; this has to be true for each form of government, but for the democracy this is more than obvious! And the point isn't that the people on the average are silly, or as you very well know (using one & t.s. w.) that they are I_mean (what is also Ger. I_gemein, again as average, and /or bad), but in the peculiar moment that when gathered in one place in order to find common solution for a given problem they give not the average vote, they produce almost the worst poss. vote! The explan. of this fact (bc. I take it for proven fact) is not difficult (when one has already posed the question, bc. you know: the point is not what is the answer, the point is what is the question), so the explan. lies in the resonance on the "frequency" of the mean ones (who are the majority), & this resonance suppresses all (as rare as they happen to be) reasonable thoughts! When people are forewarned & vote not in an excited state but after a careful reasoning this should not happen, but it still happens (bc. people, in general, behave like small children, i.e. too emotional; not to ment. the crowd), so that this has ntg. to do with finding of the mathematical mean of all the votes for a given event. I beg your pardon for the lyric. ]

~ ~ ~

We have finished now with diff. ws for the space, but there are other rel-d notions, like the directions of the compass. For the I_east (in Ger. Ost, in Fr. est, in Bul. I_iztok or in Rus. vostok, etc.) we have already spoken (<< aus, orient, iztok), and the I_west is also common on the West (in Ger. West, in Fr. ouest 2('ues')2, etc.) & comes from Lat. I_vespera (an evening; & Vesper is still used in Ger. as evening pray in the churches 2(but you also know it)2 ), which in turn comes from o. Gr. εσπεροσ, but I will tell you why these ws sound so (if you haven't guessed) --- bc. the day I_expire|s (no matter that this w. may be split in 2 & the prefix ex- taken apart); smt. sim. we have in the Sl. langs where the west is I_zapad (m-ing that the sun padaet /spadaet, falls down). On the other hand, there is a good correspondence btw. east & west (or in Fr.: est -- ouest). The etym-gy for north & I_south (in Ger. I_Nord & Süd |I_Sued|, in Fr. nord & sud, etc.) is said to be not very clear, but I'll give you some idea about these ws: north has to be rel-d to the ... particle no /not, bc nobody likes cold weather, & the south surely has to be based on the summen-buzzing of the insects (& life in general). In the Sl. langs the north is I_sever what comes from Lat. I_severus (severe for you), though it may be popularly split in: (v)se veet , i.e. there always (a wind) blows; & the south called I_jug (juzhnûj) has to be (in my view) distorted Ger. Süd, mixed with some approving & happy cry like 'juha'.

~ ~ ~

But the space has also dimensions and can be, roughly sp-ing, big or small. We have spoken about big--bik--bugaj, but many big things begin with bol- /bal- and they are not only big but, usually, also blown in spherical form, or at least like a bean, so let us have a better look. Here, of course, is your ball (Ger. I_Ball), & bc. it turns around this w. is used also as dancing ball (where from is the Fr. I_ballet), but there are many sim. ws, like: your I_bowl, Bul. I_bala (a big pack), also kalabalåk (from Tur. origin, where it's I_kalabalik, m-ing a big crowd), or Tur. I_bol (plentiful, much), or Rus. (o. & c. Sl.) bolþshoj |I_bol$shoj| (big; in Ukr. it becomes bilþshoj), or Rus. bòlee |I_bolee| (further, more than this); or take your I_bulk, or Bul. archaic I_bolvan as big (curved) stone (or stone idol), which is also Cz. balvan & Rus. bolvan, though for the Rus* this means ... a simpleton (with a "stone" head), or the Cz. name I_Boleslav m-ing a big glory (>> slava, in a peculiar context), or the ... I_metabolism (smt. meta- /medi- that balances the elements in the body, or makes them to roll like balls). I may continue with, say: Bul. I_balastra (broken pebbles used by building), or the known ballast, or the ancient (Lat.) I_ballista, where from comes the ballistics, or the Fr. I_balance, etc., & the etym-sts go back up to Skr. I_baliyan (stronger; like your I_bully) or balisthas (the strongest). But here is also Sl. (from Lat. origin) kolba as spherical container with thin neck, which is I_Kolben in Ger. (& means there also a bat 2(not of the kind that can fly)2, handle of a gun, or a maize cone, where from you should have made your ... I_club as a stick), or Bul. kålbo |I_ka^lbo| (a ball, smt. spherical), or Rus. klubok (small kålbo-ball), or their I_klumba (a group of growing flowers; & then your 2(to)2 I_climb, too); & I say that the origin is Lat. bc. there I_calabasco means: to shake unstable, ready to fall, what is present literally in the Sl. oscillation (I_kolebanie), but also in your (to) I_collapse (Ger kollabieren, also Sl.), &, if you like it (or even if you don't --- smm. I am not much of a liberal, you know), in Rus. I_koleso (I_kolelo in Bul.), what is a wheel, or also in the prep. I_okolo (around, to what we shall come much later with more ideas).
From calabasco I would like to jump for a bit to the Rus. (& c. Sl.) w. I_kolbasa, what is a big sausage, but I have to warn you that here several ideas are interwoven, though not contradictory. The 1st idea is based on their form like a colbe-ball (as by It. mortadella, also in other ws), bc. initially they were filled in swine's stomach, & an example for this is Cz. I_klobasa (exactly klubok); then the other idea starts from the killing of an animal (to what we shall come shortly) by which act its head falls down & rolls like a ball, & an example for this way of thoughts is Pol. I_kielbasa, where I_kiel is a fang or canine-tooth, also in Bul. we say I_kolja for to I_kill an animal (to cut its throat); and then comes also, I should say, a thought-through version by which each kind of meat falls into this category, what is proved by the etym-sts citing Tur. külbasti |I_kuelbasti| as a steak, & an o. Heb. kolbasar as any meat or live animal (bc. it may be killed & used for making of kolbasû). If you ask me, I personally prefer the 1st variant, where the 3rd seems to me the most dubious, bc. the sausages usually are made out of minced (& not baked) meat, they are some kind of cream, & especially the thin & long I_sausage|s (exactly sosiski in Rus.) are called in Bul. I_kremvirsh|i, what has to be from Ger. Wurst (any kind of sausage), but with the killing all is meshed. Bc., judge for yourself: we begun here with the bol- r., then went to kolb- /kobl-, then to koleb-, & using other vowel, say "a", we may go to the ... cabbala (& we shall, but on another place), or to the labia (<< l.), or to the collision, or the clan, etc. (even to Rus. arbuz; but << Kürbis), so let us not jump too much to the side now but say some ws only about the killing, as also finish with the big balls (or not strictly balls).
Well, your killing is known also in Bul. as I_kilvam (to bend down), or kåltzam (to cut, massacre --- << klåtzna), but here it's better to go to the Fr* where we may find their I_guillotine, or, even better, to take one boat, turn it bottom up & look at its ... I_keel (in Ger. Kiel), which is the lowest part of the boat, and even if it's not exactly cut out, it, still, goes a bit slashed aside. Believe it or not but here the Fr. (I sup. heard) cul comes in play, what is a bottom part of smt., or simply a bottom (what has to be heard bc. of the I_cul-de-sac as a blocked street, literally: you are in the bottom of the sack), or take their culot, what is a socket (for light bulb or of a gun-shell), or, if you prefer, their I_culotte, what are slips (not exactly of contemporary design), which for the Fr* are given as men's underwear but for the Bul* (as a bit obsolete) are only for women. Anyway, in unisex times as ours this isn't of big importance, but culotte means also a loss (bc. they go thinner & thinner, like the keel; or comp. culotte with the guillotine, even if it was named so by the name of its inventor), & I_quille (it should be read 'kuj') is your keel, or also skittles for bowling game, or a cone in mathematics; in Ger. this is called I_Kegel (so that your bowling hall is Kegelbahn in Ger.; but you have your I_keg as smt. sim.), what corresponds well with their I_Kugel, what is a ball, sphere, so that, even changing the r., we remained near to the rolling ball-head.
I am very tempted from the culottes to go to Bul. dialect kålka |I_ka^lka|, what is a (usually woman's) thigh, but we can't put all the Creation in one chapter, so that this will be left for some other time & let us now return to the I_kolelo-wheel not forgetting about the killing-I_kolja, what in Rus. is kolotþ |I_kolot$|, though there it means not only cutting (say, chopping of woods) but also pricking with stick, which is exactly I_kol in Bul. If you have read carefully you must by now be slightly puzzled, why smt. round as a wheel should become at once a stick (or v.v.), but I sup. --- bc. in etym-cal dicts you will find no explan. of this phenomenon, what is bc. our book is not so much etym-cal as psychological --- so I sup. that the point here is based on the drawing of a circle, where you have to stick one leg-kol of a compass & "encompass" the circle-kolelo with the other leg! This might seem very mathematical for some of you but this is the only way to draw a good circle (& if I would have liked to be really mathematical I would have said that a circle may be viewed as straight line but with unlimited diameter). So let us accept this for a fact & give more examples, like: Rus. I_koleja (a furrow left by rolling wheel) or kolesitþ (to travel around), or I_kolodetz (a water-well --- you've to look at the shaft as a kind of kol-stick, or as made by an enormous stick 2(though there are also other ideas here based on the sticking to & splitting --- >> clitoris or I_Kloster --- bc. the Rus* have also the w. I_klad, what is a treasure, & in Bul. the well is called kladenetz)2 ), or take their klada (a heap of burning material, a stake --- this is, if you ask me, a reversed kolodetz), or Tur. again I_kol, what is ... a sleeve of shirt, or a hand (i.e. some stick 2(but mark that the sleeve isn't the very stick, it's the envelope of it)2 ), or their I_kolay (known in Bul. too) what is a way out, clever guess (meant as koleja-furrow), & others (like the Eng. I_collar, which is Fr. col, m-ing the same, i.e. here the neck is the stick; in Bul., b.t.w., it is I_jaka stressed on the end, where jak is strong).
So you have seen that the r. bol- may become smm. kol-, retaining t.s. m-ing, but we may observe the rel-n btw. the ball (or the circle, if in 2D-form) & the stick also on the variant bol-, bc. here may be ment-d, say: Rus. I_balka (a long piece of wood etc.), what is Ger. I_Balken (t.s.), or your sim. balk, or Fr. I_balcon (a balcony), or their I_baleine (you write it baleen; & in Bul. the vocals are ... inverted, giving I_banel), or the central Bul. mountains I_Balkan, etc., but in t.s. time remains also the I_balloon, & the I_balance (where a stick is present, but one may balance also staying on a ball), & in Tur. exactly I_balka is a ... pumpkin! The r. is surely old bc. there were ... I_Baalbek temples in the Middle East (I sup. there must be some low hills, like in our Balkan 2(though the latter are above 2,000 meters, what for many nations isn't really low, but this, still, aren't the Alps)2 ). But there are diff. varieties of the r. (or blowing of the cheeks), bc. where is your I_bull (with old forms: bula, bule, or Dan. bul, or Ger. I_Bulle) there has to be also the I_bison (Fr.), & Lat. I_bovinus (an ox, but you also say bovine, it is I_bujvol in Rus., & in Lat. one may find also bovile = bubile as oxen pasture), & here some etym-gies give an I/G. r. bhel- m-ing to I_swell, like in Ger. I_Bube (called Bübli |I_Buebli| smw. in Switzerland), what is a I_boy, & what is the nearest etym-gy for your w., or even like in the known (& ment-d & loved or hated etc.) Gr. ... φαλοσ (Lat. I_phallus). Well, I have ever known that the phallus has the habit to swell in some important moments, but I didn't rel. it at 1st with the r. bol-, though now, seeing that you begin even with "sw-" (in swell), I see ntg. strange to begin with "ph- /f-", like the Gr* do, so that there may be cited also Ger. I_Pfahl (a pole or stick, i.e. kol), etc., but let us leave the phallus (to fall) at present and add smt. more about the boy.
It has to be nearly obvious that the I_boy|s usually make I_battle|s (Fr. I_bataille, read 'bataj', from Lat. I_battuo as to beat, kill, exterminate), or, then, are often beaten in order to behave, where is a heap of ws all around the world, like: Bul. bija or Rus. bitþ |I_bit$| (o. Sl. biti) as to I_beat, this your w., the battle scenes & pictures (batalþnûj in Rus.), Sl. ubitþ |I_ubit$| /ubivatþ (in Rus.; o. Sl. ouboj) as to kill, some o. Teu. bihal & bil as an axe, the I_baton, the ... I_battery (a batch of guns or "batons"), the I_battalion, your phrase "policeman on the beat" (or a "beat car"), the I_boycott, Tur. (also Bul. dialect) I_batak m-ing a mess (given from their batmak as to sink), etc. Or, if we change "b" to "v", as the Sl* have done under the influence of the new Gr. reading of "β", then also: our Sl. I_vojna (a war), Bul. I_vojnik (a soldier), our obsolete I_vojvoda-headman (it is decomposed in: boj-battle + vodja-to-lead), etc.; or there is also an Arm. I_bir as a cudgel, and t.s. Tur. I_bir m-ing one (i.e. the man's digit), or an Ar. I_shabab as an young man, a boy. I've found also a piquant rel-n btw. your I_boy & the ... I_buoy, which is Fr. bouèe |I_bouee| (buj in Rus.), saying to us that the boy has smt. like a buoy, ah?. Well, this isn't very serious, it's an assoc., but the Eng. etym-sts give even stranger etym-gy for the boy (not the buoy), namely, from an o. Fr. abuie m-ing: one put in shackles, where the buoy was from Sp. boyar m-ing to float (but >> boljarin). Anyway, there might be other ideas but we in Bul. use smm. the m-ing of buoy for the penis; so I think they are rel-d, smh.
But where is the boy & the bull there are also: the papist I_bulla, your I_bubble, Bul. I_bulka (a bride --- bc. of the bulo-veil 2(though it may be meant her untouched vagina, who knows?; I mean: who can reject the hypothesis that the veil isn't a symbol of the vagina?)2 ), etc.; but also Lat. volva = I_vulva (an envelope, membrane, or vagina) & the I_vulgar|ity, etc., though let us leave this now & add just a small remark to the I_bovinus-ox (βουβαλοσ in o. Gr. & read then 'bubalos', what also leads us to the boy-I_Bube), namely that this animal is known for its moving slowly, what is one of the m-ings of your bovine, but in Bul. the w. I_baven (what isn't c. Sl.) means only slow. Yeah, I am trying hard not to diverse from the big & swelled things, but (& this isn't a diversion) I can't abstain from ment-ing here the Tur. I_baldir ('baldår', also used as archaic jargon in Bul.), what officially is a knee (-joint), but is understood usually as a thigh (& sup-d, I should say even prayed, it is a woman's one). I put this here bc. of the closeness to their I_balka-pumpkin (the joints are rounded, & they may turn around), but also bc. I feel that this has to have influenced the building of our o. & c. Sl. I_bedro (in Rus. /Bul., biodro in Pol., bedro in Cz., etc., a thigh, leg) though the etym-sts are in a doubt and try to go to Lat. femur, what doesn't sound sim. (on the other hand they give a Latvian bedre as a hole, & Pol. ubiedrze as a mountain slope, & cite some Skr. jnu-badh as a genuflection, what suggests that the hole may be, hmm, btw. the legs, & be caused by some pricking --- << bodatþ).
Now look, when we have joined the I_swelling & pricking with a stick, we may as well go to the Sl. ... ache, which is bolþ |I_bol$| (in Rus., or bolka in Bul., bilþ in Ukr. 2(what turns out to look like smt. small, like a stinging by a bee)2, etc.), or to the verb to ache, which is boletþ (in Rus., boleti in Cz., bolech in Pol.), or to the illness (boleznþ |I_bolezn$| in Rus., bolest in Bul., etc.), and there was even o. Icl. I_bol & Got. I_bolwjan as to torment, what surely has to be rel-d to bolþshoj |I_bol$shoj|-big & Tur. I_bol-many & Skr. I_baliyan-stronger, but without all these long explans this would have seemed strange. The power may be viewed as smt. beautiful & this is why in o. Gr. one may find βελτεροσ as the best, and in this way we may easy come to the I_belle (white) colour but this will be postponed a little. With this white idea is given also Rus I_belka, what is a I_squirrel (which for you, b.t.w., has to squirm), but I cite it (for the Sl* it is "she") here bc. (even if it may be meant as flickering btw. the leaves) I don't believe much in white squirrels & sup. it (she) is a small ball (to coin a new w. 'bolka'); or at least is a belle animal.
On the other hand, with slight mutation of the 1st let. (you have to be used till now to such mutations), we come to the Eng. I_pole, or to Rus. I_palka (a stick or pole, but almost synonym of I_balka), which gives (besides the jargon use of kinutþ palku as to ... screw a girl, i.e. to make a score) the known also on the West (as being Lat.) I_palisade (a garden fence), which fits very well in Rus. bc. sad means there a garden; then poss. also the I_palisander (Brazilian tree highly valued as wood and smelling of ... violets) have to be ment-d. Then here is the palm-tree (I_palma in Lat. & Sl.), bc. it grows straight up (& gives also the palm of the hand), & an It. palo (a pole-I_kol) or Sp. palo (a tree, mast, or stick), & the palmettos, etc.; but also Rus. I_palomnik (a pilgrim), which turns out to have come from med. Lat. palmarir, or from the better s-ing It. I_palmiere, who was "the man with the palm" branch (as symbol of the peace); later on, and on the North (than Palestine or even Rome), where to find palm trees becomes difficult, this branch was changed to a willow (or smm. to dogwood) one. This is good, but there is also a song called Una I_paloma blanca, where it goes about the white pigeon (paloma in Sp.) of peace and it usually has, if not a palm, then an olive branch in its beak, so that poss. this pigeon is meant as a palomnik-palmiere. Continuing to dig here one may find an It. palomba, what is t.s. as Sp. paloma, but I_palombaro is ... a diver, what I sup. is bc. he goes now straight down (instead of up, in dual direction), so that the palm-pole may still be imagined smh. (or we meet with an imit. to which we shall come on plumb).

~ ~ ~

Ah, there are other interesting moments with the pole, bc. it may be turned to a ... plane (you can imagine that the ball was flattened, if you like), but for this >> I_polus. Then in Ger. the big things are called I_gross (for what << great). On the other hand, in Bul. we say I_goljam for big, what I feel has to be rel-d to ... your I_goal, and to the ... I_Golgotha! Bc. a goal may be a hole (as it's in football games), but may be also a high position which we want to reach (the etym-sts say ntg. clear, poss. bc. they can't see Teu. rs); & even when it is a hole this is some great hole, bc. in Bul. gol (or golûj |I_golu^j| in Rus.) means ... naked, & men like naked holes, don't they? ( To ment. also that the Rus* cry 'shajbu' on hockey games, what is Ger. I_Scheibe, & the last, surely, is rel-d to their I_schieben 2(<< s.)2. ) But let us leave the naked things for a moment & go to the Golgotha, what is some enhanced place, & if it would not be correct to say that this is a goal (an eminent position), then it is a not-goal. This very w. is translated from o. Heb. as naked skull (there was an o. Heb I_gulgoleth m-ing a skull; what reminds me about Rus. I_golova 2(or glava in Bul., c. Sl.)2 as a head, as also about Bul. archaic I_gugla as a cap like the Fr. capuchone), & it was believed that the skull of Adam was buried there; but the skull is an induced image here, it comes later on, and on the bottom lies again some ball-I_Kugel, bc. there was a Skr. I_golah as a ball, & in Heb. I_gole is pure (& the sphere is the "purest" mathematical figure) & goles is an exodus (i.e. cleaning or cleansing), what adds to the m-ing of your goal. Then I may recall to you the I_Golahn Highs, which obviously are high, &, as it turns out, they have to be also golah-formed. And if even this isn't enough for some of you then I shall remind you the Biblical hero ... I_Goliath, too, who (what is well known) was a very I_goljam-big man.
And now to finish with this golûj |I_golu^j|-naked. Etym-cally here is given an o. Ger. kalo as bald-headed what is now I_kahl, but Ger. is a new lang. for me so that I wish to cite also one Tur. w., I_kel (bald), which exists also in Bul. as archaic (especially as keljav, what is usually understood as marked by some bad illness, but this is a misunderstanding & the core idea here is of loosing of the hairs on the head); the Turks say also keleş |I_kelesh| for good-looking boy, or a brave one, or also bald, what is a strange combination of m-ings but the point (this time) is in not yet having beard (in Bul. this is also known but used only scornfully for a young boy, like your w. urchin). All this has to be rel-d also to Sl. I_kal, which in its best m-ing (Bul.) is a mud (what is, m.o.l., in the sense of the Ger. kahl), but in its worst m-ing (Rus.) this means ... faeces, but we shall come to this again (bc. it might be a bad thing but might also be smt. very good). From I_kel we may go to one Bul. jargon, gelè, m-ing a bad luck (missing the goal), what is exactly Tur. I_gele (m-ing t.s.), & here 2 more ideas (not that they are smt. new) come into play, bc. this may be some puddle (göl |I_goel| in Tur.) in which we have fallen, or it may be smt. frozen, like a I_jelly (what is Fr. gelè, or Bul. zhele, or Rus. gel; or Fr. variety gel, what means freezing, hence here is also the I_gelatine-gelatin, etc.), so that the Tur. gele may also mean sticking in the kal-mud.
In Ger. the coldness (when one gel-freezes) is kühl |I_kuehl| (you see that it's like I_kahl) and it is interesting to mark that when smt. is frozen then it as if at once becomes important (<< freeze) & big-I_goljam, bc. we ment-d the I_Himalayas in rel-n with the zima-winter, but, on the other hand, this is exactly Ger. ... I_Himmel, what is the sky & it surely is very big! Then to the Tur. I_gele may be added that it might be also smt. just cold, bc. you know the children's guessing with "hot" or "cold" for nearing or not to the answer. And then from gele we may jump to Rus. (c. & o. Sl.) zhleza /I_zheleza what is a gland, which can lead us directly to their (or our, I mean Sl.) I_zhelezo what is a steel, but we have to come to this again (>> I_zhezl-scepter). And to add smt. more to the I_goal, bc. I don't keep here small talk when sp-ing about men loving naked things & places, but have in mind also the most important thing in this world (or at least we are forced to think so bc. of the still bad forms of organization in society), namely the money, or more precisely ... the I_gold! The gold (Ger. Gold., & Heb. gold, & Hol. money units I_guldens, & Ger. I_Geld-money, etc.) hides the idea of smt. pure or clear, & that is why the Ger* say I_Bargeld when paying in cash (>> baram-to-touch), & in Bul. exists one obsolete w., I_gologan as small coin. Poss. this is bc. the gold is to be found in pure state as nuggets (unlike other metals that are usually mixed), or bc. even from the times of old Heb* men looked at the gold with more exaltation than if they have a naked girl lying in their bed, but thit is fixed in the langs.
Ah, I eagerly want to finish with the big aspects of the space, but we shouldn't miss the I_bean, which, though being not big, is, still, smt. very good (as if it was big in reality, or may become such, or we just raise it on a pedestal). Bc., look now: there is your I_bean, which is Ger. I_Bohne (also as coffee-bean) or Bul. I_bob (as a bean), but for the Ger* bohnern is to ... polish the floor (i.e. to make it look as smooth as a bean), and there is also the Fr. I_bon /bonne (good, sound, beautiful) or It. I_bene (t.s.) or Fr. (eh) bien (well, good), & a bon raised to the 2nd power gives, of course, the I_bonbon; & here are all the I_bonus|es & benefactions (Lat. I_bonificatio, giving your obsolete I_boon meant as smt. highly valued, & the benefice-performances, etc.); also in Bul. one bon is 1,000 money-units, which thousand in Tur. becomes I_bin (what corresponds well with their I_bir as one). This surely is sign for some swelling, like in the Fr. I_bonnet-cap, or in the Buddhists ... I_bonze (some big priest), or in the known in Ger. (but given from Hindu-Eng.) I_Nabob (smt. sim., a big Hindu ruler), or in your (though it looks to me like Sp.) I_bonanza as a big fortune, or in your bonny, which is a twin with your I_bone, but the bone is just smt. hard whether in the bonny the good m-ing goes afore. And this good, or resp. bad, m-ing, especially of the bob-bean is representative for some ... national tastes, bc.: in Bul. there are the ws I_bob & fasul m-ing t.s. bean, but we prefer to say bob (or bobetz, as diminutive); in Rus. they say only fasolþ & don't like it at all; t.s. I_faseole is used in Fr. (& I sup. they don't like it too, bc.: how can one like smt. that just says 'fåss', & disappears?); in Tur. they say also I_fasulye (& I sup. they also don't like it very much, at least bc. they prefer the Ar. I_bakla, which has bigger beans, though also thicker skin); in Ger. they have only Bohne, and as to the fas- r. there is a I_Fass as a big barrel; in Eng. you also don't know "I_fuss|ing" beans; in Bul. there is a jargon fas too, but for cigarette's butt (bc. when you chuck it away is says 'fåss'); even in Lat. I have found one I_phaselus, where the idea of the winds going out stays in foreground, bc. this means, besides the bean in question, also a fast-moving boat (that's, I think, they imagined that some giant, having eaten Fasses of beans, moves the boat by reactive force). So, and that's the end of the bean & the end of the big things in the space.

~ ~ ~

Yeah, but it still remains to speak about the I_small things, where, in order to get the r., I suggest to miss the "s" & leave with mal- what is easily to be found in the Lat. as I_malus (bad) or malum (an evil, bad effect, lack of smt.). Then we may continue with: the Fr. maladie (a malady for you) or I_malheur ('maljo', a malignancy) or I_malchance (bad luck), or your malevolent & malign, or the I_malaria, or the strait I_Maelstrom (or Malström in Ger., bc. it caused many naval catastrophes until not long ago), or Sl. (& pre-Sl.) mal /malûj |I_malu^j| (small, tiny), & Got. smals or today's Ger. schmall (thin, weak, scarce --- giving your small), etc. You may well see that if smt. isn't enough it is bad (<< gusto; to add also Ger. I_Mal as: once, a single occurrence of smt.), but small things are usually smitten or ground or pulverized (& then they should not always be bad), like in, say: Ger. I_Mehl (a flour), or their I_Mahl (a I_meal but not Mehl), or also your I_mill or I_molar or ... I_mall (poss. looking at the walking as at a kind of grinding; in that sense in Bul. we have one dialect, stårgalo, for a promenade-place, that is build from stårzha, what is to scrape). Or take also: Rus. molotþ |I_molot$| ('molòtþ' to grind, usually corn to flour) or molot ('mòlot', a hammer 2(to remind you the old Communist symbol of serp & molot, i.e. sickle & hammer)2 ), or old mlivo (smt. ground, usually flour) or melþnitza (a meal-work) or melþnik |I_mel$nik| (a meal-worker), or I_mol (a ... pier for breaking of the sea-waves), or melþ (a shallow place), or Fr. I_melee (a fighting crowd smiting all around, known almost everywhere), or, if you like, their ... I_omelette (an omelet), etc., leading us to Lat. I_molo (-are) as to grind. To the Ger. I_Mahl I would like to add their properly coined (but a bit obsolete) w. I_Gemahl as a ... husband (resp. Gemahlin as a wife) --- bc. they have gone, or have to go, through many difficulties in their lifes in a tight band, have eaten many bread & salt together, or they like one another like a good meal, or simply in the sense of their saying: |I_sentences| "Die Liebe geht durch den Magen." (The love goes through the stomach).
Mentioning the smiting I may remind you the very popular family name Smith, or Ger. I_Schmidt (Kovachev in Bul., but the r. here sounds diff.), what obviously comes from I_smite /smote or smith, resp. from Ger. I_Schmied (kovach in Bul., again a smith); even in Fr. exists smt. sim., smille (a special hammer for smiths). Here (I have added now the beg-ing "s", that have taken away before) are also many w., like Ger.: I_Schmiss (a blow, hitting, or a knife-wound), I_schmiegen (to press, stick to), I_schmieren (to grease, I_smear), schminken (to make up, but it's in a sense of using some mascara, or Bul. grim--grime --- << g.), or I_Schmuck (a jewelry or ornament), I_schmelzen (to smelt), schmeissen (to throw out, or also to be ... spat by flies), I_schmeicheln (to flatter to smb., in the sense of schmieren-to-smear), or Schmalz (a fat), I_Schmach (a shame), I_Schmerz (an ache or pain), etc. Or in Eng. may be cited, e.g.: to I_smash, smear, I_smell (the smashed particles), to be I_smart (a combination of smiting & being able to smell well the situation), or --- why not? --- your smiling |I_smile| (as breaking of the physiognomy), or smirking (also a kind of smile, that in Bul. becomes smårkam, what is, I beg your pardon, to take in his /her snots 2(or poss. I should have said rheum?)2, what in Rus. is smorkatþ |I_smorkat$| 2(-sja)2, though this is meant now in the reversed direction, i.e. as blowing off the nose, but this was small distraction), or also (to) smudge, or I_smooth (as properly smeared &/or smashed), & many others.
Or in Rus., say: mjatþ |I_mjat$| or smjatþ (to smash or squeeze; also mjata is the herb mint --- << menta --- bc. when you squeeze it btw. the fingers it smells good), I_mesti /metatþ |I_metat$| (to wipe away /to throw), I_smet (Bul., a garbage), smazatþ |I_smazat$| (to smear, or also to smash), I_smetana (again Bul. & means ... cream, skim of milk), or smotan (Bul. jargon for looking weary, improper, ragged), or I_smjatam (again Bul., but in Rus. it is schitatþ |I_schitat$| 2('s-ch')2, what means to count, to "grind" the numbers, to sum 2(sim. building as Lat. I_summa)2 ). Or, then, I_smeh (smjah in Bul.), what is not exactly a smile but a laugh (i.e. smt. long chewed or smashed --- bc. nobody laughs at smt. whole & finished, it looks just beautiful --- >> farce too); on the other hand smejatþsja-to-laugh is a twin with Ger. schmäen |I_schmaeen| (to make fun with smb., or to curse), & from here verschmäen is to sneer. There is also Rus. smûsl |I_smu^sl| (c. Sl., smisål |I_smisa^l| in Bul., what is a sense, m-ing, gist, i.e. smt. ground), or smelûj |I_smelu^j| (c. Sl., smel in Bul., what is brave 2(bc. he smila /melit or smashes-grinds his enemies)2 ), or I_smerch (a strong wind, typhoon), or << smertþ |I_smert$|-death, which comes from the Lat. I_mortus (though we have modified it a bit), & so on. You may be sure that sim. ws on (s)mal- will be found in every lang. (& in the Eastern & old ones), so that let us not dig further more.
OK, but let me also mark that these mal- things are usually (though not always) rel-d to the ... man, of course, bc. here is your I_male or Fr. male --- what is bc. the man is usually that who smites his enemies (and here & there hits also his wife, but, well, that's how the life goes), i.e. the maladies & malheurs on our globe are caused mostly by men (though urged to this mainly by women). ( You don't have genders in Eng. but the Fr* have 2(only masc. & fem., in fact, as also in It. & Sp., they don't accept this hermaphroditic neutrinum)2, & they judge for the gender mainly by the endings of the ws, so that it might be interesting to look more precisely at the ws ending on -eur 2('-jo')2, which are usually fem. 2(like douleur-trouble, or challeur-heat, etc.)2, but there are masc. exceptions 2(namely: the men-d malheur, labeur-hard-work 3(giving you labour)3, honneur-honour 3(bc. only men may be really honourable, this has to be widely known)3, & also bonheur-happiness 3(I'm not pretty sure about the exact thoughts of the o. Fr* here)3 )2; to sim. conclusions, maybe even more interesting, we may come looking at their comparative & superlative for the adj. mal, which are resp.: ... pis & piz --- i.e. they are just feeling pissed by so much male power! )
And smt. more to this, till now we have gone here only to the Lat. branch, but the rs of this mal-badness are very old & going up to at least biblical times: for one thing, bc. there was god I_Moloch (by the o. Phoenicians etc., of the Sun, fire, & wars) who required even human sacrifices, and (if I'm not in error) was confused with the Golden Calf (or Mammon), & for another thing, bc in o. Heb. the number 9 was called I_malhut & symbolized the ruling & power (but this was the tyrannical or despotic ruling). On the other hand, bad or not, but people wanted (& still want) this masculine power from olden times (<< also bellum), what may be proved by Lat. I_malo, what this time means to wish or agree, what I sup. was influenced by o. Gr., where μελι was a honey (<< melon, mild, milûj |I_milu^j|) and μελω was: to like, care for smb., be interested in smt. But there is in o. Gr. mel- also with bad m-ing (the poles connect, as I've stressed), like in μελαν = μελασ m-ing: black, dark, of mixed colour, ominous, malign, etc., what has given the Fr. (& then in many langs) I_melange (to mix, or a mixture). There is smt. sim. in Tur. too, where I_melek is an ... angel (a milûj-nice creature 2(they have heard about the Christian angels & have the w. I_ingelik as beauty, only that their angels have to be from another r.)2 ), but a twin with the last is their (used also in Bul.) I_melez, what is a person of mixed blood (smt. sim. to melange), i.e. their angels are like humans but not exactly; the same root with nearly the same m-ing exists in Hin. (poss. in Skr.) where I_mletsha is a barbarian, impure human, of mixed blood, and the reason for this scornful attitude on the part of the Turks to the angels is that acc. to the Islam they are only common servants of God & don't have free will as the humans.

~ ~ ~

So, and at the end of this time & space disc-on let me tell you smt. more about the colours (for we can see the space bc. of its diff. colours), besides these about which we have already spoken (<< red, orange, gold, white, vert, & Sl. krasnûj, chërnûj), and those that I leave for a more suitable context (>> blue, black, green, sinij). There is also Rus. (c. Sl.) belûj |I_belu^j| m-ing white, but this obviously is from the I_belle--ball r., where is also Rus. I_belok, what is the white part of an egg, the I_albumen /albumin; hence the r. may mutate to alba- (maybe reversing the syls), where the country I_Albania has to be ment-d (poss. the people there have whitish hairs) & the I_albino|s (who also have smt. white, though not exactly their ... noses); but then also the ... I_album, bc. it is sup-d to be initially blank and only then filled with pictures (and >> olovo later). Then we move to another modification of the r., blank, or Fr. I_blanche or It. bianco, where from is the name I_Bianca, but (I sup.) here is also Tur. I_belli m-ing visible, obvious, known, & your I_belly too (not bc. it's easy to be seen but bc. it is smt. belle, or at least rounded & ball-like), & also Bul. bled (blednûj |I_blednu^j| in Rus., wan 2(though it sounds very near to their bljadþ 3(>> b.)3 but there the idea is diff.)2 ). Then there's the ment-d modification I_Abel, where is also Ger. I_edel = adelig (of high birth, noble) or I_Adel (an aristocrat --- all nouns in Ger. are written with capital lets, as strange as this may seem), what makes a perfect rel-n with their I_Adler (an eagle) & gives also the flower I_Edelweiss, & so on. There was also an o. Gr. δηλοσ again (as the Tur. belli) as obvious, visible (& from here δελοω was to show or see), what sounds very near to Bul. I_bjal (belûj-white) with the only diff-nce in the 1st let. (but, I think, this shouldn't bother us much bc. the Sl. "b" 2(in writing)2 looks exactly as the Gr. let. delta); and there was o. Gr. Βηλοσ |I_Be^los| as the highest god in Asyro-Babylonian religion (also son of Poseidon), so that (ment-ing a god) one may go from here directly to the Ger. edel /Adel. There is also Bul. (but not Rus.) belja (stressed on the end), what is Tur. belâ |I_bela|, m-ing a regrettable incident (say, to brake a vase), what at a 1st sight isn't smt. good and, hence, has ntg. to do here, but, come to think of it, it has to correlate with their belli bc. it is smt. that's easily to be seen (as a --- sorry --- a shit in the middle of a room).
Then there is the Sl. green colour which is I_zelen /zelënûj |I_zelenu^j| (Bul. /Rus.) & is just variation of our ... gold colour (zhålt |I_zha^lt| /zhëltûj |I_zheltu^j|), what is only natural (looking at the leaves of the trees in the autumn); this is easier to be seen in Pol. where I_zielony (green) is read 'zheloni' (i.e. "zi" becomes 'zh'), but also Bul. zhålt-yellow gives our pozlata as golden coverage; resp. in Rus.: zhëltûj-yellow & I_zoloto (gold as mineral). The r. gold is old (as said above), but the Sl. s-ing stays a but aside, more like Fr. I_jaune ('zho~', golden), or It. giallo ('dzhallo', t.s.) & here is our zheltok (of an egg, where you have shortened yellow to I_yolk). But the 'zhel- /zel-' r. is also old, where, e.g., in Avs. zaranua was gold, & I_zairi was golden, what reminds me about the country ... I_Zaire (m-ing, say, the golden sand); in Skr., on the other hand, the gold was haris or hiraniyam, what must remind you about the Tur I_hayir-gain (<< h.) or Gr. χαρη-beauty or Αρησ-Mars.
On some other hand, there's also the well-known Fr. I_bijou, if we are interesting in the 2nd syl. (bc. the 1st may be for some doubling), and here (you may observe this as another r. but it's sim. to I_jaune--zhëltûj|I_zheltu^j|) more ws may be ment-d, like: your I_jewel (& the jewelers), Ger. I_jubeln or your jubilate /jubilee (Fr. jubilé or Lat. jubilo), or also Fr. I_joyau ('zhojo') what has turned in Eng. to joy. Then very near to this is Lat. I_juvenalis (juvenile --- bc. one is always happy when is young), & also jovius = I_jovialis (jovial), but this comes from I_Jupiter = Jove (or v.v., the Jupiter was called so bc. of this jovial syl.). On one more following hand there is the Ar. I_jebel as a mountain (<< I_Jebeltar) & also a sort of tobacco, & even if the mountain isn't yellow (but it is high, smt. elected, glorious, like Jupiter), still, the tobacco leaves are gathered when they become yellow-brownish, & there is not to deny that jebel sounds exactly like jubeln & jewel, so that one is in his rights to ask: why the people jubilate seeing mountains (the tobacco isn't the core, it is only a mountainous sort)? Well, they are happy not bc. of the mountains but bc. of the stones, especially if these are precious stones (such that a jeweler may be interested in)!

And with this let us accept that we are done with the time & the space.
}





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH {} AND THE LIGHT {} AND THE WISDOM{}. HE WAS IMMENSELY POTENT {} AND MADE THE TIME & THE SPACE {} AND THE MATTER |I_MATTERCHP|
{
So let us talk about the I_matter. But I have to warn you that, bc. the matter is smt. very complicated, twisted, entangled, etc., we can't avoid here some sexual ideas rel-d to the mother & the mating |I_mate| (& the cursing, for that matter, bc.: why else all folks say hard curses exactly with the mother in them?). It is properly to begin here with the Lat. lang., where I_mater is a mother and I_materia is a matter (i.e. it is the "mother" of all things), & then, going back in the time, we find an o. Gr. μητερα as a matter of any kind, & μητρα as a womb, or ματι as an eye or flower button (again some kind of mother), & so on up to the Skr. where matar was a mother (in today's Hindu she is I_mata; but << also pati). The mother is nearly so in all langs (matþ |I_mat$| in Rus., majka in Bul., I_Mutter in Ger., madre in Sp. 2(where from the name of the town ... I_Madrid comes)2, etc. 2(& I'll explain later why all children say mama)2 ), but this is also a womb (matka in Rus., etc.), what isn't surprising, of course. Here is also the maturity |I_mature|, what in its primary m-ing is to be tested by mating, & the Fr. ... I_amateur|s (they have not yet "mated" 2(bc. of the a-)2 with the matter in question), & I would like to use this place to say smt about the I_marriage, namely: with what diff. nations rel. it, what is a very instructive parallel. So in Eng. to marry is closely rel-d with being I_merry (the etym-gy is another thing, where the marriage is Fr. & has to be from Marie, the mother of Christ, and the merriment is rel-d to the mirth, to what we shall come shortly); the Ger* are very convincing with their I_Ehe (a marriage), what is just a happy exclam. (rel-d also to the I_Ehre, what is an honour, but << E.); & in Rus., Bul., etc., we say "to conclude a ... I_brak", using t.s. w. brak as for smt. broken, what, obviously, has to say that if smb. is married, then he/she has to be scratched out from the list of living humans (it has to be meant as a list of potential marriage candidates, but that's to t.s. idea; or, say, like in all fairy tales, where the book ends with the marriage of the prince or the queen). I am a little in doubt as to how to comment this Sl. view, i.e.: whether they (or we) are so practical in life, or they /we simply don't feel much about the marriage --- I sup. the latter.
[|I_comments| On the other hand, nowadays this isn't very important bc. everybody sees that the marriage as institution moves to its end, i.e., if the number of marriages still doesn't fall down (but. poss. it even falls down), then the so called divorce-to-marriage ratio rises very fast in the last half cent., what I don't think is a good sign. This may be just smt. natural, a consequence of growing standard of life (bc. that is the purpose of the family, to build a bigger 2(than a single person)2 social unit capable to overcome better the difficulties in life), and as far as in olden times there were tribes-communes, then later on big patriarchal families, which have all disappeared now, so it may be time now for the small families to disappear, too. Yeah, it may be so, but, still, I want to stress that the major cause for this perishing of the families is ... the emancipation, of course! And I am not at all convinced that the women have come to this obvious conclusion, bc., you know, they want to have family, not that they don't want, but they also want to be free, & even to take the ruling of the family in their hands --- but this is impossible! Bc., look here: the monogamous families consist of exactly 2 persons with full voices (Kurt Vonnegut says smw. that on Tralfamagor planet there were 17 sexes, or the like, but this isn't the case on our globe), so that democratic voting cannot help us here (bc. in exactly 50 % the voices will contradict; & when they don't there doesn't matter who decides). And let also be said that the monogamy was invented & forced in life by the men (bc. when this was decided the women had had no rights at all), though mainly in the interest of the women (bc., hmm, a man is like a bee, he prefers to jump from flower to flower 2(& that is why the w. defloration exists)2 )!
Why the ruling of the families by the women is impossible will be disc-ed also later on, but I may as well put here one of the reasons, namely: the growing standard of life, or simply the easier life nowadays! A small excursion in the old ages, where there existed matriarchal families, will show us that this was (& may happen smm. in the current times, too) when the life was very difficult & the procreation of the gender was the most important point, what, surely, isn't the case today. The women (as is the case in many other situations) were just "caught in step", they have not yet found the best solution, & they simply "cut the branch on which are sitting"; it is true that nowadays the men are those who suffer more by the divorces, but this is bc. in the law the principles of the ancient Romans are still applied, what doesn't correspond well with the current situation (where, to give an example, a woman often wins more money that a man), but I am sure this will be bettered in no more than half a cent. What has to be done is also, m.o.l., obvious, but I think I'll do better to write the major accents here, together with the poss. solutions (bc., although almost all of my judgments are platitudes, this doesn't mean that they are understood by the people in general; I may put it also in an aphoristic way: the most difficult things to grasp in our everyday life are, usually, those that are ... obvious; this may look paradoxical, but it is true, what can be explained with the fact that the human beings, in contrast to the other animals, are much more imaginative than needed, & we prefer to believe in fables, only not to look with opened eyes at the obvious truth).
|I_suggestions| So one thing to be done is to reform the laws to treat the marriage as a contract like any other, i.e. for a certain period (the default being, say, 5 years), with rights for every of the participants in it to prolong it (say, for another 3 years), or, better, to state (via a written declaration posted to the proper regional office & handed also to the other part) that he/she doesn't want it to be prolonged this time (the default being that they want). Another point is to have a before-made agreement not only about the personal properties of each of the participants, but also, and this is the important & yet unsolved problem, about the children, where the easiest thing is to accept (by default) that the latter (if any) are treated up to a certain age (say, 16) as personal "property" acc. to their sexes, i.e. a girl belongs to the mother where a boy belongs to the father, and when there are more than 2 children of one & t.s. sex then the 3rd, & the 4th, belong to the other parent (of the opposite sex; when it happens to be t.s. sex there are no problems), and if there are even more children of one & t.s. sex (what is hardly poss.), then the parents alternate. This has to say that each child has, or belongs to, only one official parent, & this not only after a poss. separating of the parents, but within the family, i.e. each child knows who is the parent that has to bring him/her up. This has to be very suitable and then I may make a proposition even about the ... names of the children, what is also an important (& not yet properly solved) question, namely: each child (i.e. citizen) has 3 names, where the family name is to be chosen (i.e. it may be t.s. family name but may also not be) by the parent to whom the child is to be given (or belongs), the 2nd name is to be chosen by the other parent (usually of the opposite sex), & the personal name in temporarily chosen by the official parent (who has given the family name) but the child not only has right to change it (after 16 or so) but has to do this explicitly. As simple as that! And as to the paying of alimony: this shouldn't be at all observed as problem to be decided in law courts, but has to be left to the state (which has to take from each citizen as much as it can 2(i.e. proportionally to the income)2 & give to each child 2(& to give it literally to the child after, say, an age of 12)2 as much as it is established in the moment); taking into account that the parent already must care for the child or children that belong to him or her, no matter: single, married, divorced, or widowed, there will be no need at all of law suits --- & that is, I sup., why this simple decision is not yet taken (bc. our Parliaments consist mostly of jurists, & if there will be no divorce suits then: what will the left jurists eat?). ]
But let us return to the matter, where are other rel-d ws to be ment-d, like: the ... mat colour (I_matt in Ger., matovûj in Rus., etc.; a mixed colour), or the twisted fibers of the mat as I_mattress (matratz in Rus., Matte in Ger.), or Ger. I_ermatten (to become weary --- bc. of some "mating", I sup.), or the known Fr. I_matinee (a morning, or morning-presentation --- what is bc. the sky in the mornings isn't so clear as it's in the evenings 2(>> serum)2; or also matin 2('mate~')2 as a morning), or your I_match (either as safety matches or as football match --- bc. there is some fighting, stirring, friction of bodies, like in the mating). And surely this isn't all bc. there is also the chess-I_mate, i.e. a "mating for shahs" (the I_chess is I_shah in Sl., or Schach in Ger.), & you know that a mating in this sense is when the king can't move anymore (so that the winner can "bugger" him, at least in his imagination). There's also the Rus. w. motatþ |I_motat$| (to wind, say, a thread on a spool; & they read it 'måtatþ') or namotka (a winding), but then here has to be also your ... (to) I_make /I_made, bc. this w. is used also for making of children (etym-cally make is directly from the Ger. I_machen 2(<< m.)2 but this sounds sim. & is rel-d to the power & magic, & then especially the form "made" has to be from the here-disc-ed r. bc. there is t.s. Ger. I_Made as a ... larva, maggot, what again is rel-d to the mother 2(but << also mådi or madeo)2 ). Yeah, but poss. the greatest surprise gives us the ... I_mathematics! Bc. it isn't just "mated", it's mated to the 2nd power, what has been known from very old times bc. the w. is Fr. mathematique, which is Lat. mathematica (resp. mathematicus was mathematician), which is o. Gr. μαθηματικα. Well, there is no need to take the cynical view point, so that we may sum up the matter with the conclusion that the things with the mathematics are just very twisted, more so bc. in o. Gr. this w. meant also astronomy or -logy, and was given from their μαθημα = -τοσ as: knowledge, science, area of study, guidance, strong wishes & capabilities for studying, as also μαθησισ was education (i.e., a kind of maltreating, I should say), which ws were used by Aristotle & others. So there's no need to be cynical but nobody hinders us to think that the twisted things meant here are smb's hands & legs etc., as --- you may be sure --- it was thought by scientific men in those ancient times, & is still thought by almost everybody --- namely, that the mathematics is, I'm sorry, a f#cking science /discipline! Bc., at the end, the Lat. mater is also often cursed (or, as the Rus* put it: materitþsja, or krûtþ matom, for to curse) when smt. becomes very twisted. All this is obvious, but it is better to be explained scientifically.

~ ~ ~

And now we will continue with some of the forms of the matter. Let us take 1st Lat. I_solum, what is an earth or a ground or the Earth, i.e. some I_solid body (sol in Fr.), but being a kind of matter this r. gives us also the biggest star in our solar system, the I_Sun, which in Lat is Sol (Solis) & in Fr. is I_Soleil ('solej'), resp. in Rus. is Solntze & in Bul. Slåntze (or Sunce in Srb.). The solid matter gives also the solutions (I_solutio in Lat.), & the I_salt as their main ingredient, which is nearly t.s. all around the world (as: I_Salz in Ger., sal in Lat., solþ |I_sol$| in Rus., sol in Bul., etc.); in the rel-n salt -- solution one may, if one wants, see also the law of preservation of the matter (i.e. we solve the solid but some salty parts of it remain in the solution). The salt, being so important, gives also the 1st (& still the most valued) profession in the world, this of the I_soldier (the "salt of the world"), which w. is also universally known (Soldat, read with 'z', in Ger., I_soldat in Rus., soldat in Fr., etc. 2(in Bul. we say I_vojnik what etym-cally says that he's very good at emitting of threatening war-cries, in sing. I_voj)2 ). From this r. is also Rus I_zola ('zolà', an ash /-es or cinder; they call the Cinderella from the fairy tale Zolushka), which is unknown in Bul., but we use Tur. I_zulum (an outrage or banditism), what reduces to t.s. m-ing (of smt. dirty, like ashes), though one may think here the ... I_Zulus have smt. to do (but whether this is bc. they are black people, or they mean themselves as soldiers or rulers, or smt. else, I can't tell you). And I have a big suspicion that the known Tur.-Ar. ... I_sultan, is also here --- as solo ruler (hence the It. I_solo too), which is given from Aramaic salita as to rule, overcome (and if you are curious to grasp what unites the power & the evils, so this is the bad power --- << malus).
The bad or black m-ing of this r. in the Sl. langs is also to be proved by Rus. zol or I_zloj (zål in Bul.), what is to be angry or cruel, what leads us to o. Sl. zålva |I_za^lva| (in Bul., or zolovka in Rus.) m-ing a ... sister in law (the bride of a brother, or a sister of the wife --- what is bc., you know: cherchez la femme). The colour of the ashes (what is Ger. I_Asche, & t.s. in Heb.) may be viewed as smt. light or fair or white, like in the ashen-tree (which is jasenþ in Rus. /I_jasen in Bul., where jasnûj in Rus., or t.s. jasen in Bul., means clear or light colour), but may also be viewed as smt. dirty or black (zol- /zul-). To add that the usage of piquant ws in family rel-ns (without a common knowledge of their hidden m-ing) shouldn't be smt. surprising and may be illustrated also by one strange Bul. (but not Rus., & not Sl.) w., I_kaka, for the bigger sister, which, more than obvious, is from Lat. I_caco m-ing ... to defecate (i.e. to produce caca-faeces --- I beg your pardon ---, which in Rus. are "lovingly" called, i.e. as diminutive & in sing., I_kakashka)! So that the point here is not to question this version (as some Bul. etym-sts do), but to give explan. of this phenomenon, which lies, again, in the view to the older sister as to a dirty girl, doing dirty tricks to her younger sister, bc. of her unconsciously feeling (women feel, they can't formulate well what they think but they feel it all t.s.) that when with the time she will become older, her younger sister will, poss., become a beauty; the younger one, for her part, though being sillier, doesn't as a rule behave badly, she respects the older one, but the older shows no respect to the younger (& why should she?).
Ah, I again jumped to the side, so let me return to the I_Sun, what is Ger. I_Sonne, and stays a bit away from the Lat. Solis, but this isn't so important. What is interesting here is to stress on the rel-n btw. the sun & the ... I_son, surely, which exists also in the Ger. original (where the son is I_Sohn), & in many langs the son is called sun (in Rus. they say solnûshko mojo for a young boy, where Solntze is the Sun-Solis). I don't need to indulge here in long explans bc. you know that both parents prefer to have boys than girls (& comp. this with the further disc-on of the daughter). In Sl. the son is called I_sin /sûn |I_su^n| (Bul. /Rus.), where the rel-n is with the ... blue colour of the sky, which is again sin /I_sinij, what hides t.s. idea of the Sun (after mentioning it, bc. otherwise it isn't clear why the sky & the son have to be t.s.; this is also the reason for clothing small boys in blue, where the girls are in red, what, as far as I know, is applied also on the West, but you maybe think this is just a choice 2(what is so, of course, but there are reasons behind this choice; if not the Sl. rel-n then that the girls have the colour of the blood, which is dirty in a way, we shall come to this)2 ). We are sp-ing here about the idea of the son, but there may be said smt. also about the etym-gy of the sinij-blue colour, which is o. & c. Sl. (sinþ in o. Rus., I_siny in Pol., etc.), but this r. (& with this m-ing) was known around the world, bc. there was Finnish sini (& some Mordovian 2(not from Moldavia in the former USSR)2 sen), etc., leading us to the o. Ar. & Skr. langs, with m-ing of smt. bright & shining. You may not believe me here at 1st but the given Skr. w. was I_cyamas (poss. read 'chjamas') what is the known on the West cyan or I_cyanic colour, which surely is shining; here is also the cyanide (called in Rus. sinilþnaja kislota, where the 1st w. is from sinij & the 2nd is for the acid); sim. is the case with It. I_chiaro ('kiaro') m-ing clear, bright; but on the other hand there's smt. messed with this colour, bc. cyamas is given as m-ing black & giving our Sl. chërnûj |I_chernu^j|-black colour (that's in Rus., in Bul. will be cheren), also if one reads the last It. w. as 'chiaro' it begins to darken (though such is the case with many other colours, so don't be worried too much by this remark; let us say: it is shining black). And now here emerge 2 new moments: one is that this ending --mas reminds me about one peculiar Rus. w., mastþ, m-ing colour, nuance (used mostly for horses), and if this isn't just an ending (-as), or isn't meant as some strike with a brush (most probable, >> mazatþ-to-brush), then we may follow this r. to the Skr.; the other inclusion is our Sl. evening called vecher in Bul. or vecherþ in Rus (o. vechor) or just veche in Srb., where the explan. is that this must be: veche-now (in Bul., >> v. ) + cheren-black (again in Bul.), i.e. when it becomes dark, but we had decided not to pronounce the syl. che- twice.
What concerns your I_sky, it has to be again smw. here, bc of the shining (in Ger. it is I_scheinen, schien; or take again the Skr. I_cyamas), though mutated & with additional ideas: of smt. sloping or sliding, rel-d to the ... I_ski|es (which are world-wide known & in Eng. are rel-d also to the I_skewer|s); & of some enclosure like in Rus. /Bul. I_shkaf (a cabinet, cupboard, closet), what is o. Gr. σκαφη (a boat, tub, basin), what has given the well known I_scaphander (some shkaf for the "andros"), & the sky, really, is a kind of paravane enclosing the air that we breathe; & also of a peering, casting a look, bc. in Bul. exists the strange jargon (not Sl.) I_skivam as to peer at smt.; & of stuffing of smt. too (in an imaginary container), bc. there was a Got. skatts & o. Icl. skottr as a tax, & o. Saxon skat as a coin. The etym-ists give for the sky o. ws like: sceo, scio, o. Ger. skuwo, o. Norw. skuggy (a shade or shadow), & Got. skuggwa (a mirror), but they don't provide us with any guesses for the hidden m-ing. To this cluster I may add also: Rus. I_skat (a skate as one flat fish 2(hence, also your w.)2; but also a slope, descent, in which sense it's equal to I_skos /otkos), Bul. skatavam (to pack away, or to fold), koso (awry) or kosja (to maw, resp. kositþ |I_kosit$| in Rus., which means, beside this, also to look I_askew or to limp), then Ger. card-game I_Skat (a bit strange game bc. it's for only 3 players), which is given from It. I_scarto (known also in Bul. as 'shkarto' for smt. spoiled that must be thrown away) but meant there as a card (It. I_carta & Lat. I_charta), bc. the players throw by 2 cards down (what, in fact, is again in the sense of skatavam, bc. this discarding or discharging negates the m-ing of the charta-card which isn't at all smt. to be thrown away), or also Rus. I_shkatulka (a small box), or the Eng. I_skiff, etc. Then, bc. the shkaf is equivalent with Bul. I_skrin, which is twin with your I_screen, I may jump to Bul. I_skrivam (to hide), or to Rus. I_skrjaga (or Bul. skråndza), what is a jargon w. with m-ing of the Eng. stingy, but it surely has to be rel-d to your I_scrag /scraggy or I_scrounge, which come from your I_crag (there was also an Irish creug, or Welsh craig), which is rel-d to your (to) I_shrink, or also to Ger. I_karg (poor, stingy, insufficient), or to Lat. I_scrotum (<< s.), etc. We may come to smt. sim. again on ... Scot; and for the Eng. skiff you may look back to schieben, bc. there was a Teu. skif as to split.
OK, but as far as I am mainly concerned with the ideas, not only with the etym-gy, I may change the r. a little to san- or even to sir-, and go to Lat. I_sanctus (a saint), with many varieties like: your senior or Sp. señor |I_sen$or|, the I_Senate, the known I_Sir & sire (also Fr., giving their I_monsieur) & your ... I_surname (no matter that the r. is a bit diff., but it can't mean smt. else than the "name of the Sir"), the ... I_sergeant (I sup. --- bc. they were mostly from the aristocracy, & from the common soldiers have to be called "sirs"), and then, going back in the time, we have to come to the Biblical ... I_Sarah, & to a name of a country, I_Syria (&, then, to the o. Assyria), to what we shall come again (on serum & sûr, where the m-ing changes; but it does so also by your ... I_senile). Here the m-ing of the sir--Sarah--señor is of smt. good, either bc. the blue colour is nice, or bc., being the colour of the sky, it has to be smt. elected, or for some other reason, and I may continue with, say: the Fr. (& Eng.) I_saint (but in Fr. it is read 'sen', & comp. this with the above-ment-d sen as blue), then Fr. sain as healthy, good (surely a source for the saint), or its It. twin I_sano /sana (to remind you the proverb: |I_sentences| "Anima sana in corpore sano!", or "Healthy spirit abides in healthy body!"), or other sanitary derivs coming from Lat. sano (-are) as to heal, mend, prevent, or sanatio (a healing), or sancte (sacred, moral), etc.; btw. these ws has to be also o. Sl. (Rus., Bul., now a but obsolete but still used) I_osanka (a stature, appearance, supposing it is healthy or dignified), what surely is rel-d to the ... exultant religious cry osanna (I_hosanna in Eng.) dated back to the o. Heb*. If you wish you may distinguish san- /sin- from sar- /sir- r. but here the m-ing is t.s. and the things lead us to the Skr., where even today (i.e. in the Hindu lang.) the women wear beautiful I_sari|s, the sir is called I_sahib, sircar is a (head of) government, or I_sirdar is a ruler, headman; & you still use the w. I_shrine (& then << I_Shri).

~ ~ ~

From the sacred sin-blue colour of the sky we may easily go to the I_star|s as an important kind of matter, but also as symbol of light & wisdom (<< starûj |I_staru^j|). Starting in the Lat. I may cite: their I_astrum (a star, or a constellation), giving your astral, the astronomy (I_astronomia in Lat.), the flower aster, the sign of asterisk, then the naval term I_astern (though this has to come from the steering wheel), & many others, but the r. comes from the o. Gr., where the star was αστερασ or αστρο(ν), (also αστηρ was a star or a meteor), & the αστρονομια & αστρολογια are clear. The latter sciences (if you can call the astrology science), being well known & coming from older then o. Gr. times, have to lead us to the Skr., but before going there let me make the remark that the m-ing of the r. (I/E. star- /ster-, the beg-ing "a" isn't important here) is of some great power that may stir the things (comp. your astern with astir; or star with I_stir), so that it would be better to look 1st by the Teu*. In the Ger. may be found, f.ex.: I_Stern ('sht...', a star), I_Stirn (a forehead), stark (I_strong), I_Storch (a stork --- bc. it sticks out 2(stårcha |I_sta^rcha| in Bul., & the stork there is shtårkel)2; whether in Rus., b.t.w., it is just ... a happy exclam. --- I_aist), I_Stiege (a I_stair /-case 2(& comp. this with the star)2, or a cassette 2(I_shtajga in Bul.)2 --- bc. they may be put one above the other; that is why you say, lower or upper case) or as a verb steigen (stieg, to rise, go up). Or to continue with their: I_Stange (a rod, usually for threading weights on it in heavy lifting, but also as stack of cigarettes --- hence the I_stack too), or I_Steuer (<< S.) giving your (to) I_steer (bc. it leaves behind smt. ground by the hidden great power, some I_spur 2(I_Sporn in Ger., shpora in Sl.)2 or spurt, though this isn't exactly t.s. r.), or I_Stieglitz (also shtigletz in Bul., a ... gold-finch, small bird that surely jumps much around), or I_starren (to stare), what is Lat. (your consternate is I_consterno there --- bc. of the light of the Sterns or suns), & where is also to startle or even the shorter ... I_start (i.e., straighten up, alert), etc.
( To add smt. about the I_Stieglitz: in Rus. it is shchegòl or I_chizh, but shchëgol 2(read 'shchjo...l')2 is a dandy, fop 2(in Bul. we say konte, given from the It. conte-count)2. For the bird is given a sound imit. 2(shchebetanie in Rus., or churulikane in Bul.)2, what is to be expected; for the modernly clad person is given Pol. I_Szczegol as a detail or peculiarity; and the Ger. w. is given from the western Slavs, in what I don't believe much bc. of the ment-d steigen & the other ws. But here many ideas are mixed, like: the imit. 2(in which I believe only for the chizh)2, the jumping out 2(bc. many birds mostly jump than fly; also people who show off much are called I_parvenu in Fr., what is around the par-air 3(<< paradise)3 or pervûj |I_pervu^j|-1st 3(to be disc-ed)3, but in Rus. such person is named vûskochka |I_vu^skochka|, what is from skakatþ 3(to jump)3 or I_skok as a jump)2, and there is the Rus. w. shchëka 2('shchjoka' but written as "I_shteka" --- 'shch' in Rus. is one let.)2, which you call a I_cheek, & everyone can see how near this is to your I_chick, and t.s. shteka in Bul. 2(bc. we read the Rus. let. 'shch' as 'sht')2 is the stick used in skiing 2(I mean that the cheek is smt. jumped out bc. that is the reason for your use of cheeky as rude)2, & other things. But let us not divert too much from the star. )
We may go now to some Eng. ws, like: I_stern (as noun or adj.; this is smt. around the I_Stirn-forehead, but also with the stark-strong idea bc. of the hard bones there, and, besides, this part of our body hides the bright 2(sup-edly)2 brain, it is like a star), then the I_stick, or the just ment-d I_stack (smt. gestiegen in Ger., i.e. piled up, called in computer science LIFO-structure, from: "Last In, First Out"), or the ment-d stair with the variety I_storey (bc. they go high up to the stars; or take the storage /storing), & so on. More precisely for your stern as adj. the etym-sts give an o. Eng.-Saxon stierne (serious), o. Prussian sturnawiskan (a seriousness), Lat. I_sternax (serious, severe, demanding 2(in Rus. this is I_strogij)2 ), and Skr. I_sthiras as powerful, strong, to what we shall return after a while. But bc. in Lat. I_astrum is equal to stella = sterla (& you use the w. I_stellar as almost synonym to astral) I may cite also their I_sterno (-are, stratum), what is to spread, or strata, what is It. strada & your I_street & Ger. Strasse, or Sp. (& world-wide known) I_estrada (you know, the Sp* don't like to begin ws with difficult for pronouncing consonants like "sp" or "st" & put an "e" before, to take some air 2(as much as the It* don't like to begin ws with vowels, bc. they end each their w. on vowel)2 ), or Lat. I_stratum as a layer, but its primarily m-ing was of a ... blanket or cover.
This blanket in Sl. has given, say: Rus. stelitþ |I_stelit$| or zastelitþ (to cover or spread) or Bul. I_postelja (a bedding, or a bed), or stelazh (boards to put smt. on them), or stelka (a soft piece to be put in the shoe), etc. But this was soft spreading, with "l", and when we use "r" instead we get rough coverings like in, f.ex.: Bul. stråhav |I_stra^hav| (sherohovatûj in Rus., with rough, uneven surface, or protruding hairs or grains), Bul. trija /strivam (to grind, teretþ |I_teret$| in Rus., & comp. this with I_strong & the Skr. I_sthiras), Rus. (Sl.) stradatþ or I_stradanie (to suffer, resp. pain or suffering), then Ger. (taken also in Sl.) Strauß |I_Strauss| (ostrich in Eng., but it is named so bc. it hides its head in the sand, and its bottom, with the feathers, sticks out 2(<< torch or stårcha |I_sta^rcha|)2, bc. the other m-ing 2(which I think was the initial one)2 of this Ger. w. is of a bunch of flowers; it's used also archaic for a battle 2(where "feathers flow")2 ), or their I_Strauch (nearly twin with Strauß, a thicket or scrub), or sträuben ('shtrojben', to disturb the hairs or make them stick out), or the twin I_streuen ('shtrojen', to strew), or I_schroff (rough or highly sloping), or I_Schrot (small grains, pebbles), or Schorf (a scab), but we begin again to go away from the star so let me finish here with the well known I_scruple, & the I_structure.
There are surely 1000s of ws for grinding, sticking out, covering, rising, etc., where smt stirs & which sound like star-, so that I may continue with, say: Bul. jargon I_shtur (fast moving, like crazy; this should be Tur., but it is also Ger. bc. there I_Sturm 2(taken literally in Sl.)2 is an attack, storm), an o. Gr. στρηνεσ (deafening) or στρηνοσ (haughty, arrogant) or στρηνησ (hard), or also στροβοσ (a rotation, but also a link, smt. twisted; from here in Sl. I_strofa is a line of poetry, what is strophe in Eng., giving also the I_apostrophe). Then we may come to o. Gr. στρατοσ /στρατια (an army, folk, military unit), i.e. smt. that may unexpectedly fall over us (in Bul. I_srutvam 2(se)2 is to fall dawn, like an avalanche), where from is the known I_strategy (στρατεγια) & the strategs /strategists (στρατευω is to conduct military invasion --- to strijat-grind some poor nation), & that is why I_strah in Bul. is a fear or strjaskam is to frighten (this isn't exactly so in Rus. but there strashnûj |I_strashnu^j| is frightful, or strashusþ is to fear, so that it's c. Sl.), as much as your (etc.) I_stress; then here comes the ... I_stratosphere (some stråhava-rough sphere), & so on. ( And let me use the place here to comp. the strategy as smt. more threatening, fundamental 2(a kind of "stratosphere" of the ruling)2, more general than the I_tactic|s, where in the latter only some tick-tack-ing is present. ) But the beg-ing "s" should not be very important & then we may go to the ... I_trachea --- as smt. rough, bc. in o. Gr. τραχεα was an uneven land, τραχεωσ was rough, crude, etc., & τραχηλια were pieces of meat from around the neck, or other small cuts; besides, in Rus. trahnutþ |I_trahnut$| is to hit strongly (usually on the head), & in such moments, as the saying goes, we "see stars in bright daylight".
Here may be ment-d also the Lat. I_terra (what I've already done), and the nearly placed o. Gr. πρεσβυτεροσ or your (& Sl., bc. Christian) I_presbyter (a very "teros" person, in the sense of starûj-old), then Bul. (Eastern) I_tara (a packing, which is given as It. tara, but this shouldn't be the original w. bc. in Bul. is known also Tur-Ar. I_dara m-ing t.s.), and today's Hindu (poss. o.) I_tara, what is exactly a star (so that the "s", really, isn't important; also the tara /dara may be a kind of ... envelope of the star, or some ground star dust that prevents the good old-"star" thing to shine in its full brightness, << also tir or torus). Ah, in order to grind smt. one usually does 'tår-tår' and exactly in this way is done one interesting Bul., but coming from Turkey & Persia, cold soup made on the basis of stirred yogurt with rubbed cucumbers (& dill, & oil, & ground nuts), which is called I_tarator (>> also cacik); there is another dish, too, coming from very old times, bc. in o. Gr. may be found ταραγμα (here gamma should not be read), which in Tur. is I_tarama (t.s. in Bul.), what is mashed & stirred (now with mixer) caviar, with oil & boiled manna-croup (& lemon juice & rubbed onion) & I'll tell you that, though this isn't t.s. as salmon's caviar, but it's tasty. There may be ment-d also Tur. (Gr. etc.) I_taran (an old device used for braking of town-walls) --- imagine it as a ray-beam of some star --- what reminds me one very funny Tur. w., one of the many modern (also ancient) shortenings (like Rus. GlavNarSpichProm, what in totalitarian times was part of a Ministry governing the production of ... safety matches, so that this was written on each match-box), namely their cankurtaran (read 'dzhan...'), what was (& maybe still is) their emergency health care (bc. the 1st syl. can means literally soul), where the fun comes if you think for the 2nd syl. about your cur, but in Bul. this sounds just brilliant bc. of our kur, which will be disc-ed later on, but I may as well tell you now, with the required excuses, that this means a penis.
So this is a good place to finish with the stars, but let me add also the Sl. labour, which is I_trud, with its derivs like: I_staranie (an effort, diligence; but it's twin with stiranie, what is grounding or erasing), or usårdie (in Bul., userdie in Rus., nearly t.s.), what isn't only Sl. bc. there was some Blt. I_starinty (to pull with effort), or starigs (diligent), or the ment-d Lat. I_sternax-severe or their I_strator (as a valet), giving the well known ... I_registrator (a registrar for you), & others (there was Blt. storas as heavily built, o. Icl. storr as big, powerful, important, etc.).

~ ~ ~

And now let us look at the Sl. star which in Rus. & Bul. is I_zvezda (c. & o. Sl. bc. in Cz. it is I_hvezda, in Pol. I_gwiazda, o. Sl. zvjazda, pre-Sl. gvaigzda, etc.), but known also around the Slavs, like in: o. Prussian svaigstan (a shining), Lithuanian zwaigzde (a star), some o. Ossetian zvestae (a silver), etc., where the rel-n with the shining becomes obvious (via 'zv' -- 'sv') comp-ing this with Sl. I_svet (Rus., but also o. & c. Sl.) what means a light. Yes, but here the ideas begin to swell & mix one with another, bc. our whole world is a bright place (on the contrast to the other "life" if in hell 2(I mean, there the souls may be burned but this is on some "dark", under-terrestrial fire)2; or we think that we, still, live in the paradise --- bc., you know, the God is always good, hence the world has to be also a good place), and, in fact, in Bul. I_svjat is the world (but svetja is to shine, & t.s. svjat as adverb means also: saint, sacred), in Slovenian & Cz. svet is also the world, the people, in Pol. swiat is t.s., in pre-Sl. svjatjati /I_svitati was to shine, & the r. goes back to the Skr. where čvetas |I_chvetas| ('chvetas') was white or bright, čvitras was again white, or also in Avs. I_spaeta & spithra meant t.s. And when I said "ideas" I mean that they are several and the 2nd is of bending down, what in Rus. is svisatþ |I_svisat$| (the rays of the stars & the Sun surely fall down to us), or without "s" as visetþ |I_viset$| (<< v.) what is t.s. (or the rays hang in the air, what in Rus. is vitatþ |I_vitat$| 2(<< v.)2 ); then the rays may be imagined as ... I_spat out (look 5 lines above); then they may be observed as some ... nails (as metal pieces for fastening) bc. gvozdþ |I_gvozd$| in Rus. or gvozdej in Bul. is this nail (& comp. it with the just ment-d Pol. gwiazda-star), or also I_gvozdika is a I_carnation (bc. for us it looks like a nail, with a bit "disheveled" head; & not always is red as you think, starting it from the carne-meat); it is poss. to rel. this also to the ... flowers, bc. in Pol. I_kwiat is a flower (what is also pre-Sl. kvetþ, tzvjat in Bul. & I_tzvet in Rus.), but let us make the distinction from our flowers bc. there is a stronger rel-n with Ger. & older ws (>> again tzvet).
This spitting & casting of rays or nails may be united with the idea of splitting (which lurks also in the tzvet, so that there are every reasons for this confusion), but let us continue with some other ws. Your (to) I_spit is Teu. bc in Ger. I_Speichel ('Shpajhel', "ei" is always read 'aj' there) is a saliva, but the idea of using the spit as weapon is very old (surely from Biblical times, or even before) & that is, in fact, the m-ing of the gesture of spitting. If you discard the leading "s" you may go to your I_pit as a hole (from the spitting, maybe?) or I_pith as soft core or gist (it might be meant as a kind of saliva), or to Bul. I_pihtija (smt. jelly-like), or << I_putta, or take your I_pity, what surely (if you ask me) just has to be rel-d to the known ... I_pithecus-monkey (pithecanthropus in full, but we may with pure conscience drop the anthropus bc in o. Gr. only πιθηκοσ was a monkey), which w. (in these line of thoughts) has to cause us to pity him (or her, or it --- the choice is yours) for not being exactly human, or to spit at him/her/it (what goes to t.s.). Then, although the Slavs don't say 'sp(r)-' or the like, using 'pl-' to imitate spitting, I have guessed that smt. of the kind has to be hidden in Rus. I_spichki, what are the matches (safety or not, but used for making of fire), imagining that they give some spitting sound when stricken. Etym-cally this didn't prove to be so but I still explain it bc. this is an unique Rus. w. and it sounds very funny for the Bul* (& I can't exclude the poss-ty that some Bulgarian also will read this book, can I?) due to its rel-n to our I_pichka, what is --- let us say it more decently --- a puss (but meant not as cat, of course). The official version is from I_spitza or o. ståpitza what is a spoke, where even a Skr. I_stupas as a forelock is given, which in Rus. is I_chub (hence, also near to 'stub-'; and it looks as if it flows out or shines from our head), where the latter is exactly I_ciuffo ('chuffo') in It. So that it wasn't a spit but a stick, though I, personally, don't see very big diff-nce in the idea. Anyway, bc there are maybe about 10 ws for safety matches all around the world (<< spiritus for a Gr. version, and in Ger. it is I_Streichholz, what literally says "strike-wood(en-piece)"), let also Bul. name I_kibrit be ment-d, which is Tur.-Ar. kibrit & (I sup.) here the idea of bunch of sticks has to be hidden (bc. there is a strange w. in Bul., kibik, which is also Ger. I_kiebitzen, both ws m-ing to stay around & pry in what others do, & it is given from Heb. I_kibetsn 2(also kibets, or kibutz)2 m-ing a collective or meeting).
So, and at the end of our I_zvezda-star disc-on I wish to ment. another ancient w., o. Persian I_Jezdan, who was their highest god, whose name is said to be built as pl. from jezd /iezd what meant an angel, so that, if we want, we may see the disc-d hole made either by some rays or bc. of being ... eaten (isjazhdam in Bul. or såestþ |I_sa^est$| in Rus.); hence, also the splitting or flowing may be explained as rel-d with the eating (bc. of iz- /is-, what in Bul. /Rus. is a prefix or prep. m-ing: from, taking out a part of smt.; like the Lat. ex-) and the exultant cry 'jee', bc. of seeing angels or stars.

~ ~ ~

Now let us move to our world in general & see how diff. folks think about it, i.e. with what they rel. it. The Lat. world is I_mundus & is known in all Lat. langs, e.g.: I_monde in Fr., mundo in Sp., or mondo in It., but it's known also by the Ger* as I_Mond, though this isn't our Earth but the ... moon (hence you know this r. too). This varying in the m-ings (& in Lat. mundus means not only the world but also: the Earth, the universe, the sky, then smt. neat, a law, clothes, etc.) is easily to be explained bc. this is o. Gr. μονασ = μοναδα, what is the one, the unit, & from here μονοσ |I_monos| (or mono- in many langs) means alone, giving the monk-I_monachus what I have ment-d before. The idea goes to the ancient philosophy what is well known, so here the accent is on the unity (though there may be some touch bc. of the sound 'mn' emitted by our mouth, which is I_Mund in Ger.).
Your I_world obviously (at least for me) is rel-d to the "word" in the biblical sense (such mild consonant as "l", & put btw. 2 consonants, is used usually only for distinguishing). This might not be etym-cally correct, bc. world comes from Ger. I_Welt what means t.s., but the modification of the Teu. w. (we shall come to the etym-gy after a bit), was motivated by what I just said. In the heads of the o. Teu*, though, this rel-n should not have been present, bc. there Welt stays very close to I_walten, what is to rule, govern, & here many ws may be ment-d, on East & West, like, say: Rus. vladûka |I_vladu^ka| (in Bul. vladika, a sovereign, lord, or church ruler like the bishop), or vladetþ |I_vladet$| (to own, rule, possess), or vladenie (a possession, personal domain), or Rus. vlastþ |I_vlast$| (a power), or o. Sl. velitþ |I_velit$| (now poveljatþ in Rus. is to order or say, & povelitelþ is a ruler), or o. Sl. I_vasilevs what is o. Gr. βασιλειοσ (again a ruler; in o. Gr. it meant regal), or the flower I_vasilisk having given the name of spice-herb basil (I_bosilek in Bul., in Lat. it's I_basilisk & means some mythological beast, what again is o. Gr. 2(βασιλισκοσ)2 m-ing there young king, or some bird), or the churches-I_basilica|s, & others. Or there is also your ... "I_well" (with the idea that I am feeling like a king), then the name I_Walter in Ger., or resp. I_Vasilij in Rus., what may lead us to our Sl. I_vesel /vesëlûj (Bul. /Rus.) m-ing joyful, merry (again as feeling like king), or I_Vladimir (I_Woldemar in Pol.) m-ing exactly "vladûka mira-world", or (having come to names) Skr. I_Vasudeva (or Wasudewa in Ger. version, an alias of Vishnu), or another Skr. name, I_Sarasvati (storm-rich), who was the goddess of rhetoric, wife, this time, of Brahma, or I_Amaravati (immortal --- "a" for non, "mara" for mortal, & "vati" for the power), etc. Even the known Lat. ... I_basis has to be here, which in o. Gr. (βασισ) was: a step, movement, pedestal (i.e., smt. strong & powerful).
( As to the exact etym-gy of world & I_Welt, there were old: weorold, worold, wrald, warld, etc., which 2(being 2-syllabic)2 were to be split in a wer /vir 2(Lat., << virus)2 + old /alt 2(which is an old r.)2, giving in this way m-ing of human age, but also, and this seems pretty strange, forming the ... I_werewolf, written in Ger. as werwolf. Well, this might be so, but you surely can see that this "animalistic" man is smt. superstitious, not Christian, &, besides, such view is subjective bc. the world isn't our life; but it is also controversial to me bc. there is no 'lf' from the wolf in the cited o. ws, there can be guessed only the old-root. So that I am convinced that the Teu. & Celtic tribes have tried to find some better assocs to which to stick, and the Ger* decided to rel. the world to the ruling, where the Eng* --- to the God's word, but this isn't smt. new & has to be done before at least 4-5 cents. And as to the w. word /I_Wort, it is also c. Teu. 2(Dan. woord, Got. waurd, old: wrdho, werdh, wordam)2, leading us to Lat. I_verbum 2(a w., giving also your verb /Fr. I_verbe; << also versus & vershitþ)2, what were to be traced to a Skr. I_vratam as to command or vow 2(what, I sup., is an imit. of some cry --- << varda)2. )
The r. mutates as: valt- /vlad- /vol- /vel-, or vas-/vat-, officially is given as I/G. whel- (read in Eng. manner) & m-ing to wish or choose, what is all in the sphere of the power or strong will. Here are also, say: Ger. I_wollen (<< w., or I_volo) & your I_will & the Sl. I_volja-will (or Srb. 'ja te volim' = "I want you"), or Ger. I_Wahl (a choice --- bc. that is what we mostly want 2(on this phenomenon is based the democracy, b.t.w.)2; but, on the other hand, the choice isn't easy, as it's said in the Ger. proverb: |I_sentences| "Wer die Wahl hat, hat die Qual."), or their I_Wonne (a bliss, or satisfaction 2(what reminds me of the name of Vonnegut)2 ). To continue with, maybe (we'll see to this), Ger. I_Wolle (a wool, vålna |I_va^lna| in Bul., though not so in Rus. 2(they say sherstþ |I_sherst$| what, b.t.w., must be from Ger. I_scheren as to shear)2 ), or your I_win /won (what is also Teu. but they have forgotten now the initial w. & have retained only the deriv. gewinnen /gewann, but the m-ing is exactly t.s., & you know that we all want to win), or Ger. I_wohnen (to ... live, abide --- we all want to live, don't we?; in my view here the will isn't so obvious 2(it is rather rel-d to wo-where)2 but the Ger. etym-sts give wohnen as rel-d to gewinnen), etc. And now about the I_wool, it has to be here bc. for it is given a sim. I/G. r., 'wlna-' (& in Srb. it is vuna), & also bc. we all want to be warm; besides, in Rus. (what is c. Sl.) I_volna means t.s. as Ger. I_Welle, what is your I_wave, & you see that there's only artificial diff-ce btw. Wolle & Welle, & in Bul. both ws are written as vålna |I_va^lna|, only the 1st (the wool) is stressed on the 1st syl., where the 2nd on the other one --- what is easily explainable with the curved form of the wave & of the woolen fiber.
But the point isn't so much in the will as in the strength of desire, or even in the strength of ... non-desire (the opposite ends meet), bc. there is a c. Sl. vonja (Rus. vonþ |I_von$| or vonjaet, Bul. vonja, Cz. vüne, Pol. won, etc.) m-ing ... ghastly or pungent smell, reeking, where it is clear that we don't want it but the ws sound sim. (and your reek is Ger. I_riechen what means to feel some smell, not necessarily bad). The Rus. etym-ists go here to the Skr. I_anas-blowing (<< a.), but I don't believe much in this (not that it's imposs. for your 'w' to vanish, but why should the Sl* insert 'v' isn't clear, & the point, again, isn't in the action 2(we don't breathe especially stale air)2 but in the strength & power). And there are also very sim. Sl. ws like: Rus. I_von, Bul. vån, Cz. I_ven, o. Pol. wen, etc., m-ing: out, outside, away (say, in Rus. the phrase poshël von means: go out, disappear), or another Rus. von = I_vot as "see, here", for which an unclear etym-gy is given. OK, it may not be very clear, but there are also a heap of questions like your: when, where, why, etc., which are all Ger.: I_wann, I_wo, I_warum, etc., & (though these are Lat.: quo, I_que, etc.) when one asks a question one shows strong desire, wishes to know or have smt. What I want to say is that there seems to be ntg. imposs. if the questions (& the directions, gestures) are smh. rel-d to the will & winning. And it was useful to find examples of ancient rs where this unique (at least in Europe) Eng. sound 'w' (for which one can not be sure even whether it is a consonant or a vowel) is present.

~ ~ ~

So that was about the world on the West. And the Sl. world is I_svet, what we have disc-ed (<< s.) --- I mean, in Bul. I_svjat is the world, where in Rus. this is a light, though the r. is present. But the Rus* (unlike the other Sl*) made an interesting rel-n btw. the world & the ... peace (<< p. for the Western point of view), bc. they use 1 & t.s. w. I_mir (& have the phrase:|I_phrases| miru mir m-ing "peace to the world"), where for the Bul* (Cz*, Poles, etc.) mir is only a peace. At 1st sight the situation here is sim. to the Lat. rel-n I_civilis (civil) -- civilization, i.e. we think that they are rel-d bc. we wish so, that's how the ws were coined, though there has never been a civilization or a country on our globe without an army or police, which are not civil structures (& I don't believe this could ever happen), but there is more than this here. ( Ah, when the Rus* say 2(usually as military command)2 I_smirno 2(or mirno in Bul.)2 they don't mean to stay free or relax but on the contrary, but this is a normal expression, it means not to move or stir, so let's not formalize more then needed. ) As to the world's aspect of the I_mir (only Rus., though I've heard that ... the I_Pamir mountains meant "roof of the world" so that the r. was known smw. on the south of Russia) one may think, a priori, that this is smh. rel-d to the ... Lat. I_mare (which sounds so, poss., bc. the sea waves say 'mår-mår') in a sense that the world is out of the seas (or offshore, as the Eng* say), what may be confirmed by the ment-d Pol. name I_Woldemar (Teu. Waldemar too); and then one may reason that this lulling 'mår- /mir-' was taken for symbol of the peace. Yeah, it might be so, and maybe some sim. image was present in the heads of the ancient people when the r. was made (ultimately all rs are imits of heard sounds, but this is too radical a view to be used everywhere) & that is why I ment. this here, but the official etym-gy of mir as peace (what is c. Sl.), goes not to the west but to the east, where was a Skr. I_mitras (a friend), & I may add also one o. Per. (Iranian) god of the Sun (before Zarathustra) called I_Mitra, who went in pair with the ancient Kibela /Kaballa, so that with the emerging of a god it is easy to rel. the world (& high mountains as the Pamirs) with the harmony of creation & the peace (but, still, mark that the peaceful world is united with the cabbala or fortune), & we will come later to this on I_mitkam (what is Bul. archaic for to walk around, & one usually does so mit-with a friend).
Having come to gods I may cite also other sim-ly s-ing ws from the domain of religions, like: Gr. μυρο(ν), taken literally (I_miro) in Church-Sl., what is an unction, though etym-cally it's given as rel-d only with the smelling, what is I_mirisha in Bul. (but not in Rus.) & comes directly from o. Gr. μυρισω, also μυρωνω was to fill with flavour, or take their μυροδια, known as t.s. I_mirodija in Bul. (we are, after all, their neighbours) & m-ing mint or other herb, but this is the idea of the ether that unites or encompasses the whole world. You know, the unction, or the smoke of burned incenses, from olden times have symbolic m-ing of making contact with the gods (hence with the whole world), & of living in peace etc.; there is also a Church-Sl. w. I_mirjane (in pl.) who are the laics, non-clergy, so that it turns out that we don't have your hidden m-ing (<< laicus) & sup. that those people are living in peace, or are I_mitras-friends, & there is a clergy attire called mitra (for you it should be I_mitre), & a title I_mitropolit (he must correspond to your head of eparchy). But there are more ws, like: I_mihrab, what is a praying alcove or hole in the Islamic mosques (oriented to the east), I_mar, what in many langs of the Levant means a monastery, & then our miro-unction was called there exactly I_mirrh! And, sp-ing about churches, this is bound to remind us the ... I_miracles, or the I_mirage|s (Fr.; and then maybe the I_mir-peace is really a mirage, when the ws are so close?), or, come to think of this, also the Eng. ... I_mirth! There was also an o. Ar. title of a ruler, I_mirza, where from the known I_emir has to have come (who was amir in the Ar.); then for the mirth the etym-sts give rel-n to your I_merry & a Teu. murgjaz (or merch), but you see that the latter is smt. btw. mirza & mirage. And then here is also your (to) admire, what is Fr. I_admirer & Lat admirari, to be split in: ad + mirari, so that the Eng. ... I_mirror jumped unexpectedly (being smt. miraculous), also the deriv. admiral (as equivalent to the Eastern emir /amir). To resume: mir- is very old r. for smt miraculous, as the peace is (if it can ever be reached), what is sufficient reason for the Rus* to have named the world with this w.

~ ~ ~

And now: what can be said about the I_cosmos? Not very much, in fact, except that this is o. Gr. κοσμοσ m-ing: an order, structure, state's ruling, or a decoration, or also κοσμεω was (is) to build, set, or govern, & from here comes the well known ... cosmetic (Fr. I_cosmetique or o. Gr. κοσμητικη 2(as the art to decorate 3(& to I_decorate, b.t.w., has to say that this is smt. diff. from the core --- i.e., hiding of the core)3 )2, or κοσμημα, what was an ornament or decoration); there was also a Lat.-Gr. cosmoe (given in Rus. as kosmû), what was (a member of) the ruling Council of the Ten in o. Crete island. So that the cosmos wasn't just the universe but the order & beauty of the Creation (& comp. this with the Ger. Reich). Being near to the Gr* the Bul* know the w. I_kosa as hairs (what is Gr. κοσσα) and kosåm as single thread of hair, what isn't exactly Rus. (they say now I_volos, what is from I_volja-will /I_Wolle-wool cluster as smt. freely falling --- volþnûj |I_vol$nu^j| is free or independent), but they have old kosû as hairs (rather a braid) & kosûnka |I_kosu^nka| as women's triangular scarf. I sup. here Bul. I_kozunak deserves to be ment-d, what is an ... Easter-cake (in Rus. it is I_kulich), bc. it is woven in thick braids, like of hairs, but our etym-sts give it from new Gr. κουδουνακι (read 'kudunaki', m-ing t.s.) & say that this is so bc. this bread was made in form of a bell (!?). I personally don't believe much in this "chiming" bread; we in Bul. stick to the form of the braid (though it may be also circular but still woven), & 'kozu-' isn't exactly 'kudu-', but such etym-gy is poss. (smw. in the past) bc. the idea of this ritual bread is to call us to go to church to hear the mass. This is also poss. bc. the Ger* use to eat in the mornings some small breads called Weck or Wecken, where I_wecken is to wake & Wecker is an alarm-clock, & the Ger. etym-sts say this kind of bread is c. Ger. & comes from the form of the bell, smt. like a wedge or a tower (& this form may be such bc. they eat them in the morning when it's time to wake up); but if so it is also poss. for the Rus. kulich to be called so bc. of the from of a kula-tower.
The universe, then, is self explanatory, and we have spoken about the physical world (<< physique) & about the reality (<< r.), so that here I may only remind you about the rel-n btw. I_real & reel in Eng., what isn't a coincidence bc. reell in Ger. is from Fr. reel & Lat. realis & this means real; besides, the proper Ger. w. for real is I_wirklich (& Wircklichkeit is the reality) & here the working & rotation are present (<< I_werken); or to ment. also the I_evolution (& when you roll it in full it gives the revolution), which surely stars from the I_oval (or << vulva). The idea is obvious --- the cycle (or spiral or helix, if we add a 3rd dimension) ---, the r. coming from the o. Gr. ρεω (to flow; to remind you the I_reka-river), but there is more to this. I mean that ρεω is just a scratching where the reality is due (in my view) to o. Gr. Ρεα (=Ρεη = Ρεια, in Lat. I_Rhea, & in Sl. Reja), who was daughter of Uranus & Gea, wife of Cronus, mother of Zeus (& Poseidon, etc.), where there's a fable that Cronus had had the bad "habit" to eat out his children (in order to remain on the throne) but Rhea managed to hide the young Zeus in a cave & he remained uneaten (though for a god to be eaten should not be a big disaster bc. later on all children turned alive). Bc. of this I_reappear|ing of the children of Rhea the prefix I_re- in all western langs, from that time on, has the m-ing of a "2nd coming", or of smt. that is against us (as it is in the Lat. where rea is the accused party in law-suits, but there is also rea = Rhea), though here are hidden other ideas, too, which we already disc-ed on I_Eros.

~ ~ ~

OK, but there are many material things (in fact, all things are material bc. we simply can't find a non-material smt., though we have many ws for non-material but useful ideas, symbols, or notions), so that I will continue with more paragraphs. One cluster I've promised you several times to disc. is this which I shall start with the o. Gr. καλο |I_kalo|, which isn't (though, in a way, it also is) present in the Lat. The Gr. καλο = καλον means good, well, appropriate, καλοσ is beautiful, suitable, fit, & καλλοσ is a beauty, & they greet themselves each day with καλημερα (what may be heard also in Bul. as I_kalimera & means a "good day" bc. μερα is a day 2(but this is a portion of smt. & the initial m-ing is of some space bc. this is also Tur.-Ar. I_mera as free common land, also archaic in Bul., where exactly the latter in Gr. is μερια m-ing a place or country, so that καλημερα may be translated as "good meeting with you")2 ), or, resp., on the evenings say καλησπερα (when the day expires 2(<< vespera, but in o. Gr. this was smh. rel-d to the ... I_sperm, bc. σπερχω was to force to grow, or inspire)2 ), & also other ws, but in Lat. I couldn't succeed to find this r. with this m-ing. What exists in Lat. on cal- is either rel-d to the calling (<< call), or to the mud & faeces (<< I_kal). We shall leave the cries now & will ask us the question: why such drastic change of m-ing has arisen in the Lat. lang.? Bc. it is really so, what may be proved by, say: Ger. I_Kalfactor (a common worker or servant doing odd & dirty jobs; but this is of Lat. origin bc.: factor is a worker, I_factum is a fact, I_factoria is a factory, etc., coming from I_facio as: to do, make, build, compose, give birth, & others --- what doesn't look much away from the I_futuo-f#cking, b.t.w., & also shows that people ... don't like very much the facts bc. they look to them like smt. dirty, or at least dusty), then Ger. I_Ekel (a disgust, from here ekelhaft is disgustful), & your callous (from Lat. I_callum as rough, hard, or a corn on the skin), & the I_calamity (what is Lat. calamitas; there is I_calamus as a cane, too, what has to be bc. it grows in the mud), & the before ment-d Bul. I_kal-mud & Rus. kal-faeces, & Bul. jargon kaltak as bad guy, doing dirty tricks, or kalolechenie as healing with mud-baths as it is done in many bath-resorts (& just imagine how peculiar this will sound in Rus. 2(where they, naturally, use another w. & say grjazelechenie)2 ), & surely other ws.
[|I_comments| B.t.w., it's an interesting observation that the facts sound faeces- (or f#cking-) alike, where the ideas are closely rel-d to the deus-theos. In this way the facts are accepted as blotches on the beautiful surface of the world of ideas (or ws), & that is why many people still like to think that in the beg-ing of the Creation all was much better than nowadays (no matter whether they use for this purpose the fable for the bad canine-like Cain & the belle Abel, or that we simply did & do not obey the ws of some god(s), or for another reasons), where there are, actually, no real causes to believe that we are becoming worse; the truth is, in my view, that we change so slow that there could hardly be seen any diff-ce btw. the stone-age man & the average contemporary citizen (supposing they have lived all their lives under t.s. circumstances). To put it otherwise, the ideas are always better than their realization, or, if there might be exceptions (as, e.g., the idea to deceive everybody as much as one can, just not braking the laws, what turns out to be the main postulate of the free market, & the free world in general, surely doesn't seem to be very good, from a moral point of view), then they, too, may be reduced to this statement if one takes enough care to elaborate the ideas (what, for the given example, will mean that this was not the initial idea, this was the consequence due to the realization, where the idea was simply to allow everyone to state free his or her ideas without prejudices, & then to prove who is right & who wrong). The fact is that the facts, if they are proven facts & not unmotivated assumptions, are good things per se, though they may be either good or bad for us, as the ideas too, depending on the given situation. Still, the worsening of the matters with their realization is almost always unavoidable. ]
But going around the world there are also examples for the good m-ing of the r. cal-, like: Gr. καλογεροσ (I_kaluger in Bul. 2(not c. Sl.)2, a monk but of a diff. r. & with the idea of "good man", as is commonly used by the Heb* for their clergymen), Lat.-Gr. I_kaleidoscope (bc. the pictures we saw in it are very beautiful), the well-known I_calorie (bc. it makes us warm or healthy), Tur. (also Bul.) I_kalay (a tin as metal, which is I_Blei in Ger. 2('blaj', what isn't much away from kalay, come to think of it)2, and this is smt. good bc. it makes the pans shine; in the Eng. there is also rel-n of the lead with the leader as the best man but this is bc. of the weight). And now it turns out that twin with this Tur. kalay is the Sl. w. for strengthening of our bodies, as also for tempering of the steel, kaljatþ |I_kaljat$| /zakaljatþ in Rus. (kaljavam in Bul.). Then there is the ment-d Ar. al-kali (<< I_algae), one Bul. town, I_Kalofer, named so after the voivode-headman Kalifer (in the times of Tur. joke in Bul.; he was a hajdutin, what is Tur. I_haydut 2(haidouk in Eng.)2, what means a rebel, guerrilla, but also a brigand or robber, though for the Bul* this w. is applied only in its good m-ing), but this is also the known Ar. ... I_khalif (you prefer to write it caliph & in Sl. he is halif, what sounds not much away from I_hala 2(a gust or torrent)2 -- halloo -- Allah), & others (<< I_akala). In my view here deserves to be ment-d also the modern I_calanetics bc. it makes women to look very καλο, no matter that this is given from the name of an Am. ballet-dancer (bc. then she was that who looked καλο, & she surely has heard about the Hindu goddess I_Kali, so that she has lived under the m-ing of her name); sim. to this are the calisthenics (or with "ll") & the I_calligraphy. Having gone to Skr. names then there I_Mahakala was an alias of Shiva, what splits in: maha m-ing great (<< mahatþ or I_maharajah) + kala for smt. fearful; officially the name is translated as "The Great Black" going to the r. kara- (we may come to this again but it is so in Tur. where "kara biber" is the sharp pepper in grains), what is poss. via the l--r mutation, & the black colour obviously is synonym for smt. bad, like mud, so that here kal- has the bad m-ing. But the m-ings are interwoven bc I_Kali is pictured as beautiful woman and at t.s. time she is goddess of the under-terrestrial world, that lies exactly in the kal-mud, & she is known for her vindictiveness; or take also the Indian town ... I_Calcutta, which might as well mean some beautiful kåt-corner. Anyway, the old Gr* have not fallen from the moon, they have heard this kalo from smw., but the question was: why for them this is always good where for the other nations this is mostly bad? Well, I sup. this is bc. for the hot & dry climate of Greece the mud is smt. good, bc. this means there was a rain, but also in a wide philosophical sense bc. this is needed for growing of the plants, life needs water.
I may add even more ws, bc. surely from here are the alkali & I_alkaloid|s, and the Ar. al-kali may mean a "sea weed" but it grows in the kal-mud & may as well mean (besides that this is good, also) that (almost) "all is kal-faeces" (or that this weed becomes that); and the ment-d f. have to be ... not acidic (I am not a chemist & I've never tasted them but I sup. it is so; even if it turns out that this is not exactly so my statement will not be disproved, bc. in o. times people might have thought so 2(as, f.ex., they have thought that the sperm is some kind of fat, what can be confirmed by the w. I_spermaceti, i.e. it has to say to us that the whale-ceti is full of sperm but it isn't so 3(at least bc. it may be a "cetisse")3 )2 ). The importance of the alkalis is stressed in the Sl. langs by using for them the w. I_osnova, which in general means a ground (-base or -substance) of smt. (say, of a building). And al-kali have meant also what we call now in Sl. I_luga what is a lye, the sediment found on the bottom of muddy solutions, in lakes or artificial containers, & this is tightly rel-d with the Sl. lake or pool called I_luzha in Rus. (<< l.), this kali-sediment is rel-d also to the I_calcium /calcite (>> I_Kalk for more explans); at t.s. time luzha has taken the good (here shining) m-ing of the Gr. καλο bc. luditþ |I_ludit$| in Rus. is to cover with tin, also luzhenaja glotka is an expression used for a good speaker (with well set tongue; you say a "throat of cast iron"). ( Ah, let me squeeze here also the ... I_alcohol, bc. it sounds very sim. to alkali & turns out to be again Ar., but there are some surprises. So, acc. to the etym-cal literature, the basic definition of the a. is: fine metallic powder produced by sublimation, in particular distilled spirit. It comes from med. Lat. alcohol, which in turn is from Ar. I_al-kohl 2(& this kohl, if one asks the Ger*, is a coal, or else some dust or mud --- << kahl-bald)2. This powder in ancient times was used as ... make-up, to stain the eyelids. ) So, and maybe the calmars (or calimari) are also here (I_calamaro in It., given as Gr.-Lat.-Fr., i.e. 2(I think)2 smt. kalo from the mare-sea), as well as Tur. (& Bul.) I_kalkan (a I_turbot, where your w. was o. thornbut 2(bc. of the thorny buttons covering the fish)2, but the Tur. w. means primarily a shield), then there is another Tur. w., I_kalip ('kalåp', also Bul., a boot-last, or in Tur. it is also a moulding form, i.e. smt. that makes the things kalo), then comes the chemical substance I_calomel (mercurious chloride, given as Gr. kalo + melas 2(black)2 & used as purgative 2(though, if you ask me, it may as well be: kal-faeces + μελι-honey, i.e., making our excrements to honey-nice cream)2 ), & others (why not also the Rus. ... lake I_Baikal, as smt. baş-big + kalo-good?).
And now let us have more closer look at the I_faeces --- squeezing our noses, of course. I sup. here we have to split this w. in: some 'fju' (like your pooh) + 'kal' (bc. in Sl. they are called I_fekalii 2(in pl., but there's no sing.)2, & in one Bul. vulgar jargon fashkii 2(what is Tur., faşkiye |I_fashkiye|)2 ), so that the real r. has to be kal-, as it is for the Sl* (with the ment-d piquant nuances), but in Lat. (& for the West) the accent is put on the 1st syl. bc. in pl. (in Lat.) they are I_faex. The mud, resp. the faeces, are not always bound to be bad, bc.: I have ment-d the curious rel-n btw. the Sl. mudû-testicles & mudrûj-wise, the cow dung may be smt. good (to what we shall come on guano), you have the w. I_fecund (surely from the faeces), which means good, fertilized, & here I want to tell you smt. about the eastern ... I_fakirs. On one hand they are known as illusionist, but on the other hand their name surely fits well with the faeces /faex! And this isn't a coincidence bc. the real Hindu fakirs of old times went around in dirty cloths, led ascetic way of live, & had had the habit to cover themselves with ... cow dung (bc. it was believed that it healed many illnesses). From here it's an easy step to another r. for the faeces, namely the Lat. caco (<< kaka) but we have touched it (eh, not literally) & shall come again to it in later times. But I may as well mention that the ... I_infection means taking (inadvertently) of some faeces, as much as the I_disinfection is trying to get rid of them (resp disinsection is getting rid of the insects).
Now you may open your noses & take a deep breath bc. there will be ntg. bad-smelling till the end of this chapter, & we shall continue with the interesting w. I_calembour. It is Fr. & known all around the world, but the Eng. etym-sts say this comes from the name of fairy-tale personage from low Saxon, some Pfaff von Kahlenberg (what, b.t.w., means "bald mountain"), where their Ger. "brothers" say for their I_Kalauer (as synonym) that it is from the town Kalau (in Schlesien-Silesia), what, in fact, are 2 versions. I will explain it to you otherwise, doing the splitting in the Fr. lang. & in: calem + some bour-, but the latter not as bourge--I_Berg but as I_bourde, what in Fr. means: a lie, bosh, blah-blah, & even in Rus. (surely from the Fr.) burda means dirty water that must be thrown out in the sewage, or also smt. badly cooked, & here is also the known I_burlesque (Fr., or burlesco in It., coming from burlette as a joke, smt. to cause laugh), what, clearly, is an imit. of some (abhorring) 'brr'. And would smb. of you ask: what the calem here means? Well, if smb. asks, I'll tell him /her that this is the Tur. (known also in Bul.) I_kalem, what is a pen, pencil, chisel (or an office, i.e. the place where documents are written). Hence the calembour is a joke of the feather-pen (or tongue, here), what I sup. fits better with the m-ing. The confusion (or the diff. versions) is due to the fact that the kalem is from t.s. καλο-r. as the Ger. I_kahl-bald; and as much as your laugh is the Tur. laf (a funny story), so the kalem might have been known from old times. Not that the Fr* don't have w. for the feather --- their I_plume, giving the plumage --- but an oriental w. seems more exotic.
B.t.w., the pen in Ger. is Bleistift (literally: "leaden stick"), and if I_Blei may be from the Tur. I_kalay then so Bul. I_moliv (a pen) may be built as some 'mm' (for the wonder of it) + 'oliv', where the latter is from Bul. I_olovo, what is a lead as metal (signed with Pb., from I_plumbum, what is plumb in Eng., but about its etym-gy later). But here are confused 2 metals, namely: the lead (Pb.) & the I_stannum- or I_stagnum-tin (Sn.), bc. Bul. (also Srb., Cz., etc., o. Sl.) olovo-Pb. is called in Rus. I_svinetz (poss. named so for its siv 2(Bul. for gray)2 colour), but then the Sn. is kalaj in Bul. where in Rus. it is òlovo (there's a diff-nce in the stressing but this isn't important); also in the Ger. the things are not very precise bc. the lead is Blei, but this is near to the Tur. kalay-tin. The olovo is given from an o. Prussic I_alwis (also Lithuanian alvas), rel-d to the Lat. alba-white, and before that was an o. Gr. αλφοσ (as t.s., though I have found it in a dict. as some white lichen used in medicine); then the stagnum obviously leads us to the stagnation (stagnum in Lat. is stagnated water, having in mind its gray or dirty look, or that this metal melts easily but looks like metal only when hardens). So, and in Rus. the pencil is I_karandash, what is a deriv. from the kreda-I_Kreide-chalk. Ah, but I have to add also the Fr. ... I_caramel, burned sugar with red-brown colour (that may be taken for blackish), which is an useful w. bc. it shows us how the Fr* may take smm. Tur. ws, bc. they have ntg. sim. on cara- (& mel -- melt, is an obvious rel-n; or << melange), where in Tur. I_kara is black as it was already said.

~ ~ ~

OK, and now let us cast a look at the I_stone|s, but not in the Eng. version (which is Ger. --- Stein), bc. they just stay where were put, but in the Sl. variant like in Rus. kamenþ |I_kamen$| (or Bul. kamåk |I_kama^k|, or Cz. kamen, or Pol. kamien, etc.). This may teach us smt., bc. when the Sl. stones have ntg. to do with the staying, then, maybe, they should have smt. to do with the moving?! This may seem surprising, but that has to be what the Eng. verb ... I_come (or, better, "come in") has to say; this surely is Ger. I_kommen (t.s.), but this is also the well known ... comet (I_comete in Fr.), which is a stone (of a kind) but it also comes to us. In other ws, the Sl. kamenþ-stone contains the movement in itself (& how dialectical this sounds!) simply bc. it can be thrown (we'll come later to sim. ideas on şiş, Küste, & others). Searching in this direction I have found smt. from this r. also in the o. Gr. where καμνω |I_kamno^| was: to become tired, weak or thin, to endure, to work until full exhaustion, etc., i.e. to drop down from tiredness like a stone, but in t.s. time actively moving! But then I may add more to this, bc. there is the Eng. ... I_comb (& "b" here is just for distinction, you don't read it), what surely is Ger. I_Kamm (a comb or a mountain ridge), & if in Eng. one can take this just for smt. I_combine|d (we have spoken about the r. co-), then in Ger. kommen becomes exactly kam in Imperfect; & even if it is smt. combined then of what? Of some spokes or arrows, i.e. of frozen in their movement pebbles; t.s. idea can be seen in the I_projectile, where you sup. that it is projected or thrown. So that I may coin a new noun "come" as a ... hole into which to fall in this come /came movement, what turns out to be not a new idea bc. that is what the Lat. ... I_comma (Ger. Komma) means, & not only as punctuation sign (to roll in the hole, to rest a little, to take some breath) but also as clinical death, I_coma (of which one may come out, but may as well also not come); & comma obviously is Lat. & Gr. judging by its building of pl. --- in Ger. it's Kommata, like Lemma, Lemmata.
Then I may continue with Sl. I_komin (in fact Bul., & doesn't it say to you: "come in"?) as a chimney-pipe (in Rus. it is dûmohod, i.e. a smoke-way) or kamina (an open fire), but this is the known Ger. Kamin (both things) & It. camino (again both, a I_hearth 2(bc. this is ... the heart of the home, b.t.w.)2 ) & Lat. I_caminus (a hearth) & Sp. camino (here m-ing a way, direction, a mean, i.e. the important thing is the movement; in It. they use 2 "m"-s here & cammino is a movement, resp. as verb I_camminare is to move, go 2(with io-I cammino etc.)2 ) &, come to think of it, also your I_chimney (a variety of camino on 'ch' bc. you just like this let.), & before this was o. Gr. καμινοσ (a hearth or fire). So that the Sl. komin /kamina has to be called 'komout' in the sense of leaving the smoke out of the room, but it leaves also fresh air in, so that we mustn't formalize more than needed. But then here is also Rus. I_komnata (a room), in the sense of your I_common-room, & all common things (saying to us: "come in & take me"), & o. Fr. comun (now I_commun) as a commune (what is Lat., m-ing there a common property), & the Communists (who you surely dislike; I also don't like them, but ... I like their ideas), & the I_communication|s, & diff. I_camera|s /camaras (includeing the photographic), & the commitments (to come to smb. & do smt. mit-with him /her), & the I_committee|s (Lat. commitere as to announce, gather together), & so on. Especially about the komnata are given: Ukr. kimnata or kivnata (bc. I_kivok in Rus. is to wave with hand or head as a sign of approval, or to come nearer, t.s. in Bul. as verb is I_kimam), Cz. & Pol. komnata, then o. Ger. Khaminata (= cheminata = kemenate = kemenade etc.) going to Lat. I_caminata m-ing a room with a hearth (open fire).
Bc. of this strong pulling of the r. come- the room in Ger. is called I_Zimmer and I_ziehen is to pull or haul (<< z.); Bul. room, then, is I_staja, what comes from the staying (though this doesn't mean that the pulling is entirely disappeared bc. exactly staja in Rus. is ... a flock of birds, & stjazhatþ |I_stjazhat$| is to gather or acquire, say money) but we shall come to this again (>> stoic). Surely here is also Fr. I_camion (a horse-cart or chariot for them, from here also a lorry, but in Bul. kamion is only a lorry 2(though not so in Rus., they say I_gruzovik, what is from gruz as heavy weight)2 ), and one may look at it as at a moving "hole". And then (why not?) I may put here the known I_camea (cameo in Eng.) too, which isn't only smt. precious, but 1st of all a kamåk |I_kama^k|-stone that was carved (a "combed" stone, in a way) to show a picture of an animal (or whatever) becoming precious bc. of being worn as amulet. There is also Bul. I_kama as a knife (expressing the idea of the projectile), which must be smt. oriental bc. it isn't Rus. From here we may go to the ... camel, but not now; now we shall go to the hummock. Bc. the Eng. I_hummock (for which the etym-sts say only that it is of naval origin & has arisen in 16th cent.) has to be like the Bul. kamåk |I_kama^k|, or, then, like Rus. (c. Sl.) I_holm /holmik, what is a hill. It doesn't matter that the hummock is a big, usually out of ice, block, bc. big or small are relative notion (I may cite several geographical places in Bul. with "kamåk" in their names, but in each country may be found sim. examples), and even in Sw. holm is a hill (& in Dan. it's a peninsula), what surely is so, bc. everyone has heard about the town I_Stockholm (poss. a big hill; Stock has to be smt. around your stack). Etym-cally for the holm (chliem in Cz., chelm in Pol.) is given an o. Ger. hulma, what has to be the source also for the Sw. holm & Eng. hummock; and for the kamenþ |I_kamen$| is cited also an o. Eng.-Saxon hamar (what is now your ... I_hammer), but (in my view) this is short distance back in the time & lacks the ideas given above.
But let us return for a while to the common things (I_I_komnata, & Kamin, & Lat. I_cum as the prep. "with") & add smt. diff., but what I think is also rel-d, though it is mostly Sl. What I mean is Sl. (c. & o.) I_kum as a godfather, resp. kuma for the --mother, where the etym-sts give an o. (Rus., Cz., Pol.) kumotrå /kmotr, coming sup-edly from a vulgar Lat. commater, or resp. compater (becoming kåpetrå, or Alb. kumptër /kindër, or Rum. cumetra), but there was also Tur.-Ar. I_kuma as any wife (it may be also a slave or a cook) with which one lives together, so that the w. is known also on the East. Then there is also I_kumir as an idol (o. Sl. koumirå), for which there were not a good etym-gy, but there were a Syrian I_kumra as a priest, & Arm. kumr as a gender, lineage, so that it fits here with the common things (a god or priest usually unite the people) & also adds smt. from its 2nd syl. rel-d to the mir-peace, but suggests also an imit. of humming ('khåm'). And then, bc. it sounds alike, comes Rus. I_komar as a gnat (also Cz. & Pol. komar, etc., c. & o. Sl.), for which o. Prussian camus as a bumble-bee is given (in Rus. shmelþ |I_shmel$|, b.t.w., bc. it shumitþ 2(makes noice)2 ), & a Lithuanian kamine or kamane as t.s., what leads us to Ger. hummen as to buzz (resp. I_Hummel is t.s. bee). This officially leads us away from the common things (though not much, if one takes hummen for summen and goes to the Lat. I_summa as putting the things together), but the buzzing is usually caused by wasps or bees & they may lurk, smh., in Ger. ... kümmern |I_kuemmern|, what is to be worried or troubled (by komari-gnats, maybe; as much as your bothering suggests bodatþ-pricking). The etym-sts don't say this but give an o. high-Ger. kumber as a worry, trouble, med. Lat. cumbrus /combrus as a barrier or dam (one has to gather stones or the like to build it), Gaelic-Lat. I_comboros as carried together, & Fr. I_decombrer as to gather the garbage --- what reminds me about the Tur. (known also in Bul.) ... kümür |I_kuemuer|, what is a coal, which is also gathered. ( Your I_garbage, acc. to me, has to be built from: Ger. gär 2(gären |I_gaeren| is to ferment)2 + your bag. ) After this I wouldn't be much surprised if Rus. kumûs |I_kumu^s| (a ... mare's milk) has to be also here, bc. it comes from Southern Asian (Kazakhstan etc.) kumyz, given from kummak as to shake or stir, what in turn sounds to me like Tur. (also Bul.) I_kaymak, what is a milk cream taken by skimming (called I_slivki in Rus., b.t.w., bc. of slitþ as to pour). So that the common things (together with the movement for their gathering) have their saying in many unexpected places.
And now let us comp. the I_comete-comet with the I_meteor bc. they are sim. flying stones. The point of this is to come to the syl. met- which also contains in itself the moving (& it turns out that the comet contains it in its both syls, com- & met-), bc. here are, f.ex.: Rus. metatþ |I_metat$| (Bul. mjatam, to throw), the ment-d Bul. I_mitkam (to move about), the o. Gr. μετεωροσ = μετηοροσ (high, eminent --- it might be meant as smt. thrown high by some god) together with the I_meteorology (which now isn't science exactly for meteors but the weather looks like smt. cast from the gods), then Rus. I_mesti (becoming metu, metëshþ, to sweep), the known Lat.-Gr. I_metaphor (metatþ + φορεω-to-carry, smt. thrown far or high), then the I_myth (o. Gr. μυθοσ), & the slightly changed Lat. I_muto (mutare, to change, mutate, throw, take a distance). Ah, this isn't all, then comes your I_move /I_motion (the latter giving also the ... I_emotion, surely 2(and the modern nowadays promotions --- forced by the almost choking over-productivity)2, bc. it is some movement of vital fluids or neural impulses in our bodies), the more mutated mobile things (from Lat. I_mobilis or mobile, giving the perpetuum mobile), then from Fr. I_meuble ('mjobl', mobile or movable) we come not only to the automobile (what's obvious) but to Rus. mebelþ |I_mebel$| or Ger. Möbel (a furniture, but the point is that it's smt. movable, on the contrast to the real estate which isn't, & that's why it is smt. "real"), & then also to the ... I_mob, of course. The ancient r. here is Skr. I_methati = mithati m-ing to change, alternate (& you see how perfect it fits with the Rus. metatþ), or also Avs. mitha as phony, deceiving (bc. it changes, what also is a perfect match for the Gr. myth), and from here is given one Bul. w., måst |I_ma^st| (mestþ |I_mest$| in Rus.), which primarily m-ing is of smt. squeezed (<< müssen |I_muessen |), but it has another m-ing of revenge (which is the only m-ing of the Rus. w.), what is to be explained with this moving like a shuttle (going & returning), i.e. to return acc. to the shown or given (as you "met" it to me so I'll "met" it to you); I may ment. also the Ger. prep. I_mit-with with the idea again of some fast movement together (let's go mit me; though this isn't etym-cally sound bc. smt. mit is what lies around "me", what is around the sound 'me', which is common for maybe all langs 2(>> mama)2 ).

~ ~ ~

From the big (& moving) stones we may, without much efforts, come to the smallest things or the I_atom|s, which, as it is well known, come from o. Greece, where the w. (ατομ) was coined by Democrites. When this is an artificially made w. I may allow myself, although it is very short, to split it in: a + tom, saying a no-"tom", bc. τομα = τομη meant: a piece, end, tree-stump or trunk, a hit, cut, division, intersection, etc., or also τομοσ was a part or piece (of some body, I_tomus in Lat.), so that the atom is not only indivisible but also as if non-material (bc. they had not had electronic microscopes in those times); here is the I_anatomy too (to search for the annals of the tomus-es), though we have ment. it before. For the Slavs I_tom is a volume of series of books (or just a book), tome in Eng., i.e. it is smt. small (but that can say smt. like 'tåm' when dropped down), or maybe not so small as can be judged by your ... tomb, which is Fr. I_tombe. But on the West this r. exists mainly beg-ing with "s" instead of "t", bc. there was also o. Gr. σωμα (-τοσ) as a body (alive or dead), or σωματικοσ as belonging to the body, physical, carnal, what has gone to the Lat. & Eng. as I_somatic; there is a Sl. I_som too, what is the name of one big & tasty river-fish (you call it sheat-fish), which can also be from here (as very somatic one); & (I sup.) your particle ... I_some too (bc. it isn't Ger., they say: etwas, einige, ein wenig, what are entirely diff. ws). And then it may be interesting to know that when the Ger* breathe they inhale ... atoms --- bc. they call this atmen, & I_Atem is a breath! Well, the It*, for their part, like to breathe arias --- bc. I_aria there means not only what other folks understand but also I_air (so that count this w. too 2(as a prelude to the next paragraph)2, together with Gr-Lat. I_aero things).
If we now elongate the 1st let. a little (showing more ecstasy) we shall come to the I_auto (-mobile, -mation, etc.), what is also o. Gr. (αυτο(σ), read before 'aito', now 'avto', as in the Sl., & on the West 'auto'; also αυτοματον is a self-effecting mechanism, or an event, & αυτοματοσ is the I_automat (-on), with pl. automata), though this is a diff. r. & we have said smt. about it on: I_aus, I_aether, & autumnus. We may continue with o. Gr. αετοσ (in Bul. is a small town on the Black Sea coast named I_Ajtos), what is the bird eagle (we shall come to your w. on some other place), that flies high in the air-ether (αιθηρ(-οσ) ), & is surely rel-d in the o. Gr. to αιθοσ, what is a fire, flame, burning coals, what has given Lat. I_aestuo (to burn, ignite, boil, having in mind the rising sun, which moves in the ether), where from has come also Lat. I_aestas, what is hot weather, summer, or an outing in the nature, and I may bet this has given the well known ... I_ecstasy (ekstaz in Sl.). You see, the fire & the air are diff. things (or elements, acc. to the sciences in old Greece) but they are rel-d. The ether has to be rel-d also to the known Gr. ... I_hetera (in Lat. & Sl.), what is a women (though often used in contemptuous m-ing), where the w. has arisen bc. in those times only men gathered together (to eat, drink, talk, play games, etc.), so that if the company was heterogeneous (ετερογενησ in Gr., i.e.: of diff. gender-sexes), there were also some girls, on the contrast to the homogenous (ομογενησ, i.e. of t.s. gender) party, where there were only men, but this isn't bc. I_homo means a man, no, it means of t.s. kind (so that an only-girls party is also homo; & the lesbians are also homosexuals). If this is so then the ether has to be smt. diff., but from what? Well, from all the things-elements (i.e.: air, fire, earth, & water). The Lat. homo becomes in Fr. homme (read just 'om') & in Sp. I_hombre ('ombre') & is very near to Lat. I_umbra, what is: a shadow, darkness, constant satellite, spirit, etc., implying the thought that the human being is just a shadow (of God, maybe); and this umbra has given your I_umbrella.
From the αετοσ-eagle & the ether I sup-d has to be influenced the ... ethics, as smt. invisible but hidden in our heads & inflaming us for good dealings, but the etym-sts give this only from Fr. I_ethique, then Lat. ethicus, then o. Gr. εθικοσ, which (besides that begins with "ε" instead of "αι") meant habitual (& εθισμα was a habit), so that this should not correlate with the ether. Well, it doesn't, directly, but it, still, is smt. ever-present in our heads (as it was believed for the ether), and I may even pick from the Gr. w. some "tick /tack" that ticks is our heads, or rel. it to Rus. particle I_eto (look, see, take it), & the ethics surely has given the Fr. I_etiquette (accepted also by the Sl*), what for the West is a way to behave, but for the Sl* it is also like your tag put on the wares (to distinguish them as smt. good). However, if we insert one lisping consonant in the beg-ing we may come to the I_phaeton, i.e. o. Gr. φαεθων, what means bright, shining, also the planet Jupiter, or we may take the shorter φαοσ as a light or shine, what are again things put smw. in the ether. Then there was the Gr. εωσ |I_eo^s| (a morning, I_east, day, the goddess of the morning, the prep. while or until; << zora), the eons (I_aeon in Lat.) as some invisible, like ether, particles but this time of the time, the I_Aeolian harps, etc. And there is the interesting point that what is light & I_aerial (to remind you about the aerie, usually for eagles) it is also beautiful & everlasting, bc. in Lat. I_aetas was: a bygone, smm. before, the whole life, an epoch, a person, & aeternus was I_eternal, & this was the cause for your ... I_age (with o. forms: aaege, eäege, Port. atge, etc.) to emerge, but enough with this atomic theme.

~ ~ ~

The last portion here will be about the fire, but again in its Sl. form of ogån (Bul.) or ogonþ |I_ogon$| (Rus.) bc. this once more time turns out to be nearer to the Skr., where it was I_agnis, & Agni (= Wahni) was the goddess of the fire, & it was a personage I_Agnimukhe m-ing a fiery-mouth. ( B.t.w., about the I_mukha-mouth, this surely is an imit. of some mooing like a cow, where is also your I_mouth and Ger. I_Maul & I_Mund 2(the 1st used for animals, the 2nd for humans, but both m-ing a mouth)2, but it, really, is a Skr. w. bc. there was another name, I_Krawjamukha 2(in Ger. writing)2 m-ing, this time, a meaty-mouth 2(<< korova /I_krava)2, though there is also Rus. I_muka 2('mukà')2, what is a flour, & an o. & c. Sl. muka 2(now 'mùka')2, what is a pain or suffering, so that the mooing is well rel-d to the suffering 2(this isn't a happy cry)2 & to the grinding of food 2(to flour)2 in the mouth. ) On the West you have also caught smt. (though not much) of this agni- r., namely the I_ignition, which is Lat. (I_ignus is a fire, & igneus is fiery), but the r. is widely spread in other areas, there was Blt. ugnis & ugnus (a fire), & other ws. ( The fire is usually made by burning of coals, what reminds me about the curious Rus. rel-n btw. their ugolþ |I_ugol$| as a coal, & 2(c. Sl.)2 I_ugol as an angle or corner, so that I sup. the ugolþ 2(which, maybe, isn't c. Sl.)2 was named so bc. the easiest way to take the coals is when they are placed near to the surface, or are entirely open & easy to be gathered 2(comp. with the kümür)2, what in Rus. is ogolitþ /ogoljatþ 2(to strip)2; bc. of this strange rel-n to the angle that we, in Bul., have not grasped, we must have made the w. våglishta for the coal, from: v-in + ogolitþ 2(in a varied form)2. )
Yeah, but alongside the Rus. ogonþ |I_ogon$| stays also their o. jagnje (or even older & nice-s-ing (j)agnþtzja) or today's jagnënok or Bur. I_agne (also Cz. jehne, Pol. I_jagne, Srb. jagnje, etc.), what is not known to the Eng* or Ger* but was exactly I_agnus in Lat. (& from there agneau 2('anþo')2 in Fr. & agnello 2('anþelo')2 in It.) or αμνοσ in o. Gr., & this is the nice looking & tasting young lamb, which just has to be rel-d to the fire, at least bc. it is usually cooked on a burning fire. But there are many ideas here bc. the lamb is symbol of the new life (there was an o. Eng. aenian as coming out with lambs, giving birth to lambs --- if you are a she-sheep, of course), & the lamb was used in many religious sacrifices in ancient times, & there was an agnus dei (meaning our Christ, though I am not religious to vouch about this), & the fire is an ever-renewing substance, it lives & is ever newly born, &, if we go to a let.-level, here are present: the let. "a/an" as beg-ing (<< anas), & the r. gn- as knowledge (<< gnome) or thought ("mn" in the Gr. αμνοσ --- << mnemonics), or some ecstasy if "gn" has to be read as 'nþ' (& then the above cited Skr. 'Anþi' may be really sim. to Wahni), etc.
And now --- to the Eng. I_fire, which is Ger. I_Feuer, Fr. I_feu ('fjo'), etc., and has many derivs like: Bul. I_fira (smt. gone to the wind, expired, usually used for gathered fruits or vegetables when with the time they loose their weight) which isn't our but o. Gr. φυρα (& Tur.-Ar.), Bul. jargon I_firkan (tipsy, as if burning with internal fire); then to simplify the 1st let. & continue with: o. Gr. πυρ (a fire) & πυρα (a flame, fire, burning), giving your I_pyre (for burning of the dead, or smm. also of alive persons), then Rus. (c. Sl.) I_pir, what isn't exactly a fire /pyre but a ... feast (big eating & drinking), i.e. the consequences of making a fire, with the derivs I_pirog (a pie) & pirozhki (buns or the like; not that we rel. them now with the fire but they are rel-d). Then, come to think of it, also Ger. I_Pirsch, what is a hunting (i.e. an expectancy of a pir-blast); then let me cite also Bul. pårzhola |I_pa^rzhola| (roasted steak, from pårzha |I_pa^rzha| as to roast), or the assoc-d Ger. I_feiern ('fajern', to celebrate, surely with the idea that this usually means to make fires, to eat, drink, dance around, shoot fire-crackers, etc.), what comes from Lat. I_feriae as holiday or celebration, having given also Ger. Ferien (holidays, only pl.), & the I_pyrotechnic|s, & so on.
In short, this r. (I/G. pur- /pyr-) is very old, there are given: some Hetian pahhur, an o. Sumerian (i.e. about 4-5 mills back) gir and Semitic kirr as furnace, what are diff. imits of flying ('får', & go far away) or burning ('pår- /bår-', like in your to I_burn), but the things, in my view, are more profound than this (for even animals try to imitate heard sounds) bc. here we come to the classical ... form of the fire --- the I_pyramid (o. Gr. πυραμιδα, but they are older then o. Gr.)! This just can't be a coincidence and in this cluster are also: o. Gr. πυργοσ |I_pyrgos| (a tower, or a castle), one Bul. town, Burgas, all the Fr. I_bourgeoisie (together with the ... hamburgers), Ger. I_Burg. (again a castle, & twin with the I_Berg-mountain), also many sources of light, like: Gr. φαροσ (I_pharos in Lat., shortened to far in Sl., light source of any kind; >> also I_fakel), Ger.-Lat. I_Furie (Fury, usually fiery), the Lat. I_furor, the (optical) I_focus (Lat.-Gr.), Bul. furna, which is exactly Lat. I_fornacula (an oven, we have cut the -cula bc. we don't need it), & so on. Then come many ... church priests around the world, like: Bul. I_sveshtenik or Rus. svjatoj otetz (this is from our I_svet-light but to t.s. idea bc. sveshtnik in Bul. is a candlestick), Ger. I_Pfarrer (direct deriv. from pharos), before that the old ... I_Pharaoh|s (as symbols of light for the o. Egyptian populace) & the I_Pharisee|s (t.s. for the o. Heb*), and surely the I_Brahman|s too, if you comp. their name with Ger. I_brennen (to burn), but let us not return now to the disc-ed brej /bravo exclam.

Ah, it looks like we have reached the end of this chapter.
}.





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH {} AND THE LIGHT {} AND THE WISDOM{}. HE WAS IMMENSELY POTENT {} AND MADE THE TIME & THE SPACE {} AND THE MATTER {}. THEN HE MADE THE GRASS & THE TREES |I_TREESCHP|
{
And we come now to many names in the domain of flora, only not of this latter r., which we have disc-ed before (<< fleur). The grass is easy, it's Ger. I_Gras, which is usually I_green or grün |I_gruen| (if you ask the Ger*) and has the "habit" to I_grow becoming groß |I_gross| (big or tall); in Sl. though it rastjot, to what we shall come after a while. ( Ah, to squeeze here smt. tasty & Fr., their I_croissant as a kind of long bun, which is from croisser as to increase, grow. ) But the I_tree|s are more interesting bc. they not only scratch & stir while growing (<< thrive or three), but in Sl. turn out to be much smaller than on the West bc. I_trava /travka (treva in Bul.) is exactly the grass! And don't you, please, think that this is a coincidence bc. of t.s. r. is the I_turf, which is I_torf in Sl. (but << tor), though m-ing a bog (with sup-edly abundant & decaying vegetation, a peat), but there is also Rus. dërn |I_dern| (read 'djorn') m-ing a grassy covering. Anyway, we shouldn't be bothered by the tallness of the grass-trees bc. in older geological times there has grown mainly grass (& the diff-nce is not really in the height but in the living cycle, which is less than an year for the grass 2(it withered, if smt. remained these are the rs)2, & more than that for the trees; in this sense the banana-tree is counted for grass); or take also your grape comp-d with the grapefruit where the latter is about 6-7 times linearly bigger (i.e. 300 times heavier); or comp. also Fr. I_arbre-tree (having given, I sup., the I_arbalest 2(arbalet in Sl.)2 or cross-bow 2(with o. forms: arblast, arbelest, arwe-blast, arrow-blast, & late Lat. arcuballista)2 ) with your /Lat. I_herb /herba. So by the chain: turf -- 'durf' -- 'djorn' (bc. the Rus* 2(& some other Sl*)2, don't have this beautiful sound 'å' & put 'jo' instead, reading, e.g., your girl as 'gjorl') -- 'djorf', we may come to Ger. I_Dorf, what is a village (where surely grows grass). But the original w. (if we don't go back to the Skr.) is o. Gr. δεντρο or δενδρον |I_dendron|, what has to be well known bc. here are all the I_dendrite|s & dendrons in neurology, as also the I_dendrarium|s (botanical gardens). The Eng. tree (but not the Ger., they say I_Baum, what is smt. that becomes big, and also must be rel-d to bauen as to build, make) & the Sl. trava have both come from this Gr. δενδρον, but this isn't very easy to be seen bc. many folks have cut the 1st syl., either bc. they didn't have thought it was important (this isn't smt. on 'tr- /dr-'), or bc. they imagined it as smt. that can be ... burned (<< de- or denþ).
But from the δενδρον we come also to the ... (Fr.) I_dent & the dentists, surely, or Lat. dens (dentis), & to your I_dense (which is again Lat.) --- bc. the dents-teeth grow very dense. The assoc. of the dent with the grass-tree is obvious bc. both things grow & have rs (&, acc. to some Gr. myths, the ancient myrmidons have grown out of the teeth of a dragon), but one may wonder how etym-cally this has arisen bc. only in new Gr. there is δοντι as dent, where in o. Gr. was ntg. of the kind with m-ing of a tooth, though there were sim-ly s-ing ws, like: δονεω as to shake, δονασ as a cane (<< Donau or dno-bottom), & also the I_dynamic|s (δινη- is common prefix for rotational movement); but, factually, there was a dent of this r., only with preceding 'o', i.e. οδοντ- |I_odont| (a prefix for smt. like tooth). This dont- /dent- or even dut- is given as I/E. r. giving your I_tooth /teeth (but we shall come again to this on, hmm, ... teat), & there was Skr. dan & Avs. I_dantan as a tooth, & you may hear well this thundering in making of the hole (with teeth). There is also Rus I_desna (usually used in pl., desnû), what isn't Bul. but is c. Sl. (Cz. dasen, Pol. zesna, o. Sl. djasna, pre-Sl. desn) m-ing the gum in the mouth, which for you may be smt. gum-like but for the Sl* it is the place where the dents-teeth grow (a kind of dno-bottom for them). The exception in Bul. (we use venetz 2(a crown)2 for this gum) is interesting but justified, bc. of the confusion with our I_desen m-ing right, what is so bc. we are neighbours of the Gr* & they call the right (side) δεσιοσ. But then may as well arise the question: why in the o. Gr. δεσιοσ means exactly right, i.e., might this have smt. in common with the disc-ed r.? To this I may express my opinion, namely, that these 2 notions have to be rel-d bc. the teeth are hard & stronger than the gum, and so is also our right hand (comp-d with the left one).
Now, we disc-ed the etym-gy of left & right, which in Sl. are, resp., levûj |I_levu^j| (in Rus., or ljav in Bul., etc.) & pravûj |I_pravu^j| (in Rus. etc.), what means also straight, but allow me to indulge here in some reasoning about what is right & what isn't. For one thing there is the stronger right hand, what situation (I'm not sure) may be rel-d to the direction of Earth's rotation, but then this has to influence many other things like, say: the right claw or pincer of the crabs has to be also, as a rule, stronger, or the right ... bosom of the women has to be bigger, or (why not?) the right ovum of the men, acc-ly; and then, just out of curiosity, there has to be a rule to which side a "normal" (i.e. an average) man places his "pencil" when he puts pants (bc. it can't stay exactly in the middle, & I, for my part, am "left"-oriented, as much as I am so oriented in the politics, so maybe there is a rel-n?). Well, the positioning of the penis may not correl. strongly with one's political orientation (it rather correl-s with the usage of the right hand for supporting it while using it acc. to its prevalent function; & from here also with the design of men's slips) but the right hand, obviously, has given the division in right- & left- winged parties, where the right ones are not exactly right or just but are suitable for socially stronger persons, & the left ones are good for the weaker & poorer. ( Though for me it still seems strange how a big part of the population may support stronger people, having in mind that those who are really strong are usually about 5 % of the population, but this is due to the wishes & expectations 2(as a rule imaginary)2 of the majority of people. ) So this simple m-ing of the right /left division is clear for the population of almost all countries (even in Russia), just not in Bul. (bc. we are poorer than church-mice, as the saying goes, but want still eagerly to turn right, & do so), and I am almost convinced that this is due mainly to etym-cal reasons, bc. in Bul. "right" as "am I right?" is prav, but "right" as a party or hand is I_desen, so that we are not in clear about the rights of the stronger ones (who, for their part, are right not bc. they are not wrong, but bc. they have stronger hands 2(& may punish those who doubt in their rightness)2 ).
The right or justice (where the latter should not mean exactly right but what is right from the point of view of the left ones, of the masses, but let us make them here equivalent) is usually forced upon us, what can be seen in many ws, like: Eng. I_judge comp-d with Bul. I_dzhaskam as to hit, smash (<< dzh.; here may be ment-d also Tur. I_cacik 2('dzhadzhik')2, what is synonymous with the ment-d I_tarator which is made by hard stirring of yogurt; but this is sim. also to your ... I_jazz, if you prefer it so), or Ger. I_recht /I_richtig (right; & I sup. you hear well the scratching 2(usually accompanying the cutting off of smb's head)2, or, else, the snarling of the ruler; also their I_Rechtsanwalt or just Anwalt as I_advocate 2(who isn't an "added voice" but the justified force --- << walten)2 ). To continue with: Sl. pravo (a justice, from pravûj |I_pravu^j| as straight but also right --- << also pråch), or Fr. justice as I_droit ('drua', which not only sounds like smt. hard & hitting 2(there was in old times a short spear called drot or the like in Lat., bc. there is t.s. I_drot /drotik in Rus. m-ing t.s. --- where from, b.t.w., the Rus* have made their jargon verb drochitþ |I_drochit$| for to ... masturbate, i.e. to make it hard like a stick)2, but it is also masc., where all other sciences are fem.). Or take then o. Ar. I_hagh, what is again a justice (which this time is some 'håk' on the head 2(until either the cudgel or the head breaks; or you may comp. this with Ger. I_Hagel as a hailstorm)2; also in Bul. is well known, from the times of the Tur. yoke, the so called dish-håk or "teeth-tax" 2(money required from Bul. host, usually wealthy one, after providing all the eating & drinking 3(what, b.t.w., was reasonable bc. when the host is wealthy he has enough money, and if he wasn't wealthy then they shouldn't have staid by him; and, after all, what else to answer to a silly question: why the money?)3 )2 ). So this was the 2nd point in the disc-on, what the right usually means.
And there is a 3rd point, namely: why we move on the I_right side? Well, I don't know why exactly, bc. it surely is better to move on the left side, in order to act better with the stronger right hand and this comes from ancient times, it was so in knight's tournaments, it is so for the naval people who say I_portboard (for the left board) & I_starboard (for the right one, but this isn't bc. only on the right side one can see stars, no, this is bc. of the distorted Ger. I_Steuerbord, what means where the moving force comes from), it is so when you are "he" & walk on the street with a girl who has to be on your left to leave your right hand free. So I don't know for sure why we move on the right side but I am highly suspicious that this is bc. it just sounds crazy to say that: the right side to move on is the left side, or the right side is the wrong side, or the like, so bc. of this pun it must have been decided to move on the right side; hence the cause is, again, etym-cal, &, as much as I may commiserate with the Eng* for their insistence to move on the left side, they have to cease playing donkey and switch to the widely accepted decision (as they have turn to decimal subdivisions for their money). And there is, still, another interesting question, namely: why the Arabs continue to write from right to left & from bottom to top (& to read the books from the end, from our point of view)? Could it be that they are just a bit perverse? Well, I don't think so, bc. the Ar* are neither more nor less perverse than any other folk is (you know, we all are trying to be "perverse" in smt. or other in order to be diff.), but I doubt that they will accept my explan. for the cause for this, bc. of not being smt. very reasonable or honorable to be proud of it. But it is logical, bc. what I sup. is that their movement of the hand is one of ... grasping (!), nearing of smt. to us, where our (not only Western, also Sl.) way of writing is of giving, and the old folks just didn't (& don't) like to give (not that we like it very much, nowadays, but we try to); hence the spoiling or not of the just written text should not be of big importance for them (and also I don't sup. they have bigger percentage of left-handed people than we have).

~ ~ ~

Well, let us now return to the plants and concern us with their I_bloom|ing or I_blossom|ing, what is mostly Teu. (I_Blume is a flower in Ger.; << B.), but not only, bc. it is m.o.l. t.s. as the ment-d I_fleur-flower (via b--f or beta--vita mutation). Still, there are many ideas here, bc. this isn't only flowing or flying, it is also bursting on bl- /pl- (like in the Bul. jargon I_pljokvam (se) as to plonk), and it's also, as curious as this seems, the I_blue colour (I_blau in Ger.). So let us investigate the diff. aspects. Blau is c. Ger. & Lat. where the Teu. part is mostly on bl- and in the Rom. langs it's on pl- but this division isn't exact; here may be cited, e.g.: o. Frisian bleu, Port. blau, blava, o. Sp. blavo, an It. dialect biavo (the correct w. being bianco), Dan. blaauw, all this m-ing blue, what is rel-d to Lat. I_flavus (& a hypothetical Rom. blavus) though this means ... yellow, golden, fiery. This would have seemed strange, haven't I stressed that the core idea here isn't in the very colour but in the ready-to-burst state of the bloom, &, really, the etym-sts give here an I/G. r. bhel- (what, obviously, is swelling or bursting), & there are also Ger.: blühen |I_bluehen| (Norw. blöm, Sw. blomma, etc., all m-ing to bloom, make buttons) or Blüte |I_Bluete| (a blossom or flower-button), & I_Blatt (a leaf; which sup-edly correl-s with I_platt as plain), etc.
Around the I_blue colour (I think I've mentioned that the colours are not strictly defined) has to stay also the Eng. (but not Ger. or Sl.) I_black, as smt. intensely blue (the Eng. etym-sts cite an o. Teu. blach but ntg. before this, so that I think I am right about the I_blau-blue), with an additional hint from the I_blotch, which comes from the ... I_blood (Ger. I_Blut), so that we turn now to the fiery red colour. One may only guess why the blue colour has to signify the flowers and I guess this is mainly bc. of the characteristic for high-placed meadows (say, in Himalayas) colour of the flowers; but there were not many choices left bc.: the grass is green, the gold is golden (zhëltûj |I_zheltu^j| in Rus., what sounds sim-ly but we shall come again to this), the red colour (at least in the Teu. langs) is taken for things that cast rays & shine, the brown colour is burned in a way (>> b.), then the sky is blue but it also shines & is sim. to the Sl. I_sinij (<< s.), so that we (i.e. the ancient people) are left with the blue colour, but, as you have just seen, it signifies also the blooming & from here the blood too, bc. the fable for the blue aristocratic blood has to have deeper rs (I mean: why not golden, like the Sun?) & this rel-n, blau -- Blut -- Blüte, isn't occasional.
Now let us come to the Rom. variety on pl- & answer the following question: what is it that rel-s the Eng. I_plum with the ... I_plumb (bc. you don't read the last let.) & the plumbing (which leads the water up or down like a plumb; or bc. usually the plumbing is made out of Pb.)? But it's easy, and if you have followed my explans you have to have seen that Bul. I_pljokvam-to-plonk is very good aid to the answer, i.e. both things just fall down & either burst or are very near to bursting (what is also the reason for saying plummeting & not "plumbeting"). Etym-cally one should use not exactly the 'pljok'-ing & has to say that the plum is, in fact, Ger. I_Pflaume, or to go to the ancient langs (what we shall do, after a while) but the sound imit. here is so obvious (you may think also of spitting out the fruit-stone, if you like) that it doesn't matter much where we shall start. To this cluster may be ment-d, say: Rus. plevatþ |I_plevat$| (pljuja in Bul, to spit), or Rus. I_plamja or plamenþ (or plamåk in Bul., a flame, where the latter is Ger. I_Flamme & It. fiamma & Lat. flamma, & here is also the Flame as Flemish-inhabitant), or Bul. I_palja (to ignite, inflame), or the I_plasma, or Fr. I_pluie ('pljui', this time a rain or hailstorm, also of bullets) or as verb pleuvoir ('pljovua', to walk, fall down, rain in abundance 2(il pleut is "it rains")2 ) or the short I_pli (a tuck, fold, or salvo), or (why not?) the Lat. I_pluralis (plural in Eng.) which comes from pluo (it rains), & so on, no matter whether it rains water, or bullets fly, or smb. spits, or a fire burns. From here it is easy to go to Rus. I_pulja (a bullet), though it is also smt. small & in the "poultry"-cluster (to which we shall come later on), but it seems to me more interesting to ment. Ger. I_plump, what isn't like in Eng. (obese, fat, abundant), but means clumsy, awkward (what are rel-d notions), where from is the deriv. Plumpstoilette, what is an outer toilette, without water and with only a hole, where, I beg your pardon, when "smt." falls through the hole it says 'plump' (like the plum-Pflaume, but this is t.s. idea of the dung), so that this implies the thought that the plump person is clumsy bc. he /she may easily fall & burst like an overripe plum.
This plump-fat person in Sl. becomes polnûj |I_polnu^j| (in Rus., pålen in Bul., plny in Cz. & Slovakian, or o. Sl. plånå) where from in Rus. polnò means enough, but the etym-sts go wide back to a Skr. I_purnas or pranas (or Avs. påråna) with t.s. m-ing, & from there the r. had gone to o. Greece where πληρησ was t.s. & πλεον was the greater part of smt., & to the Lat. where I_plenus was plump, obese, strong, wealthy, or a pregnant woman, & then to your I_plenty, & so on (say, It. pieno as full, ample). In this sense, as smt. plenty (or naplodeno, from the plod-fruit, << p.) & causing dismay, I would like to add here Fr. I_applaudissement, modified by the Eng* to applause. With sim. imit. (say, clapping of hands, I_pluie-spitting of ws, or jumping about) may be explained also: the Eng. I_play (both as playing games or musical instrument, what is so in many langs), the I_ply & the plywood (smt. smashed), Ger. & Sl. tooth-filling (I_plombieren /plomba) what surely is Lat. & Fr. bc. there is the Fr. I_aplomb; or take Rus. blevatþ |I_blevat$| (to vomit, puke) as twin to plevatþ-to-spit |I_plevat$|, so that the plumb has to be originally arisen bc. of the ... spit of the masons as 1st nature-given plumb.
Sim. "spitting" origin have some fruits in other langs like: Sl. I_sliva (a plum), which is rel-d to slitþ /slivatþ |I_slivat$| (to pour out) or I_sljuna /sljunka (= Lat. I_saliva), or Rus. I_persik = Bul. praskova = Srb. breskva = Ger. I_Pfirsich = Eng. I_peach (where in the latter the spitting may not be obvious, but when you say ... I_impeach|ment you mean just this) = Fr. peche ('pesh') = It. pesca ('peska'), and << pruna--pruina--I_prishka (or >> pitch), or Bul. round & big plums called afåska |I_afa^ska| (in sing.), or Ger. bonbons I_Praline (in sing.), bc. they are plump, & I_prall in Ger. means tight, swelled, or the disc-ed Rus. I_plod-fruit (& plotþ|I_plot$| -body), or one Ger. plum (they are several kinds), I_Zwetschke (which has to be rel-d to Bul tzvåkvam |I_tzva^kvam| 2(or v.v.)2 what is to burst or drop down, like what the birds drop smm. on our heads; there is also one Bul. jargon for baby-boots, tzvitchki), & so on. In fact, smt. bursting may be found in the very name fruit, which is o. & new Fr. fruit, It. frutto, Ger. Frucht, Lat. I_fructus (a fruit, or product of the soil), if one comp-s it with I_Pfirsich or I_furmi-dates.
To finish with the plums let me add also that there is a Bul. w. for the small & round ones, that are good only to distillate I_raki (that is in Ar., we say rakia, & for you it has to be brandy or whisky but it isn't exactly so), namely I_dzhanka, which is given from Tur. I_can ('dzhan') what is t.s., but this isn't important here (in my view) bc. can in Tur. means mainly a soul and it's smt. nice, where dzhanka is obviously used with contemptuous m-ing like the Eng. ... I_junk (for when it falls down it says 'dzhån' /'dzån'), which is given from o. Fr. jonc which was Lat. I_juncus as a garbage (I found it as a cane & = to junc but that is "from t.s. opera"; << also kankanas). Ah, and to clear a bit more the I_saliva (also Fr. salive); this is what has given the I_salvo, which is I_zalp in Sl. & I_Salve in Ger. (with 'z'), but there is Ger. twin I_Salbe what is your salve (an ointment) & Heb. zalb, & I should add also the Rus. cynical w. I_zalupa as the capitus of the penis, so that: how does this fit together? Well, it isn't difficult, bc. the 1st nature-given ointment was the saliva, and when one spits one gives a salvo of saliva, & that's what does the penis too (though the Rus* surely don't make such analysis saying zalupa, but when the w. was coined smo. has thought this; on the other hand, we may start from lupitþ |I_lupit$|, what is to hit, bestrew with strokes, & what has to be rel-d to the Lat. I_lupus-wolf, but smh. I don't value much this version).
But the r. salv- has given also the I_salvation, of course, which comes from It. & Lat. salvare as to save, and this (though the things are messed with the salt --- << solum) fits good in its m-ing with the idea of peace of the Eastern I_salaam (<< s.). Even the Tur.-Ar. ointment called I_mehlem (known also in Bul.) contains the consonants 'ml' & has to stay not much away from the salve--salive, but there's also the church ... I_psalm, which must perform for the believers the effect of a good salve ('ps' is to keep silence & then comes the salaam-salve). And as far as we ment-d here the w. I_save, and bc. "l" often may disappear (or change to "i" --- << piano), let me explain that it is given from o. Fr. salver, now sauver ('sovè'), & via the Lat. salvare, from an o. Gr. σωζειν (I found σωζω 2(as also some σψζω, what I sup. has to be read 'spzo' --- bc. of the problems in o. Gr. with the let. 'b', now resp. with the 'f', so that let us not stick to the Gr. lang. here, they must have heard the w. from smw.)2 ). Yeah, but the interesting thing is that your Western I_savoiur /savoir (& I don't say "our" bc., as you know, I have my Urrh) is I_Savaoth (there's also the name Sava), what is another & old name for Christos, so that He may also be rel-d to the discussed salving, and to the ... Sabbath (<< & >> S.) too, bc. this day is in a way "saved" (i.e. liberated). ( And I come to the need to dig here bc. of the heard phrase: "Lama sabat-hami", which is o. Heb. & said to mean "Why you, God, left me?", but which might be translated not exactly & mean smt. like: "2(Oh, my)2 teacher 2(-blama 3(>> b.)3 )2, help-save me 2(say, 'hmi' --- >> moi)2". )

~ ~ ~

We shall continue further with other fruits but let us now cast a glance at the Sl. blooming called tzvetenie /protzvetanie (in Rus., or tzåftja |I_tza^ftja| in Bul.), or at the flower button which is I_tzvet (in Rus., or tzvjat, in Bul., kvet in Cz., I_kwiat in Pol., etc., o. Sl.), what carries another idea (though the Rus. etym-sts don't give it, but for me it is obvious), namely that of splitting (not spitting any more), or doubling, or vegetative proliferation. This is easy to be seen if we go to the Ger* where: I_zwei is the number 2, I_Zwist is a quarrel, I_Zweig is a branch or filial, I_Zweifel is a doubt, I_zwicken is to pinch or tweak (surely from zwicken, but you've changed the 1st let. bc. you don't like 'tz' so much as the Teu* like it), I_zwischen is btw., I_Zwerg is a gnome, I_Zwiebel is an I_onion (where onion, b.t.w., is rel-d to the ... I_union), etc.; but it is also Sl., bc. in Bul. we say I_tzvick for the juice of yogurt (it happens, when you take a cup of yogurt, dig a hole in it with a spoon, & wait an hour or so for the juice to separate; << also tzvåkvam |I_tzva^kvam| before), or the Rus* say sveklo /svëkla |I_svekla| (I_tzveklo in Bul.) for the sugar-beet. Not much diff. is the situation in the Eng., but you have to begin with 'tw-', like, say: two, I_twin, I_twig (exactly a branch-Zweig), I_twist, I_tweed (a highly twisted fiber, I sup.), twine (a string made of 2 fibers 2(they should be at least 2 & I think they are 3 but these are details)2 ), etc. (to remind you about Mark I_Twain); but here is also Bul. I_tojaga, what is a cudgel (i.e. again a twig), & we shall return to this very soon on ... I_taiga (where surely many twigs are to be found).
As far as two in Sl. is I_dve (dva, dvoe, etc.), here are other ws like: I_dvor (a ... court) or I_dvoretz (a castle), and here you are quite right to ask: why a court has to be deriv. of the number two? But if you ask yourselves this question you have to find the answer --- bc. you (or I or whoever else) can't have a court if you haven't made a fence, & then you have divided the space in 2 parts; that is also the reason why in Rus. the door is dverþ |I_dver$|, though there is the w. vorota (<< v.) or vrata (what is from the rotation) m-ing t.s. More than this, even the ... motion or movement in Sl. comes from the number 2 bc. the Rus* say dvigatþ(-sja) |I_dvigat$| (I_dvizha 2(se)2 in Bul., etc.) for to move, just bc. we think (I mean, smo. back in the time have thought this, bc. nowadays we don't like much to think) that to move is to make a copy of oneself, to multiply oneself in another place, like the flowers move & leave branches in the process of vegetation (where the splitting in 2 is fixed in the Lat. even on a let. basis, in the let. "v"!). The r. here is I/E. I_duo, which we have already disc-ed, but let me cite also Skr. I_dvayas (2 or twice) & Avs. dvaya (t.s.); and the Sl. court (Ukr. dvir, Cz. dvor, Pol. dvora, etc.) was also old bc. in Skr. I_dvaram was a door, what not only is an exact copy (i.e. v.v.) of the Rus. dverþ, but suggests also the splitting of the space in 2 (dvoitþ |I_dvoit$|), as well as Bul. (o. Sl.) opening of the door (I_otvarjam), & initiates our rotation |I_rotate| (vårtja in Bul.), too.
And now we come to the I_taiga, which is known in many langs (in Asia & wide away), & where the core idea is not only of twisting & twigs but also of ... thawing & curving, where the last 2 things are united bc. when smt. thaws is shrinks & bends down! This is easy to be observed in the Teu. langs where in Ger. we have f.ex.: der I_Tau as a I_dew & das Tau as a I_tow (& one can't unite both these ws without what I have just explained bc. there is ntg. else in common btw. a thick string & drops of water), then I_Teich ('taih') is a small lake, I_Teig is a dough, & so on. But there are also Sl. rel-d ws (come to think of it) as: Rus. tajatþ |I_tajat$| what is to thaw (in Bul. we say I_topja 2(se)2, what has to be rel-d to our I_topka what is a ball 2(bc. it says 'top-top' jumping on the ground)2 & it is very curved, I mean, regularly & incessantly), or the strange (as Sl. building) deriv. taëzhnûj |I_taezhnu^j| ('tajozhnûj', not tajgovûj) as smt. rel-d to the taiga (what moves the w. very close to tajatþ-to-thaw), or also Bul. I_toplina /Rus. teplota /ets. (c. Sl.) meaning warmth (the cause for to topja-thaw smt.), or Bul. (Sl.) I_utajka (ou + Tau-dew), what is a sediment, or Rus. verb taitþ /utaitþ m-ing to hide smt. (from here I_tajna is a secret), what uses t.s. picture. Or I may remind you the Eng. ws: I_tide, tidy, I_tier, to tie or a tie (here the point is in the towing not in the thawing), then the I_typhoon & the I_tycoon (tossing people around like a typhoon), from here we may come to the theme & the time, but we've disc-ed them (<< temja or Tempel).
This r. is very old & widely-spread, especially the I_taiga is tajga in Rus., & also in the Altai-region (if we don't bother whether it's with "i" or "j", or "g" or "γ"); in many southern & eastern Republics of the former USSR, though, it smm. means a mountain (but it is also curved) & may be shorten to just tau. Here deserve to be ment-d also: the I_Thai (& Thailand --- either bc. there are mountains there, or/& bc. the climate is taiga-like), the island I_Taiwan (poss. they often have typhoons there?), also Ger. I_Taube, what is a pigeon (bc. it makes waves in the air), poss. Ger. I_taub what is deaf (bc. he doesn't hear the 'top-top' of the topka-ball; to add that though in Rus. the ball is from diff. r. they use topatþ |I_topat$| as jargon for to walk or run; and we have spoken about tun/tat--done, so that a deaf person may be meant as "done" in a way 2(or as Bul. tåp = to your stupid; or smt. of the kind)2 ). Then the Ger valley is I_Tal (smt. tajalûj-thawed), then there is Bul. I_top m-ing a gun, & Rus. topþ |I_top$| m-ing a bog, & there was an o. Tur.-Ar. (acc. to the Koran) I_tair m-ing a bird (an animal with wings). And there is also your ... typing, bc. a I_type is smt. that one presses in order to make a copy (or hits the keys of the typewriter), this is like the thawing or making of waves. And now we come to just the symbol for sim-ty, the sigh "~", or the Gr. let. I_tau ("τ"; even in "θ" the tilde-wave is present), & from here also to the I_tautology (repeating, making copies), & other examples. ( Smm. "t" is changed to "s" what gives Rus. I_suk as variety of the twig, bc. that is what it means. ) But I would add also smt. else, with the supposition that taj- is written in this way but read in Eng. as I_taj, then this becomes one special Muslim head-wear usual for ... I_Tadzhikistan, of course, what reminds me also the mausoleum I_Taj-Mahal ("The Great Cupola-taj"); this Muslim hat in Rus. is called I_tjubetejka, what surely comes from the Tibet-mountain. This looks like a coincidence with τ--taiga--Taube--etc. bc. taj isn't stepped on but sticks out, but then --- the image may be inverted! If this isn't exactly so then I still don't feel defeated bc. these might be opposed notions (like cap -- cup, to what we shall also come); besides, there might be hidden rel-ns to smt. honoured, great, touched or touching, for what purposes comp. 'tadz-' with I_tacha & chtitþ (to honour), teka-to-flow, the tact, I_touch which is Fr. touché, etc.

~ ~ ~

Now let us continue with the growing in Sl. what is I_rasti /rastët in Rus., & rost is a growth or rostok is a spray (young stem) there, & I_rastenie is a plant (not as factory, of course; you show here good imagination but this may lead to confusion bc. a vegetation is one thing, & a factory quite another), & I_roshcha is a small grove, but this is o. & c. Sl. (rasta is to grow, råst is human statute in Bul., rusti in Cz. means to grow, I_roshch in Pol. is a rost-growth, etc.), as it is also Skr., where rhnoti was to grow, heave up, & riñoti |I_rinoti| was to leave it to run, giving also your to I_run, or Lat. I_rivus (a I_river), to what we shall come later again. From the last ws you see that this r. isn't unknown on the West, but as a plant it is known just as one definite kind that comes from the East, namely the ... I_Reis in Ger. or rice in Eng. or ris /riz in o./new Fr. or riso in It. or I_oryza in Lat. (ris in Rus., oriz in Bul., etc.); though here surely is also the race (Fr., or I_Rasse in Ger., or rasa in Sl.) bc. it grows; & I would put here also Bul. I_riza, what is a shirt (for t.s. reason, although this is near to Rus. I_rubashka, what is your & Lat. I_robe, but there are nuances, bc. a clerical robe is I_raso in church-Sl. & in riza we have t.s. r., where rub-, though sim., shows a friction).
But growing is one thing and ... cutting (of what grows) is another one; though, still, these are rel-d notions, what may be seen in Rus. by the parallel I_rasti -- rezatþ |I_rezat$| (or I_rezha in Bul., to cut), or even in their (c. Sl.) particle I_raz (once, one piece or look or try, mal in Ger.), what is meant as one scratch or stroke; the latter may be used also as prefix (raz- /ras-) when it suggests a step or stroke, from here a distance in Rus. is I_rasstojanie (where stojatþ is to stand). Then, if we go to the Ger*, we may find their I_Rasen ('razen', given as c. Teu. but with unclear etym-gy), what is a meadow (& it needs cutting, doesn't it?); or, if we go to the Fr*, then we surely will find their I_raison ('rezo~', or raisoner as to think), & if one isn't convinced that to reason is to cut like with a I_razor-blade I may cite also Ger. I_rasieren (to shave 2(the beard-"Rasen")2 ) or Fr. raser ('razè' t.s., & rasoir is the blade ); then our Sl. I_razum m-ing brains, thoughts, may be looked at as combination of the Fr. raison & the Sl. I_um. But there are more ws, bc. in Ger. I_Reise ('raize') is a tour, trip, excursion, what is given as c. Teu. (Sw. resa, Eng. to rise) & Blt.-Sl., & very near to this is their reißen |I_reissen| /riß (this time with "s", to I_tear --- you see, you have left with only the let. "r" from this r. & you don't even pronounce it), or the variety I_Reiz /reizen (with 'tz', a charm, beauty, but so strong that it as if tears you in pieces /or to enchant, inflame); to add that the rice in Ger. is der-"he", but as das-"it" I_Reis means a branch or young twig. Ah, & when one walks on Reisetours he often needs I_rest, what in Ger. is I_Rast, what turns out to have been a measure for distance (a kind of scratch on the ground, or a stick /post, giving the I_Post as such) bc. there was Got. rasta (some distance in miles), which has gives o. Rus. I_rasteg as a sim. linear measure (but I can't tell you how long it was); there is also Ger. (accepted in Sl. too) I_Raster (the distance btw. 2 adjacent pixels or tiny lines on a screen or graphic), which was Lat. raster m-ing there ... a pick as gardening tool.
OK, and one concrete plant that grows & winds & needs rjazane-cutting is the grape, but as far as your w. speaks only about some grains or grasping them we shall start from Ger. I_Traube m-ing the same (i.e. a cluster, bunch, as well as wine grapes; it is so also in Bul. grozde, but in Rus. there are diff. ws: grozdþ for the cluster, & winograd for the wine-grapes). The Ger. etym-sts I use say this was local Ger. & Hol. (druif there) w. m-ing a lump, bunch, but with unclear etym-gy, though I hope to clear now at least the ideas hidden there, and the further branches in the etym-cal tree. Let me 1st point out the idea for granulating, which, bc. of the hidden in the r. scratching, exists in the Traube (& is poss. rel-d there with trauen-believing 2(the trusty people are closely rel-d like the grains of a grape; << t. & drugar-friend)2 ), what is true for the I_grape too ('trb' --> 'grp', if we count only the consonants), as also for the I_grozde, &, m.o.l., for the I_winograd (if we split it in: vino + grozdþ, or better + ogorod-garden). Then if we change 'b' to 'f' in the Ger. we come to I_triefen (troff, getroffen) as to flow, I_drip, or also to tropfen /tröpfeln as only to drip (resp. I_Tropfen is a I_drop, and they like to use the phrase|I_phrases|: ein guter Tropfen for a good wine), but here is also the stepping upon & the trotting (in making of the wine) bc. of their treten (trat, getreten) or the variety trotten (>> Treppe). And as far as the grozde & the grape grow, so the winograd & the wine-plant (what is Lat. vinum = I_vino as a wine, coming from vinea as wine-plant) wind up (giving the vint-screw & the I_vintage), as much as, I sup., Fr. I_raisin ('reze~') as grape (giving your raisins as only dried grapes 2(which in Ger. bear the strange name I_Rosine|n)2 ) rastët-grows /rises. But there is more to be said here, namely one ... name, poss. Gr. but known in Bul., which is closely rel-d with the vineyards --- Trifon Zarezàn (though the Rus* have their Trofim what etym-ly is t.s.), who is a saint celebrated on 1 Feb., when rjazane-cutting of the wine plants is usually done (the very beg-ing of the spring), and his name just triefst-drips with Trauben-grape juice.

~ ~ ~

Now let us speak about groups of plants or thickets. Though not exactly the latter w. which is just smt. thick or wild (<< dick), and neither about groups which are smt. gathered together bc. of a scratching or grasping. What I mean is to begin with Ger. I_Kitsch, which is now known in many langs as smt. inappropriate in our cloths or house design, which is given as arisen in new times (19th cent.) from a I_colloquial (smt. local, not officially recognized, b.t.w.) kitschen as to smooth or make even the face of smt., but I think there is more than this. Staying in the Ger. there is their (not Eng.) kitten as to fill an interface (with a I_Kitt-putty), what has been generalized to the Eng. I_kit (as every needed instrument, or set of them), but also, I sup., to your ... I_kitchen (which surely is Ger. Küche |I_Kueche|, & Rus. etc. kuhnja, but you have modified the w. stressing not so much on the cooking as on the many kits for that purpose which are to be found there). The r., however, is much older bc. in Bul. we say I_kitka for a bunch (bouquet) of flowers, or I_kicha (se) /zakichvam (se) for to make oneself beautiful (presumably with a flower), or I_kichur (a lock of hairs), and this isn't Sl., we (i.e. the old Bul*) have carried it with us coming from smw. around the Pamirs, & it has given derivs in diff. langs, like: Ger. I_Kittel (literally taken in Rus. as kitelþ, a man's jacket or waistcoat, i.e. some picturesque cloth), an o. Rus. ... town I_Kitezh (from some fairy tales), would-be sunken in Svetlûj Jar lake, poss. Ger. I_kitzeln (to tickle, presumably with a straw; though >> also klitzen), & maybe others. ( Smh. sim. to this is one Tur. w., I_gidi 2(gidija in Bul.), m-ing a brave, courageous, or clever man, which w. makes strange rel-n 2(in my view, that's it)2 with Ger. I_gedeihen /gediehen, what is to procreate, grow, overcome, and the strange thing is that there is now no Ger. "deihen /diehen" 2("ge-" being there common prefix)2, & the etym-sts cite: Got. gadheihan, o. high-Ger. gedihan, Hol. gedijen, o. Eng. gedhion --- hence the name I_Gedhion --- all this with m-ing of growing & hardening. If we start from dieg- we may come to the dyke & diga 2(<< them)2, but I think it is poss. to derive it also from gid- /kit- as a growing 2(branch of a)2 plant, smt. sticking out or ahead, & then here has to be also the known I_guide, which is Fr., but the Rus*, too, say I_gid. And having come to this I may as well ment. one Bul. conversational w., gådelichkam, what is to tickle 2(Ger. kitzeln)2, which isn't Sl. & is poss. of Tur. origin, arisen from gådel |I_ga^del| or making 'gådi-gådi', what is that slow movement with fingers, up & down; from here is the name of one Bul.-Eastern string musical instrument, gådulka, where t.s. idea of gådel-ing is minded. )
So, and under thicket I mean Rus. I_kust or kustarnik (t.s.), which phonetically isn't much away from the I_kitka-bunch, & which is o. & c. Sl. (Ukr. kust or kusht, o. Sl. koup as a heap, etc., though in Bul. we say hrast for a thicket), & Blt. (kuokstas /I_kukstas as a hay-stack), but this leads us to the cut /kåt |I_ka^t| r., which I still (<< I_kucha or I_kuczki) am just ment-ing. Here must be also your I_custom, as smt. rel-d to the local community (>> also costa & custos), then surely the customer, bc. he /she is accustomed to the things he buys (where in Ger. he is der I_Kunde, masc., and die Kunde, fem., is an information, knowledge, so that for them the client is that who gives the important information about the wares that are being sold, or that he is the only important info for the seller; where your-Fr. w. I_client says us only that he/she is smt. that may be ... modeled however one wishes 2(<< clay)2, but that was b.t.w.). ( Officially the custom is derived from Lat. consuetudinem, from consuescere, to be split in: con + some sui 2(Gen. case, sing., from oneself --- << svat or socer)2, what is to t.s. idea 2(hence the people have thought my thoughts, i.e. v.v.)2 but puts it in a more complicated way. )
What I wanted to stress on, however, is the rel-n to our Sl. art, which is I_iskusstvo in Rus. (izkustvo in Bul., o. Sl. iskous /iskousiti), from here iskusnûj is masterful, kustarþ |I_kustar$| is obsolete Rus. w. for an artisan, craftsman, & kustodej is also obsolete for charodej what is a magician, & in Ukr. I_kusiti is to try, experiment, but here is also the I_iskushenie, what is a ... temptation (to taste a little, to bite a small morsel), &, on the other hand, this is Ger. I_Kunst (again an art)! The idea here (in my view) is that the artisan works alone or isolated, not like in the big factories nowadays, he is a free lancer, but he also produces small samples of things, like thickets here & there. Sim. to the kust-thicket sounds also Rus. kistþ |I_kist$|, what is a palm of the hand (you say also I_wrist, bc. it writhes) or a paint brush (kistochka, if it's small), & in Bul. we use t.s. w. kitka (of the hand) for the wrist (t.s. as for the bouquet), so that 'kus- /kit- /kåt-' may be one & t.s. r.. And in order to complicate even more the things I will ment. also Bul. jargon I_kunka as palm of the hand, & another jargon (children one, or used by enamoured persons), I_gunkam, m-ing to embrace or hug (with kunki-arms), which seems (to me) rel-d to Ger. I_Gunst (a favour, support, or mercy; from here zugunsten is prep. m-ing "in favour of"), which in turn is (officially) rel-d to the I_Kunst-art (that is usually done with kitki-hands).
In this sense (of strong wish or desire-I_Gunst) has to be also Ger. Gönner (a supporter, patron, guardian), or gönnen |I_goennen| as to support, have favour for, give out of good heart, what, together with I_gunkam-to-hug, might as well have arisen in ancient times as imit. of some ... 'gu-gu' (coo for you), what the children & the pigeons use to say when they are happy. Yeah, it might be so, though the etym-sts give here a building from ge + unnan is sense of sticking to some union, & from here to allow oneself smt., what seems (to me) very moralizing (but it is in accordance with the Teu. psyche); they ment. the rel-n of Gunst with Kunst & then with können-to-can |I_koennen| (what supports my including of the I_kunka-hand here), where I sup. the Gunst is not so much in what one can as in what one wants to grasp or take for himself (bc. gnutþ |I_gnut$| in Rus. is to twist or bend down --- << gnatþ |I_gnat$|). Or we may take also Ger. vergnügen |I_vergnuegen| m-ing to entertain, have fun, resp. as noun V. is an entertainment (though they haven't now any gnügen). However it may be, it is interesting to ment. that the Turks have the w. gön |I_goen|, what is a ... hard leather (usually for shoe-soles), & I sup. the idea of guarding or supporting with the gön fits well with Ger. Gönner (though, if you take the 1st syl. away, as ge+unnan, it doesn't). But I have ment-d this Tur. w. also bc. they like much such cooing sounds, like, f.ex.: güven |I_gueven| is a trust (from here güvendi, or I_gjuvendija as archaic in Bul., is a girl-friend 2(though we take her for prostitute bc. she is usually paid for her favours)2 ), güveç |I_guevech| is a tasty meal baked in a pottery cup covered with a lid (& this pottery, too 2(though etym-cally this has to come from the cow meat usually put in the pot --- >> gaus)2 ), gül |I_guel| (from Per.) is a rose, & others (>> ogle).
Ah, but the thickets may scratch or catch or even (partly) skin us, if we are not careful enough while going through them, so let me put here some remarks about the I_derma-skin, which is the known (I sup.) o. Gr. δερμα m-ing: a skin, shell, moss, i.e. smt. that can be torn --- bc. it is rel-d to the tearing (of the skin) called δερω, where from in new Gr. δερασ is a skin or I_fell (what, b.t.w., tells us that the Eng* think it either falls of itself 2(as is the case with the snakes)2, or, & I think this is the most probable, the best fleeces --- hence count also the I_fleece --- come from the family of I_feline|s 2(that are sup-edly fallen down)2, where are the lions), & here is also the dermatology. Your I_tear|ing has to be also from here but it isn't so obvious as is with Rus. dratþ |I_drat$|, or Bul. I_dera, etc. in the Sl. langs, m-ing t.s. (and bc. I_kozha is a skin 2(what isn't away from the I_coat, b.t.w.)2 so kozhoder is a hide-skinner); then here has to be also the Sl. fell, more precisely the fleece, in the form of I_runo (what also isn't obvious, but I sup. it might have went via some hypothetical 'derono' & then been shortened to 'rono'), & I_dripi (torn clothes in Bul.) or I_golodranetz (a pauper in torn clothes in Rus., dripljo in Bul.), & the tree I_drjan or drenka (in Bul., or dren in Srb., though diff. in Rus., a dogwood), etc. In Ger. the tearing is diff. (I_schinden /schund, near to your I_skin) but there is smt. left of this imit. cluster bc. I_Dorn is I_thorn (& Dornrose is the wild rose, & Dornröschen is the Sleeping Beauty from the fairy tale), & such is the case also in Sl. where the thorn is trån |I_tra^n| in Bul., or I_ternovnik /tërn in Rus. (though the I_hawthorn is bojarûshnik |I_bojaru^shnik|, what starts from I_boljarin 2(old title of a ruler)2, poss. bc. the Rus* just like very much this red colour). There is also Tur. & Per. I_dere (known in Bul. too), what is a small river or a gully, which is poss. rel-d to their I_derece (read 'deredzhe', from Ar. origin) m-ing a situation, usually bad one (and I think this is rel-d bc. of the idea of falling in the mud or lokva-lock), and surely many other ws but this must be enough for an imit. cluster.

~ ~ ~

OK, and now let us move to some parts of the plants, where we have already ment-d the leaves (<< leaf, list, Blatt) so that I may say smt. about the stem. This is again an imit. cluster (of some squeezing or smashing so that the air comes out, or of sticking smt. smw., etc.), but not only a pure imit., and here may be cited, say: Lat. I_stipo (-are, to stick in or fill, hence also your I_stipulate, & Ger. I_stiften 2(to set the foundations of smt., meant as planting a tree)2 too 2(&, come to think of it, also Bul. I_shtipja or Rus. shchipatþ as to pinch, what is the inverted action)2 ), or Lat. I_stipula (a I_straw, where your w. comes from Ger. I_Stroh, but it correl-s better with Bul. stårcha-to-stick-out |I_sta^rcha|, << st.), or Lat. stipes (a stem, I_Stamm in Ger.), or Rus. I_stvol (a stem or tree-trunk), or Bul. ståblo |I_sta^blo| (t.s.; but this reminds me about your I_stable, then I_establish, what is Fr., though we shall dig here more on Stab), or Rus. I_soloma /solominka (slama in Bul., a straw), etc. And bc. the stipula--stem--straw supports the crown &/or the leaves and sucks fluids from the earth here has to be ment-d also the ... I_stipendium (though in Eng. you very rare say a stipend & prefer to use the w. scholarship). It might be interesting to ment. also the Ger. pair I_stauen & I_staunen, where the 1st is to stop or hold water with a dam (one of the m-ings of the Eng. to stem, but this Ger. w. has to be the source for the Eng. to I_stow), & the 2nd is to stare. Here are the I_stand|ing, staying, etc., in many langs, but this isn't interesting, so let us keep our attention only around the strength (of the stem, hence the I_stamina too) & the I_step|ping above, in which way we come to, say: Ger. I_stumpf (blunt), their I_Stempel (a stamp, but not as post-stamp), I_stampfen (to tread, tramp, step upon), then the I_steel, though not exactly in the Eng. /Ger. form (of smt. still, silent, or stagnated; it is I_Stahl in Ger., stalþ in Rus.) but as Bul. I_stomana (t.s.), what is better bc. it is nearer to o. Gr. στομωσισ (sharpness, hardness, tempering of steel) or new Gr. στομανο (a steel).
But this isn't all I wanted to tell you bc. here, surely, is the I_stomach (exactly o. Gr. στομαχοσ & Bul. stomah, though not so in Rus. --- << zhivot), and while some of you wonder what may rel. the stem & the steel with the stomach I shall add also the ... I_stomatology (bc., obviously, it sounds in t.s. way), & one special container for fluids (like a mug but not exactly) called in Bul. I_stomna, what is o. Gr. σταμνοσ (or new σταμνα). If you start here with the image of the teeth as kind of steel-like stems (what smm. works, &, f.ex., in Ger. the dandelion is Löwenzahn |I_Loewenzahn| 2(lion's teeth)2 bc. its leaves stick out of the earth like teeth; you have retained the lion but added some dandy bc. it just looks beautiful) you will get to nowhere here bc. there, surely, are no teeth in the stomach (neither in the stomna); but I have said before that the main idea is that of squeezing or smashing what makes this hissing sound (<< hysteria; & I may add also Gr. χιστεμι as to put or I_set --- ah, there is a hissing in your set, too), so that in this sense the stomach & the stomna are just strong containers, and the teeth have ntg. to do here, they just happen to be in the mouth, bc. in o. Gr. στομα. was a mouth or throat (also a face, or a speech), & στομιον was an entrance or just a hole (also key-hole).
On the other hand, when the stem is too high (like a tree-trunk), or also when the hole is big enough, then smt. may slide down (comp. with ski -- sky) or escape (from Fr. I_escapade), or just scape (although for you this isn't used as verb but it is meant that smt. may fall down), or become, as we in Bul. say (illiterate), I_skapan (bad, foul, meant as spoiled fruit). I ment. this here bc. I want to clear the point with the ... I_scapegoat, which is bouc emissaire in Fr. (a bouc-goat used as an emissary for smb. else), Sündenbock |I_Suendenbock| in Ger. (Sünde is a sin, & Bock is a goat), izkupitelna zhertva in Bul. (a sacrifice to compensate for the wrong doings of smb. else, from kupuvam-to-buy), & kozël otpushchenija in Rus. (smt. sim.). There has to be an old fable about tormenting some donkey for the sins of his master, or, if we go further back in the time, about hitting the columns of some cathedral with sticks bc. the people were angry to the gods, and no matter that this leads to ntg., and is just a silly behaviour, we continue, still, to apply this method very often. Psychologically this surely helps a little, but it's on the reasoning level of children or animals (like, say: why the wolfs cry at the moon?; if you have asked yourselves this question you have to have come to the answer, that they, poss., think the moon might be smt. ... tasty what they can't reach & that makes them angry). Even if I understand this I can't help wondering how silly we are, on the whole, but this, surely, is not to the point of our disc-on.

~ ~ ~

So our disc-on continues with the I_root|s of the plants, though not exactly of this r., which is Lat. I_radix (but << radius), giving also, say: Ger. I_Radieschen (a radish), Rus. rediska or I_repa (rjapa in Bul., exactly la rapa in It., a I_turnip --- you may ... turn it however you like & it looks t.s., ah?), etc; neither the Sl. r. called I_koren, to what we shall come after a while (bc. this isn't so much a root of a plant as is its bark --- I mean, a r. has also an outer covering), but of the kind of the most tasteful r., the I_carrot. Here we shall start with o. Gr. κερατο or κερασ what is a I_horn (& you see how near this is to the corn & koren, to what, as I said, we shall come soon), what surely has given the known I_carotin (pro-vitamin A found in the carrots), also Tur. I_kereste (with primarily m-ing of wooden material used in construction works, or thick leather for shoes, smt. hard & rough, but as cynical jargon 2(heard also in Bul., kereste)2 this is a synonym for the penis 2(where for t.s. purpose the Ger* use the idiom Süßholz |I_Suessholz| 3(mit jemandem reiben)3, i.e.: to rub the "sugary twig")2 ). But the Sl. horn called I_rog has also to be here (though it doesn't sound near to the Gr. w. but it simply has to be from there); and then we go to the West where some "rogs" are also to be found, albeit in diff. m-ing. Well, the m-ing is not much diff. bc. this is in the sense of some pricking with horns (down-up), or hitting below the belt, as can be seen by the Fr. I_arrogant (known all around the world & m-ing a person who rises his horn or nose too high), or in the Eng. I_rogue, who in Sl. is called I_moshenik (in Bul, but in Rus. it's t.s. only with two "n") & comes from I_mushkam (Bul., to prick or stick, but sim. is the known Fr. ... I_musket /musketeer, so that the r. has to be old & Eastern).
To become sure that in the Western "rog" t.s. Sl. I_rog-horn is hidden I may add that in Fr. the primarily m-ing of their rogue ('rogè') is to cast fish-I_roe (if you are a fish, or course, & a feminine one; so that your roe has to be shortened from this Fr. w.), & here you can't do without the picture of the I_cornucopia (throwing out caviar or whatever one wants). And do you know what give the Eng. etym-sts for your rogue? Ah, they say the w. has arisen in 16th cent., was artificially coined to signify ... vagabonds & paupers (with old variants: rog, rogge, rooge, roog, roge, & roague 2(& you guess how these ws have to be read bc. I can't do this)2 ), and has ntg. to do with the Fr. rogue. But then, I'll ask, how have they (the o. Britons) come to this r., not to some other, if there was not some hidden m-ing rel-d with this s-ing? ( If I am not in error, the w. Roger is used in radio communications as a kind of full stop bc. it is short & sounds like a click, but this is not our case. ) And even if the o. Eng* didn't have liked enough the o. Fr*, for to accept their rogue & modify its m-ing, there were Lat.: I_rogo (to beg or ask), I_rogatio (a question, plea, or law bill), or rogator (one who asks or I_interrogate|s --- so you see that the Eng* have very well known this r.); but to interrogate is, as you say it also in another way, to I_bother (for what << I_bodhati or bodatþ |I_bodat$|, where the latter is t.s. as the just cited I_mushkam)! Then to remind you about the derogation |I_derogate|; and there was also a Lat. rogus as a pyre or tomb, what can also (having accepted the idea of bothering as pricking with horns) be explained as some rogatio-plea to the gods to be merciful over our dead. So that the things are rel-d, though not in strictly etym-cal sense; and that the Eng. rogue is regarded as a kind of goat may be seen also in Ger. I_Spitzbube (where spitz is sharp, & I_Bube is a boy), what is a valet in card games but also moshenik-rogue (or I_swindler, what in its turn has to be rel-d to the ... swine, I sup. 2(or winding-twisting)2; or a scoundrel, what speaks about his scandalous behaviour).
The "I_rog" may not always be hard, but then it has to be smt. that at least sticks out, like in Gr. ρογα what is a ... nipple (& it isn't very soft, as far as t.s. w. is used also in technical m-ing); in t.s. way the kereste-"carrot" may also be a bit soft, but then it has at least to be used for rubbing, as is the case with Lat. I_cero (-are, -atum), what means to rub --- & this, or, more precisely, the chemical name I_ceresin (a mountain-wax), is given as source for Rus. I_kerosin (aviation petrol). So exceptions are poss., but in most cases these are some hard parts of plants; and now we move to sim. hard things like the Rus. I_koren-root, where are many more ws as, e.g.: Fr. I_cornichone (small cucumber with pimples), which comes from their corne m-ing a I_horn, but here is also your I_corn = to Ger. I_Korn as a grain (bc. corn is corny 2(isn't it?)2, & also bc. the wheat plants & grass in general have small sticking out spikes; Ger. Korn is used also as synonym for vodka, bc. it is made out of corn 2(i.e., it has to be so, if not faked)2 ), & surely the I_corner (made popular world-wide with the football games), & Fr. cornet (= to Ger. Horn & your horn; from here is Ger. musical instrumentI_ Waldhorn), & the shortly ment-d I_cornucopia (a horn making many copies of what is there). To continue with Bul. korniz, which is Fr. I_corniche (a cornice 2(but in Bul. we deliberately pronounce it 'kUrniz', bc. I_kur is a penis & niz 3(in Rus., but the r. is Sl.)3 is down)2, which w. was built adding the niche, bc. curtains initially were put in niches), & Bul. adj. I_korav (hard; what some jokers again say as 'kurav' implying a rel-n with the kur 2(where other & more profound ideas are hidden, to which we shall come later)2 ), & I_kora (a bark) or Rus. diminutives korka, korochka (usually of bread), & surely the well known I_cork (being also Heb., where kore was a bark & korek was a cork or a fuse), & so on.
At this point it would be good if some of you will ask yourselves the question: why the I_koren-root & the I_kora-bark must be derivs? But this isn't difficult & we have spoken several times about dual images uniting some polar notions; and if you are not convinced that these are dialectically opposed things then I may remind you also Fr. I_coeur ('kjor", a heart), what is Lat. cor /cordis (t.s.) coming from o. Gr. κηρ = κεαρ (again a heart), though in Eng. it has changed its m-ing a little & become a I_core (or I_Kern in Ger., what is sim. 2(from here Kernphysik is nuclear physics)2 ), and then the core & the bark are, clearly, opposed notions. So, but the core is not always a heart (<< I_korem-belly), & here is the I_coral (made of kind of horns) & the I_corral (smt. like kora-bark encircling the core area; taken in Rus. as koralþ), & the Fr. I_courage (smt. hard or corny 2(or "kur"-ny, if you like)2 ), & the decoration (Lat. I_decorum, decora in pl.), which is smt. that changes the core, etc. Poss. also Tur. kör |I_koer| (kjorav in Bul., blind) may be ment-d here (if you think that this is in the sense of closed bc he/she can't see the outside world); from here kör-sokak is a cul-de-sac, kör-sofra is a free meal, & kör-fişek |I_fishek| are fireworks but usually used contemptuously (like, say, applied to the democracy).
Then, having come to the Turks, why not to recall you their ... I_Koran (as a core of laws & moral, Kuran in Tur.)? I am not an orientalist (& my point, anyway, isn't in going into details) so I will not disc. in full the m-ing of the r. kor- /kur- in Tur., but I may ment. that it has m.o.l. sim. m-ing of smt. hard (like I_kurnaz, what is given as clever, but in Bul. it is to be heard mostly as boastful, sticking out as person), or of smt. thrown (say, a die cast, bc. kur'a is a lot), or, & this is a new nuance, of smt. ... baked (to become hard --- bc. I_kurak is dry, & from here is their 2(Ar.)2 I_kurabiye, what is a cake or cookie 2(what comes in turn from Ger. I_Kuchen, what is from their Küche-kitchen |I_Kueche|)2, & I_pechenje in Rus. 2(from pechþ as to bake)2 ). And now, look: the Tur* live on the south, for them dry weather is smt usual, not bad, & that is why in Eng. a I_desert (a w. from another r.) is an area without water, but under deserts (in pl.) are usually understood not many such areas but smt. that one deserves (having "baked his case" well), and at t.s. time a I_dessert is smt. sweet, what has to carry t.s. Tur.-Ar. idea of well baked Kuchen-cake; with t.s. idea in their heads the ancient Rom* must have built the ... I_dissertation (the etym-sts give here the splitting dis + I_sero, where the latter meant to unite or twine, hence with dis- the m-ing must be negated to disentangle 2(we shall dig here more on serum)2 but for me this isn't very convincing, where the rel-n with the dessert is obvious). In short, for the Tur* if smt. is "kura" it is usually good, & this has to be true also for their I_kurban (a good eating, though primarily meant as sacrifice, but it was baked, not eaten raw), or kurdişi |I_kurdishi| (archaic kurdisvam in Bul. m-ing to sit, what is given from kurmak as to built, set, establish), or I_kurgan (burial mound), but the things are meshed with the curving, about what I said smt. before (<< Kürbis |I_Kuerbis| or Korb), bc. the Koran may be a twin to the Heb. Torah and the kurban in Latin becomes I_corban.
But let us return to the I_coeur-I_heart, which in Ger. is I_Herz, & in Rus. is I_serdtze (sårtze in Bul., etc., o. Sl. srådþtze), & together with the Lat.-Gr. cor is given from I/G. r. kerd- (again a heart), where was an o. Prussian seyr (t.s.), & so on, up to a Skr. I_hrd ('hrþd' bc. it has a point over the "r") or hrdayam, or Avs. zåråd (t.s.). It is clear that this is smt. I_hard & screeching, and I may add also some Tur. ws, like: I_sert (hard), I_serbez (commanding, intolerant, sharp, not easy-going 2(the 2nd syl. corresponds very well with Ger. böse |I_boese|, what is angry, not content with anything)2 ), & I_sersem (a puddenhead, strange, not like the others). ( It surely is a coincidence that a man called Heindrich Herz has invented the electrical vibrator & in honour to him the frequency of electrical current is measured in I_hertz, but I am not sure whether he didn't have lived under the aura of his name bc. his mechanism is a kind of Herz; the strange rel-n in the Ger. of Herz with I_Scherz 2(a joke)2 has also to be taken for coincidence 2(the etym-sts cite o. Teu. scharz as a jump, or schurz as a run 3(now I_Sturz is a falling down)3, as also the known It. musical term I_scherzo 3(read 'skertzo', like the scholar)3, so that the idea is of jumping, not exactly of pulsating)2 but the screeching or squeaking 2(or a laugh in the case of Scherz)2 may as well rel. them. )

~ ~ ~

So that was about the diff. parts of plants and now we come to some concrete names, but only to the most interesting & carrying instructive or curious ideas. Let us take the shortly ment-d cucumber, but this time as Rus. I_oguretz. In fact this is Ger. I_Gurke & Eng. I_gherkin, but I begin with Sl. w. (though, as an exception, not Bul.) bc. the w. is c. Sl. (Pol. ogorek, Cz. okurka, etc.), and from here, via the western Sl*, it has given birth to: Sw. gurka, Dan. agurk, It. I_augura, Fr. augouvire ('oguvir' --- smt. begins to stick up, to cock, << virja or virilis), etc. Still, the Slavs have not alone coined this w. but heard smt. from the Gr*, where αγουροσ (now read 'aguros') means green, not ripe (or a young boy), coming from o. Gr. αωροσ as not ripe, precocious (& you see, b.t.w., that "γ" may arise or disappear or not be read, & later on, in It., "g" is used for softening, like in signore). This clearly tells us (if we have not known it before) that gherkins have to be eaten before they ripen, but the point is that in the Sl. langs of t.s. r. is the w. bitter --- gorþkij |I_gor$kij| in Rus. (&, hmm, I sup. that this has to be the reason why the Rus. ... writer Maksim Gorki has written mostly bitter stories, ah?), girkij in Ukr., goržki |I_gorzki| in Pol., horky in Cz., gorchiv in Bul., etc., o. Sl. gorþk, and I may continue with an o. Irish goirt (again bitter), & nearly t.s. Ger. I_garstig (not exactly bitter but: bad, spoiled, burned; from here they have the obsolete w. Garküche |I_Garkueche| as cheap pub or canteen). I am practically convinced that this gorþkij taste (from here the mustard in Rus. is gorchitza) comes from the gherkins, though the etym-sts rel. the bitterness to the burning; but, if so, there are several ideas mixed here, bc.: αγουροσ is very near to the αγορα |I_agora|, what we disc-ed on I_gora-forest & I_gorja-to-burn (or gären |I_gaeren| as to boil or ferment), there is also the curving or corning (bc. they are wry and with pimples, not as the long ones) & a hump in Rus. is exactly I_gorb, the bitter taste is as if smt. wry & this 'grr-' is smt. what we usually say when we are not satisfied (you have changed it to 'brr-' in Teu. I_bitter 2(though there the idea of some biting bc. of the cold might have a precedence)2 ) --- so that I continue to think I am right.
I may add even more ws here, like: o. Gr. αοροσ (omicron instead of omega) what was ... a dream (& it may be taken for smt. not ripened, not yet real life, smt. precocious or predictive), or their οροσ |I_oros|, what was: a forest or mountain (= to the Sl. gora) but also ... curds (i.e. smt. twisted & shrunken, what in Bul. is gårchav |I_ga^rchav|, what is a twin with gorchiv-bitter) & also a boundary (where you scratch or dig the earth to mark it; but >> again oros for smt. piquant), so that we now return to the ploughing in the form of (ment-d) Lat. I_aro or your arable where has to be some o. Gr. αροω (t.s., but I couldn't find it in a dict., though I found αροω = αραω as to see, distinguish, maybe the border lines?). Then to say smt. also about the I_cucumber. It is I_cocomero in It., cogombe in Port., etc., up to Lat. I_cucumer or cucumis (& cucumerarium --- nice w., ah? --- was a cucumber-field), to add also Lat. cucuma as a ... night-pot, where surely the wry or shrunken form comes into play (what we shall continue on I_kuka-hook 2(for cucuma, in my view, some funny assocs with the cuckoo are also poss. but that is to t.s. idea)2 ).

~ ~ ~

We have finished with the cucumbers, but I would like to come from here to the opposite of Gr. αγουροσ-non-ripen what is πεπων |I_pepo^n| (ripe, soft, juicy, nice), what has given Bul. (not Rus. or Sl.) ... melon, which is called påpesh |I_pa^pesh| (πεπονι(α) in new Gr.), & also påpka |I_pa^pka| is a flower-button (again not c. Sl.). Having come to the I_melon let me remind you that your & Teu. name for this fruit --- though I don't know whether you count it for a fruit or for a vegetable, this isn't clear in Bul., too, and the Rus* officially count it for a ground plant like the other ... berries with a group-name I_jagoda (the latter w. poss. saying smt. like 'ja, ugodil', i.e. "yeah, I've found it"), where t.s. w. 2(though this time in Bul.)2 is used also for the strawberries (!) as concrete name of the plant --- so this "berry" comes from o. Gr. μηλον where it meant an apple, with the idea of smt. sweet bc. of their μελι-honey |I_meli|. A certain mess continues till nowadays bc. there are 2 sim. "berries" which in Fr. are both melons, but in Ger. the one is I_Wassermelon (the green outside & red inside, & very watery), which you call also watermelon, & in Rus. it is I_arbuz (we'll disc. this name after a while), in Bul. it is I_dinja (poss. bc. if you drop it down it bursts saying 'dånn'), in Srb. (& obsolete in Bul.) is I_lubenica (bc. in the summers everyone loves to eat them, what is to ljubja as o. & c. Sl. & is in the I_Liebe-love cluster); & the other one is I_Zuckermelon in Ger. (i.e. sugary, it's usually yellow inside but may be also green & still very sweet) & for you it is just a melon, but for the Rus* this one is called dûnja |I_du^nja|, what has to be more c. Sl. bc. in Srb. it is dinja, though in Bul. it is, as I have just said, påpesh |I_pa^pesh|. On the other hand (as ment-d smw. before), there is a twin to this Gr. w., μελλον, what is a future, and I don't think this can be explained with mere optimism (bc. it usually is said the other way round, i.e. the human race has degenerated from the time of Creation), so that I sup. here the paradise fable about Eve & the apple & the serpent has to have its saying (bc. this apple has changed the future of the whole mankind, if you believe in this fable, of course).
On the 3rd hand, the Gr. μηλον, voyaging around, has given Lat. I_melimelum as some sweet apple, and Port. I_marmelo as a quince, & this is what the Eng. etym-sts give as source for the well known ... I_marmalade (which w. got my attention bc. you use 2 ws, this & the jam, where the other folks can do well with just one w., so maybe you have had some reasons). Yeah, but I don't believe much in what the etym-sts say here bc. I think I have stronger idea starting from the ... I_Marmara (Sea) (i.e. this + some "lata" as smt. sweet --- >> ladno-well, or rel. it at present to glad), bc. for you the marmalade is made out only of oranges & that is where from they have come, for cents & mills. This Marmora (or Marmor in Ger., or Mramornoe more in Rus., etc.) surely has been named so bc. of its I_murmur|ing, & it has been also the source for the I_marmoreal stones (Marmor in Ger., I_mramor in Sl., we reverse the lets). From the marmalade I have gone to the I_chocolate (bc. it, too, is sweet and the ws have sim. endings) but here I have made a blunder, bc. the latter comes from the aborigines of North America (Mexican I_chocolatl, then Sp. chocolate, what was the name of the plant that was used by the Aztecs for the purpose), so that I was misled by the ending (which is typical for those people bc. they have, say: Ketzalkoatl, Popokatepetl, etc. names).
But to return to the plants, where the ment-d Rus. I_jagoda-strawberry (& this is of the cultivated sorts where the wild ones are called I_zemljanika 2(in sing.)2, i.e. smt. on the I_zemlja-earth) reminds me to tell you that the deriv. jagoditzû |I_jagoditzu^| (in pl.) means not another kind of this fruit, or some dessert with them, but ... the bottom as part of the body (& I don't say ass or the like bc. this is an official medical name; & it is in pl. bc. the 2 halves of it are meant, to be more precise). This surely shows good imagination on the part of some intelligent Rus. medicus, but it is also in accordance with the påpesh |I_pa^pesh|-sweet-melon being flower button, which button may easily grow & become a bottom (of the body), what is (in a kind, if one seeks for this point of view) present also in the Lat. where I_podex (being smt. pedi-, like the pedestal, or the illness I_podagra) may be shortened (or modified) to popo & then it means again a bottom, what is literally taken in Rus. (as I_popa or popka, though there are cynical varieties, too); this will help us later in understanding of the cynical name of Bul. arse (in one of the versions, bc. cynical ws are, as a rule, not given in etym-cal dicts & I have made my own little research), when the time for such ws comes.
So, and until that time let me clear the I_berry, where I have ment-d earlier that this r. is old & in Bul. this means to pick (<< I_bera), but that's c. Sl. (bratþ |I_brat$| or sobiratþ in Rus.; from here I_obir is a robbery, I_uborka is a cleansing or gathering of the harvest, etc.), as also c. Teu (Ger. I_Beere is your berry), & Tur. (I_bereket, t.s. as archaic in Bul., is a harvest, earnings, wealth, smt. good that we gather), & so on, up to a Skr. I_bhas m-ing to eat. In other ws, the Sl* are using this r. to signify the action, where the Teu* --- the end product. But its primarily m-ing of eating allows me to put in this heap also the ... I_bread, of course (which is Ger. I_Brot), & the process of breeding (Ger. brüten, & I_Brut is a I_breed), or of bearing (your to I_bear, bore, born, which is Ger. gebären |I_gebaeren|, gebar, geboren), or of brewing (I_brauen in Ger., & from here the beer or Ger. I_Bier is given), or the heaving of the dough (broditþ |I_brodit$| in Rus.), or the boiling (brühen |I_bruehen| in Ger. is to boil & Brühe is a bouillon), or even the mere movement (bc. broditþ |I_brodit$| in Rus. means also to walk, and I_brod in Bul. is a wade-through). To the beer I wish add that this Ger. I_brauen just has to correl. with the ... I_braun colour (I_brown in Eng.), what tells us how it has come to exist (as smt. long time cooked or well fermented); even the ... I_brow, i.e. Ger. Braue (which is taken in Rus. as brovþ |I_brov$|, but not in Bul.) comes again from this colour. There is smt. of this r. (though slightly changed) in the Lat., too, where I_bibo (bibere) is to drink (& bibitor is one who drinks, or bibandi is "drinking, let us drink", or bibax is one inclined to drinking, a drunkard), what has given also Fr. I_boire (read 'buar', with je bois etc., & past part. just bu) as to suck or fill oneself with I_booze (to what we are coming soon), as also It. bere as t.s., & Bul. I_biberon, what is an artificial teat, baby pacifier. From here we may come to the babies |I_baby|, who may be small children (as Bul. I_bebe) or big girls (like the grown Eng. babies, that are fit enough to give birth to young babies) or even very old women (like Rus. I_babushka or Bul. I_baba), and then also to the ... I_bear (Bär |I_Baer| in Ger.), but this isn't so much bc. of the sucking as is bc. of the crying of the babies, or of the specific snarling of the animal (not that I have met angry bears to hear this, but, as the saying goes, it's better to pray not to meet a bear, than to think what to do if one meets it).

~ ~ ~

Ah, we have moved to the I_booze but I don't know whether to start with this w. or with the Rus. I_arbuz. Poss. it would be even better if I, in honour of the Eng. as lang. of narration, start with your strangely s-ing ... I_calabash (which is strange bc. it sounds like Lat. I_halabala, what is blah-blah, or hocus-pocus, or the like), & then come to the Rus. melon & the boozing (& to other things). So the calabash is a kind of I_pumpkin (the latter being some ... pimple, I'll tell you, or, if you prefer it so, smt. that, if one drops it on the ground, bursts & says "pumm"), though not so ripe & meaty as it, just spherical (like the hookah 2(which in Rus., being foreign also for them, has the calabash-s-ing name kalþjan |I_kal$jan|)2 ), & there is a sim. Bul. vegetable, I_alabash (a kind of round turnip), & then the etym-sts give also Fr. I_calebasse & Sp. calabaza as t.s. I_Kolben-like thing (<< K. or I_kolbasa). In fact, they give much more ws, like: Catalonian carabassa, Sicilian caravazza, Aryan khirbiz, Tur. I_gorpuz, the I_arbuz in question, some Gr. ws, & go to Per. kharbus or I_kharbuza. Then let me add also: the ment-d Ger. Kürbis |I_Kuerbis| as a pumpkin, Rus. I_obuza as heavy worry, duty, or harassment (as if a weight-'arbuz' is fastened to us), Rus. dialect karapuz m-ing a plump child (exactly the Tur. gorpuz), then your I_caravan (car + van for you) or Bul. (but of Eastern origin) I_karavana as very big but shallow pot (as if one half of a pumpkin), & others. The ancient kharbuza being a long w. I may (following the example of the specialists) split in: khar (as big, rough) + buz(a) (in Per. I_buza or puza was some aromatic fruit), but we are walking now on a, m.o.l., known ground bc. I have spoken earlier about both rs (<< I_ar /acre, & also boss), so that I have to add smt. only to the fermenting & juicy fruit.
Such juices are usually very nourishing and on the East they are represented 1st of all with the known (I sup.) Tur. I_boza (a thick & nearly alcohol-free drink made by fermenting of grain; recommended for breast-feeding women), which is well know on the east & south of Europe (like: boza in Bul, buza in southern Asian Republics of the former USSR, μποζασ in Gr., etc.), but also on the West (though for the Western etym-sts this isn't so obvious bc. they speak about unknown etym-gy here) in the form of the ... I_bosom, of course (Ger. I_Busen, from here vollbusig is well endowed women, what you call I_buxom). The r. being very old (& imit. on bo- /bu-) there are many ws deserving to be ment-d, rel-d in the m-ing of some sweet fruit, like: Bul. I_buza ('bùza', a cheek 2(<< ch.)2, but used also as official name for each of the halves of the jagoditzû-bottom |I_jagoditzu^| 2(or should I say "semi-bottoms"?)2 ), Bul. dialect I_buzdrav (pulpy & shaking like jelly, or woman's breast, or, in order not to sound abusive, like an udder), all Bul. mammals (I_bozajnik, from bozaja as to suck milk from female breast), Rus. I_puzo as a belly, your ment-d I_booze (we shall see sim. idea on Sau or pork), Rus. jargon buzitþ |I_buzit$| as to weep or cry (used for babies or little children --- here in pure imit-al sense), maybe your I_abuse /-ive (in the sense of Rus. obusa; though it has to be built of: ob + use, meaning some abnormal use, but there might be additional ideas), & so on. On the other hand, this strong rel-n of the I_boza-drink with the bosom --- I may add that even in ... Japanese the woman's breast is called I_basuto --- has provided the reason for the name of one plant, that (surely known from old times) is good for breast-feeding women (& purifies blood in general), which you call very strangely ... I_elder (so that you may think about this name until I clear the point), but in Rus. it is I_busina (or båzi |I_ba^zi| in Bul.; where the scientific name was Sambucus Nigra).
That's good but this ancient I_buza /puza was a decaying fruit (one never knows, b.t.w., when is the right moment of ripening after which the decaying takes place --- like it is with, e.g.: the growing age, or the capitalism, or the corruption, etc.), so that this r. has smm. bad m-ing, what can be seen, f.ex., in Tur. I_boz what is gray or brown (of the colour of I_boza), but then the deriv. I_bozaltim means, sorry, faeces. Not so bad but still not with good m-ing is Ger. böse-angry |I_boese| (so, maybe, one is böse when is feeling like covered with shits?), then there is one Bul. colloquial expression "to have /feel båz" m-ing to be afraid, & I sup. the Rus* have smh. felt these things, bc. they don't like at all to drink boza, where in the southern countries it is smt. equivalent to the hypothetical manna. Then there are even hard curses of this r. (taken from Schweik's stories) like Ger. I_buserieren (Der Teufel soll buserieren!), or Hun. I_baszom (Baszom az elet!), which I will not translate here. Leaving the curses aside I may continue with Bul. dialect bastisvam (to spoil), which poss. has to be correctly put as I_boztisvam (to make it boza-like), bc. basta in Bul. is a fold on the clothes (what is given from Tur. bastirmak as to press, but this is near to the ment-d pastirma-pastrami), what is diff., though not very much bc. the spoiling fruit often shrinks; you have also heard it from smw. bc. the Eng. I_baste is smt. sim., but then I may add also It. I_basta (enough --- sp-ing or doing smt., but maybe it is meant as a kind of decaying, saying that from this point onward we are making things to boza /bozaltim), or Ger. I_basteln (to make by hand, manufacture, poss. as putting the things neatly), or your bast (i.e. Ger. I_Bast --- as smt. pressed or folded, the official etym-gy is not clear), & surely other ws.
So, and now let me explain the I_elder, though this is simple. I mean, it is obvious that this must be the older smt. (Sambucus-bambucus or whatever) bc. in Eng. elder is archaic for older, though the etym-sts give some o. mid.-Ger. elderne or elhorn used for this plant with that Lat. name, & add that later on the people have begun to use t.s. w. for other sim. plants. Yeah, but did you get it? You should, if you know that there are two sim. plants, one of which is a tree, and the other one (that is bitter & not tasty) is a grass (one-yearly plant), & if you go to pick the blossoms (or the fruits, later in the autumn) you have to choose the taller (older) plant. I_Old (or Ger. alt) is Lat. I_alter where it means not only old, but another one (alter ego is my 2nd "I"), hence the alternation is changing from one "ego" to another (in an incessant cycle), and the m-ing of old comes from the fact that each individuum is a copy of his father or mother (or the neighbour, what also happens).

~ ~ ~

OK, having begun with ground plants or vegetables (<< v.) let us continue with them. In Rus. the vegetable is called I_ovoshch, what I sup. (bc. the Rus. etym-sts say only that it is o. & c. Sl. 2(Cz. ovoce, Pol. owoč)2 but are in doubt & don't give good etym-gy) is smt. like "oh" + veshch ("what a thing!"). On the other hand there is the sim-ly s-ing Ger. I_Obst, what isn't exactly this, it is a fruit, but this shouldn't bother us much bc. in Bul. I_ovoshka is again a fruit (tree), & this Obst was before: obez /oboz, Hol. ooft, o. Eng. ofet, & was build from I_ob (though here = über /ober m-ing above) + smt. for I_essen-to-eat (what isn't at all obvious, hence it might be that the etym-sts just want it to be so), & this meant any thing suitable for eating but diff. from bread or meat, what I would put more simple as smt. found on the ground or plucked around. So that Obst -- ovoshch may be closely rel-d, though with diff. ideas in diff. langs. There is also Ger. Gemüse |I_Gemuese| as vegetable, what is given as rel-d to the Mus-cream (<< M.) or Maul-mouth (<< M.) and isn't so interesting.
But in Bul. we have devised one peculiar w. (if one begins to think about it), namely I_zelenchuk, which has to be split in: I_zelen (green, from here zele in Bul. is a cabbage) + some I_chuk, and the things begin to become interesting bc. chuk officially means ... a hammer, but this isn't Sl. (bc. in Rus. the hammer is I_molot --- << m.) so that we are in our rights to look around on the Balkans. And, really, there is a çük |I_chuek| ('chjuk') by the Turks, though it means --- I am sorry to tell it, my dear readeresses, but it must be told --- so it means a penis! More that this, in Bul. is widely used the (now acceptable also in public) jargon I_chukam (se) as --- you have to expect this --- to screw, where the primarily m-ing is of to hit or grind (say, black pepper, or nuts) or knock (on the door). And in order to make you certain about the funny (let us call them so) thoughts of some clever Bulgarian (or poss. Turk) in older times in imagining the act of copulation as hitting with some hammer (or mallet) I will ment. also the w. çükündür |I_chuekuenduer|, what is a (sugar) beet (or smt. else beet-like, i.e. hard & ugly), & is known also in Bul. as chukundur.
Here I must make some remarks, where the 1st is about another I_chuk-like ws in Bul., which are many, like: I_chukar (a tor, rock, stony hill), I_chupja (to crash or split --- exactly what your I_chip means), chukanche or chukalo (smt. used for grinding), chuturche (archaic for the 2(usually wooden)2 cup where this grinding with chukalo is to be done), I_chutura (jargon for a mug-head), I_chupka (jargon for "disappear, go away", also a fold on a dress), I_chvor (hard place in a wooden plank where a branch had grown), (on) chorchuk (obviously Tur., means awry), & others (<< shtur), which are Eastern, not Sl. (to knock, f.ex., in Rus. is stuchatþ |I_stuchat$|, from stuk, not chuk, though it's sim.). The 2nd remark is about the ending of the çükündür |I_chuekuenduer|, which poss. is in the sense of your durable (which is Lat. & we shall come to it later). And another one is about this green çük |I_chuek|-penis (or vegetable) --- I mean, why not, why should this thing always be red? Another one is that, if we write this w. in the usual notation as chuek (which is often used), and read it then in Ger. fashion like 'hük' or 'huek', we may come from here to the mysterious (bc. I have met no etym-gy, though this is understandable) Rus. vulgar jargon I_huj (what is again the penis) --- but I, personally, don't believe in this & give (on the reserved for cynical ws place) another version. And there, still, leaves one more remark to be made, about relating the screwing to hitting & knocking, and it is that this isn't an unique idea & may be met based on diff. rs, like Ger. jargon I_bumsen (again to screw), or your --- I'm, sorry, my dear readeress, not yours, but the Eng. --- I_bum (as a tramp, but also as an ass, and I sup. you are clever enough to grasp that the ass is here bc. if there's a well-formed & nice bottom 2(well, bottom sounds better than ass, doesn't it?)2 & you 2(or smb. else, if you happen to be squeamish or well brought up)2 slaps it then it says 'båmm' 2(&, as I have heard it as a characteristic for really nice woman's bottom, if you 3(& this time you surely have to be a man)3 slap it in the morning & go to your job then it 3(that nice bottom)3 continues to reverberate & say 'båmm' for a long time, smm. even till you ... return home from the place of bread-winning)2 ). So that is how I think (& may cite also Ger. I_bummeln as to walk, stroll, saunter, what is again in the sense of hitting, either the left side of the road, or the right one, bc. you walk, without concrete destination, & that is what a bum usually does), where the etym-sts keep silence about bumsen, but about bummeln remind us the movement of the pendulum (the clock saying 'bim-bam-bum'). Still, we shall return to this "bumming" (with some added ideas) on one Skr. w., I_yabyum.
But let us continue with other vegetables. I think the eggplant is an interesting w. bc. each folk has put diff. ideas in the building of its name. We shall begin from the east and move with the sun, so in Rus. it is I_baklazhan, what is a little distorted pronunciation of Bul. patladzhan, which isn't really Bul. but Tur. I_patlican (read 'patlådzhan'). And I speak about distortion in the Rus. bc. in this way it becomes as if rel-d to Tur. I_bakla, what is a kind of bean (<< b. or bob), but much bigger than the usual bean & with very firm skin (which has to be spat by eating), what isn't the idea of the Tur. w., which is that of a ... pistol, but pronounced as I_patlak (in Bul., though the r. is Tur. where I_patlamak is to burst). Here may be cited also Bul. (which is Tur.) pataklama (a gunning, sounds of fire arms), so that the eggplant either looks like a gun (wry & with a handle) or/& bursts when is overripe & hits the ground. T.s. w. is to be found by the Gr* (πατλιντσανα), for which they may pretend it is theirs (as much as the coffee a la turka is called Gr. there) but it isn't, where the really Gr. name is μελιντσανα |I_melintsana| = μελιτσανα, which has to be Gr. bc μελι is a honey for them --- although to think that the eggplant is sweet seems very strange to me, more probable is that they just like their ... colour, bc. μελιντσανεσ is this mauve (or magenta) colour of the fruits of this plant; there is a sim. rel-n with the colour in Bul. bc. we call the eggplants also moravi, where their typical colour is I_morav (& where from comes the name of that colour will be cleared soon), but this is in a reversed to the Gr* way (i.e. for us the fruit comes from the colour).
Going to the Fr* we shall find their I_aubergine what has the idea of a ... shelter for the little seeds bc. auberge is a hospice; this corresponds very well with Ger. I_Herberge m-ing a hut or hospice (I_Berg is a mountain or hill there and I_bergen is to hide, put in a safe place 2(behind a mountain, as it turns out)2 ), but nearly t.s. is Rus. uberechþ |I_uberech$| (to save, or take away), & we shall come again to this on Tur. I_bayir (though it isn't much away from the disc-ed berry). The Eng. I_eggplant is self-explanatory, but this idea about the seeds being like small eggs is present in Rus. I_ikra baklazhannaja, what is baked & marinated inner part of eggplants (mainly the seeds), where only ikra is a caviar (i.e. the eggs of the fishes). The Ger* use either the Fr. w., or Eierfrucht, where from the Eng. eggplant has come (bc. it is a translation of the Eng. w., i.e. v.v.). So that's it, but having ment-d the Rus. I_ikra (which sounds pretty strange there) let me explain that this w. is given as c. Sl. (ikra in Ukr., kra in Cz./Pol., though not Bul., we use hajver, i.e. caviar), & Baltic, & there was Irish inchair (maybe 'inhair', in Genitive inchrach), what was the I/G. name of the ... liver (the etym-sts have some doubts about this but here I haven't), which was I_yakrt in Skr., yakarå in Avs., I_iecur in Lat. (& jetra in Sebrian). The doubts may arise bc. of the diff m-ings, but if we take for granted that this is smt. that looks granulated or curved & sticking out (& the caviar looks so & is thrown out --- << rogue, roe) then this fits well, especially if I add that in Rus. ikra is also ... the calf of the foot, & in Ukr. ikra is also ... an udder (of a cow). And the I_caviar (to cover this w. too) is from the ... cave, or cavern (at least for the Fr. caviar this is given), but this is the idea on the West, where Bul. hajver is from the Turks (havyar or I_hayvar) & here the idea has to be of smt. thrown high (away).
And now let us take Rus. I_kabachok in focus, which in Eng. is vegetable marrow (<< m. to get why you've called it so), what is a variety of pumpkin, but the strange thing is that this is diminutive from I_kabak & the latter means ... a pub, drinking house, tavern (but often kabachok is used also as a pub). So how is this? Well, I am afraid the Rus* can't explain this, if not for anything else, then bc. this is exactly the Tur. I_kabak & there it is a pumpkin. Did you get it? Surely the idea has to be that in a pub (not in a big restaurant) people sit very dense, like seeds of a pumpkin; t.s. idea lies in your I_pub, which is from public and the poss-ity of bursting lurks in this very r.; there is also Bul. mehana (a tavern), which is, in fact, Tur. I_meyhane, where the 2nd part has to be the I_khan (<< it) but the 1st one (I_meh, at least in Bul.), is a water- or wine- skin (also a fur), so that it stretches out (if I am not imagining the things bc. the beg-ing mey- may be smt. like mine or main). But the rs of the I_kabak lie well in the Tur. where I_kaba means: meaty, heavy, plump, & in Bul. we use kaba as good piece of meat, without tallow, though the Rus* have also their I_kaban (a wild-boar); on the other hand this is smt. round (so << again Kürbis |I_Kuerbis| or Korb, or >> kobila later). ( There are not much Tur. ws in the Rus. but there are some, and, f.ex., I may ment. o. Rus. I_ochag 2(a hearth, home)2, what is exactly Tur. I_ocak 2(read 'odzhak')2; this isn't Bul., but we have smt. sim., I_odaja 2(a room, a bit obsolete)2, which is smw. btw. ocak & I_staja-room. ) And if one of you thinks that this is good but there is ntg. of this r. on the West, so he or she makes a big error bc. here, surely, are: the well known Fr. ... I_cabaret, & your I_cab, or I_cabinet, cubicle, the I_cube, the cub, etc.
Ah, I have missed smt. before (in fact, & you may bet on this, I am always missing many & many ws, but this is unavoidable), when I was sp-ing about the I_repa-turnip, namely to add smt. about this Sl. w., which isn't only Sl. and has to be of Teu. origin bc. there the turnip (but also the beet) is called Rübe |I_Ruebe| (I sup., bc. it is good for I_reiben-rubbing, or bc. there some rubbing arises when one pulls it out), and bc. this r. is an imit. so in Bul. it (i.e., our rjapa) may be rel-d with rupam as illiterate dialect of I_hrupam, what is to eat with crunching. I have left this remark before bc. this Rübe is added also to their carrot which is die-"she" Möhre |I_Moehre| (resp. Mohrrübe), and I have just ment-d this I_morav-mauve colour. So here is one piquant moment, namely that this Möhre has a twin brother der-"he" I_Mohr (which, resp., has the carrot for a twin sister, right?) m-ing for them a Moor (or just a Nigger), what hides sim. rel-n with the red colour (here mauve, although it isn't t.s., of course, it is reddish-orange) as with the Turks (<< turkey), bc. they are Muslims too. ( Your Moor, b.t.w., is a bit distorted bc. it is maurus in Lat., i.e. these people have ntg. to do with your moors, resp. Mauri /Mauritania is an aria in North-Western Africa, what is an o. name, coming from o. Gr. μαυροσ, and in those times the ideas behind it had to have been diff. from those of the colour. ) The Slavs have taken the Möhren as morkovþ |I_morkov$| /morkovka (in Rus., or morkov in Bul., mrkva in Srb., etc.) not caring at all to rel. them to some black people with red fezzes (bc. they are much away from us).

~ ~ ~

There are also the tomatoes & potatoes, which are new ws & not so interesting, but, still, smt. may be said, namely that the I_tomato (I_domat in Bul., Tomate in Ger., etc.) comes from native Mexican (Aztecs) I_tomatl (which, if you don't know, up to the 18th cent. were cultivated mainly for decorative purposes). Then the I_potato has to be smt. very good for pots (if you ask me, though officially it is given from Sp. patata, or also I_batata as native name in Haiti 2(what shouldn't contradict to what I am saying 3(precise analysis has to be done in the Haitian)3 but doesn't explain the mutation to potato)2 ); in Rus. (Bul.) it is kartofelþ bc. it must be dug out of the earth (I_krot in Rus. or kårtitza in Bul. is a mole as animal), though this isn't etym-cally correct bc. the w. is Ger (I_Kartoffel), but then it has to mean smt. hard (comp. it with Karte or Karton). There are diff. names here & there with their own ideas, like, say: Srb. paradajz for tomato (smt. from the paradise), & krompir (kompiri in some southern Bul. areas --- maybe they are rel-d with the korm-food) for potato, but I will not indulge in much talking here and turn your attention only to the most interesting names.
Such interesting name is Fr. I_pomme as potato, but being smt. highly ... pumped, this means also an apple, or a head of cabbage, even its primarily m-ing was of an apple, where the potatoes have come later & must be qualified as pomme de terre (i.e. earth-apples), resp. pomme frites are fried potatoes (not more qualified bc. nobody will fry apples, I sup.). But we are not done with the pomme bc. in Fr. this means also: plump, round, perfect, & here has to be ment-d Rus. I_pomidor, which is given as coming from It. "pomi (in pl.) d'oro" as "golden apples" (or, acc. to another source, from Fr. "pomme d'amoure", now as "love apples", bc. of being red), though this isn't at all an apple, neither is golden, but is a tomato (& the Rus*, I sup., knowing also the w. tomatû, ... just alternate eating them); there is also Rus. I_pomeranetz, what is, this time, a bitter orange (a combination of It. pome-apple + arancia-orange --- a pretty strange combination, if you ask me). There was also Lat. pomum (a fruit, no matter of what kind --- << plod), or pomarium (an orchard), orI_ pomarius (made out of fruits), and even this isn't all bc. here comes the known Fr. I_pommade (pomade, & so on in other langs 2(as sup-edly made out of apples)2, but for the Rus* pomada is usually ... a lipstick). Ah, and ment-ing the I_cabbage before let me add that this vegetable bears diff. names in diff. lang., like: I_Kraut in Ger. 2(<< K.)2, I_zele in Bul. 2(smt. zeleno-green)2, I_kapusta in Rus. 2(a capita)2, smt. kabak-like in Eng. coming from Fr. I_caboche, etc.; but the interesting moment here is that from the Fr. variant, shorten to boche (for tête de boche), is given the popular (though abasing) Fr. calling of the Ger* as I_Boche (so that one may think this is a translation of Sauerkraut, bc. the Ger* like much to eat it, & some other may think this is a mug- or cabbage- 2(or, as the Bul* say, onion-)2 head --- nice neighbouring rel-ns, ah?).
Now, having spoken about the corn, let me add a pair of sentences about the I_maize-corn, though I don't mean exactly this r., which is Mais in Ger., I_mais in Fr., maiz in Sp., etc., and which has come from the region of Cuba in the 16th cent. & has to mean smt. important from the Mayas (though I haven't found this about the Mayas definitely said), but some other names for it on the East & by the Slavs. The most interesting, I think, is Bul. I_tzarevitza, which I have decoded to mean a ... "king's grass" (tzar /tsar is a king + trevitza as diminutive from the treva-grass) --- bc. it is good for everything (as grain for animals & people, & as green mass for forage)! ( As an example of Bul. imaginative genius 2(though such examples are not much --- but that is bc. we are small nation)2 I wish to put here another really Bul. w., the jargon I_pljuskam 2(to eat too much)2, which, I am sure, comes from much ... "plussing", incessantly adding, where the influence has to be Fr. bc. they use this particle oftener than the other nations, namely for building of comparative & superlative forms of the adjs. ) The Rus* call the maize I_kukuruza, what obviously is smt. for the cocks (or, else, some nut like cocoa /coconut, >> kuka, but here I don't believe in searching for o. & foreign rs bc. the w. is new). The Turks say I_misir, what in Bul. (misirka) is an archaic name for a hen (it is given also m-ing a turkey) that lays eggs. The Rum* use I_mamaliga (surely smt. for mammals, or, to put it better, a manna), & also I_mamul (known in Bul. too) is a maize-cob.

~ ~ ~

Ah, there are also many spices & for each of them there is smt. to be said, but I can't indulge in too many explans, so I'll try to be concise. There is your I_parsley (or Fr. persil), shortened a bit from Ger. (what has to be Lat.) I_Petersilie, becoming I_petrushka in Rus. (but I can't tell you exactly what this Peter here does; though I may guess there was some Christian fable about it bc. in Bul. it is I_magdanoz & here ... Maria Magdalena must come in play). Then there is the celery (Ger.-Lat. I_Sellerie, Fr. celeri, Rus. selþderej |I_sel$derej|, Bul. I_tzelina, but also 2(we use 2 ws for it)2 ker(e)viz 2(reading the 1st let. as 'k' and causing a havoc btw. the left lets)2 ). Then there is also the I_ginger, which is I_Ingwer in Ger. (by the Slavs it isn't much used, though it's dzhindzhifil in Bul. & imbirþ |I_imbir$| in Rus. 2(poss. they think it is good to be ... put "in the beer", bc. this is done smm.)2 ), & has to be, smh., rel-d to the ... gene (in sense of smt. giving us more tonus, energy, to what we shall come later, but comp. it now with your I_ginseng). More interesting, however, is the I_dill, but I don't mean here your w. (it is o. Teu., from: dile, dilli, tilli, etc., & given from unknown origin, though I may guess it has to correlate with Fr. ... I_diligence & your diligent, which come from Lat. dililo as to praise, honour 2(& you hear how nice & lulling this sounds; smw. here has to be, come to think of it, our Sl. 3(Bul. /Rus.)3 I_leleja /lelejatþ as to praise high, cherish, admire)2 --- what is bc. it is good to be added in many dishes); so what I mean is the Bul. name kopår |I_kopa^r|.
I might have given the Rus. name I_ukrop, but there all lets are mixed (bc., as I have ment-d, of their serious problems with the important let. 'å'), though they have the w. kopër and with 2 m-ings: one is an apparatus for sticking pylons in the earth (given from Lat. I_caper m-ing, mark it, a goat, which in turn was o. Gr. καπροσ, m-ing this time a boar 2(or also some carp-like fish)2 --- i.e. there is smt. hard & sharp that sticks out, like a spear, but that is how the dill looks like 2(though it isn't hard, it just has spike-formed leaves)2 ), & the other m-ing were (I haven't heard it, so it has to be an old w.) our kopår |I_kopa^r|-dill (which the Rus. etym-st I use relates to their kopotþ |I_kopot$| 2(a soot)2 sp-ing about smelling 2(what I will never believe)2; but, on the other hand, a Lat. I_capronae as forelock is cited, & Skr. I_kipram as mustaches, but is said that it is wrong to think so 2(where I think this is exactly the right way to think)2 ). This o. kipram is a good hit bc. that is where from the I_capron-fibers (at least Sl.) come, & Bul. I_koprina (a silk), & our ... nettle (kopriva in Bul. or I_krapiva in Rus., o. & pre-Sl., but this is a misunderstanding bc. it hasn't capronaes but makes our skins as if covered with dew-drops --- << okropitþ), & one Bul. dialect (not. Rus., poss. Gr.), I_kiprja (se), as to better one's looks, wear fancy clothes (what might as well be fem. modification of the mustaches bc. is applied to women); a bit later I have found this w. even in the It., where I_cipria ('chi-') is again smt. for bettering of our view, namely powder.
To put it briefly, a dill is a spear, but a spear in Sl. is I_kopie, & there is o. Rus. kopþ |I_kop$| as mining shaft (also kopi in Bul., though not very literate, is young sapling or a sprout), & your shaft means also a spear (the ment-d dualism), & there is your I_copy looked at as throwing of some spear (though it may also be related to the copulation), & here comes the just ment-d Rus. kopotþ |I_kopot$| (but as smt. that "copies" in the chimney, nakaplivaetsja in Rus., from kapatþ-to-drop of kopitþ-to-spare 2(but these are rel-d things >> I_kapka, kup)2, only not bc. is smells). But there's more to this, bc. there is a sim-ly s-ing ... tree (the dimensions don't matter much in etym-cal matters), the I_cypress (I_kiparis in Sl.), that has long "mustaches"-branches (like fibers, & they are kind of spears, smt. long) & it looks very nakipreno-beautiful, & then, of course (for, how else?), the island I_Cyprus (Kipr in Rus. --- I may guess there grow 2(or at least have grown)2 many cypresses, which in o. Gr. were called κυπροσ, & the island was t.s., just with capital let.) is here, & poss. the town ... I_Capri, & your caprice /capricious (Fr.-It. I_caprice known in many langs --- bc. it isn't only a whim, it is smt. that one finds beautiful like I_capronae--I_kiprja-se, or, from etym-cal point of view, from It. capriola as a jump of a I_caper-goat).

~ ~ ~

OK, and now let us go to the fruit-trees, where I have already ment-d some of them (<< nar-pomegranate, orange, peach, dzhanka-plum), & for the apple disc-ed only the Fr.-Lat. name pomme, so let me come to the Eng. I_apple, which is Ger. I_Apfel, from here Apfelsine is an orange (& let us not bother now what this -sine means), which is directly accepted in Rus. as apelþsin |I_apel$sin| (again an orange). The Eng. etym-sts give here some Welsh afal & a Teu. r. ablu- /aplu-, and their Ger. colleagues ment. Sl. I_jabloko (in Rus.) & other Baltic ws, but are not very convinced in the etym-gy. If we go to the Slavs then their apple is o. & c. Sl. (jabålka in Bul., jabliko in Cz., ablåko in o. Sl.), & sim. ws exist in the Baltics (obuolas), also by the Teu* (o. Prussian woble, o. Ireland abal), & in Lat. (Abella, but this was a town in Champaign known for its good apples; otherwise I_abellana was a ... nut). Yeah, but you know that I am usually interested in what a given w. says to the people sp-ing the lang. and here we see a little mess, bc. the Sl. (& Blt.) jabl- & Lat. abel- speak about smt. round &/or I_belle-good (f.ex. obål |I_oba^l| in Bul. is round, like your oval; t.s. might be the o. Prussian woble), where Apfel /afal is smt. that ... falls or has to be thrown away (comp. it with your ... I_offal); & however sim. jabloko may be to the apple, there are nuances, bc. the Sl. w. starts with some 'ja' (yeah) & then comes the ball, where the Teu. variant (& we better look to the Ger* not to the Eng*) starts with ap- or ab- & this is Ger.-Lat. prefix (or prep.) for smt. that separates of falls, or we are moving to smw. (say: in Lat. I_absurdus = ab + surd, where sordes is a garbage, smt. dirty, like the Eng. sordid; or Ger. I_Abend 2(an evening) = ab + end 2(of the day)2, or an abort is smt. to be thrown away bc. in Ger. I_Abort = ab + I_Ort 2(a place)2 so that this is their ... toilette).
So let us use the moment here to look more precisely at this ab, bc. in Bul. we have the w. hap m-ing ... a pill (of medicine), i.e. smt. small, as if bitten (from the whole), & I_hapja is to bite (this is also Rus., though hapatþ there means to grasp, embezzle, pilfer, but that's to t.s. idea), & this is an Eastern w. bc. this hap is Tur.-Ar. I_hap, which, poss., stays in the core of Ger. ... I_haben (to I_have) --- if one takes it as a bite or morsel (we'll come again to haben); & don't think that the Ger* don't know the Ar. hap bc. they say kleine Häppchen for small sandwiches (-chen is for building of diminutive there). But being Teu., Lat. & Ar. this r. has to be found also in the o. Gr. and there really is smt. sim. (that's, if one knows what to search for), namely απλοισ (= απλοιδοσ = απλωσ), what is single or simple, i.e. not double, what is known in medicine as I_aploid (a cell with only half of the chromosomes), staying in pair with I_diploid (a fertilized cell, a zygote). Now having established preference to begin with ap- (& m-ing some hap) and adding to it smt. else small, like Fr. I_petit (where from, in the form of their shorter pti m-ing t.s., I may derive Rus. ptaha or Bul. I_ptichka what is a bird, but this isn't very correct --- << patati), we come to the appetite in Eng. (or I_appetit in Fr.), don't we? Then in Lat. I have found (not that you can't do this too) also their ... I_apis, what is a bee (bc. it hape-stings; & here is your I_apiary as a beehive), but also, written with capital let. as Apis, this is now the saint Egyptian bull (bc. it "stings" with its horns), & you (or whoever else) can't unite the bee with the bull without using the idea of pricking.
But the biting has diff. aspects, where one of them is the closing (of the morsel in the mouth), what may lie on the bottom of Tur. hapsana (a jail; in a dict. I found I_hapsis with this m-ing), the hap-pill is also closed in some shell, & there are also the I_capsules (kapsa or kabza) here. Another aspect of the biting is the ... dividing in halves (I_halb in Ger.)! ( So that now << I_Helvetia about the Swiss being half Ger* & half Fr*. ) And another more aspect (I sup.) is the ... I_helping (I_helfen, half, in Ger.)! ( The Ger. etym-sts trace helfen to o. I/G. rs & to Lat. I_scalpo, scalpere as to cut, scratch 2(hence, count the scalp of the skull & the scalpel as the instrument for doing this)2, but I think this is a side-jump bc. with 'sk-' we have sliding 2(<< sky)2, not dividing in two 2(nearly)2 halves, & the scalp is an envelope of the skull, so that is diff. )
Good, but let us return to the trees where the next interesting one is the I_cherry. It comes from o. Fr. cherise (cerisier 2('serizje')2 now) what is from Lat. I_ceresia = ceresea (& very near to this is Rus. I_chereshnja, or Bul. cheresha), & there was even a Gr. κερασεα = κερασοσ, what shows the idea of I_Kern--corn--carrot (look a little bit back), and I may tell you that there is a sort of Gr. wine & grapes called I_Keratzuda, but not this is interesting here. ( Ah, to be more precise I have to say that there are two kinds of cherries which in Rus. /Bul. carry diff. names --- the one is chereshnja which is sweet, and the another is I_vishnja 2(poss. bc. it visit-hangs-down, or bc. it's easy to be videtþ-seen --- I don't know exactly, but from this name is built the adj. vishnëvûj /vishnev as dark red colour)2 which is sour & of intense red-violet colour, but these are nuances. ) More important, in my view, is the rel-n, especially in Ger., btw. I_Kirsche (a cherry) & ... I_Kirche (a I_church), & even in one of the dialects each "ch" is pronounced as 'sh' so that these 2 ws sound exactly t.s.! There is no such rel-n in the Sl. langs and I have the feeling that this has wider consequences bc. we (at least the Rus* & Bul*) don't value much either the church (for we are not enthusiastic church-goers) or the cherries (for we have many other fruits), where all Teu. nations are both truly religious & like very much the cherries (fresh or in form of liqueurs or Kuchens), & that is the reason for your I_cherishing, surely (bc. you don't say "churchish" or "churish"), & also the Ger* use the phrase "mit jemandem Kirschen essen" with the idiomatic m-ing of "to be in good rel-ns with smb.", as it is also known that the Japanese, too, cherish very much the cherry, especially in the time of blossoming, so that this must not be a coincidence (no matter what the etym-gy is, for which >> Kirche).
Another interesting fruit, though not cherished on the West, as also by the Sl*, is the I_mulberry-tree, where the Eng. variant tells us ntg. definite but the Ger. I_Maulbeer (-baum) says that this is some berry for the Maul-mouth. But I don't mean this name, neither Rus. I_tut /tutovoe (derevo), nor Bul. dialect dudi (officially we say chernitzi, from cheren-black, even if they are of the white sort), nor Tur. I_dut, which turns out to be Afghani I_tut --- & I am sure it was named so bc. ... well, bc. when the berries fall on the ground they say smt. like 'tu-tu-tut', being many & falling in rapid succession when a gust of wind comes. So I don't mean this (though there was ntg. bad in telling it to you) but the Lat. name I_morus, which is from o. Gr. μωροσ what meant --- but that's the point, that this meant: silly, a fool (resp. μωρια was a folly, craziness), what you surely will believe bc. you use now the w. ... I_moron, of course! What I want to stress on is that in the Eastern countries, especially in Himalayas, this is an useful fruit (bc. there are not many fruits there) & it was dried for the winter (like raisins), but after the o. Gr., in Lat. & further more, it becomes synonym for craziness (poss. bc. it is smt. small & only water --- aqua nuda, to put it in Lat.); but that's about the idea, and etym-cally the Lat. morus-mulberry has to be from o. Gr. μορια (note the "ο"), what was some saint olive.
Yeah, but in Bul. this contemptuous view to the mulberry is also present bc. I have ment-d that I_morav is that (crazy) magenta /mauve colour of the eggplant (or the mulberry), and it is a crazy colour bc. it isn't smt. decent but smt. to show off (or cast dust in the eyes of the others); but, in fact, that is the moron: he/she wants to be interesting with smt., but he/she can't find what with and makes it by some silly thing. [|I_comments| Like --- and I'm to apologize for saying this but it's so obvious --- so like to bore his/her ear-lobe & hang a ring there, or on the nose, or on some other place (places can be found); or to make a tattoo. Before the emancipation only the women wore earrings (what is, m.o.l., excusable bc. they have to ... catch some man, this is important for the proliferation of the humans), but they are naturally coquette, also sillier --- sorry, sorry --- than the men are, so that this was met with a good eye. Now every man may competes for the palm of moronity on an equal level with the women, and that's a big progress! Though, on the other hand, it isn't democratic to forbid the people to behave silly, that has to be one of their (without me, I allow myself to be excluded from that number) basic rights --- bc., who knows, maybe it isn't so silly? Let's try do it & then see. So that some try, and some see, and some (which are, usually, the majority) ... don't see anything bad, even if it is bad, bc. smo. has to teach them. But we come to t.s. point (of the circle), namely that it isn't democratic to teach anybody to anything (bc., who knows, etc.). So that let me drop the matter. ] Ah, and maybe to this r. (& in this sense) may be added one before ment-d Tur. jargon, I_muruk (a father), i.e. "my silly father" (though in this way we may go to some mordacious ideas); there is also Rus. I_mura ('murà') as silly ws, but here a rel-n to the murmuring is more appropriate. Whatever the rel-ns to other ws are the moron is Lat.-Gr. & comes from the fruit of mulberry tree.

~ ~ ~

There surely are many other fruit trees (say, the I_pear has to be Fr. poire 2(smt. not much away from the I_pomme)2, which in Ger. is I_Birne 2(some berry, I should say)2, & in Rus. is I_grusha or in Bul. krusha 2(poss. smt. gross-big)2 ), but I have come to no valuable ideas here. On the other hand there is the pine (<< I_pinus), which is, in a way, rel-d to the penis, which (well, not the penis) is I_bor in Bul. (also Rus. 2(m-ing there a pine-forest, not a single tree, but these are details)2 ), where in Ger. I_bohren is to make a hole (to I_bore), then I_borgen is to I_borrow money on a loan, & in Bul. is known the Tur. borç |I_borch| ('borch') as money to return, what must be meant as smt. taken (bc. bårkam |I_ba^rkam| /bråkvam in Bul. is to put a hand smw., in smb's pocket, usually), or it is a score made smw. to remind us to return the money, so we come in this way to one big cluster carrying the idea of smt. sticking out, long & annoying us (as explained on dålg or indulgentia), or sharp as a blade, or meant as a taste, and there are many ws to be ment-d here. Let me cite some of them, say: Bul. (here Tur.) burgija (an instrument for boring, a gimlet), Rus. buritþ |I_burit$| (to bore), poss. o. Gr. δουρα ('dura') as a piece of wood, a spear (& I say "poss." bc. the Gr. "δ" looks exactly as the Sl. 'b', so that from here it's poss. to come to our bor, but on the West this has given the durable things --- to be disc-ed), then Ger. I_Brust (I_breast in Eng. --- bc. the ribs stick out & protect the body, but also bc. in Ger. it's "she", so that it might be meant as woman's bosom), then the border (Ger. I_Borte, or Fr. bordure , bordjur also in Bul.) with its twin, the board (Ger. I_Bord --- it keeps the others, if meant in the sense of a ruling body, but initially it was in the sense of a wooden plank). Ah, there is also the I_bourse (Fr., & known everywhere, though the Rus* have modified it a bit to I_birzha; its initial m-ing in Fr. was of a money-bag or scholarship-stipendium, so that it might be smt. outside of us but important bc. it supports us, like the breast), then Ger. Börste |I_Boerste| (a I_bristle, like of a boar, hence the I_boar may also be put here as an animal with Börsten, and it has a hard & sticking-out muzzle; and I may add an additional hint to the bourse as preserving us like animal's skin 2(or that the money-bag might have been made out of boar's skin, but this isn't a strong idea)2 ), & others (I sup-d the I_borsalino-hats are also smh. rel-d but it turned out they were named so bc. of the name of their It. producer).
But this isn't all, bc. ... the I_beard (Ger. Bart, << barbarian) has all the reasons to be ment-d here, & poss. the Sl. fighting which is borþba |I_bor$ba| in Rus. (borba in Bul., etc.; though this might have been formed mainly from the cries boj -- voj) --- and do you know why I'm telling you this here on the plants? Well, bc. of Rus. ... I_borshch, what is their traditional soup made chiefly (there are other vegetables put there) out of beet, but of that red sort (not sugar-beet). This soup is well known by the Western Slavs (Cz*, Pol*, Ukr*) & was called so bc. the leaves of the beet are sharpened like bristles (but I sup. bc. of the peculiar, not exactly sharp, taste too), and the Rus. etym-sts add also that the Börste |I_Boerste|-bristle was bürsti in o. Icelandic, & even in Skr. I_bhrstis (it should be read as 'b'rþstis') was a sharp vertex or a ridge (the latter, b.t.w., is exactly I_rid in Bul. and we haven't heard this from the Celts but from the East). ( Ah, from this soup the Rus* have coined a verb for to overdo smt., as if to put too much salt there, pereborshchitþ. ) From here we may return to the ment-d Tur.-Ar. I_bahar (also Bul.) as variety of the black-pepper (the grains are not so sharp in taste but with stronger aroma), and bc. the point now is not so much in the natural sharpness of the leaves as in the taste, so I may add that bresk in Cz. (or I_brzazg in Pol.) means sharp taste, also bårzam |I_ba^rzam| in Bul. is to hurry (i.e. to jump forward). This is only natural bc. when we (not only the Bul* & not only the Sl*) see or feel smt. extraordinary (that must be awed, or that frightens us) we usually say 'brr', & especially in Bul. is known the jargon bahår for bitter cold (<< Bahr-Lut as Dead Sea).

And even if there are many other ws to cite, with this I am closing the chapter.
}





IN THE BEGINNING {} WAS THE GOD {} CALLED URRH {} WHO WAS THE TRUTH {} AND THE LIGHT {} AND THE WISDOM{}. HE WAS IMMENSELY POTENT {} AND MADE THE TIME & THE SPACE {} AND THE MATTER {}. THEN HE MADE THE GRASS & THE TREES {} AND THE ANIMALS |I_ANIMALSCHP|
{
for which a German might say that they live just ein I_Mal (only once) but we have disc-ed the etym-gy of this w., also of the Sl. zhiznþ /zhivot. So I may begin with some parts of the animal body, though here also smt. was already said (<< heart or serdtze). But there is your I_head (<< also golova), which is smt. hard and coming, maybe (acc. to me), from Fr. tête |I_tete| (t.s.; to remind you the phrase|I_phrases| tête a tête m-ing eyes to eyes 2(literally "head to head")2 ); there is not a good etym-gy given here (some o. Frisian & Teu.: had, hobit, houbit, then poss. Lat. I_caput & Gr. κεφαλη etc., but this doesn't at all sound alike); and in Ger. it is diff., I_Kopf (nearer to the κεφαλη & poss. rel-d to their Knopf what is a button, i.e. again smt. hard & sticking out). With the tête |I_tete| the ideas are not only about the hardness or sticking out, but mainly about I_test|ing (<< I_tasten), bc. there was a jargon usage of tête as your mug-head, & this is given from Lat. testa (it has to be so bc. of the chick above "e" for missing char) as a brick, chip, shell, which is made out of some kind of dough (b.t.w., I_testo in Rus.) tasting it with fingers, & that is why testum in Lat. means pottery; to add also the ... I_text (which in It. is exactly testo) as smt. to be formed. But surely here is also their I_testis (though not as what you may think but as an eyewitness), & I_testiculus (now as a testicle, with which a man proves that he is a man), & testamen (a proof or a document for smt., giving the I_testament as last will, as also the Old & New T. 2(as many times repeated lies, or proved by ntg. fables, taken for truth just bc. of their constant repetition --- a widely used in the politics & advertising method)2 ), etc. (there is Rus. I_tetiva as bow-string); to end this paragraph with one, a bit strangely s-ing, Lat. rule (though still applied in the jurisprudence), namely: |I_sentences| testis unus, testis nullus, i.e., one eyewitness proves ntg., what, surely, has to be influenced by the God's wisdom to provide each man with 2 testicles.
So, about your arm we have already spoken (<< also Sl. ruka, reka), & about the fingers too, and what concerns the hand then it is exactly Ger. I_Hand, but officially also ntg. certain is given (it is c. Ger., there were Got. handus poss. rel-d to hinðan as to catch, but ntg. before that). Well, I may add smt. to the hand, namely that it is an analog to the leg (we'll see shortly t.s. idea used in Sl. I_krak), and there is the known Fr. I_hanche ('ha~sh') having become haunch in Eng., & from Fr. side it is given from an o. Fr. hanka as a leg or pillar, coming from Ger. I_hinken as lame walking (or take your I_hinge), so that all this may be rel-d, as smt. I_hang|ed on (what is I_henken in Ger.; >> also I_Schenkel), what is based on an imit. of hitting or catching in the form of 'hag' (<< Hagel, or >> Hagebutte). Ah, & from this I_hanche I have come to the strange Rus. w. I_hanzha as a hypocrite, with the idea of looking at the haunch but not daring to state it in the open, what is a natural guess (the etym-gy of hanzha is so unbelievable that I can't allow myself to put it here).
Then it comes the leg, though not of this r. (I_leg has to be just smt. long; or, then, lying down) but as Ger. I_Bein, which has given your I_bone (& Hol. been & Sw. ben etc.), but I've rel-d the bone to the I_bean, where in the Ger. Bein has to be (bc. the Ger. etym-sts give "dark etym-gy") smt. by or around (I_bei in Ger.) the body (<< also I_body where the r. is old & with the idea of smt. living, like a bud; and to the Sl. body we shall come relatively soon). Yeah, but the Sl. leg is more interesting bc. in Rus. it is etc., but this doesn't at all sound alike); and in Ger. it is diff., I_Kopf (nearer to the Knopf what is a button, i.e. again smt. hard & sticking out). With the |I_tete| the ideas are not only about the hardness or sticking out, but mainly about I_test|ing (<< I_tasten), bc. there was a jargon usage of as your mug-head, & this is given from Lat. testa (it has to be so bc. of the chick above "e" for missing char) as a brick, chip, shell, which is made out of some kind of dough (b.t.w., I_testo in Rus.) tasting it with fingers, & that is why testum in Lat. means pottery; to add also the ... I_text (which in It. is exactly testo) as smt. to be formed. But surely here is also their I_testis (though not as what you may think but as an eyewitness), & I_testiculus (now as a testicle, with which a man proves that he is a man), & testamen (a proof or a document for smt., giving the I_testament as last will, as also the Old & New T. 2(as many times repeated lies, or proved by ntg. fables, taken for truth just bc. of their constant repetition --- a widely used in the politics & advertising method)2 ), etc. (there is Rus. I_tetiva as bow-string); to end this paragraph with one, a bit strangely s-ing, Lat. rule (though still applied in the jurisprudence), namely: |I_sentences| testis unus, testis nullus, i.e., one eyewitness proves ntg., what, surely, has to be influenced by the God's wisdom to provide each man with 2 testicles.
So, about your arm we have already spoken (<< also Sl. ruka, reka), & about the fingers too, and what concerns the hand then it is exactly Ger. I_Hand, but officially also ntg. certain is given (it is c. Ger., there were Got. handus poss. rel-d to hinð as to catch, but ntg. before that). Well, I may add smt. to the hand, namely that it is an analog to the leg (we'll see shortly t.s. idea used in Sl. I_krak), and there is the known Fr. I_hanche ('ha~sh') having become haunch in Eng., & from Fr. side it is given from an o. Fr. hanka as a leg or pillar, coming from Ger. I_hinken as lame walking (or take your I_hinge), so that all this may be rel-d, as smt. I_hang|ed on (what is I_henken in Ger.; >> also I_Schenkel), what is based on an imit. of hitting or catching in the form of 'hag' (<< Hagel, or >> Hagebutte). Ah, & from this I_hanche I have come to the strange Rus. w. I_hanzha as a hypocrite, with the idea of looking at the haunch but not daring to state it in the open, what is a natural guess (the etym-gy of hanzha is so unbelievable that I can't allow myself to put it here).
Then it comes the leg, though not of this r. (I_leg has to be just smt. long; or, then, lying down) but as Ger. I_Bein, which has given your I_bone (& Hol. been & Sw. ben etc.), but I've rel-d the bone to the I_bean, where in the Ger. Bein has to be (bc. the Ger. etym-sts give "dark etym-gy") smt. by or around (I_bei in Ger.) the body (<< also I_body where the r. is old & with the idea of smt. livingI_nogà, but nogoj /nagaja (also nagishom) means ... naked (hence the legs must be naked, or otherwise they are not of any interest 2(from the vantage point of the man, of course)2 ), & in t.s. time exactly nogoj is a case form m-ing "using the leg /foot" (so that the rel-n leg -- naked in Rus. is very strong); as much as your w. I_naked is also here bc. the r. was o. & in Skr. I_nagnas was naked, poor, not armed, unprotected, or nagnika was nakedness. But there is more to this, bc., coming from the Skr., this r. has given many ws around the globe, like: Fr. negligè |I_neglige| (not properly dressed), or Ger. I_nagen (to cut, incise with teeth, to nibble) giving the rodent as Nage(r)tier, or their I_Nagel (a nail, or talon of bird, i.e. the instrument for biting or tearing), which is c. Ger. (including your I_nail) & has come from I/G. r. (o)nogh- m-ing a nail or tooth or beak, hence I may cite also Rus. nogotþ |I_nogot$| (Bul. nokåt, a nail), & maybe the ... I_nose (I_Nase in Ger., nos in Sl., I_nasa in Skr.; I have ment-d this, << naître |I_naitre|). Or we may go to the old Greece where ονυξ was a nail, tooth, or hoof, giving the known mineral I_onyx (bc. the o. folks imagined that it looked like finger nails, with alternating red & white layers), or go to the Hin*, too, where I_nag is a ... snake (hence you may put the I_snake also here 2(though the beg-ing "s" changes the r. a bit 3(but, still, not much, bc. in It. this let. in the beg-ing is = to the pref. ex-, and the snakes cast their skins)3 )2, but then, why not also the I_snack?).
On the other hand, the pair of legs are like ... scissors (aren't they? --- cutting the space) so that here comes the Sl. knife, which is I_nozh in Rus. or Bul., nizh in Ukr., etc. (c. Sl.), together with the scissors (which for us are just a pair of knifes) called nozhnitzû |I_nozhnitzu^| /nozhitzi; also in o. Gr. may be found smt. sim., their νυγγω |I_nyggo^| as to prick, shove, reflect. Still, the nakedness isn't disappeared bc. here is the known Lat. I_nudus /nuda (slightly modified but it is given here bc. the m-ing fits), where from are all the I_nudist|s, then in Ger. together with I_nagen-to-nibble exists also the verb I_neigen (building an interesting pair of ws), where the latter means: to lean, have a liking for smt. /smb., & from here as noun Neige is ... ah, but it isn't strong desire, no, it is what is left on the bottom of a glass (bc. seeing it everyone wants to heave it & pour it in his /her own throat 2(the Ger. etym-sts rel. neigen to nicken-to-nick & cite a Lat. niti as to weight, lean to smt. 3(so that you may include here the ment-d I_Niet -- nut -- I_nitka)3, what is probable, but for me the assocs are more interesting & in this way we jump to the side bc. the ideas are diff.; I also doubt about this etym-gy bc. there is a very sim. Lat. nitide or I_nitidus as shining, where this quality may very well come from the nudity, not from the heaviness)2 ).
Further on, there is Sl. (Rus., Bul.) I_nagon as strong desire but mainly in sexual context (like the lust, sexual drive) and I have initially expected to find this w. in the Fr. (with such beautiful nasal -on) but, alas, there is ntg. of the kind there, so that (bc. the Rus. etym-sts 2(which I've consulted)2 remain silent here) it has to be only Sl. (jargon), though closely rel-d to Ger. I_neigen (& to the negligè|I_neglige|--naked parts of the body). In fact there is smt. sim. in the Eng. too, your I_nag (given with doubt from a Dan. negge), either as old horse, or as pony, or as to nag smb., bc. this is either smt. that nibbles us from inside (strong wish), or this I_nagen-nibbling is in its direct m-ing (when this concerns the horses). But in Eng. this is a single w., where in Rus. there is also naglûj |I_naglu^j| (nagål in Bul.) as pert, impertinent, what surely (in sexual context) has to carry the ideas of nogoj-naked, I_nagon, & neigen (the etym-sts give it as o. & c. Sl. with Cz. nahly, Pol. nagly 2(also Blt. but from the Slavs)2 m-ing fast or quick, they cite even some Lat. naguot as to move fast, but this idea is consequence of our ideas).
So this was about the c. Sl. noga-leg, with the exception of Bul., where we say I_krak, what may be taken for variation of our I_ruka /råka-hand (o. Sl., with some Blt. ranka 2(& renku, or rinþkti as to gather)2, but I don't value much these langs as etym-cal sources for Sl. ws), but it may hide also other ideas, so let me dig here a little. This I_krak-leg isn't just Bul. but, acc. to the etym-sts, o. & pre-Sl. (krakå /karakå 2(the last 'å' in o. Sl. ws, as said already, is dumb let., like the Fr. -e, & was used earlier as end-char 3(when ending on consonant)3 bc. the space isn't exactly a let. in any alphabet)2, they give also some Blt. karka as bottom part of the leg but only of a pig 2(what may be just some carne)2, & Alb. krahë |I_krahe| as an upper arm --- with t.s. my remark about these langs), what may lead us to the ... I_crab, bc. it is I_rak in Sl. (& the most important parts of a crab are its "hands" or "legs"). So let us speak about the crab (bc. it is an animal, after all). The etym-gy here isn't very precise bc. this is sound imit. (of scratching), but there was Skr. I_karkatas (a crab) & karkaras (prickly), then o. Gr. καρκινοσ (crab as animal or as the constellation), giving the Lat. I_cancer (also as the illness) or I_carcinoma (& you see that the r. varies: 'kantzer' -- 'kartzen'), & Ger. I_Krebs & your crab & Rus. krab (but only as sea-animal), & the Sl. I_rak (which may also be viewed as inversion of the kar- r.) as a cancer or river-crab. In a way karkaras sounds like 'barbaras' (<< barbarian), so that the rs may be rel-d, but here we are interesting in the I_krak-leg, what really is very near to the rak-crab & råka-hand (or raka in Srb.); on the other hand this isn't much away from the disc-ed arm, or also from the crane (<< Kranich). But there are other sim-ly s-ing (& smh. rel-d) ws, like: Ger. I_Krake (a sea-calmar, & it also has many hands or legs), or Ar. I_arak, which has given the I_raki-vodka but its initial m-ing in Ar. was of a sweat (& it comes from the arm-pits), or (I have met it in a book) the old Hebrew's hard curse I_raka (where I don't know the exact m-ing of it, but it surely has to mean smt. pervert 2(bc. the crabs don't move in the normal way)2 or bad, ill).
And bc. of the I_arak-sweat I will return again to the Sl. I_reka-river, as also to the I_ruka /råka-hand --- this time with the image of smt. flowing out of our body. This is an interesting moment, but now you have to imagine some dress (enveloping the arm) bc. I_rukav in Rus. is what in Eng. is called I_sleeve, but to slitþ /slivatþ |I_slivat$| in Rus. is to pour out (<< litþ |I_lit$|), even the exact sliv in Rus. means a gully or pipe for taking off sewage waters, so that it turns out that for you also smt. flows around the arm. You may think this is just funny, not serious, but, however it is, this flowing-idea exists in many other roots, like in: your I_trousers, which correspond (having come to this) with the prep. I_through, or the I_trough (& the I_throw|ing); then let me take your I_hose what you use mainly to water the plants in the garden but for the Ger* t.s. I_Hose are ... the trousers! ( We are disc-ing here the hidden for the Eng* idea, but acc. to the Ger. etym-sts their Hose is rel-d to the --- believe it or not --- I_Haus-house, & they are right bc. I have met this idea in one book, it is like that fairy tale about the old lost glove where one mouse made it its home, then a wolf, then a bear, etc. ) But there are also the Rus. trousers, which are called I_brjuki (they say also shtanû, what is from to stand) but in Ger. Brücke |I_Bruecke| is a ... bridge, & where a bridge stays there has to be some river, hasn't it? Let us not go into details here about what kind of river this may be (bc. the Sl. soul is a deep one), but some river surely was imagined; I wouldn't be surprised even if in It. I_camicia m-ing a shirt smt. sim. is hidden, comp-d with their camino-chimney (<< komin). And smt. may flow also through the ... socks (>> I_Socke), especially of the kind of Tur. (Per. & Ar.) çorap |I_chorap|, known also in Bul. (&, b.t.w., as Gypsy jargon the ... vagina was called churabè --- bc. men use to "put" it on like a sock over their special extremity 2(or, if you are poetically inclined, you may change the last w. with "cock")2 ), where the flowing is to be seen bc. of the Tur. çuçur |I_chuchur| (known also in Bul., or chuchurka) what is a spigot or small tube (from here I_churka is usually jargon for boy's penis), or bc. of Bul. I_shurtja as to flow, or I_chishkam as (again jargon for) to piss (rather, pee), etc. From sim. r. & with the same idea in Ger. may be found their I_Strumpf m-ing again a sock & rel-d with their I_Strom as small river, stream, or a current (also electrical), or even better with Bul. or Rus. I_struja m-ing a stream or a flow.
On the other hand, one may say: this I_brjuki might be the Eng. I_breeches. Yeah, they might, but there the idea is diff. In Brücke |I_Bruecke| smt. breeds below (<<brühen |I_bruehen| or brod; << also I_Brust), as much as in the I_reka-river smt. thunders or reverberates like a bagpipe or bass-instrument (ruchitþ |I_ruchit$| in Rus.), where the breeches are smt. broken, or sharp & cutting like ... like the I_Britt|s! I mean that Brittany or Britannia or British (arisen in 9th cent.) has to say that this country is cut apart from the continent, though etym-cally the things are not so clear, there's a Fr. province I_Breton (with the town Brest), but in the Lat. Brit(t)ones is only an inhabitant of Britain. Here is also Ger. I_Brett (& o. Eng. bret = brit) as wooden plank, then one Bul. jargon, I_brichka, as smt. (usually a car) old & worn out, which is given from It. I_birrocio ('birocho') as horse-cart, to remind you also the Fr. I_bric-a-brac (& >> brick too; in the Lat. this r. sounds a bit diff., I_brevis as short, brief, what is breve in It.), so that the I_breeches are wedge-formed trousers, but also with a hint for some ... cutting at the bottom part of the body (when breech means a bottom; or take also the phrase "breach of promise"). The Brücke-bridge may also hide some cutting (here, in crossing of the river) bc. the r. is very old; this may be proved, say, citing the o. Heb. ritual of ... circumcision called I_bris, although in Rus. the exclam. brûsþ |I_bru^s$| is used to ... drive dogs away, but then maybe the Heb. idea is t.s. (to throw away the praeputium & say "bris" for not wanting it back). And not to forget the Sl. ... shaving, what in Rus. is britþsja |I_brit$sja| (bråsna 2(se)2 in Bul., or briti in Cz., etc.), or resp. the razor-blade in Rus. is britva (or bržytwa |I_brzytwa| in Pol., etc.), where the etym-sts give: Skr. I_bhrinati as a wound, Avs. I_pairibrinati as to circumcise (& << paradise for the beg-ing of the w.), some Thrakian βριλων as a barber, even in Alb. "britmi i pare" was the month September, as the 1st harvest-month (& "britmi i düre" was October; also brisk was razor blade there).
From here, comp-ing britmi with the Pol. bržytwa |I_brzytwa|, I sup., we may come also to the Sl. harvesting which is I_zhatva in Rus. (as a noun, or zhatþ as verb m-ing to reap, or I_zhnetz m-ing a reaper) what is some sound imit. based on 'zhåt-' what we (some Sl* tribes) have found better s-ing than 'br(zh)it-' (& your I_reap, then, has to be sim. imit.); it is also very probable that our ... wound, which is I_rana in Rus. (c. Sl., & ranitþ /naranitþ is to wound), has started from smt. like the Skr. bhrinati. ( I wished to insert here our I_obrjad 2(a ceremomy, ritual, usually religious --- bc. of some sacred cutting, << sacro)2, but this is: ob + rjad-order, so that there is no "britting" here; there's also Ger. I_obrig & Obrigkeit 2(= to our obrjad-ritual)2 but this also has to be coincidence bc. it comes from ober 2(above)2 )

~ ~ ~

Ah, we have spoken for a long time about the legs & what we put around them but we have almost forgotten the I_foot, which is Ger. Fuß |I_Fuss| (& << Zoll or inch as rel-d to the foot). Here I prefer again to tell you fist my version, and then to ment. the official etym-gy, for what purpose we have to start with Sl. (Rus.) I_bos /bosòj (or Cz. & Pol. I_bosy, etc.) what is barefooted. This is useful bc. it leads us directly to the ... I_Bosforus (o. Gr. Βοσποροσ, you prefer to write it Bosporus), what meant "goat's wade-through" (rather a pore, judging by the ending), though βοσισ wasn't exactly a goat (or another animal) but what they use to ... eat, the forage, & βοσκω was to graze (<< boza, bozajnik; to add that I_bozki is Bul. dialect for the tits). It is exaggerated to sup. that this strait may be crossed on foot, but this is natural image; what is interesting here is: why the animals have to be closely rel-d with going I_bos-barefooted? But this is easy to grasp, they don't wear shoes (the horse-shoes are smt. that you imagine are shoes); & from βοσισ-grass-etc. it is easy to come (via the s--t mutation) to o. Gr. βοτανη, Lat. botanicus, or the well-known I_botany.
Not much away from here, I sup., is Fr. I_bois ('bua') m-ing a tree or forest (<< f., but it's rel-d to the fire), which is given from Lat. I_boscus (though I couldn't find it in a dict. but there is It. bosco m-ing t.s.), yet here many ideas are mixed: not only the disc-ed animal food, also the big animals (on bo-/bu-, like Lat. bos = I_bovis as an ox) or just as smt. growing (like Ger. I_Baum-tree), & poss. also the ... boa-snake, which is Lat. I_boa = bova (m-ing also a prolonged container for wine; used by Pliny, but given from unknown origin). So, and now to the Fuß|I_Fuss|: this isn't exactly bos but the Gr. let. "β" (not "φ") looks very alike the Lat. "f", & now the Gr* read it as 'v', but it often sounds like 'f', so that I find such etym-gy (i.e. βοσισ -- "fosis") very probable. The Ger. etym-sts say that there was Got. fotus, what was I/G. r. ... ped- (<< pederast), but I don't find this good phonetically, and you know that I_foetus is Lat. for an embryo but it isn't foot-like, neither walks on the ground, though it is smt. naked & a kind of animal (bc. it isn't yet human being, if it was human embryo); besides, I think this w. has to be from (or at least is closely rel-d with) the Lat futuo.
But there is one important part of the foot, namely the heel, and here we shall start again from the Sl* bc. they are nearer to the Gr. source saying I_pjatka (in Rus., or peta in Bul.) where the o. Gr. w. was πεταλον. Yeah, but here you will need some explans bc. this is the known Eng. (& Fr. & Lat.) I_petal m-ing a leaf of flower blossom, what doesn't seem to have smt. in common with the heel (& the m-ing in o. Gr. was t.s. as in Lat. 2(or also of a thin metal plate)2, or there was also πεταλοσ as open, like the palm of the hand). But now, look at the petal of a flower (say, of a daisy). It is oval, isn't it? As oval as one Bul. (here Tur.) dry sausage called sudzhuk (sim. to the lukanka, << l.) which we buy in pieces called (archaic) I_petalos. So here the form is important, & t.s. form has also the horse-shoe called also petalo in Bul., & a horse foot (I mean, its shoe) doesn't differ much from the human heel, & we don't call the whole foot peta /pjatka bc. the important part (that steps & presses down & leaves petal-formed imprints on the ground) is only the heel. In the Fr. also exists the w. petal (petale) with your m-ing, but the Fr* have begun to analyze & dissect the Gr. w. (I have reached to the conclusion that from the Western nations the Fr* have made the best poss. use of the Gr. ws, I would say that they have more Gr. ws than in the Lat., if this is at all poss.; even their capital, I_Paris, I think, is named so bc. of the ancient hero Paris 2(at least the town is masc.)2, who has stolen the beauty Helen & with this action caused the ancient Trojan War), so the Fr* have split the Gr. w. & made also the w. I_talon, which has come to the Eng* with m.o.l. t.s. m-ing. You see, the talon is the heel, but if it is of a bird then this may be a nail (the hind one & the sharpest), but the heel (that presses) isn't disappeared bc. a talon is also some thin piece of paper or other folio (& by the Sl* this is the only m-ing of the w. talon; or in Lat. I_petalum means metal folio). There is also smt. else "petaling" by the Sl*, the buttonhole called petlitza in Rus. /Bul., which comes from Rus. I_petlja m-ing a loop or hoop, where from is the verb petljatþ as to go in circles, wander, meander.
But there's another interesting moment, the ... number 5, which is pjatþ |I_pjat$| in Rus. (pet in Bul., etc.) & this comes from o. Gr. πεντε |I_pente| (t.s.). But what has the 5 to do here --- did you get it? Well, most probably the πεταλον was named so bc. most flowers have 5 petals, & the fingers of many animals are 5 (& the stars are usually drawn with 5 rays), & in the graphical image of the number 5 exists some oval curve --- hence one talon may as well be 1/5th of a petal(on)! And what about the Eng. w. I_heel (bc. in Ger. it is Ferse, some scratching or granulating, like in the w. Firn, the everlasting snow)? The etym-sts can't help us here bc. they give some o. Eng.: hela, hüle, hiel (even some Blt. kinku as a joint but this has not a single let. in common with "heel"), but with no idea & ntg. really old, so that I'll tell you my version which is more phonetic than etym-cal. It starts from the antique Gr. epos, namely from the name of the hero ... I_Achilles! And why I think so? Well, bc. of the natural (though questionable, if you ask the etym-sts, bc. I have met ntg. of the kind in the etym-cal books) egg is, in fact, ovum, but in one case form it becomes ovo (where the phrase|I_phrases|: ad ovo 2(from the beg-ing)2 may be cited), but there is also a verb ovo (ovarum, ovare), which doesn't mean to lay eggs but to jubilate (smt. like Ave 2(Maria)2) & here is also the I_ovation, so that I was right about the happy exclams.
Then to the I_eye: it is I_oko in Sl. ('okò', 'òka', 'ochì', or 'òchi, smt. like 'oho'), your w. sounds like the Ger. Ei-egg (the m-ings may vary 2(& an eye looks like an egg)2 but the happy cry remains), in Ger. it's I_Auge (some 'au'), in Fr. is I_oeil ('joj'), in Lat. it's I_oculus (what means also a look; this is where from the o. Sl oko has come; & here is the place to ment. their I_occultus 2(occult), what is from occulo, -are as to hide, what has to be split in: oc + cult 2(officially + celare, from I/E. r. kel- as to hide, but in this way it is difficult to be grasped)2, what fits here as rel-d to the seeing 2(I mean that such things can't be seen but smb., still, may imagine seeing them; that is also why a ghost in Sl. is prividenie = pri + videtþ-to-see)2 ), & in Skr. it was I_aksha /akshi, i.e. again 'ah'. ( Hmm, and from the latter Skr. w. obviously 2(but after much time has flown by from the beg-ing to the moment of my coming to this here conclusions)2 has to be one widely spread on the East 2(Tur., Ar., Gypsy)2 name, I_Aisha --- with the idea that I value her as the irises of my eyes; comp. this later with Akhmed. ) The situation is sim. with the I_ear too, where your w. corresponds well with (to) I_hear, in Ger. it is I_Ohr (some 'oho') corresponding with hören |I_hoeren| as to hear, in Sl. it's I_uho (the stressing may vary in diff. Sl. langs), in Fr. it's I_oreille ('orej', they use the last 5 lets, b.t.w., to say only 'ej'; here they cry loud hoping to be heard), in Lat. it's I_audio (again 'au' but more like a w.; & again to squeeze one more w., their I_audeo as to wish, dare to ask 2(i.e.: "'Au' 3(, what a thing! I want it)3!")2 ), & the Skr. ear was I_karna (what this time isn't just a happy exclam. but some coughing for to be heard).
So, but the I_oko is o. Sl. & now the Rus* use I_glaz instead, where the idea is diff., though, if one takes only 'gl-' from it & interprets this as some ecstatic cry (for wanting to gulp smt.) it might turn out to be t.s. But in which langs it is most probable to meet such s-ing? I think in the Ger. this is poss. (<< Glück), also in some Sl. langs, bc. the glaz isn't alone, there are also: Rus. I_vzgljad (a look), ogljadetþ (to see, observe), Bul. I_ogledalo (a mirror, for us there is ntg. ... miraculous in it), Bul. I_gledam (or even gljodam as one dialect, to see; from here a view is gledka), & poss. other ws, but the original s-ing has to come smw. from the East. I started to dig here not only bc. of the glaz but also bc. of the Eng. ... I_ogle, what isn't just a look but a longing one, and this sounds strange in the Eng. (even in Fr. or Sp. I couldn't find a single w. beg-ing on ogl-), & the Eng. etym-sts say only that it was from 17th cent. (i.e., not very o.) & was "vagabond's jargon" (that's how they put it) coming from o. Ger. ögeln (now äugeln |I_aeugeln|, read 'ojgeln') m-ing to cast a look, to observe (where it is clear that in Ger. this is deriv. from the I_Auge). So that, though ogle & glaz, and put here also your I_gaze & I_glare, can be viewed as some additions to the eye-r., they sound diff. from the Skr. I_aksha; & when I said that here must be smt. Eastern I had in mind, say: Tur. gös |I_goes| as eyes (from here karagös means black-eyed 2(but in Bul. exactly this is a kind of river-fish --- poss. with t.s. idea, though I have never looked a fish in the eyes --- have you?)2 ), or << gül |I_guel|-rose (they like roses very much) or göl |I_goel|-puddle (that might be a kind of mirror), or this Bul dialect gljodam, which comes from regions with mostly Tur. population, & others. In Ger. also may be cited more ws, like: I_glotzen (to stare, a jargon), or their I_Glas ('glaz') m-ing a glass or mirror or window (poss. source for glotzen), or I_Glanz (a glance, shining, where from the glare has to have come); or we may return to Russia where a window-glass is I_okno (like an oko-eye 2(of the house)2 ) & I_ochko is a score (in a game, but also smm. as a flower button).
And one more moment (together with the glancing) --- the ... I_amber, though not of this r. (which, b.t.w., is some gulping 'ah(m)'). The story here is that in old times the Teu* have not known the glass-wares and seeing that the Lat* made them (as phials or beads for necklaces; the window-panes come much later) they've chosen their own old w. glasa, which meant amber, also for the glass, & so later on for the glass was coined Ger.-Lat w. I_glaesum. But initially this was the amber (there was an o. Eng. glär for the amber), which in Tur. /Per. is called I_kehlibar (also kehlibar in Bul., but we pronounce the 'h'), and if you allow me to split this w. I'll do it in: kehl + bar (where bar may be just an ending, but may mean also that this is smt. that one wants to touch --- >> baram), & as for the kehl, well, this isn't much away from (to) glare, or from Ger. I_klar = to Eng. I_clear = to Fr. clair (where eclairer is to shine, what has given the known ... pastry I_eclair, i.e. shining, or smiling, pastry); so that it may be said that Klara /Clare is clear as kehlibar. Ah, & although glaz is only Rus. as an eye there are sim. ws in the other Sl. langs, like: Pol. glaz (a stone or cliff) or I_glazny (smooth, or skilled), or Bul. (& Rus.) gladåk |I_glada^k| (smooth) or I_glazura (a glance, or glancing covering, say of a tart), or Cz. hlediti (to look, this is o. Sl. if on gl-), & even the Sl. ... hunger may be put here (I_golod in Rus., glad in Bul., etc., << them) bc. of the gulping imit-n. And let us finish with this the parts of the animal body.

~ ~ ~

OK, so let us go then to diff. animal names. They are so much that I wonder with which one to begin, but maybe it would be good to begin with Bul. name for the calf which is I_tele (telënok |I_telenok| in Rus.), what is suitable bc. this is a twin with Rus. I_telo (or tjalo in Bul.) what is a body (animal or not). My version is simple (as all said by a genius, ah?): the telo-body is rel-d to its I_Teil|s (parts, in Ger.)! This is philosophical idea (of decomposition, dividing of the whole body, or the world) & I only wonder why I have met it nowhere so simply stated (poss. bc. of this jumping btw. Sl. & Western ws), but I hope you'll believe me after my explans. The Teil-part is widely spread on the West --- Fr. I_taille ('taj', also Ger. & Sl., a waist --- bc. it divides the body 2(where you poss. think that on the I_waist smt. is ... wasted & that is why it is so thin)2 ), the worldwide known I_detail, your (ouch, not exactly yours but Eng.) I_tail, the Eng. I_tailor (who makes & connects the Tails of the dresses), then your I_deal & dealer (to do, but with the idea of decomposition), then to divide, one Got. dails (source for your deal, also for Sw. del), Rus. delitþ |I_delit$| (Bul. delja etc., to divide) & Bul. djalam /I_djalkam (to truncate, cut), Sl. I_dol /I_dolina (a valley), & others. Maybe Bul. I_dete (a child) is also here, as if being part of woman's body (where I say "maybe" bc. this is also children's jargon & near to I_djado-granddad, to what we shall come later), what is, in fact, c. Sl., bc. the Rus* have an obsolete detë ('detjo') but don't use it now (they say rebënok |I_rebenok|, what, in my view, has to be distorted from ... 'reVjonok' coming from revetþ |I_revet$| /reva as to cry, weep; & the parents should have made this on purpose, in order to hinder the children to understand this name & ... begin to cry louder). ( Well, etym-ly rebënok is given from the ... slave, rob or o. Sl. robå, what I don't think fits in the m-ing 2(though there is a reason for such ideas bc. the Rus* use to say, unliterary, robjata instead of rebjata as pl. for boy)2; but it may fit if rel-d with the small things, I_dreben in Bul. 2(but >> d.)2, bc. some Skr. I_arbhas as a boy is cited, what was rel-d with orbe- r. where is Ger. I_Erbe 2(<< E.)2 as heritage; still, even if so, the modification of the r. might have been done in accordance with the above-given ideas. ) Then, as a twin with the Eng. tail, may be viewed also the w. I_tall (as with big telo), though this is questionable bc. in Ger. I_toll (& that's how you read tall) means raging, crazy (but we'll come further to this "heavy" idea).
So, and now let us look at this parallel from the Sl. part (I_telo, o. Sl.), which turns out to be well present in the o. Gr. (& further back). There were: τελοσ |I_telos| (as an end, decision, army, tax, etc. --- it's a normal situation in the o. langs to have many m-ings for one w., what is bc. of the assocs hidden behind, so here the main idea, I sup., has to be that of some connection that makes the parts to one whole thing), or τελεω (to finish, do, carry --- you begin to feel the idea, don't you?), then in Lat. may be found I_telum (this time as a ... spear, a mean for smt., an instrument --- t.s. idea; and the m-ing of tax for the τελοσ comes, poss., from the view to the taxes as an instrument for governing, & the instruments are usually sharpen, they bore through & in this way connect), from here we may return to the Fr. I_taille which means also: a trimming, cutting, sharp end of smt., a figure (<< f.), stature, what now fits good; as also (in my view) Fr. particle I_tel /telle (masc. /fem.) m-ing "such" (i.e. identical, cut out of t.s. body). Then we may go again to the Gr. but to the new lang. where t.s. τελοσ |I_telos| means exactly a body, & τελι is a string (of a musical instrument), what you have to believe bc. from here come the I_telephone & the television etc., & to stress also on the fact that a string may be looked at as 1-D body. But if so, then in Bul. we know the Tur. I_tel as a wire; and then in Ger. exist the twins: I_Seite (read 'zajte', as usual) m-ing a string, and I_Saite (read t.s.; and mark that for the Ger* it isn't at all usual to write one & t.s. phoneme in several ways, as this happens often in the Eng. or Fr.) m-ing a side (what is 1-D body 2(or a face, what is 2-D body)2, i.e. the border of the body 2(which, though normally 3-D, may also be 2-D)2 ). And after so much ws I think I may as well ment. also one Western ... country with a good taille-waist. Have you guessed it? But it surely has to be I_Italia (Italy)!
That's good, but I ment-d the I_tele-calf & left it unfinished. It is, etym-cally, from new Gr. θηλυ (they just changed "τ" to "θ"), what is a female (animal or woman), so that our tele isn't exactly the child but the dame, and, really, in Rus. 'tjolka' (written tëlka |I_telka|) is a pregnant cow (that will bring a tele /telënok |I_telenok|). But the things, in my view, are still rel-d to the I_telo-body & its connected parts (via visible link or invisible force) bc. θελω means: to want, like, or love (i.e. smt. draws me to the object); I even sup. that Rus. ... hotetþ |I_hotet$|, what is to want, may be derived from here (the 'ho-' being a kind of prefix, or rather a happy exclam.; & telo -- hotelo rimes good & has suitable carnal m-ing); we shall return to this Gr. r. on ... intellect. But there is smt. more to this drawing to the beloved one, smt. from the gods, bc. θελημα is god's will, what may lead us to your ... to I_tell (say, by the telephone or the telly; but << also talk); some god may have stuck his fingers here also bc. of the bull Taurus (<< T.), as father of the tele-calf, what also sounds m.o.l. sim.; from here we may go then to our Sl. tzjal /tzelûj |I_tzelu^j| (whole) but let us leave this for the moment.
( Yeah, but these are mostly assocs of your author which are questionable from etym-cal point of view, where for the I_dete-child 2(besides θηλυ as for the I_tele)2 an I/E. r. dhe(j)- is cited 2(we shall come to this on doitþ |I_doit$|)2 & a stress is set mainly on the ... milking 2(what doitþ in Sl. means)2 or breast feeding 2(Gr. θηλη as breast's nipple, or θηλαζω as to feed with breast)2. Then for hotetþ |I_hotet$| is said that it's o. & c. Sl. 2(say, Cz. chtiti, o. Sl. hotjati /hoshtå |I_hoshta^|, pre-Sl. håteti or hotio; but not Bul. 3(you see, we have about 90 % Sl. ws and the left minority are called Bul. but they are Eastern --- Tur., Ar., Per., from the Pamir & Altai region)3, although in Bul. is widely used the particle I_shte /shta /shtesh, what surely was influenced by this o. hoshtå, though, in addition, or more directly, it may be derived from the before-ment-d Tur. iştah |I_ishtah|-longing)2, but this is also Eastern 2(an Arm. xand as strong wish or xind as a joy 3(to be read with 'h', not 'ks')3 is given)2, & o. Gr. 2(χατεω was to want, & χατισ was a lack or want)2, & Lat. 2(becoming there sentio)2, what has to be understood as written like xentio bc. in Avs. was some ksshatra as a ruling, & in Skr. ksajati was to rule, govern, but, mark, it is said that these last ws should not be rel-d; etc. So you got, I sup., why I have put this in parentheses, bc. all is meshed & I am trying to simplify the things, and in general I am right 2(though not in the details, which exactly are questionable)2. The tele, sucking or not, is a part of the woman 2(animal one or not, & if it happens to be born as human it is called dete)2; and even if for hotetþ there are good Gr. sources 2(χατεω & χατισ)2 I may add also the Eng. ... I_hot, resp. heat, bc. you know the children's guessing saying "hot" or "cold", i.e. what is hot is what we want 2(& in Ger. Hitze-heat means, besides this, also an excitement or carnal desire; in Fr. it is highly mutilated to chaud, read 'shod', so that it is difficult to find t.s. idea)2; it was also useful to see that this Lat. "x" coming from the Gr. "χ" is a cavernous vocal. )
Ah, all this was about the Sl. I_calf, but your w. isn't difficult, it is near to the ment-d I_cube or I_cub, smt. spherical, coming directly from Ger. I_Kalb (I mean, from its predecessors, like o. Kalbo, what is exactly the Sl. kålbo |I_ka^lbo|-ball 2(<< k. or Kolben)2 ), which is given from an I/G. r. gelbh- m-ing to curl in a ball (what young animals, say dogs, like to do). The cub may become cube bc. this is also a "pumped" figure, otherwise there is ntg. curved in the cube (but poss. the old people imagined the cube as a die and it rotates when thrown). You don't know this, & nowadays in Bul. this is forgotten, but not half a cent. ago there was an apprentice qualification for which official document was issued & such person was called I_kalfa (met also in Srb.), & the young ones were happy to be called "calves" --- bc. nobody cared to analyze the w. It is interesting to ment. also your other m-ing of the calf as one sticking out bone of the foot, which in Rus. is I_ikra (<< I., again smt. rounded), but in Bul. it is I_prasetz, what comes from our I_prase-pig (hence, it bears your idea --- to relate the bones of the foot with animals bc. to go barefooted is animal-like). From another r., but with sim. idea, is the bull, where were: o. bulle or today's Ger. I_Bulle, Dan. bul, etc (<< bull, bûk; << also I_bulla), where an I/G. r. bhel- as to swell is given and some etym-sts state that here is also the Lat. I_phalus, what may as well be true bc. the bull plays important part in human history from old times & is present (in some way) also in the love plays, to what we shall come some time later.
The other name of the bull, Taurus, we have also disc-ed, so let me say a pair of sentences about the I_cow (but << krava), which is Ger. I_Kuh, o. Frisian ku, Dan. koe, Got. Kouz, I/E. gwous, Skr. I_gaus (or gao or go), & even Sumerian gu. Such old w. has to be an imit. & usually the cow says 'muu', but maybe the old folks have heard it as 'kuu'. However it is this is its name, though in Ger. I_Gaul is a ... working horse (i.e. he/it performs the role of a cow or bull); here is also Ger. I_Gauleiter (a big ruler in Fascist times, literally "cow driver" 2(bc. of the I_Leiter-leader, but it isn't very clear whether it begins with Gau for Kuh-cow or with Gaul-horse 3(not that this is so important)3 )2 ); there's also Ger. I_Gau as a region, landscape, but this (if it isn't transferring of the name of the ruler to the ruled area) should be from the Gr. goddess I_Gea (the Earth 2(ah, I have met a crazy, sorry, Eng., way of writing her as "Gaia" but this isn't correct)2, where from is the I_geology 2(though, on the other hand, who can disprove the statement that the ancient Gr* have named the Earth Gea bc. we often use to ... milk her, like a cow?!)2 ). This r. is to be met also in Sl., but slightly modified, where the bull as species is called govjado /I_govedo (Rus. /Bul.) & the cow meat is resp. I_govjadina /govezhdo, also govetþ |I_govet$| /zagovjavam is to eat rich (m-ing meat), though here are hidden also some indecent moments, to which we shall come much later. I sup. Sp. gauchoes have also to be here bc. they are usually known as cowherds (in Sp. I_gaucho is given as: skillful, dexterous, experienced, beautiful, rough, or a tramp, & from here gauchar means to behave, react 2(not necessarily as a cow /bull /beast)2, but this simply has to be rel-d to the cow --- for sim., exceeding their initial m-ing of professions rel-d to some animals, >> sheep). Ah, there is also Ger. I_Vieh for (horned) cattle, & Fr. I_viande as meat, having given the Eng. veal (poss. also the venison), but this has to be an imit. (unless it has gotten the ... 2nd syl. of our Sl. govjado /govetþ, what isn't to be excluded, come to think of it 2(bc. this is suitable imit.)2; or it is rel-d to the Fr. vie-life as smt. alive 2(what may come to t.s. idea)2 ).

~ ~ ~

Now let us choose another animal. I propose, having just spoken about curved bulls & cows, & about horses doing their job, to go to the good old I_horse, though not as Eng. w. (which has to be an imit. of neighing or whinnying 2(the etym-sts give old: hors, hars, o. Saxon hros, Dan. ros, & Ger. Roß |I_Ross|, coming from some o. χorsam, which was of unknown origin; besides, I sup. the Roß, being an army horse, which are usually of reddish-brown colour, has to be rel-d mainly to the I_rouge--rose, or the I_Rost--rust)2 ), but as Sl. name. In this case we have Rus. kobûla |I_kobu^la| or Bul. kobila or Cz. kobyla, etc. (o. Sl.), m-ing a female horse, a mare (<< m.; but the gender isn't important), and when I use Sl. w. here it isn't bc. I want to teach you Rus. (or Bul.) --- you should have seen this till now --- but bc. such ws are usually variants of, either Western (Lat., Gr.), or o. Eastern, ws. Here both poss-ties are true, & the Western ws are, say: Fr. I_cavalier (a rider), Sp. I_caballero (a gentleman, but he surely has ridden on a horse-back, in those o. times), Fr. I_chevalier or It. cavaliere or Rus. (Sl.) kavaler (t.s.), what comes from Fr. cheval (a riding horse), which is Lat. I_caballus (a working horse, this time, or take It. cavallo as a horse) & o. Gr. καβαλλησ (with the Lat. m-ing); but it's even older bc. in Persian I_kaval was a fast horse for riding, & in o. Tur.-Ar. käväl was again horse, & so on. Till now you have seen the poss. mutations of the r. & should have come to the conclusion that here is also the ancient ... cabal = I_cabbala, of course, which is: Sp. /It. cabala, Sl. kabala, Lat. cab(b)ala, o. Heb. I_gabbalah, etc. (the Eng. etym-sts add also that in the times of Charles-II this was jargon name for the ... Foreign Office; also in 1673 was a junta consisting from: Clifford, Arlingtone, Buckingham, Ashley, & Landerdale, whose 1st lets gave CABAL). That's good, but what is it that rel-s the riders with the cabal, as also with the ... pipe? Bc. there is Tur. & Bul. I_kaval as musical pipe (what is t.s. Per. w. m-ing a horse), which pipe in Alb. becomes I_kaba (so that << kaba-meaty), & in Bul. exists also the combination w. kaba-gajda (where the latter is a bagpipe)
Well, this shouldn't be very difficult for you bc. I have spoken about the curving or curling (this time from the r. kaba-). The I_cabbala is smt. awfully twisted, the horse, hmm, has a curved back (not that the humans haven't) on which the rider sits, & the I_kaval-pipe issues sounds that are waves (>> also sinus). But let us continue. In o. Gr. there was καβαλεσ as a name of one Libyan tribe (& you may bet that they were good riders), then καββαλε or καταβαλλω was to drop, throw, knock down (>> also kata-, & the ball is obvious). Further, here is ... the I_cobble-stone (cobble is the classical Roman paving stone, which is curved), & the I_cobbler (who doesn't make cobbles, he makes soles & heels of boots & whole boots, but they are also curved), & Rus. I_kabluk (a boot-heel --- smt. done by a cobbler), or Ukr. kablik or Pol. kablak (this time as a bow), or o. Rus. obluk /I_obluchok (a bow but of a sledge cart), & Tur.-Ar. kabluk (a boot-heel, like in Rus.) coming from Ar. I_kab as a heel; & then the I_cab or cabin or Fr. I_cabriolet (rel-d also to the Tur. I_kabak-pumpkin); & the o. Sl. kobila means in Cz. & Ukr. also ... chicken breast-bone (in Bul. we say the "konja-horse 2(<< konþ)2 of the hen"); as also the I_hoof of the horse (Ger. I_Huf) has to be ment-d, bc. a Skr. I_caphas as hoof is given (so that the o. Teu* have poss. distorted the 1st syl. --- say, by the sequence: kab -- kaph -- kuf -- huf). Then there is also a Rus. (said to be unique, bc. not Sl.) kobelþ |I_kobel$| as a ... dog, which may be explained with t.s. curving, though the etym-sts give a poss. Skr. cabalas as motley, of mixed colours; anyway, this reminds me that the bottom line of this Skr. w. has to be the idea of the mixed colours viewed as smt. twisted, like the cabbala (as the rel-n btw. Rus. shar-ball & sharitþ-to-colour says us 2(<< shar)2 ). And I would not be surprised if here also Tur. (& Bul.) I_kobur, as a kind of boot for guns (gun-case) has to be included (bc. it's used by riders); then the ... snake I_cobra (Sp. & Port.) --- for I am sure nobody will deny the curving of the snakes; or Tur. & Ar. (heard also in Bul.) w. I_kabil m-ing "possible" (the doubt is a sign of shakiness); & Bul. I_kobilitza (curving stick with caves on both ends for hanging of 2 buckets, used for carrying of water), etc.
But there are other names for horses (excluding the ment-d konþ) and one of them is Rus. loshadþ |I_loshad$|, which isn't (for those knowing some Sl. lang.) smt. bad (i.e. I_losh in Bul., but it's c. Sl. &. rel-d to the lying 2(<< lozhþ)2 ), but a kind of I_lozhe (a bed, o. Sl., << lezhatþ). Then there is Ger. Pferd but we shall come to it on ... path (bc. it is a kind of vehicle). And there is also the Gr. horse --- I_hippo in Lat. or ιππο in o. Gr. --- which deserves a better look, at least bc. the Gr. w., besides horse, means also the prep. "under" (again bc. the horse is under us), and you surely will believe this bc. there is the known I_hippodrome (ιπποδρομοσ in Gr., ippodrom in Rus., hipodrum in Bul., etc.), as much as there is the Lat. I_hippopotamus m-ing literally a "river (potamus) horse" (in Ger. it is Nilpferd). B.t.w., the latter "horse" in Rus. is gipopotam, but also I_begemot (you write it behemoth but don't use much this w.), what is given (I couldn't have guessed this) from Heb. b'hemoth m-ing a "great or monstrous beast" (some big "moth", ah?), from b'hemah as beast (& is stated to be from Egyptian p-ehe-man m-ing a water ox); also let me add that in Lat. there's another name for the horse, I_equus, i.e. smt. equal, horizontal (comp. with the Rus. loshadþ -- lozhe). The opposite of hippo (Lat.) = ιππο is hyper = υπερ (& you see that the beg-ing "h" is parasitic Lat. insertion), & there are many ws with these prefixes (though super- & sub- are also used), like: I_hypothesis (gipoteza in Rus. 2(almost everywhere in foreign ws beg-ing on "h" the Rus* put "g" instead, & I have ever wondered why they don't say 'Grist (-os)' instead of Christ, but each rule has to have its exceptions)2 --- bc. it lies under, i.e. before, the thesis), or I_hypophisis (bc. this gland lies in the bottom part of the brain), or I_hypothermia (insufficient warming of the body), or I_hypodermic (bc. it goes under the derma-skin), or I_hypotheca /ippoteka (bc. one puts smt. very valuable 2(smm., hmm, even his ass)2 down in the feet of smb. else), etc.
But also the ... I_hypotenuse is here, bc. in the usual way of drawing of right-angled triangle it lies at the bottom of the picture and the catheti (& I would rhyme them with ... cadets) compete to fall over it (or "her", rather) --- & if you think this is just funny so I'll say: well, yes, it is, but this is the way the ancient students (who were grown persons & only men) have imagined the things, bc. the hypotenuse is a very long w. & fem. (gorgeous female, ah?) m-ing exactly "tensed, or stretched below", & the catheti (I_cathetus in sing.) are masc. & surely slide down (katitþ |I_katit$| 2(-sja)2 in Rus. is to slide or roll, & I_katok is a roller 2(used for paving of streets, but also as skating-ring)2; >> also kater); besides, all the trigonometric functions are rel-ns, what is, roughly sp-ing: one above & another one below (>> ratio).
Then on hyper may be ment-d the figure I_hyperbola as smt. around the ball but going farther on, higher than the ball (υπερβαλ(λ)ω in o. Gr. meant to throw over, or avoid smt.). And as much as υπερ- isn't away from περι-, & we tuned for a while on mathematical wave, let me ment. also the known I_perimeter (περιμετρον = περιμετροσ, m-ing a circumference or its length), which in Bul. is to be explained easily as: "peri (to go fast, or hit, a jargon) + meri (I_merja in Bul., meritjþ in Rus., to measure)". More precisely, the 1st one is περισ |I_peris| as around, or περι as prep.: to, toward, around, by; and the 2nd half is the I_meter (μετρον is a measure, μετρω is to count or I_measure, & μερισ |I_meris| = μεροσ is a part, side, layer, also a destiny --- << I_mera). There are diff. derivs of meritþ in Sl. (say, I_izmerenie is a dimension), but smt. was left also on the West, namely your ... I_merit, which is o. Fr. mèrite & Lat. meritum (a price, value, wages 2(i.e. smt. weighed, << wage), or resp. Lat. merito (-are) as to win or earn. And having bitten also into peri- (but << par; & I may add here the I_parameter, I_parallax, etc.) I wish to remind you about the I_peripatetic|s (followers of the school of Aristotle, who, acc. to the legend, liked to walk when giving a lecture 2(& to tell you the truth, I also like to do so, not being an Aristotle)2 ), the I_peripetia-hindrance, the peregrination, the I_periphery, the just ment-d Bul jargon I_otpera (to hit or smash), the I_periscope (a scope to watch whether smb. wants to "otperi" us, say, a bomb), the I_percussion (some "cussion" 2(>> kåt)2 around), Bul., which is Tur., I_pervaz (a window-sill), Tur. perçem |I_perchem| (& Bul., perchem), & the etym-sts give also Skr. parchus as a rib, & Avs. påråsu (a rib or side). Here is also Rus. perstþ |I_perst$| (pråst |I_pra^st| in Bul., o. Sl., a finger 2(<< f., fine)2; but t.s. Bul. w. means also ... earth, soil, i.e. smt. pulverized & everywhere around, like par-vapour), some Blt. I_pirshis (a breast of a horse), I sup. the old ... I_Persia|ns too (though there the main idea has to be that of being 1st 2(what isn't much diff., but we'll come to this in another context)2 ), etc. The syl. per- (or smm. ber- bc. Rus. I_peretz 2(a pepper, or piper in Bul.)2 is biber in Tur. 2(<< biberon-teat too)2 ) means not only around but also smt. sticking out (the idea of the Persia), like the perstþ|I_perst$|--peretz, & from here I_perchatka in Rus. is a glove, & in Bul. percha (se) is to show off, & I_perka is a I_propeller (you have changed "r" to "l" in the main part but it is sim.; also the prep. per is t.s., & the prefix pro- as variety). From Rus. I_paletz (synonymous with perstþ-finger, though in Bul. this is only the thumb) we may go easy to the Lat.-Gr. I_phallus (at least bc. it is a kind of finger, but this is trivial).

~ ~ ~

Well, we have gone away from the animals but we are returning to them now continuing with the ass, where many & interesting names are present. I hope you'll allow me (in honour of my citizenship) to begin with the Bul. w., namely I_magare (where from we derive also the name of the thistle --- magareshki bodil-thorn), which isn't Sl. & isn't clearly explained in the etym-cal dicts). Smt. is given there, the Gr. μαγαρα, what is a garbage, dung, or μαγαριζω, what is to make smt. dirty, or to desecrate, or to, sorry, defecate --- & it's natural to look in the Gr., & search for dirty things bc. the ass is usually taken for dirty & disgusting animal, it isn't like the horse, which in the Arab world was valued more than a woman (& they, I mean the Arabs, were right about the women, up to a certain extent, of course) --- but they (now the etym-sts) are not pretty sure. And they are not sure bc. they didn't have my simple idea in their heads, namely, to derive this animal from the mythical Μεγαιρα (Megäre |I_Megaere| in Ger.-Lat., Megera in Rus., Megaere for you), one of the 3 goddesses of vengeance (Erinnyis, in Ger. Erinnyen, which, b.t.w., make a perfect pair with their I_erinnern as to remind 2(what might not be etym-cally very sound)2 ), whose name is a symbol for bad & scolding woman in maybe all langs; from here has to be (or at least has to be influenced) your ... meager (what is Ger. I_mager, officially given from the ... macro things 2(o. Fr. maigre, It. magro, Lat. I_macrus, & o. Gr. μακροσ)2, but I am not so sure --- I mean, it may be, when this explan. is given, that the meager person is simply longer than he/she is thick, but there has to be some other touch, too, bc. if one is thin one just isn't accepted as macro-big; besides, one may be meager and small).
Convinced in my hypotheses we may begin to dig, and here are many more ws to be found, namely: one Bul. jargon, mekere (a bad, wicked guy, a rogue), that turns out to be Tur. & Ar. mekâre |I_mekare| with primary m-ing there of loading animal (what an ass, surely, is), also in Ar. I_mahara meant an intriguant, dishonest person; then there was some o. Heb. megera (given as poss. source for the o. Gr. μασαρισ) though m-ing ... to saw, what may look like a jump to the side but it isn't, bc. in Bul. I_magare means also a saw-horse (this "animalizing", b.t.w., is widely spread, with small diff-ces, such as: the Eng. usage of a horse, Rus. of a goat 2(bc. they say "kozlû for sawing", where kozël is a goat)2, Ger. again of a goat 2(Bock)2, & Bul. of an ass), but there is more to this bc. Rus. husbands often say: |I_phrases| zhena-wife vesþ-whole denþ-day pilit mne na-over golovu, where pilitþ is to saw (& golova is a head, so that the phrase is an idiom for scolding). Being intrigued to dig here I've found also that there was a Skr. I_makara as a sea monster, what explains the saw (it had had some spikes on its back, surely), & in o. Gr. existed μαχαιρα as a short knife, sabre or sword, also as a sacrifice (from here μαχαιρισ was a razor; and although in this way we move to mahatþ |I_mahat$| 2(to wave or throw away, << m.)2 this fits also with the saw). There is also one Bul. (not Rus.) particle, I_makar, given as new Gr. μακαρι, m-ing "though, in spite of" (there is even It. magari as: maybe, even if), what also here fits (in sense that I want it even if for the others it may be, sorry, a shit); and there is Tur. I_makara (known also in Bul.) as a spool or winch (which may μαχαιρι-swish very fast), & we shall come to nearly t.s. on macerate.
So, and now we continue with the Sl. ass which is osël |I_osel| (in Rus., or osiol in Pol., o. Sl.), but not only Sl. bc. there was Got. asilus, which is Lat. I_asinus, or asina (a she-ass), which then, obviously, is also Ger. I_Esel ('ezel') & Eng. (ah, I don't say "your", do I?) I_ass. OK, but how has this name arisen, what is the hidden idea? Yeah, the idea is better to be seen in the Sl. variant where this is twin with I_osil (in Bul. 2(ostþ in Rus.)2, an awn, or arista, to use the Lat. w., of a cereal plant), & here is the I_axes (Lat.), which in Sl. sounds easier --- o. Sl. & Rus. osþ|I_os$|, Bul. os, Cz. os, Ukr., eisþ, etc. --- though it exist also in the Blt. langs (asis), in o. Teu. (assis), & surely correl-s with the ax /I_axe (the thorn from 1-D figure becomes a 2-D one --- rather v.v., we make an intersection of the axe), & is also the known o. Gr. αξων, becoming I_axon in Lat. (giving the neural axons, the axial directions used in axonometrical projection, & the I_axiom 2(meant, mark it, as the main axes of the statement, but with ntg. divine, which was the case with the theorem)2 ). And now, being also an animal (albeit very tiny) & s-ing in t.s. way, I would like to ment. here Rus. I_osa, which is o. & c. Sl. (Cz. vosa, Pol. osa, etc.), what is your I_wasp, which w. is instructive as to the loosing of the 1st let. ("w"), or changing it to "v", bc. this is Lat. I_vespa, & Teu. wafsa, wefsa, wespe, & Blt. vapsa, etc., given from an I/G. r. wobhes-, which was very old bc. in Avs. I_vawzhaka was some demonic animal (seeing which one says 'au /wau', but it also buzzes in a hot Sl. manner, on 'zhå-'), & in Skr. urnawabhis (I_urna- here has to be rel-d to the urine & other old things) was a ... spider! Let me add to this also Rus. I_ospa as the illness small pox (as if stung by wasps), & Lat. I_vespera-evening (<< v.), & the spider's I_web (& the WWW on the Internet), & Ger. I_weben (to weave), and let us think a little about all this.
The weaving is, in a way, smt. like stinging, the wasps live in woven nests, the spider (called I_Spinne in Ger., hence we may ment. also, though this is from another r., your spin & spine) weaves its web, and in the I_vespera-evening the sky darkens as if covered by some web; b.t.w., from the Lat I_vespa Fr. I_guepe (again a wasp) is given, what I find strangely mutated, but maybe that is how the Fr* have fought with your (& ancient) 'w'; on the other hand I may ment. here one Bul. jargon, I_gepja (>> also I_guepard), what is to fetch, to lay one's hands upon smt., to pilfer, & this is also an act of stinging. And smt. else, the wasp reminds me another Bul. jargon, I_vaptzam /vaptzvam, what is to dye, to colour, but mainly used as idiom for "to be stuck in the mud", where I thought this may be taken for a kind of covering, like in a web, though the Bul. etym-sts give this from o. Gr. βαπτω (then 'bapto') as to dye or rinse, & there is also new Gr. βαφτω (now 'vafto') or βαπσιμω ('vapsimo') again as to dye or temper (steel), what is a good etym-gy. OK, this may be so, & then here surely is the I_baptism, & this leads us to some baths, but, on the other hand, I may still be right about a rel-n to the web (bc. one must not pay much attention to this Gr. "β", & bc. a sinking is like a stinging). ( Also about the Rus. I_ospa-small-pox is said that this is from sûpatþ |I_su^pat$| 2(to pour)2, but this may be additional idea; anyway, this isn't so important bc. in the ancient times the name of the wasp was coined as sound imit. --- some 'båzz /wåzz'. )
But there are other names for the ass, like the Rus. dialect (from the southern Republics of the former USSR) I_ishak, where Azr. ašak, or Tar. išak, etc. are given, but ntg. about the hidden idea is said. Well, I'll tell you the idea, this animal has to be rel-d to the very popular ... Heb. name I_Isaac! You may laugh but, still, this may be true bc. I remember well when in the 1st 2-3 years after the dethronement of Bul. Communist leader Todor Zhivkov many peasants named their pigs Tosho. And don't forget that the Heb* like very much the sound 'sh' & that this name, being widely used, may as well become a synonym for silly person (like: Rus. Ivanushka-Durachok 2(>> durak)2, or Ger. I_Hans, where from I_Hanswurst means a clown, & hänseln is to banter or to spot, what relates with their I_Gans-goose, or take the Eng. I_John, rel-d to the john-toilet, etc.), & this "creative" act might easily have been done by the Arabs (as old neighbours of the Jews). ( Ah, ment-ing Rus. ws of Tur.-Ar. origin, & being tuned on quadrupeds, let me squeeze here also the strange Rus. w. I_jamshchik m-ing a coachman 2(there's an o. Rus. romance "Jamshchik, ne gony loshadej")2, which is given as Tur.-Ar. jamchy /jamchi, but which is very near to Bul. I_kamshik, what is a whip, & which is given also from some Tur.-Ar. qamshik; there is also a river in Bul. 2(in an area with many ethnic Turks)2 called I_Kamchija --- poss. with the idea of swishing through the region like a whip; comp. this with Rus. kamûsh |I_kamu^sh| 2(a river-cane)2, too, which is again Tur. kamiş |I_kamsh|. )
Now let us return to the ass, bc. the etym-gy (from Lat. I_asinus) is one thing, and the ideas & assocs are smt. else, when you use it also as a bottom (& remember the ancient megera), & in this sense it is synonym with your, ouch, with the Eng., I_arse. There are some more ws to be ment-d here like: Ger. I_Arsch (exactly an arse), & Ger. I_Aas (I_carrion, you stress on the need to carry it away as soon as poss.), which explains the pungent odour of the ass /arse (-hole). ( Hmm, I suspected that the ... I_arsenal might have been smh. rel-d to this 2(with an obvious idea which I wish not to write down explicitly)2 but it isn't, bc. its primarily m-ing was of a port or pier, arisen in Venice 2(I_arzanale in It., or arsenal in Sp.)2 & of Ar. origin, where dar-achchin'ah meant a manufactory or place for business activity, and was built from: I_dar 2(a house, or a place)2 + al 2(prep.: of, for)2 + china'a 2(a factory)2; the beg-ing "d" has vanished later thought for an article. My error, however, is excusable bc. of the Eng. I_arson, but it's said the latter comes from Lat. I_ardeo 2(-ere)2 as to burn 2(this is also Bul. 3(Sl.)3 jaråk |I_jara^k|-bright & Rus. 3(Sl.)3 alûj |I_alu^j|-red)2, & it gives also your I_ardent, ardour, & I_arid, with what I agree. ) And as to the etym-gy of the Arsch, there was an o. I/G. r. orso- m-ing a bottom (part of smt.) or a small hill, which was also an o. Gr. ορροσ /οροσ |I_oros| given as an arse (though in a dict. I found it as: a border, border sign or line 2(in Bul. this dividing line btw. the fields is called I_sinur & is rel-d, smh., to the curved sinus, which we shall disc. on another place)2, also a measure, difference, or term in an algebraic expression --- in short: a kind of cutting, what might as well be meant as jargon for the arse bc. the idea for it being some "dividing line" isn't a new one; though, on the other hand, it may as well be meant as smt. stuck out, heaved as a mountain), what isn't much away from the disc-ed I_Eros, if you ask me. It might be also that smw. here is Ger. ash (I_Asche) --- m-ing that a carrion (or a dead body) is just a dust, smt. burned (figuratively). But the ... I_ace, which in Ger. is As, surely isn't here (it is from the 1st let., "A"); as much as the w. Aryan, or the Lat. art (which is I_ars), isn't.

~ ~ ~

OK, let us go now to the I_pork or the swine. The 1st w. obviously comes from the pouring and is Fr. porc & Lat. I_porcus (also porca as conversational form 2(& just to mention the beloved It. curse porco maledetto as damn pig)2 ), though in Rus. exactly I_porka is a beating, but this has to be an imit. of hitting or tearing (in Bul. we say 'pras' for such hitting that breaks smt.); on the other hand the pouring is also an imit. of filling of some container to the brim after what it tears in parts (I_porja in Bul. is to tear or break, say the waves with a motor-boat), but anyway, porka fits good bc. if one has behaved as a pork (or cur) then he/she deserves it. In the Sl. langs this r. is also present (I_prase in Bul. or porosënok |I_porosenok| in Rus., etc.; also por in Bul. is a polecat or a stoat; & you use it in the porcupine), but here we may find also the sin --- I_porok (o. Sl., though << also rok) --- which on the West exists in the form of the ... pornography, which turns out to be o. Gr. (πορνη is a prostitute there, & πορνο- is widely used prefix, say πορνικοσ was lecherous), and to be interested in I_porno matters means to live like a pig (or at least it was meant so before the sexual revolution, or should I say sexual emancipation?). The pouring or porene-tearing is also o. Gr. where ποροσ is a wade-through or current, πορεια |I_poreia| is a step, way of walking, πορρω |I_porro^| is forward, ahead, wide away, and this not only gives our porja & porka but also helps us a bit in understanding of the porno matters as rel-d to the tearing of smt. feminine (let me not go into details).
There might be diff. ideas rel-d with the pork, like Bul. pråsvam (se) or Rus. prûsnutþ |I_pru^snut$| m-ing to burst out (for the Rus* usually laughing), or It. I_pranzo as their lunch which is like our Sl. eating to the full (<< prall & >> obed for more details), or Bul. I_porkan m-ing tipsy, what in Ger. is translated as angesäuselt |I_angesaeuselt| ('angezojselt', & it sounds very beautiful), what is deriv. from their I_Sau-swine. And before finishing with the porc (ah, << pomme too) let me ment. also the process of I_pump|ing (say: Ger. Pumpe, Sl. I_pompa, etc.), where from come all the pompous things (in Lat. I_pompa is a carnival or church procession, then in Fr. they have their I_pompeux), where with this "m" we just close our mouths (in order not to spill the liquid poured into them, I should say). Then about the I_swine: this is smt. swelled (not poured this time) & in Ger. it is I_Schwein ('shvain'), in Sl. I_svinja, but this name also contains its bad m-ing bc. in Bul. I_svinshtina is smt. bad or arrogant or porno etc., and in Ger. there is the interesting w. Schwank (usually used in pl. as Schwänke) |I_Schwaenke| m-ing a pun or joke (but you may bet this is smt. indecent, some svinshtina). On the other hand, the Schwein means also some luck (poss. by the strange inversion of the m-ing, i.e. in spite of smt., like your touching hunchback, or meeting chimney-sweeper 2(the Rus* even have the habit when wishing smb. success in an exam or the like to say |I_phrases| "ni puha ni pera" literally m-ing: to be so torn in pieces that not a single feather 3(likening you with a bird)3 to be left on its place, and the answer is "k chërtu" m-ing ... "go to hell")2 ). A variation, or shortening, of the swine is the I_sow, with: o. sugu, suga, su, Ger. Sau ('zau'), Norw. syr, Lat I_sus /suis, what surely is rel-d to the I_suck|ing (bc. suculus was a young sow in Lat, which is sukalche in Bul. or I_sosunok in Rus. 2(from sosatþ |I_sosat$|-to-suck)2 ), but there is also smt. scornful that lurks in this name bc. t.s. I_sus in Tur. means ... "shut up". Ah, and later I have found that this r. is o. Gr. & that here is the place to ment. also the ... I_syphilis, bc. it is given as med. Lat., from a name of poem, "Syphilis or the French Disease", from 1530, where is narrated about one shepherd S. (but the fable was o. Gr., they ment. Aeneis & Thebais), so that the idea is for a pig's disease, & then I found in the o. Gr. the w. συφεοσ as pigsty (so that the swine was in those times some 'sifea'). As to the I_pig (which isn't Teu.), it has (if we stick to this s-ing & don't go to the pork) to be a variation of the pike (bc. of its muzzle, or the tusk of the boar) & so rel-d also to the ... pugilism & the pugnacious things.
On the other hand --- I personally don't count the hands, bc. they are too many, & don't advice you to count them, too, --- there are other sim-ly s-ing (to the pork or swine) ws which I have to explain smw., so let me do this here. One such w. is Fr. I_porte, what is Lat. porta (a portal, door), & here, obviously, is also the port, but the ... I_import too (m-ing all that comes through the port, from overseas; hence the important things are usually the foreign ones 2(for our way or thinking)2 ), & the portion & -ing (Lat. I_porceo what means to hold 2(what may come through a given porta)2, or I_porto what is to carry 2(smt. through the port)2 ), & the I_portier-porter (who allows the people to enter the portal but in portions), & the ... I_portrait (the pictured person 2(at least when the portrait is a masterpiece)2 looks as if he/she will step out of the wall & trot into the room; or, to put it simple, that it holds the image of the person --- that's my guess), & the portiere, porthole, portico, portfolio, I_portmonnaie (Fr. money-bag), etc., leading us (if we go back in the time, but also aside in the space) to the Ottoman Porte (either as a door to the Orient, or, as specially selected portion of rulers in Turkey, or, maybe, the Turks take this figuratively as a door to their rulers though which the common people are not allowed to enter, they have to wait before it). On the other hand (ah, these hands!), one may think about the I_port as a place where the ... coach-drivers say just 'prrt' (or 'tþpruu' in Rus. --- << also gare) to stop the horses; or that one begins to go πορρω-forward (or πορεω-break the sea-waves), or smt. else (in imit. ws there may be several approaches, & we shall come again to this on, sorry, sorry, fart); if it was only the porta-door one might have said that it just tears apart (pori, from Bul. porja --- << dverþ), but this isn't much diff., & it is again an imit-on. So, in this connection I may add also Bul. ... orange called I_portokal --- as smt. καλο-good coming through the port. With slight mutation but retaining t.s. m-ing of place for stopping has to be ment-d, I sup., also the I_park, as green place as well as parking lot for cars; maybe one Bul. jargon, pråkvam |I_pra^kvam| (se), as to emerge unexpectedly, too. And as to the swelled swine maybe the ... swan (Ger. I_Schwan) deserves to be ment-d; I mean, it is poss. rel-d also to schwimmen-to-swim or schwingen-to-swing or some swishing movement, but the important part in it, still, is the curved neck.
Ah, it might be useful to provide you here with one small parallel for the names of the ... porcelain, bc. they are several. Mentioning the porcelain (Fr. I_porcelaine) you have to guess now that this has to come from the Lat. porca (or more precisely, I_porcella, as diminutive), but this still doesn't answer the question: what a small pig has to do here? One may guess that there were some animal figures made out of porcelain (say, money-boxes like pigs, as I initially sup-d--- bc. these things have world-wide usage, and poss. that's also the reason for the Ger. I_Schwein to mean a luck, too), but the official answer is that not such figures were meant but pieces (cups, I sup., though they speak about Venus shells) which looked like a ... vulva of a sow. ( Well, I personally have never looked in such vulvas so I may keep some doubts about this & sup. that pigs for saving of coins were meant, & the vulva is the slot for inserting of the coins, no matter that nowadays it is set above in the back of the pig, instead of below; and if I have to look for some cynical assocs I would then say that 'portzelan' sounds to me like built of: 'pork' + ... lajno-shit, bc. it is plastic before baking. ) Anyway, the porcella explains why this money-boxes are always in the form of pigs (if at all animal-like) & not, say, of horses or elephants or bears (i.e., the vagina of a sow has called picturesque images in the heads of the people in old times, which a bears' vagina just can't call). So, and there is also the I_faience (which isn't exactly porcelain but smt. sim.), which is easy to be explained bc. it is said to have come from the name of It. town Faenca (though I still think that there might be smt. fine hidden in the name, then of this town). And there's also Rus. I_farfor (exactly porcelain), for which I sup. the reverberating flying (<< hvårkam or I_farfar) has to play the main role, i.e. again some figures were meant but this time they are birds. Well, the etym-sts don't put it so simple, but don't contradict to my guess, bc. they cite Ukr. farfur & Pol. I_farfure, which have come from some Persian /Ar. faγfur (poss. read 'fajfur'), what was an ancient title of the Chinese emperor, as also a region in China where such wares were made; and I say that this doesn't contradict to the bird's hypothesis bc. you all know about the Chinese dragons, & the emperor surely was comp-d with some strong animal (like the lion or eagle), so that the flying may as well be hidden in this emperor's title, and also they, surely, have made such (& other) figures out of porcelain.

~ ~ ~

Another, if not dirty, then at least funny animal is the ape or monkey. There are a heap of names here, but we have disc-ed the maymun-monkey, & ment-d the şebek & pithecus, so let us pay some attention to Rus. (not c. Sl.) obezþjana |I_obez$jana|, too. The etym-sts say it was called earlier illiterate oblezþjana (some deriv. from licking or sticking the tongue out) bc. the name was foreign, coming from Tur.-Per. I_abuzine. Yeah, but then: what might this Per. w. mean? Well, I don't know Ar. or Per., but it sounds very near to your (Fr.) ... obscene, what is Lat. I_obscenus m-ing indecent, disgusting. And then we may ask ourselves: why should this w. have so indecent a m-ing? The answer is: for one thing (let us leave the "hands" to rest a little), bc. it splits in: ob + scene (so that it is smt. that shouldn't be put on the scene), and for another thing, bc. in Lat. it (or, more precisely, obscenum) meant genitals (& you know well that it isn't decent to show one's genitals in public 2(or, as we in Bul. have the saying: don't leave your prick loose where you earn your keeping; then there was made correction, that you may take it out where you make your money, but the important thing is not to brandish it too high; but some say that there is even one last correction, namely that you may loose it as free as you want & brandish it as high as you can, but you have to look carefully not to cross it with that of your boss --- well, it turned out later that this is put much more succinct in Eng. as: "Don't screw the crew!")2 ). Anyway, I don't state that abuzine must be split in t.s. manner as in Lat., but this is highly probable (or abu- may be sim. to the taboo, or mean smt. else disgusting 2(to what one says pooh)2; or/& -zine may have sim. m-ing as Ger. Sinn-sense --- to be disc-ed).
Then there is also Ger. I_Affe (& affen is to behave like monkey), what in Eng. becomes I_ape, and this surely sounds funny & reminds me about Fr. I_gaffe (a hook, or lapse, omission; or as verb gaffer means to do such things). This isn't an etym-gy but it fits well with the mental image for the monkey (the hook here may be in sense of making fun, pulling the leg, as you say), &, besides, the Ger. etym-sts (who I usually consult) say that this was from an unknown (?) language. I, for my part, don't think that Affe is such mysterious w., bc. there is Lat. I_efficio as to do, manufacture, or effigies as a replica, picture, expression, appearance (i.e. an imitation, making after), & here is also your effigy (Fr. I_effigie). T.s. idea of making after an example (like a parrot, if it comes to sp-ing) is to be found in Lat. I_simia (simian in Eng.), which surely is deriv. from similis-I_similar (or v.v.). In other ws, the Ger* have taken the idea of simia & transferred it on the r. effi- /affi- (making the w. even nearly symmetric, like the pop-group Abba); on the other hand it is poss. (nobody says so but you will see now) that the whole ... continent I_Africa is smw. in this heap bc. this is an o. Lat. (& Gr.) w., Africanus (met in the works of Cicero), which was made (by obscure reasons) fem. to Africa, & it was coming from some Afri (I_Afer in sing.) m-ing the Northern part of Africa --- so that the idea that there lived mainly monkeys might have been applied while coining the Ger. Affe. About the Fr. name singe I will say ntg. (as much as I will make no comments about the name ... I_Simeon, as our Bul. ex- or future-, Prime Minister or King, is /was called).

~ ~ ~

And now I propose to shed some light over the I_sheep, which in the Eng. variant is again Teu., Ger. I_Schaf. There are many ws here, not only the Schäfer-shepherd, or the I_Schaft-shaft (m-ing the unavoidable shepherd's staff, which may be also a scepter, or