Темежников Евгений Александрович: другие произведения.

The Military Balance 2018

Журнал "Самиздат": [Регистрация] [Найти] [Рейтинги] [Обсуждения] [Новинки] [Обзоры] [Помощь]
Peклaмa:
Конкурс фантастических романов "Утро. ХХII век"
Конкурсы романов на Author.Today

Летние Истории на ПродаМане
Peклaмa
 Ваша оценка:
  • Аннотация:
    Военный баланс в 2018 году от Международного Института Стратегических Исследований. С русским переводом.



THE MILITARY BALANCE 2018

ВОЕННЫЙ БАЛАНС 2018

   The Military Balance 1987

ОГЛАВЛЕНИЕ


Editor's Introduction / Введение
   Chapter 1. Chinese and Russian air-launched weapons / Российское и китайское авиационное оружие.
   Chapter 2. Comparative defence statistics
   Chapter 3. North America / Северная Америка.
Canada, USA
   Chapter 4. Europe / Европа.
Albania, Austria, Belgium, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italia, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, Malta, Montenegro, Multinational, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom
   Chapter 5. Russia and Eurasia / Россия и Евразия
Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan
   Chapter 6. Asia / Азия
Afghanistan, Australia, Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, China, Fiji, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea North, Korea South, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, New Zealand, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka; Taiwan, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Vietnam
   Chapter 7. Middle East and North Africa / Ближний Восток и Северная Африка
Algeria, Bahrain, Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libia, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestinian, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, UAE, Yemen
   Chapter 8. Latin America and the Caribbean / Латинская Америка и Карибское море
Antigua & Barbuda, Argentina, Bahams, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad & Tobago, Uruguay, Venezuela
   Chapter 9. Sub-Saharan Africa / Африка к югу от Сахары
Angola, Benin, Bostwana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African, Chad, Congo, Cote d'Ivoire, DR Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenia, Lesoto, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe
   Chapter 10. Country comparisons and defence data
   PART TWO. Объяснения и примечания

Editor's Introduction

   Western technology edge erodes further
   Defence policymakers worldwide remain challenged by a complex and fractured security environment, marked by increased uncertainty in relations between states and the proliferation of advanced military capabilities. Attacks in 2017 highlighted the continuing threat from transnational terrorists. Persistent conflicts and insecurity in parts of Africa meant that the continent still demanded the deployment of significant combat forces by African and external powers. In the Middle East, the war against ISIS, the civil war in Syria, the destructive conflict in Yemen and Iran's destabilising activities dominated the regional security environment. In Europe, low-level conflict persisted in eastern Ukraine, with Russia reinforcing its military posture across the border and its military capabilities preoccupying European NATO states. In Asia, North Korea tested its first intercontinental ballistic missile. Pyongyang's provocations may be an immediate threat, but there was also an increasingly pervasive concern over China's military programmes and activities. In 2017 Beijing introduced yet more advanced military systems, and deployed elements of its armed forces further afield.
   Defence spending
   Though much talk in early 2017 was of possible retrenchment, the United States has so far doubled-down on its commitment to European defence. Funding for the European Deterrence Initiative has risen, and the US is deploying - and looking to sell - more equipment to Europe. So, in July 2018, when President Donald Trump arrives in Brussels for the NATO Summit, the US, having increased its own effort, will be looking for additional signs that European leaders are boosting their own defence funding. In early 2017, NATO states redoubled their commitment to boost spending. IISS figures show that the rising trend observed in Europe since 2014-15 has continued; real-terms annual growth in defence spending reached 3.6% in 2017. Some of this may have resulted from US exhortations, but mostly it stemmed from changing threat perceptions among European states.
   Indeed, in 2017, Europe was the fastest-growing region when it came to real-terms defence spending. Taken together, northern and central European states increased defence spending in real terms by 4.8% in 2017. However, more NATO states claiming that they will reach the target of spending 2% of GDP on defence is not necessarily the best outcome, and there could more usefully be greater focus on output in terms of combat capability instead of financial targets.
   Although the overall balance of global military spending continues to shift towards Asia, the growth in Asian defence spending slowed in 2017, reflecting factors including reduced economic growth in some states. In turn, this indicated that the upwards trend in regional spending of recent years may have owed as much to strong economic growth as it did to changing threat perceptions. China's defence spending, however, has continued to rise. After years of double-digit growth, China's increases have since 2016 been aligned with GDP growth at 6-7%. However, the downturn in spending by some of the top defence-spending states, including Russia and Saudi Arabia, meant that in real terms, global defence spending effectively stagnated in 2017.
   China
   There has been no slackening in the pace of China's military modernisation. Its progress in defence aerospace remains remarkable. Indeed, China looks on track to field before 2020 its first front-line unit equipped with the Chengdu J-20 low observable combat aircraft. If so, the US could soon lose its monopoly on operational stealthy combat aircraft. China also continues to develop an array of advanced guided-weapons projects. The IISS now assesses that the latest in China's expanding missile line-up - the PL-15 extended range AAM - could enter service as soon as 2018. This weapon appears to be equipped with an active electronically scanned array radar, indicating that China has joined the few nations able to integrate this capability on an AAM.
   These are all part of the air force's goal of being able to challenge any opponent in the air domain. For the past three decades, the ability to operate uncontested in the air has been a key advantage for the US and its allies. This can no longer be assumed. China is pursuing similar ambitions at sea. The launch of the first Type-055 cruiser presages the Chinese navy closing another gap in its developing blue-water capabilities. More broadly, the PLA's suite of increasingly capable military systems points to the growing development of land-, air- and sea-based anti-access/area-denial capabilities to complement its growing power-projection capacity. But using these capabilities to best effect requires that China makes similar progress in improved training, doctrine and tactics.
   China's progress in military research and development meant it had already become the single most important external influence on the trajectory of US defence developments. Not only has China's defence industry maintained its relentless development tempo, it has also continued to pursue advanced technologies, including extremely high performance computing and quantum communications. China's emerging weapons developments and broader defence-technological progress are designed to further its transition from `catching up' with the West, to becoming a global defence innovator: in some areas of defence technology, China has already achieved its goal. China's willingness to export military equipment - including advanced missiles and armed UAVs - means that Western defence planners will have to take account of a more complex and contested future threat environment.
   Russia
   Russia remains the principal security concern for states in eastern and northern Europe. Moscow has continued to deploy advanced military equipment, including S-400 air defence systems and 500km-range Iskander ballistic missiles, in the Western Military District. Though Russia's armed forces continue to introduce new equipment, the heralded generational shift in military materiel is taking place more slowly than first anticipated. Russia is experiencing further funding and industrial shortcomings and will likely further slow or delay the delivery of some systems in its 2018-27 State Armament Programme. While advanced systems such as the Su-57 combat aircraft and the T-14 main battle tank will eventually see service, their numbers will likely be fewer than initially thought. This problem is even more pronounced for Russia's navy, but Moscow is seeking to offset the impact of its sclerotic large surface-ship construction by continuing to distribute high-precision weapons systems to smaller, more varied vessel classes.
   Continuing allegations of Russian interference in Western electoral processes again indicate that Moscow views its modernising armed forces as just one aspect of the capabilities it can employ to realise strategic goals. Cyber capability should now be seen as a key aspect of some states' coercive power, giving them the chance to wage covert digital campaigns. This might be an adjunct to military power, or employed in its place, in order to accomplish traditional objectives. This has driven some European states to re-examine their industrial, political, social and economic vulnerabilities, influence operations and information warfare, as well as more traditional areas of military power.
   Europe
   One aspect of the response to this has been greater cooperation between the EU and NATO over so-called `hybrid' threats. Russia's activities have also spurred some European states to enhance their military inventories. Russia's rocket artillery, and its combat-aviation and precision-missile systems, are generating greater attention on air and missile defence in Europe, notably in the east and north. Some states are eyeing Patriot and other ground-based air-defence systems, boosting armoured vehicle fleets, rebuilding fixed-wing combat airpower and developing air-launched stand-off strike power. It seems as if, finally, some European states are looking to rebuild a credible conventional deterrent capability.
   Improving the quality of their military systems is one answer; so too is enabling mobility, so that military capabilities can be rapidly brought to bear. Serious thought is now being given to how to make this easier at the bureaucratic level. Discussions in late 2017 examined how to ease the movement of military materiel across Europe. These moves were given impetus by stronger US pressure on European states to do more for their own defence. Without this effort, the Trump administration claimed, Washington might `moderate' its support for Europe.
   These concerns led some in Europe to question the degree to which they could rely on external assistance. Also, EU member states in 2017 finally took steps towards permanent structured defence cooperation, and the European Commission established a European Defence Fund. Both developments have the potential to deliver financial benefits by reducing duplication in defence spending.
   Challenges to the West
   Increasingly fast, precise and technologically sophisticated military systems are being developed by non-Western countries, particularly China and Russia, and militarily useful technologies are increasingly accessible at relatively low cost. In response, Western states will look to `leap-ahead' technologies to maintain an edge. This will require greater agility, and greater acceptance of development risks by governments and the defence and technology sectors. Success is by no means assured. The growing democratisation of technology will make it harder still.
   The integration of accelerating technical developments into defence organisations could offer transformative capabilities. New information-processing technologies will improve military systems. Indeed, the speed and scope of some modern sensor systems already surpass human processing capability. Greater use will likely be made of artificial intelligence and machine learning, as states look to develop automated decision-making to augment human capacities, boost weapons capabilities and gain early advantage, including through the use of economic and political levers and cyberenabled information and influence tools.
   For all the transformative potential of these technologies, continuities in conflict will persist - certainly in terms of the nature of war fighting. These would be recognisable to the founders of the IISS in 1958, who had just 13 years before emerged from the Second World War. Other aspects of today's military-security environment would also be familiar, including tensions over nuclear weapons. Persistent allegations that Russia has deployed ground launched cruise missiles and discussions over nuclear weapons on the Korean Peninsula raise the spectre that states could again conceive of theatre nuclear weapons as military complements to increasingly modernised strategic nuclear systems.
   Using new technical processing capabilities to augment military systems will compress response times, and may drive more automation in defences in order to minimise an adversary's first-strike advantage. This increases the risk of miscalculation in response and may drive other nations to seek such technologies. This is worrisome in the strategic weapons arena, which relies on a degree of transparency and shared situational awareness. Combined, these developments should place a premium on more measured and smarter diplomacy, improved military-to-military ties and emphasis on confidence- and security-building measures. Furthermore, at a time when bonds forged during the Cold War are under continued stress, they should mean that states sharpen their focus on the benefits to be gained from alliances or other cooperative relationships.

Введение


   Западная технология отстает
   Политики в области обороны во всем мире по-прежнему сталкиваются со сложной и нестабильной обстановкой в области безопасности, характеризующейся возросшей неопределенностью в отношениях между государствами и распространением передовых военных потенциалов. Нападения в 2017 году подчеркнули сохраняющуюся угрозу со стороны транснациональных террористов. Постоянные конфликты и отсутствие безопасности в некоторых частях Африки означают, что континент по-прежнему требует развертывания значительных боевых сил африканскими и внешними державами. На Ближнем Востоке в обстановке региональной безопасности доминировали война против ИГИЛ, гражданская война в Сирии, разрушительный конфликт в Йемене и дестабилизирующая деятельность Ирана. В Европе конфликт низкого уровня продолжался на востоке Украины, при этом Россия укрепляла свою военную позицию за границей, а ее военный потенциал занимал европейские государства НАТО. В Азии Северная Корея испытала свою первую межконтинентальную баллистическую ракету. Провокации Пхеньяна могут представлять собой непосредственную угрозу, но все большую озабоченность вызывают военные программы и деятельность Китая. В 2017 году Пекин представил еще более передовые военные системы и развернул элементы своих вооруженных сил на местах.
   Расходы на оборону
   Хотя много разговоров в начале 2017 года было о возможном сокращении, Соединенные Штаты удвоили свою приверженность европейской обороне. Финансирование Европейской инициативы сдерживания возросло, и США развертывают и продают больше оборудования в Европу. Так, в июле 2018 года, когда президент Дональд Трамп прибудет в Брюссель на саммит НАТО, США, наращивая собственные усилия, будут искать дополнительные признаки того, что европейские лидеры наращивают собственное оборонное финансирование. В начале 2017 года государства НАТО удвоили свои обязательства по увеличению расходов. Данные IISS показывают, что тенденция роста, наблюдаемая в Европе с 2014-15 гг., продолжается; в реальном выражении ежегодный рост оборонных расходов достиг 3,6% в 2017 году. Некоторые из них, возможно, были результатом призывов США, но в основном они проистекали из изменения восприятия угрозы среди европейских государств.
   Действительно, в 2017 году Европа была самым быстрорастущим регионом, когда речь шла о реальных расходах на оборону. Взятые вместе, Северная и Центральная Европа увеличили расходы на оборону в реальном выражении на 4,8% в 2017 году. Однако большее число государств НАТО, заявляющих, что они достигнут цели расходования 2% ВВП на оборону, не обязательно является лучшим результатом, и было бы более целесообразно уделять больше внимания производству с точки зрения боеспособности, а не финансовым целям.
   Хотя общий баланс глобальных военных расходов продолжает смещаться в сторону Азии, рост оборонных расходов в Азии замедлился в 2017 году, что отражает факторы, включая снижение экономического роста в некоторых государствах. В свою очередь, это свидетельствует о том, что наблюдавшаяся в последние годы тенденция к увеличению региональных расходов, возможно, была обусловлена как сильным экономическим ростом, так и изменением представлений об угрозах. Однако расходы Китая на оборону продолжают расти. После нескольких лет двузначного роста рост Китая с 2016 года был выровнен с ростом ВВП на 6-7%. Однако спад расходов некоторых ведущих в оборон государств, включая Россию и Саудовскую Аравию, означал, что в реальном выражении глобальные оборонные расходы фактически стагнировали в 2017 году.
   Китай
   Темпы военной модернизации Китая не замедлились. Его прогресс в военной авиации остается замечательным. Действительно, Китай, похоже, на пути к созданию до 2020 года своего первого боевого малозаметного самолета Чэнду J-20. Если это так, то США вскоре могут потерять свою монополию на оперативную боевую авиацию стелс. Китай также продолжает разрабатывать целый ряд передовых проектов в области управляемого оружия. Теперь IISS оценивает, что последний в расширяющейся ракетной линейке Китая - PL-15 увеличенной дальности AAM - может вступить в строй уже в 2018 году. Это оружие, как представляется, оснащено активным радаром с электронным сканированием, указывающим на то, что Китай присоединился к немногим странам, способным интегрировать этот потенциал на УРВВ.
   Все это является частью цели ВВС, чтобы иметь возможность бросить вызов любому противнику в воздушном пространстве. В течение последних трех десятилетий способность бесспорно действовать в воздухе была ключевым преимуществом для США и их союзников. Этого больше не будет. Китай преследует аналогичные амбиции на море. Спуск первого крейсера Type-055 предвещает, что китайский флот сократит еще один пробел в своих развивающихся возможностях в океане. В более широком плане набор все более мощных военных систем НОАК указывает на растущее развитие наземных, воздушных и морских средств противодействия доступу/отказу в зонах в дополнение к его растущему потенциалу. Но использование этих возможностей для достижения наилучшего эффекта требует, чтобы Китай добился аналогичного прогресса в улучшении подготовки, доктрины и тактики.
   Прогресс Китая в военных исследованиях и разработках означал, что он уже стал самым важным внешним влиянием на направление оборонных разработок США. Оборонная промышленность Китая не только сохранила свой неумолимый темп развития, но и продолжала развивать передовые технологии, включая чрезвычайно высокопроизводительные вычисления и лазерные коммуникации. Новые разработки в области вооружений и более широкий оборонно-технический прогресс Китая направлены на дальнейший переход от "догоняющего" Запад к роли глобального оборонного инноватора: в некоторых областях оборонных технологий Китай уже достиг своей цели. Готовность Китая экспортировать военную технику, включая передовые ракеты и вооруженные БПЛА, означает, что западные военные планировщики должны будут учитывать более сложную и спорную будущую обстановку угрозы.
   Россия
   Россия остается главной проблемой безопасности для государств Восточной и Северной Европы. Москва продолжает размещать в Западном военном округе передовую военную технику, в том числе зенитные комплексы С-400 и баллистические ракеты "Искандер" дальностью 500 км. Хотя вооруженные силы России продолжают внедрять новую технику, предвещаемая смена поколений в военной технике происходит медленнее, чем предполагалось вначале. Россия испытывает дополнительные финансовые и промышленные трудности и, вероятно, будет и далее замедлять или задерживать поставки некоторых систем в рамках своей государственной программы вооружений на 2018-27 годы. В то время как передовые системы, такие как боевой самолет Су-57 и основной боевой танк Т-14, в конечном итоге поступят на службу, их число, вероятно, будет меньше, чем первоначально предполагалось. Эта проблема еще более остро стоит перед военно-морским флотом России, но Москва стремится компенсировать последствия своего забытого строительства больших надводных кораблей, продолжая распространять системы высокоточного оружия на более мелкие, более разнообразные классы судов.
   Продолжающиеся утверждения о вмешательстве России в избирательные процессы на Западе вновь указывают на то, что Москва рассматривает модернизацию своих вооруженных сил лишь как один из аспектов потенциала, который она может использовать для достижения стратегических целей. Кибер-потенциал теперь следует рассматривать как ключевой аспект принудительной власти некоторых государств, давая им возможность вести скрытые цифровые кампании. Это может быть дополнением к военной мощи или использоваться вместо нее для достижения традиционных целей. Это побудило некоторые европейские государства пересмотреть свою промышленную, политическую, социальную и экономическую уязвимость, повлиять на операции и информационную войну, а также более традиционные области военной мощи.
   Европа
   Одним из аспектов реагирования на это стало расширение сотрудничества между ЕС и НАТО в отношении так называемых "гибридных" угроз. Деятельность России также побудила некоторые европейские государства увеличить свои военные запасы. Ракеты России, ее боевые авиационные и высокоточные ракетные комплексы привлекают все большее внимание к противовоздушной и противоракетной обороне в Европе, особенно на востоке и севере. Некоторые государства присматриваются к системам ПВО "Патриот" и другим наземным системам, наращивают парк бронетехники, восстанавливают боевую авиацию и развивают воздушную боевую мощь. Похоже, что, наконец, некоторые европейские государства стремятся восстановить надежный потенциал обычного сдерживания.
   Одним из ответов является повышение качества их военных систем, а также обеспечение мобильности, с тем чтобы можно было быстро задействовать военный потенциал. Сейчас серьезно задумываются над тем, как облегчить это на бюрократическом уровне. Дискуссии в конце 2017 года рассмотрели, как облегчить распространие военной техники в Европе. Эти шаги получили импульс благодаря более сильному давлению США на европейские государства, чтобы они сделали больше для своей собственной обороны. Без этих усилий, заявила администрация Трампа, Вашингтон может "умерить" свою поддержку Европы.
   Эти опасения заставили некоторых европейцев усомниться в том, в какой степени они могут полагаться на внешнюю помощь. Кроме того, государства члены ЕС в 2017 году, наконец, предприняли шаги к постоянному структурированному оборонному сотрудничеству, а Европейская комиссия учредила Европейский оборонный фонд. Оба эти события могут принести финансовые выгоды за счет сокращения дублирования расходов на оборону.
   Вызовы Западу
   Все более быстрые, точные и технологически сложные военные системы разрабатываются не западными странами, в частности Китаем и Россией, а полезные в военном отношении технологии становятся все более доступными при относительно низких затратах. В ответ западные государства будут стремиться к "прорывным" технологиям, чтобы сохранить преимущество. Это потребует большей гибкости и более широкого признания рисков в области развития правительствами и оборонным и технологическим секторами. Успех отнюдь не гарантирован. Растущая демократизация технологий сделает ее еще более трудной.
   Интеграция ускоряющихся технических разработок в оборонные организации может обеспечить трансформационный потенциал. Новые технологии обработки информации позволят усовершенствовать военные системы. Действительно, скорость и объем некоторых самомоднейших систем датчиков уже перегоняют людскую обрабатывая возможность. Более широкое использование, вероятно, будет обеспечиваться искусственным интеллектом и машинным обучением, поскольку государства стремятся развивать автоматизированное принятие решений в целях укрепления человеческого потенциала, наращивания потенциала в области вооружений и получения преимуществ на раннем этапе, в том числе за счет использования экономических и политических рычагов и кибернетических средств информации и влияния.
   Несмотря на весь преобразующий потенциал этих технологий, конфликты будут продолжаться - разумеется, с точки зрения характера военных действий. Они были бы узнаваемы для основателей IISS в 1958 году, которые только 13 лет назад вышли из Второй мировой войны. Были бы знакомы и другие аспекты сегодняшней обстановки в области военной безопасности, включая напряженность в связи с ядерным оружием. Постоянные утверждения о том, что Россия развернула на Корейском полуострове крылатые ракеты наземного базирования, а также дискуссии по ядерному оружию создают угрозу того, что государства вновь могут рассматривать ядерное оружие театра военных действий в качестве военного дополнения к все более модернизированным стратегическим ядерным системам.
   Использование новых технических средств обработки данных для усиления военных систем сократит время реагирования и может привести к большей автоматизации в обороне, с тем чтобы свести к минимуму преимущество противника при первом ударе. Это увеличивает риск просчета в ответ и может побудить другие страны искать такие технологии. Это вызывает тревогу на арене стратегического оружия, которая зависит от степени прозрачности и общей ситуационной осведомленности. В совокупности эти события должны сделать упор на более взвешенную и разумную дипломатию, улучшение военных связей и акцент на мерах укрепления доверия и безопасности. Кроме того, в период, когда связи, возникшие в ходе "Холодной войны", подвергаются постоянному стрессу, они должны означать, что государства должны сосредоточить свое внимание на выгодах, которые могут быть получены от альянсов или других отношений сотрудничества.

Chapter One. Chinese and Russian air-launched weapons: a test for Western air dominance


   Since the end of the Cold War, the air domain has been one of assured superiority for the United States and its allies. This dominance, however, rests on weapons and technologies that China and Russia are increasingly attaining as part of a broader effort to counter US capabilities, and to deny US and allied forces unimpeded control of the air.
   These two nations - emerging and resurgent air powers, respectively - are developing their own `fifth-generation' combat aircraft with the requisite low-observable characteristics. In parallel, they are pursuing air-launched weapons to complement these projects, and at the same time are recapitalising their weapons inventories with missiles that will enhance their ability to contest control of the air. Some of these weapons are now appearing on the export market.
   In 2015-16, Beijing brought into service the PL-10 imaging infrared air-to-air missile (AAM). In 2018, it may well introduce the PL-15. These missiles markedly improve the combat air capability of its air forces. Meanwhile, Russia has brought into service two upgraded versions of existing weapons, along with a new long-range AAM, and this pace of development may continue. Indeed, Moscow is looking to further exploit a range of advanced technologies that are appropriate to guided weapons. This trend is, if anything, more pronounced in Beijing. For example, China has already started to use active electronically scanned array radars for missile applications. It is also developing dual-mode guidance seekers; working on increasing the average speed of weapons; boosting the manoeuvrability of its missiles; and, at the same time, improving on-board processing in order to enhance missile performance. Although Russia is also working on some of these areas, China's efforts are better resourced.
   Presently, air combat is increasingly enabled by accelerating technology developments in communications and on-board processing power that enable faster and more coordinated activity between dispersed platforms. As such, and as part of the modernisation of its air-combat capabilities, China is also seeking the ability to create and exploit friendly digital networks, while developing the tactics, techniques and procedures to degrade an opponent's networked environment. With regard to air-to-air systems, this will likely include off-board targeting at extended launch ranges, where another platform (i.e. not the aircraft carrying the missile) would identify and provide the target location and in-flight updates to the missile.
   Chinese progress
   The extent of Chinese progress in the air-to-air guided-weapons arena was apparent with the introduction of the PL-10 AAM. This weapon provided a marked improvement in performance over the previous generation of short-range missiles operated by the People's Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF), and its development has placed China among the handful of nations with a defence-industrial base capable of producing such a weapon. The PL-10 uses aerodynamic and thrust-vector control, but the PLAAF will require an advanced helmet-mounted cueing system in order to exploit the manoeuvrability the weapon offers. During 2018, a missile designated PL-15 may also begin to enter front-line service. The PL-15 is an extended-range active radar-guided AAM and, when in service, would be the most capable AAM in the PLAAF inventory. Significantly, in late 2015, it was identified as a weapon of concern by General Hawk Carlisle, then head of the United States Air Force (USAF) Air Combat Command.
   However, the PL-10 and the PL-15 are not the only systems with which the US and its allies are having to come to terms. China is also developing a very-long range AAM intended to be used to attack high-value targets such as tanker, airborne early-warning, and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft. Furthermore, Beijing appears to be pursuing two or more configurations of rocket-ramjet AAMs.
   By the early to mid-2020s, China will clearly have a broader - and far more capable - range of air-toair weapons to complement the combat aircraft that are now in development. These will likely force the US and its regional allies to re-examine not only their tactics, techniques and procedures, but also the direction of their own combat-aerospace development programmes.
   Russian resurgence
   Meanwhile, Russia has also begun to recapitalise its air-to-air-weapons inventory, after funding cuts forced a two-decades-long lull in procurement activity. For example, some 30 years after it was first test fired, the air force has now introduced a version of the Vympel R-77 (AA-12A Adder) medium-range active radar-guided missile into service. The R-77 entered production in the 1990s to meet export orders, with the export variant publicly called the RVV-AE. However, only test rounds of the baseline version were procured by the Russian Air Force. It took until 2015 for the air force to introduce into service a variant of the R-77 - the improved and upgraded R-77-1 (AA-12B). This was first deployed operationally in late 2015, when Su-35S aircraft operating from Khmeimim air base in Syria were shown carrying the weapon.
   Along with the R-77-1, the air force has also begun to take delivery of an improved version of the short range R-73 (AA-11 Archer) - the R-74M (AA-11B) likely entered the front-line inventory around the same time as the R-77-1. The R-74M has a greater maximum range than the R-74 and is fitted with an improved seeker. Also noteworthy was the introduction into service of the R-37M (AA-13 Axehead) active radar-guided long-range AAM in 2015-16. This missile is the primary armament of the MiG-31BM Foxhound interceptor. This weapon can also trace its design origins to the late 1980s.
   At least some of the renewed stimulus in Russian guided-weapons development has been provided by China, partly as a potential customer and partly as an increasingly credible export rival. The R-37M is being offered as a candidate weapon for the Sukhoi Su-35 Flanker, which China has already purchased, and the missile may be part of the aircraft's weapons package. Meanwhile, China's PL-10 AAM is already being offered for export, as is the active radar-guided medium-range PL-12. The high-agility imaging infrared PL-10 is significantly more capable than Russia's R-74/R-74M, while the baseline PL-12 appears to have a better performance than that of the R-77 (AA-12A).
   The PL-12 programme - which started in the late 1980s - benefited greatly from Russian technology. The original version of the missile uses a radar seeker designed by the Russian firm Agat, with several other components also provided by Moscow. Without Russian support, the PL-12 programme would, in all likelihood, have taken considerably longer and produced an inferior weapon. Today, however, Beijing is no longer reliant on Russian missile-technology assistance; it is now at least Moscow's equal, and, perhaps in some areas, it is now in the lead.
   Going electronic
   China appears to be one of the few nations to have used an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar on an AAM, rather than a traditional mechanically scanned planar array. The PL-15 has been widely reported as using an AESA. Meanwhile, Japan's AAM-4B AAM is also fitted with an AESA seeker, while there is speculation that the US AIM-120D variant of the AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile also uses an AESA rather than a mechanically scanned seeker.
   AESA technology is increasingly being used as the primary sensor for combat aircraft, with mechanically scanned array radars replaced by either fixed or moveable electronically scanned arrays. These offer a number of advantages, including better detection performance in terms of range and against low-observable targets, greater resistance to countermeasures, a reduced probability of intercept and improved reliability. However, the high cost of introducing these systems (the transmit-receive modules that are the building blocks of AESA technology are comparatively expensive to produce) has, until now, acted as a brake on their introduction, particularly on single-use weapons such as missiles.
   Several performance factors have likely contributed to these countries' decisions to overcome the cost barriers relating to AESA technology on AAMs. In the case of China, where weapons research and acquisition is less constrained by funding restrictions, these factors likely included these systems' improved performance against low-observable targets and greater resistance to countermeasures on target aircraft, such as radio-frequency jammers.
   The inherent flexibility of AESA technology, in terms of its frequency agility, makes these seekers more difficult to counter by jamming. In contrast, traditional radar countermeasures involve identifying the frequency on which the threat system is operating, and then generating a jamming signal on the same frequency.
   Efforts are also under way in Russia to develop AESA seekers for air-to-air applications, including the Izdeliye (Article) 180/K-77M, a development of the R-77, and a new design known as Izdeliye-270. However, some Russian seeker designers remain Chinese and Russian air-launched weapons 9 unconvinced of the value of moving from a mechanically scanned system to electronically scanned arrays. There have also been indications that the Russian microelectronics sector has struggled to produce transmit-receive modules to the required reliability and cost targets.
   Long- and very-long-range engagement
   In the late 1980s, Soviet guided-weapons designers were considering the development of long-range AAMs to be used against high-value airborne platforms, such as tanker and ISR aircraft, which traditionally remain far behind the forward edge of any air battle. The Novator KS-172 design, for instance, was intended to be used at ranges of up to 300 kilometres. However, it languished with little or no state support throughout the 1990s and beyond, before losing out in a 2009 competition with the Vympel Izdeliye-810 long-range missile. The latter is based to some extent on the long-range R-37M but it has an airframe modified for carriage in internal weapons bays, including on the fifth-generation Sukhoi Su-57 combat aircraft (the prototype is known as the Sukhoi T-50).
   It is apparent that China has also decided to pursue a long-range AAM capability, quite possibly tracking Russian developments. Images of a large, long-range missile being carried by a PLAAF Shenyang J-16 combat aircraft appeared on the internet in late 2016. The weapon is estimated to be about six metres long; by comparison, the R-37M is just over four metres long. The design only had four control surfaces at the tail, with no mid-body wing, suggesting a missile design not intended for high manoeuvre ability. The missile is well into development. Along with an estimated maximum range of greater than 400km, it probably also uses dual-mode guidance. The images appeared to show that as well as an active radar seeker, the weapon was also fitted with an infrared adjunct seeker. The use of dual-mode guidance would make the missile more resistant to countermeasures, and improve aim-point selection.
   In a very-long-range engagement scenario, off board sensors - those on the launch aircraft - would provide initial targeting information and mid-course updates during the missile's flight. A lofted trajectory would also be used, potentially at altitudes in excess of 30,000 metres, in order to minimise airframe drag. Given the considerable diameter of the missile's body, the radome could accommodate a large antenna, with this providing a detection range of perhaps 40-50 km or more against a target with a large radar cross section, such as a tanker or airborne early-warning aircraft. The infrared or imaging infrared adjunct seeker could be used for terminal aim-point selection to try to ensure maximum damage or as an alternative primary seeker were the missile's radar seeker to be jammed.
   A challenging future environment
   China's very-long-range weapon will, when it begins to enter service in the next few years, provide the PLAAF with the ability to threaten high-value air targets at extended ranges. This will likely influence how potential opponents consider their own future operations. Coupling the J-16's operational radius with a 400km-range AAM would, for instance, be a forcing factor for an opponent's planning of its tanker refuelling tracks or large-platform ISR missions. It is perhaps no coincidence that the USAF is increasingly interested in a low-observable tanker-aircraft design. Yet more concerning from a US perspective is the fact that this development is only one aspect of the PLAAF's effort to recapitalise its AAM inventory with more capable systems, including the PL-10, PL-15 and the rocket-ramjet-powered AAMs that offer far greater engagement options. These developments are themselves nested within a combat-aircraft upgrade and re-equipment programme.
   China's progress will also continue to spur missile-technology developments in Russia, while collaboration between the two countries, at least at the subsystems level, remains a possibility; indeed, Russian industrialists have suggested that this is already taking place. With the PL-10 and the PL-12 already on offer for export, and the possibility that further upgrades might appear on the export market, Western air forces will have to take account of a more complicated future threat environment. However, although technology might be a central element of air power, it needs to be used appropriately if best advantage is to be gained. The PLAAF is moving towards more demanding and realistic training scenarios, but these developments will need to continue - and the lessons fully integrated into doctrine, training and tactics - if it is to take full advantage of the weapon systems now entering its inventory.
   Big data, artificial intelligence and defence
   Big-data analysis, machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) are points along a continuum that will progressively remove human beings from complex decision-making. The automation of inductive `reasoning' and empirical modelling allows for improved pattern recognition of all sorts, ranging from identifying similar targets to predicting correlated behaviour. Currently, however, these largely involve algorithmic models operating on extremely large data sets rather than genuine cognition or abstract decision-making capabilities that would resemble human intelligence. Although the current position on this technological continuum may be debatable, these technologies are starting to have a transformative effect on defence capability. As in every other aspect of modern economies and societies, automated algorithms are being leveraged to collect, compile, structure, process, analyse, transmit and act upon increasingly large data sets. In the military context, the opportunities for remote-sensing, situational-awareness, battlefield-manoeuvre and other AI applications seem promising. It remains unclear, however, whether these new technical capabilities will ultimately shift the balance in favour of offensive or defensive actions.
   Military applications
   On 11 May 2017, Dan Coats, the director of US National Intelligence, delivered testimony to the US Congress on his annual Worldwide Threat Assessment. In the publicly released document, he said that `Artificial intelligence (AI) is advancing computational capabilities that benefit the economy, yet those advances also enable new military capabilities for our adversaries'. At the same time, the US Department of Defense (DoD) is working on such systems. Project Maven, for instance, also known as the Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team (AWCFT), is designed to accelerate the integration of big data, machine learning and AI into US military capabilities. While the initial focus of AWCFT is on computer-vision algorithms for object detection and classification, it will consolidate all existing algorithm-based-technology initiatives associated with US defence intelligence. The overall objective is to reduce the `human-factors burden', increase actionable intelligence and enhance military decision-making.
   Other armed forces appear equally interested in the potential of AI and are inclined towards similar potential uses. In 2017, the UK's Defence Science and Technology Laboratory launched a challenge that included developing an automated system to identify and classify vehicles from satellite imagery. Meanwhile, NATO's Science and Technology Organization has scheduled a `specialists' meeting' in France on big data and AI for military decision making at the end of May 2018, and the UN has announced that it is opening a new office in The Hague to monitor the development of AI and robotics.
   Beyond Europe, China is applying facial-recognition algorithms to the domestic video footage collected by closed-circuit television cameras in order, it says, to boost public safety. It is also placing more emphasis on big data and AI for air-force operations. Beijing's state council has set a target output of RMB1 trillion (US$147.1 billion) for Chinese AI industries by the year 2030, asserting that `breakthroughs should be made in basic theories of AI, such as big data intelligence, multimedia aware computing, human-machine hybrid intelligence, swarm intelligence and automated decision-making'. In 2017, the Russian news agency TASS reported that the Kalashnikov Group has developed an AI-controlled combat module that can independently identify and engage targets, and that radio-electronic technologies firm KRET was working on unmanned systems with swarming and independent decision-making capabilities. Those are but a few of the initiatives under way; the full range of military applications for AI is certainly expansive.
   From tactical to operational
   Even though technological innovation has not yet replicated human reasoning in independent machines, AI portends significant changes at all levels of military doctrine and practice. The UK's Royal Navy, for example, is pursuing Project Nelson to exploit and enable developments in AI across the Big data, artificial intelligence and defence 11 `whole naval enterprise'. AI systems will be introduced to provide `cognitive support to operators and users', playing a part in mitigating data overload in today's complex sensor- and data-rich operational environment. Military services also emphasise the relevance of these new capabilities to enabling functions, such as logistics, as much as to their use in front-line combat roles; they are about the future, but also about helping today, UK officials have said.
   But immediate gains from AI are also being realised in the tactical realm. Command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR) are reaching new heights of efficiency that enable data collection and processing at unprecedented scale and speed. When the pattern-recognition algorithms being developed in China, Russia, the UK, the US and elsewhere are coupled with precise weapons systems, they will further increase the tactical advantage of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and other remotely operated platforms. According to the DoD, however, the `deep learning' software being integrated into those systems is meant to complement, not replace, the human operator. Instead, it serves to reduce the required reaction time and augments the effectiveness of munitions packages.
   For purely computational tasks, big-data analysis and machine learning can now supersede human capabilities. For example, one June 2016 report stated that a US company had developed an AI system (called `ALPHA') that prevailed in combat simulations against an air-force veteran. In an interview, ALPHA's developer explained that it can process enormous amounts of sensor data and uses mathematical modelling to determine tactical responses. However, it utilises an approach called `fuzzy logic' (akin to industrial control-system applications that act on sensor inputs), rather than a neural-networking approach, which would seek to emulate the human brain. As such, today's tactical advantage stems from much greater data-processing capabilities, rather than `smart' machines per se.
   Through its `capability technology' research agenda, the European Defence Agency (EDA) is also exploring big data in defence modelling and simulation environments. In addition to enhancing combat efficiency, research and development (R&D) in military AI applications will create new adaptive methodologies for training personnel (such as fighter pilots). Furthermore, massive processing capabilities available for C4ISR information will almost certainly engender new operational opportunities. China's defence sector has made breakthroughs in UAV `swarming' technology, including a demonstration of 1,000 E Hang UAVs flying in formation at the Guangzhou air show in February 2017. Potential scenarios could include competing UAV swarms trying to impede each other's C4ISR network, while simultaneously engaging kinetic targets.
   As the European Council on Foreign Relations said, `AI will be part of the future of warfare, initially through autonomous weapons that can find and engage targets independently and operate in swarms'. The shift to coordinated networks of smaller, unmanned platforms will pose operational challenges for the large, centralised weapons systems that dominated twentieth-century warfare. This will also have implications for military doctrine, defence procurement and combatant commanders - especially as the reduced human and financial cost per unit of such UAVs renders them more expendable in combat scenarios.
   More AI applications for weapons systems of tactical and/or operational significance in the land, sea, air and space domains can be readily envisioned, but the biggest impact of machine learning may be on military decision-making itself. In 2017, the Innovate UK initiative announced ё6 million (US$7.7m) in Ministry of Defence funding for `new technologies, processes and ways of operating that improve the ability of defence staff to analyse and exploit data in decision-making'. Machine learning will soon be employed not only to process sensor data and engage military assets, but also in an attempt to `outwit' human opponents. Indeed, predictive analytics for adversary behavior is a key objective of operational AI in the long term.
   Strategic advantage
   US Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joseph Dunford stated in early 2017 that `information operations, space and cyber capabilities and ballistic missile technology have accelerated the speed of war, making conflict today faster and more complex than at any point in history'. Nations have less time to marshal their resources in response to security challenges than in the past, Dunford said. Because of this, and in order to stay ahead of the accelerating speed of war, automated decision-making will increasingly be relied upon by military forces. That is particularly true regarding strategic C4ISR assets and nuclear deterrent capabilities, whose disruption or destruction could pose an existential threat. Smarter offensive weapons will drive an `arms race' for more automation in defences in order to minimise any first-strike advantage. Yet the strategic balance surrounding nuclear security relies on, and clearly encourages, some degree of transparency and common situational awareness. Substantially raising uncertainty in the nuclear arena could threaten instability and have a mutually deleterious effect.
   Meanwhile, integrating capacities, such as AI, that greatly enhance the capability of conventional systems could risk undermining the measures of transparency and predictability around military-platform capability that underpin confidence and security-building measures and treaty regimes. It could also fundamentally alter threat perceptions around the deployment of ostensibly traditional systems by adversaries. Additionally, in conventional military conflict or in peacetime, AI could be utilised to intentionally distort information resources or destabilise the existing state of affairs.
   Russia's President Vladimir Putin said that AI raises both `colossal opportunities and threats that are difficult to predict now'. Although he was speaking in a non-military context, his claim holds true in the military realm too. It is too early to judge whether AI is predominantly an offensive or defensive tool. In fact, the strategic balance may simply tip in favour of the party with the superior military AI algorithms, since they could enhance nearly every type of weapon system. Or essentially, as Putin further stated, whoever leads in developing AI will become dominant.
   The real strategic impact of AI will concern its ability to impair or delay decision-making by military and political leaders. As in the operational realm, human processes will be targeted because they remain susceptible to manipulation by AI in a big data environment. Recent elections have shown that automated efforts can influence social-media perceptions and even temporarily create competing `factual' accounts. There is an inherent conservativism to modern military theory, which seeks to avoid potentially catastrophic conflicts; reduced levels of confidence in the accuracy of information would delay defensive decision-making, potentially to the benefit of the aggressor.
   Ethical considerations
   The ethical question of whether or not lethal autonomous-weapons systems (LAWS) should be permitted to make life and death decisions received much media attention during 2017. In August, over 100 prominent science and technology leaders joined Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk and others who had already warned the United Nations two years earlier about the risks of so-called `killer robots'. Nonetheless, several countries continue to develop LAWS that would be capable of completely independent operation if desired. For his part, the vice-chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, US Air Force General Paul Selva, has argued that humans should be kept in the decision-making loop. As of 2015, the UK's foreign office did not support an explicit prohibition on the use of LAWS, because it felt international humanitarian law (IHL) provided sufficient regulation. The UK armed forces, however, only operate weapons systems that are subject to human oversight and control.
   There is a clear distinction between applying IHL or specific rules of engagement to LAWS in the field and `hard wiring' those ethical limitations into the systems themselves. In that respect, the military considerations are analogous to the current debates regarding how to programme driverless cars to respond in worst-case scenarios - including choosing between different potentially fatal options. Except in the defence sector, it is presumed that the AI guidelines would be set by national military authorities and not by private companies.
   2018 and beyond
   A July 2017 study conducted on behalf of the US Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity highlighted that advances in AI are occurring much faster than originally anticipated. The report also placed AI on a par with aircraft and nuclear weapons as a transformative national-security technology. Accordingly, it will likely warrant new strategic thought to reveal its full implications and create doctrinal models. As such, AI will need its counterparts to Billy Mitchell and Giulio Douhet, or Thomas Schelling and Herman Kahn.
   China's Next Generation Artificial Intelligence Development Plan may be the beginning of that process. Released in July 2017, it lays out a holistic national strategy for R&D, economic development and national security pertaining to AI. This includes strengthening integration between the military and civilian sectors, reflective of the fact that AI is a dual-use technology whose fundamental principles have applicability well beyond the military domain. Big data, artificial intelligence and defence 13 Indeed, this makes both constraining its development and regulating its proliferation nearly impossible. With Chinese, European, Russian and US leaders all publicly declaring that AI represents the future of national power, there will undoubtedly be large-scale investment and concomitant advances in military AI applications around the world.
   Algorithmic warfare will change battlefield armaments, tactics and operations. Effective missile defences enabled by swarming interceptors would also affect the existing strategic dynamic relating to nuclear weapons. But if recent experience with cyber operations is any indicator, then the most potent militarily relevant applications of AI technology may, in the near term, be to manipulate civilian infrastructures for coercive objectives and to conduct influence operations during peacetime. From 2018 onwards, there will likely be further automated social-media campaigns and machine-learning tools employed to detect and/or interdict them. Indeed, by 2020, one may see complex AI-based perception-management operations - perhaps even falsifying or spoofing sensor data - to introduce strategic uncertainty into an adversary's decision-making processes.
   Big-data analysis and machine-learning algorithms are already available and vastly expand information processing capabilities; the defence sector is certain to capitalise on those innovations. Moreover, military applications will go far beyond improvements to specific weapons systems, and qualitative changes to tactics and operations will mandate revisions in strategic doctrine. Automated decision-making will play an increased role at every level of the command-and control process, from swarming miniature UAVs to the national command authority. Genuine AI in the scientific sense (i.e. truly independent logic systems that can indistinguishably mirror human thought processes and in turn create their own machine learning algorithms) may still be years away, but it is not too early to begin establishing normative limits for LAWS through IHL and military rules of engagement, in anticipation of this eventuality. Some technologists consider that these decisions will need to be addressed much sooner than we think.
   Russia: strategic-force modernisation
   Nuclear weapons have long played a fundamental role in Russia's national-security strategy. Moscow sees them as an essential aspect of strategic deterrence - which also comprises conventional and non-military capabilities - enabling it to maintain strategic stability and prevent military conflict. This suggests that Russia does not consider its nuclear capability in narrowly military terms, but rather relies on this to position itself as one of the guarantors of a stable international system.
   This does not mean, however, that nuclear weapons do not have a military role. Russia's military doctrine, last updated in 2014, states that the country reserves the right to use its nuclear capability in response to the use of nuclear weapons - or other weapons of mass destruction - against Russia or its allies, and in circumstances where aggression with conventional weapons would put at risk the very existence of the state. While this language indicates that the range of conditions for the use of Russia's nuclear weapons is relatively constrained, it is nuanced enough to allow Moscow to suggest that it can resort to nuclear weapons in a number of scenarios. While the Russian political and military leadership clearly understands the catastrophic consequences of a large-scale nuclear exchange, Moscow appears to be maintaining a degree of ambiguity about its intentions and capabilities that makes it very difficult to completely rule out the possibility of a limited use of nuclear weapons in some eventualities. Indeed, in its military exercises, Russia has practised scenarios that involve the use of such weapons.
   Defence industry
   Given the role that nuclear weapons play in its national-security strategy, it is unsurprising that Russia devotes substantial resources to the maintenance and modernisation of its nuclear forces. During the financially lean years of the 1990s, Russia focused on maintaining the core components of its strategic arsenal, preserving key defence-industrial enterprises, and consolidating development and production in Russia (although the maintenance of some legacy systems continued with the support of defence enterprises in Ukraine).
   These efforts allowed Russia to bring together key elements of the Soviet-era military-industrial infrastructure, and to preserve a significant number of military research and design institutions involved in the development of advanced military systems. In this period, Moscow also developed a broad outline of its nuclear-modernisation programme that helped it maintain its strategic forces with the limited financial resources that were available. As more funds became available in the 2000s, the modernisation effort was intensified and subsequently expanded to include a number of new programmes. To a large extent, this expansion was driven by the defence industry, although the factors that helped justify the modernisation effort included the need to maintain numerical parity with the United States and to counter US missile defence developments.
   Today, key enterprises involved in the development and production of Russia's strategic systems include the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology, which leads the development of land and sea-based solid-propellant ballistic missiles (RS-12M2 Topol-M (SS-27 mod 1), RS-24 Yars (SS-27 mod 2) and Bulava), and the Votkinsk Machine Building Plant, which produces the missiles. The Makeyev State Rocket Center is the lead developer of liquid-fuel missiles, including modifications of the R-29RM Sineva (SS-N-23 Skiff) submarine launched ballistic missile (SLBM) and the new silo based Sarmat. These missiles are produced at the Krasnoyarsk Machine Building Plant. The Tupolev Design Bureau is the main contractor for work on the current range of strategic bombers. Upgrades to old bombers are carried out at several plants, but it is planned that new aircraft production will be concentrated at the Gorbunov Aviation Plant in Kazan.
   Analysts have questioned the demographic profile of the workforce within Russia's defence industries, and the need to make the industry an attractive career option for young engineers. While defence enterprises might be seen as a reliable career path in a period of broader economic difficulty, these industries now have to compete for talent. This was reflected in the pay rises noted in recent years. And although Russia's strategic-defence enterprises appear to have preserved some of their expertise, problems remain, for example, in transferring the necessary skill sets and experience to the younger generation of engineers.
   Meanwhile, the Bulava missile programme encountered some difficulties at the development and serial-production stages; development of the Sarmat missile is now several years behind schedule; and the industry still has to demonstrate that it can resume the production of strategic bombers. However, while economic challenges may be holding at risk some elements of Russia's broader military-modernisation drive, and while time frames might slip, the intention is likely to complete the strategic-modernisation programmes currently under way.
   Strategic forces
   Land-based systems
   Land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs) constitute the main pillar of the Russian strategic nuclear triad. Russia is carrying out an active ICBM modernisation programme, which has accelerated in recent years. The missile system at the centre of this modernisation is the single-warhead Topol-M (SS-27 mod 1), which was deployed in 1997-2009, when Russia was constrained from deploying a multiple warhead version of that missile by the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). When START expired in 2009, Russia switched to deployment of the RS-24 Yars (SS-27 mod 2), which is a version of the Topol-M (probably somewhat upgraded) that uses multiple independently-targetable re-entry vehicles (MIRVs). Both of these missiles are deployed in silos as well as on road-mobile launchers. As of early 2017, Russia was estimated to have 78 single-warhead Topol-M missiles and 96 multiple-warhead Yars ICBMs. The deployment of Yars missiles is expected to continue as part of the modernisation process.
   The relatively new Topol-M and Yars missiles carry about half of all the ICBM warheads in Russia's inventory. The other half are deployed with the older ICBMs that were introduced in the early 1980s. One of these missiles, the UR-100NUTTH (SS-19 mod 3), is in the process of being withdrawn from active service.
   The other, the heavy R-36M2 (SS-18 Satan mod 5), is currently deployed with two missile divisions. With each missile carrying ten warheads, 46 ICBMs of this type account for 460 deployed warheads. These missiles are expected to stay in service until about 2020. After that they will be replaced by Sarmat, a new silo-based liquid-fuel ICBM that is currently under development. Sarmat, however, is not necessarily an adequate replacement for its heavy predecessor, as its characteristics are closer to those of the UR-100NUTTH (SS-19); this stems, analysts maintain, from the fact that the R-36M2 was built in Ukraine and that as a consequence Sarmat is, in effect, the heaviest missile that Russia can currently produce. With a launch weight of about half that of the R-36M2, Sarmat is likely to have smaller throw-weight and might carry fewer than ten warheads.
   Although most Sarmat missiles are expected to carry nuclear warheads, it also appears to be the launcher of choice for Russia's developmental hypersonic glide vehicle (HGV), which is often referred to as Project 4202 or Yu-71. The Yu-71 vehicle is currently undergoing flight tests, which may lead to an initial deployment in the 2020s. The boost-glide HGV will not necessarily be nuclear-armed.
   Although the deployment of a MIRVed, silo based ICBM is often considered a politically destabilising move, Russia appears to believe that Sarmat is essential for countering US missile defences. Its calculation is that even if only a small number of these missiles can survive an attack, they could provide an adequate retaliatory response. The hypersonic vehicle also appears to have the penetration of missile defences as its primary mission.
   In addition to the two main ICBM development programmes - Yars and Sarmat - Russia is working to revive the idea of building a rail-mobile ICBM. Even though the project, known as Barguzin, was not included in the earlier State Armament Programme, development is under way and the first missile ejection test took place in November 2016.
   Another missile under development, known as the RS-26 Rubezh, is nominally considered an ICBM, since it demonstrated a range of more than 5,500km in one of its flight tests. Rubezh, however, is believed to be an intermediate-range missile that is based on the first two stages of Yars. Russia completed flight tests of the missile in 2014 and initially planned to begin deployment in 2015 to missile units near Irkutsk and at Edrovo/Vypolzovo. However, the deployment was postponed and is not expected to begin until at least mid-2018. It is possible that it will be deployed with missile divisions that operate the Yars ICBM, perhaps reflecting the judgement that Rubezh may comprise two Yars stages; if this is the case, co-deploying two different missiles would make more sense as there may be commonalities in terms of training, maintenance and logistics support.
   Maritime systems
   In 2014 the Russian Navy received the third Project 955 Borey-class ballistic-missile submarine. This delivery was part of Moscow's strategic fleet modernisation programme, which calls for the construction of eight submarines of this class. The fourth submarine, which is expected to join the fleet in 2019 - and subsequent boats that are currently at various stages of construction - appears to be an upgraded design, called Project 955A Borey-A. Each submarine carries 16 Bulava solid-propellant SLBMs, with up to six warheads on each missile. This construction programme is now expected to be completed in 2021.
   In the meantime, Russia continues to maintain and operate ballistic-missile submarines of Project 667BDR (Delta III) and Project 667BDRM (Delta IV) types. These submarines were built in the 1970s and 1980s and are kept in service by regular overhauls and repairs. Both classes carry liquid-fuel SLBMs. The three Delta-III submarines that are currently in service rely on the supply of R-29R (SS-N-18) missiles that were built in the 1980s. To equip submarines of the Delta-IV class, Russia has relaunched a production line for R-29RMU2 Sineva (SS-N-23) SLBMs and developed an upgraded version of that missile, known as the R-29RMU2.1 Layner. This latter missile, accepted for service in 2014, is said to be capable of carrying up to ten warheads, although it is perhaps deployed with only four, like Sineva.
   It seems likely that Delta-III submarines will be withdrawn from service when they are replaced by the new Project 955 Borey, although Delta-IV-class boats will probably remain in service for some time after 2025. However, the plans for future submarine construction are not clear. Most likely, Russia will continue the Project 955 line along with the development of a new submarine with a solid-propellant missile. Given Bulava's patchy test record, it is possible that the missile will be new as well. At the same time, some reports suggest that Russia may be developing a new liquid-fuel SLBM, which would require a different development line; while industry may favour this option, the navy is believed to be more cautious. However, no decision about the direction of the SLBM programme is understood to have been taken at the time of writing.
   Strategic aviation
   Until recently, Russia's strategic fleet included 16 Tu-160 Blackjack and over 50 Tu-95MS Bear bombers. These aircraft were originally built as strategic weapons platforms, with the Kh-55 (AS-15) nuclear capable air-launched cruise missile (ALCM) as their principal armament. The recent overhaul and modernisation of the Tu-160 fleet has given these aircraft the capability to use conventional weapons as well. Both aircraft can carry the Kh-555 ALCM, which is a conventional version of the Kh-55. They can also carry the new conventional Kh-101 ALCM, and its nuclear version, which is known as Kh-102. The capability of the Tu-160 and Tu-95MS to use conventional ALCMs (Kh-555 as well as Kh-101) was first demonstrated in 2015, when these aircraft were used to attack targets in Syria.
   Modernisation plans for Russia's strategic aviation currently include two main projects: the development of a new long-range bomber, known as PAK-DA, and revived production of the Tu-160; these newly produced versions are designated Tu-160M2. PAK-DA, meanwhile, is reported to be a subsonic flying-wing aircraft, although there is only scant information on the project. In order to allow its bombers to conduct stand-off operations, Russia is reportedly working on a new ALCM, known as Kh-BD, with a range that will be considerably greater than that reported for the Kh-101/-102. PAK-DA may conduct its first flight in the 2020s. Once in service, it will replace the old Tu-95MS bombers, although the air force has not yet indicated how many new bombers it would like to procure. The first Tu-160M2 is also expected to be ready in 2019, with serial production starting in 2021, and the air force is considering an order of up to 50 of the aircraft.
   Early warning and missile defence
   In addition to modernising all elements of its strategic triad, Russia is upgrading its early-warning system and working on the upgrade of its strategic missile defences. The country's network of early warning radars has undergone a complete overhaul with the construction of a series of new-generation Russia: strategic-force modernisation 17 radars, known as Voronezh-M, Voronezh-DM and Voronezh-SM. The construction of the first of these began in 2005 and it became operational a few years afterwards. In 2017 Russia announced that it had complete radar coverage of all approaches to its territory.
   In 2015, it launched the first Tundra satellite, part of a new space-based early-warning system, known as EKS. This was followed by a second launch in mid-2017. These satellites are deployed on highly elliptical orbits and can provide partial coverage of potential ballistic-missile launch areas. When complete, the system will include as many as ten satellites on highly elliptical orbits, as well as geostationary satellites. The current plans call for ten new early-warning satellite launches by 2020. However, it is a new system, so Moscow might be waiting to see how the first satellites function, while there are also likely issues relating to manufacturing capacity, to say nothing of the challenge in launching eight more satellites before 2020.
   Russia is also modernising the missile-defence system deployed around Moscow. The new system, sometimes referred to as A-235 or Samolyot-M, appears to be a modest upgrade of the current A-135 system, which includes the Don-2N battle-management radar and 68 short-range 53T6 Amur (SH-8 Gazelle) interceptors. The system is known to be nuclear, although it is possible that Russia might look to deploy a successor without nuclear warheads. In 2017 Russia conducted a test of what appeared to be a modified 53T6 interceptor, although it is not known whether this test was part of the A-235 development programme.
   Another significant project is the development of what has been claimed to be an anti-satellite system, known as Nudol. Russia has been conducting tests of the launcher since 2014, and this programme may also be part of the A-235 missile-defence project.
   Non-strategic nuclear weapons
   Russia maintains a substantial non-strategic nuclear force that includes a variety of delivery systems. These include bombers, short-range ballistic and cruise missiles used by ground forces, air-defence systems, cruise missiles and torpedoes used by the navy, and weapons operated by naval-aviation and coastal-defence forces. It is estimated that Russia's current active arsenal includes about 2,000 nuclear warheads assigned to non-strategic delivery systems. According to official statements, all Russia's non-strategic nuclear weapons are kept in centralised storage facilities. However, Russia has never clarified which facilities this definition covers. Currently, Russia maintains at least 12 national-level storage sites and an estimated 35 base-level facilities that can be used to store and maintain nuclear weapons for extended periods of time. With the exception of ICBMs and SLBMs (and possibly some cruise missiles), nuclear weapons are not deployed on their delivery vehicles and are stored at some distance from operational bases.
   The development and deployment of new nuclear-capable delivery systems is clearly under way, although most of the new systems are designed to be dual-capable. One major project in this area is the development of the Iskander-M system, which includes a short-range ballistic missile and a short-range cruise missile. The system is widely believed to be nuclear-capable and has apparently been used in some exercises to simulate nuclear strikes. Russia will soon complete the deployment of Iskander-M in all 12 army and navy missile brigades, where they are replacing older Tochka-U missiles.
   Another important programme is the development of a family of long-range cruise missiles that can be deployed on submarines, surface ships and potentially on land-based launchers. This family includes the long-range missile known as the 3M14, a land-attack cruise missile (LACM) that is part of the Kalibr weapon system. Starting in 2015, Russia repeatedly demonstrated the capability of this missile in attacks against targets in Syria. Kalibr missiles were launched from surface ships deployed in the Caspian Sea as well as from submarines deployed in the Mediterranean Sea. Russia has announced a plan to deploy Kalibr missiles on a range of surface ships and submarines. The first multipurpose submarine of the Project 885 Yasen-class, Severodvinsk, has demonstrated the capability to launch Kalibr missiles as part of its test regime.
   Older types of submarine are being modified to carry these missiles in their torpedo compartments; Yasen, in contrast, is believed to have a mix of vertical launch tubes and missile-capable torpedo tubes. The Kalibr missile may be at the centre of the allegations of non-compliance with the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty levelled against Russia by Washington in 2014. According to Washington, Russia has tested, produced and begun to deploy a ground-launched cruise missile (GLCM) with a range between 500 km and 5,500 km, in violation of its obligations under the INF Treaty, which Moscow denies. Although the US has not disclosed details of the alleged violation, it is possible that Russia did adapt the submarine-launched LACM to a wheeled ground launcher and therefore may have developed a GLCM that is very similar to Kalibr. If that is the case, this deployment constitutes a violation of the INF Treaty; so far, diplomatic attempts to resolve the issue have been unsuccessful.

Глава Первая. Китайское и российское авиационное оружие: испытание на господство в воздухе Запада


   Со времени окончания Холодной войны воздушное пространство было местом гарантированного превосходства Соединенных Штатов и их союзников. Это доминирование, однако, основывается на оружии и технологиях, которые Китай и Россия все чаще получают в рамках более широких усилий по противодействию потенциалу США и союзным силам в беспрепятственном контроле над воздухом.
   Эти две страны - зарождающаяся и возрождающаяся воздушные державы, соответственно - разрабатывают свои собственные боевые самолеты "пятого поколения" с необходимыми малозаметными характеристиками. Параллельно они занимаются разработкой оружия воздушного базирования в дополнение к этим проектам и в то же время осуществляют модернизацию своих арсеналов оружия с помощью ракет, что повысит их способность оспаривать контроль над воздушным пространством. Некоторые из этих вооружений идут на экспорт.
   В 2015-16 годах Пекин ввел в эксплуатацию инфракрасную ракету PL-10 воздух-воздух (УРВВ). В 2018 году он вполне может ввести PL-15. Эти ракеты заметно повышают боеспособность ВВС. Между тем Россия ввела в эксплуатацию две модернизированные версии существующих вооружений, а также новую дальнобойную УРВВ, и эти темпы развития могут продолжаться. Действительно, Москва рассчитывает на дальнейшее использование целого ряда передовых технологий, подходящих для управляемого оружия. Эта тенденция, во всяком случае, более выражена в Пекине. Например, Китай уже начал использовать активные радары с электронным сканированием для ракет. Он также разрабатывает двухрежимные системы наведения; работает над увеличением средней скорости оружия; повышением маневренности своих ракет; и, в то же время, улучшением бортовой обработки в целях повышения эффективности ракет. Хотя Россия также работает в некоторых из этих областей, усилия Китая лучше обеспечены ресурсами.
   В настоящее время воздушные бои все больше активизируются за счет ускорения технологических разработок в области связи и бортовой вычислительной мощности, которые позволяют быстро и скоординировано осуществлять деятельность между разрозненными платформами. Как таковой, и в рамках модернизации своих возможностей воздушного боя, Китай также стремится к созданию и использованию дружественных цифровых сетей, разрабатывая тактику, методы и процедуры для деградации сетевой среды противника. Что касается систем "воздух-воздух", то это, скорее всего, будет включать в себя бортовое целеуказание на увеличенных стартовых дальностях, где другая платформа (т. е. не самолет, несущий ракету) определит и предоставит местоположение цели и обновленную информацию о ракете в полете.
   Китайский прогресс
   Степень прогресса Китая в области управляемого оружия класса "воздух-воздух" стала очевидной с появлением УРВВ PL-10. Это оружие обеспечило заметное улучшение характеристик по сравнению с предыдущим поколением ракет малой дальности, эксплуатируемых Военно-воздушными силами Народно-освободительной армии (ВВС НОАК), и его развитие поставило Китай в число немногих стран, имеющих оборонно-промышленную базу, способную производить такое оружие. PL-10 использует аэродинамическое и тягово-векторное управление, но ВВС НОАК потребует усовершенствованной системы нашлемного наведения, чтобы использовать маневренность оружия. В течение 2018 года ракета PL-15 может также начать поступать на службу. PL-15 представляет собой УРВВ с активным радиолокационным наведением расширенной дальности и, когда она будет находится в эксплуатации, то будет самым способным УРВВ в ВВС НОАК. Примечательно, что в конце 2015 года оно было идентифицирован как оружие, вызывающее озабоченность генерала Хока Карлайла, тогдашнего главы боевого командования ВВС США.
   Однако PL-10 и PL-15-не единственные системы, с которыми приходится мириться США и их союзникам. Китай также разрабатывает УРВВ очень большой дальности, предназначенный для нанесения ударов по таким ценным целям, как танкеры, самолеты раннего предупреждения и разведывательные, наблюдательные и разведывательные самолеты (ISR). Кроме того, Пекин, как представляется, создает две или более конфигурации ракетного прямоточного двигателя УРВВ.
   К началу-середине 2020 - х годов Китай, несомненно, будет иметь более широкий - и гораздо более способный - диапазон воздушного оружия для дополнения боевых самолетов, которые в настоящее время находятся в разработке. Это, вероятно, заставит США и их региональных союзников пересмотреть не только свою тактику, методы и процедуры, но и направление своих собственных программ боевого аэрокосмического развития.
   Русское возрождением
   Между тем, Россия также начала модернизировать свои запасы оружия класса "воздух-воздух" после того, как сокращение финансирования вынудило к двух-десятилетнему затишью в закупочной деятельности. Например, примерно через 30 лет после первого испытательного запуска ВВС ВВС ввели в эксплуатацию вариант активной радиолокационной ракеты средней дальности "Вымпел Р-77" (АА-12А). Р-77 вышел в производство в 1990-х годах для выполнения экспортных заказов, с экспортным вариантом, публично называемым RVV-AE. Однако российские ВВС закупили только испытательные ракеты базового варианта. ВВС потребовалось до 2015 года ввести в строй вариант Р-77 - усовершенствованный и модернизированный Р-77-1 (АА-12В). Впервые они были развернуты в конце 2015 года, когда были показаны самолеты Су-35, действующие с авиабазы Хмеймим в Сирии.
   Наряду с Р-77-1 ВВС также начали принимать на вооружение усовершенствованную версию Р-73 (АА-11) - Р-74М (АА-11Б), вероятно, поступившую на вооружение примерно в то же время, что и Р-77-1. Р-74M имеет большую максимальную дальность, чем Р-74, и оснащен улучшенным приемником. Также заслуживает внимания введение в эксплуатацию Р-37М (АА-13) с активным радиолокационным наведением дальней УРВВ в 2015-16 годах. Эта ракета является основным вооружением перехватчика МиГ-31БМ. Это оружие имеет свое происхождение с конца 1980-х годов.
   По крайней мере, некоторые из новых стимулов в разработке российского управляемого оружия были предоставлены Китаем, частично в качестве потенциального клиента и частично в качестве все более надежного экспортного конкурента. Р-37М предлагается в качестве оружия-кандидата для Су-35, который Китай уже приобрел, и ракета может быть частью оружейного пакета самолета. Между тем, китайская УРВВ PL-10 уже предлагается на экспорт, как и активная радиолокационная PL-12 средней дальности. Инфракрасная PL-10 с высокой подвижностью изображения значительно более эффективна, чем российская Р-74/Р-74M, в то время как базовая PL-12, по-видимому, имеет лучшую производительность, чем у Р-77 (AA-12A).
   Программа PL-12, начавшаяся в конце 1980-х годов, в значительной степени опиралась на российскую технологию. В оригинальной версии ракеты используется радиолокационная головка, разработанная российской фирмой Агат, с несколькими другими компонентами, также предоставленными Москвой. Без российской поддержки программа PL-12, по всей вероятности, заняла бы значительно больше времени и произвела бы оружие более низкого качества. Сегодня, однако, Пекин больше не зависит от российской ракетно-технической помощи; теперь он, по крайней мере, равен Москве, и, возможно, в некоторых областях он теперь лидирует.
   Будут электронные
   Китай, как представляется, является одной из немногих стран, которые использовали активный радар с электронным сканированием (АФАР) на УРВВ, а не традиционный с механическим сканированием. Сообщалось, что PL-15 использует АФАР. Между тем, японская УРВВ AAM-4B также оснащен АФАР, в то время как есть предположения, что американский вариант AIM-120D усовершенствованной ракеты AIM-120 средней дальности "воздух-воздух" также использует АФАР, а не механически сканируемую головку.
   Технология АФАР все чаще используется в качестве основного прицела для боевых самолетов, при этом механически сканируемые антенны радаров заменяются либо неподвижными, либо подвижными электронно-сканируемыми антеннами. Они обеспечивают ряд преимуществ, включая повышение эффективности обнаружения с точки зрения дальности и против малозаметных целей, большую устойчивость к контрмерам, снижение вероятности перехвата и повышение надежности. Однако высокая стоимость внедрения этих систем (приемо-передающие модули, которые являются строительными блоками технологии АФАР, сравнительно дороги в производстве) до сих пор служила тормозом для их внедрения, особенно в отношении оружия одноразового использования, такого как ракеты.
   Некоторые факторы эффективности, вероятно, способствовали принятию этими странами решений по преодолению барьеров затрат, связанных с технологией АФАР на УРВВ. В случае Китая, где исследования и приобретение оружия в меньшей степени сдерживаются ограничениями финансирования, эти факторы, вероятно, включали повышение эффективности этих систем против малозаметных целей и большую устойчивость к контрмерам на самолетах-целях, таких как радиочастотные глушители.
   Присущая технологии АФАР гибкость, с точки зрения ее частотной гибкости, делает эти головки более трудными для противодействия путем помех. Традиционные радиолокационные контрмеры включают определение частоты, на которой работает система угрозы, а затем генерирование сигнала помех на той же частоте.
   В России также предпринимаются усилия по разработке комплекса "боеголовок воздуха-воздух", включая "изделие" 180/К-77М, развитие Р-77 и новую конструкцию, известную как "изделие-270". Однако некоторые российские конструкторы "боеголовок" по-прежнему не убеждены в ценности перехода от механически сканируемой системы к электронно-сканируемым системам. Имеются также данные о том, что российский сектор микроэлектроники борется за производство приемопередающих модулей с требуемой надежностью и затратами.
   Дальнее и сверхдальнее действие
   В конце 1980-х годов советские конструкторы управляемого оружия рассматривали возможность разработки дальнобойных УРВВ для использования против дорогостоящих воздушных платформ, таких как танкеры и самолеты-разведчики, которые традиционно остаются далеко позади переднего края воздушного боя. Например, конструкция "Новатор" КС-172 предназначалась для использования на дальностях до 300 километров. Однако в 1990-е и последующие годы она практически не пользовалась государственной поддержкой, пока не проиграла в 2009 году в конкурсе с ракетой дальнего радиуса действия "Вымпел". Последний базируется в некоторой степени на дальней Р-37М, но имеет планер, модифицированный для перевозки во внутренних отсеках вооружения, в том числе на боевом самолете пятого поколения Су-57 (прототип известен как Сухой Т-50).
   Очевидно, что Китай также решил развивать дальний потенциал УРВВ, вполне возможно, отслеживая развитие событий в России. Изображения большой ракеты большой дальности, перевозимой боевым самолетом ВВС НОАК Shenyang J-16, появились в интернете в конце 2016 года. Длина оружия оценивается примерно в шесть метров; для сравнения, длина R-37M составляет чуть более четырех метров. Конструкция имела только четыре руля в хвостовой части, без среднего крыла, что предполагало конструкцию ракеты, не предназначенную для высокой маневренности. Ракета находится в стадии разработки. Наряду с предполагаемой максимальной дальностью более 400 км, она, вероятно, также использует двухрежимное наведение. Судя по изображениям, помимо активного радара, оружие было оснащено инфракрасным вспомогательным искателем. Использование двухрежимного наведения сделало бы ракету более устойчивой к контрмерам и улучшило бы выбор цели.
   По сценарию сверхдальнего действия бортовые датчики - те, что находятся на борту носителя ракеты, будут предоставлять первоначальную информацию о цели и обновлять средний курс во время полета ракеты. Для сведения к минимуму лобового сопротивления планера будет также использоваться траектория полета, потенциально на высотах свыше 30 000 метров. Учитывая значительный диаметр корпуса ракеты, радиолокатор мог бы вмещать большую антенну, обеспечивая дальность обнаружения, возможно, 40-50 км или более против цели с большим радиолокационным поперечным сечением, такой как танкер или самолет раннего предупреждения. Инфракрасная или тепловизионная вспомогательная головка может использоваться для выбора конечной точки прицеливания, чтобы попытаться обеспечить максимальный урон, или в качестве альтернативного основного, если радиолокационная головка ракеты будет забиваться помехой.
   Сложная будущая среда
   Сверхдальнобойное оружие Китая, когда оно начнет поступать на вооружение в ближайшие несколько лет, предоставит ВВС НОАК возможность угрожать дорогостоящим воздушным целям на больших расстояниях. Это, вероятно, повлияет на то, как потенциальные противники рассматривают свои собственные будущие операции. Соединение операционного радиуса J-16 с УРВВ дальностью 400 км, например, было бы вынуждающим фактором для планирования противником его топливозаправочных трасс или крупно-платформенных миссий разведки. Возможно, не случайно, что ВВС США все больше интересуются малозаметной конструкцией танкеров-самолетов. Еще больше беспокоит с точки зрения США тот факт, что эта разработка является лишь одним аспектом усилий ВВС НОАК по переоснащению своего инвентаря УРВВ более способными системами, включая PL-10, PL-15 и УРВВ с ракетно-прямоточным двигателем, которые предлагают гораздо большие варианты взаимодействия. Сами эти разработки включены в программу модернизации и переоснащения боевых самолетов.
   Прогресс Китая также будет продолжать стимулировать развитие ракетных технологий в России, в то время как сотрудничество между двумя странами, по крайней мере на уровне подсистем, остается возможным; действительно, российские промышленники предположили, что это уже происходит. Поскольку PL-10 и PL-12 уже предлагаются на экспорт, а на экспортном рынке может появиться возможность дальнейшей модернизации, западным военно-воздушным силам придется учитывать более сложную будущую угрозу. Однако, хотя технология может быть центральным элементом авиации, ее необходимо использовать надлежащим образом, чтобы получить максимальную выгоду. ВВС НОАК продвигается в направлении более сложных и реалистичных сценариев подготовки, но эти разработки должны продолжаться - и уроки должны быть полностью интегрированы в доктрину, подготовку и тактику - для того, чтобы в полной мере использовать оружейные системы, которые сейчас входят в ее арсенал.
   Большие массивы данных, искусственный интеллект и защита
   Анализ больших массивов данных, машинное обучение и искусственный интеллект (ИИ) являются точками вдоль континуума, который будет постепенно удалять людей от принятия сложных решений. Автоматизация индуктивных "рассуждений" и эмпирического моделирования позволяет улучшить распознавание объектов всех видов, начиная от идентификации целей до прогнозирования коррелированного поведения. В настоящее время, однако, они в основном включают алгоритмические модели, работающие с чрезвычайно большими массивами данных, а не подлинное познание или абстрактные возможности принятия решений, которые напоминали бы человеческий интеллект. Хотя нынешняя позиция по этому технологическому континууму может быть спорной, эти технологии начинают оказывать преобразующее воздействие на обороноспособность. Как и во всех других аспектах современной экономики и общества, автоматизированные алгоритмы используются для сбора, компиляции, структурирования, обработки, анализа, передачи и использования все более крупных наборов данных. В военном контексте перспективными представляются возможности дистанционного зондирования, ситуационной осведомленности, маневрирования на поле боя и других приложений ИИ. Однако остается неясным, изменят ли эти новые технические возможности в конечном счете баланс в пользу наступательных или оборонительных действий.
   Военные приложения
   11 мая 2017 года Дэн Коутс, директор Национальной разведки США, дал показания Конгрессу США о своей ежегодной оценке угрозы во всем мире. В опубликованном документе он сказал `что "искусственный интеллект (ИИ) развивает вычислительные возможности, которые приносят пользу экономике, но эти достижения также позволяют новые военные возможности для наших противников". В то же время Министерство обороны США (МО) работает над такими системами. Проект Maven, например, также известный как Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team (AWCFT), предназначен для ускорения интеграции больших массивов данных, машинного обучения и ИИ в военные возможности США. Хотя первоначально AWCFT фокусируется на алгоритмах компьютерного зрения для обнаружения и классификации объектов, он будет консолидировать все существующие инициативы на основе алгоритмов, связанные с военной разведкой США. Общая цель состоит в том, чтобы уменьшить "бремя человеческих факторов", увеличить оперативную разведку и повысить эффективность принятия военных решений.
   Другие вооруженные силы, как представляется, в равной степени заинтересованы в потенциале ИИ и склонны к аналогичным потенциальным видам использования. В 2017 году Лаборатория оборонной науки и техники Великобритании поставила задачу, которая включала разработку автоматизированной системы для идентификации и классификации транспортных средств по спутниковым снимкам. Между тем, научно-техническая организация НАТО запланировала "встречу специалистов" во Франции по большим данным и ИИ для принятия военных решений в конце мая 2018 года, а ООН объявила, что открывает новый офис в Гааге для мониторинга развития ИИ и робототехники.
   За пределами Европы Китай применяет алгоритмы распознавания лиц к отечественным видеоматериалам, собранным камерами скрытого наблюдения, чтобы, по его словам, повысить общественную безопасность. Он также уделяет больше внимания большим данным и ИИ для операций ВВС. Государственный совет Пекина установил целевой объем производства в размере 1 трлн юаней (147,1 млрд. долл.США) для китайских отраслей ИИ к 2030 году, утверждая, что "прорывы должны быть сделаны в основных теориях ИИ, таких как интеллект больших данных, мультимедийные вычисления, гибридный интеллект человека и машины, интеллект роя и автоматизированное принятие решений". В 2017 году российское информационное агентство ТАСС сообщило, что группа "Калашников" разработала управляемый боевой модуль с ИИ, способный самостоятельно определять и поражать цели, и что фирма "КРЭТ" работает над беспилотными системами с роящимися и независимыми возможностями принятия решений. Это лишь некоторые из осуществляемых инициатив; полный спектр военных применений ИИ, безусловно, является обширным.
   От тактического к оперативному
   Несмотря на то, что технологические инновации еще не воспроизвели человеческий разум в независимых машинах, ИИ предвещает значительные изменения на всех уровнях военной доктрины и практики. Королевский флот Великобритании, например, преследует проект Нельсона, чтобы использовать и обеспечить развитие ИИ через большие данные, искусственный интеллект и оборону 11 "все военно-морское предприятие". Системы ИИ будут внедрены для обеспечения "когнитивной поддержки операторов и пользователей", играя роль в смягчении перегрузки данных в сегодняшней сложной сенсорной и богатой данными операционной среде. Военные службы также подчеркивают актуальность этих новых возможностей для вспомогательных функций, таких как логистика, а также для их использования в боевых ролях на передовой; они касаются будущего, но также помогают сегодня, сказали должностные лица Великобритании.
   Но непосредственные выгоды от ИИ также реализуются в тактической сфере. Командование, управление, связь, компьютеры, разведка, наблюдение и разведка (C4ISR) достигают новых высот эффективности, которые позволяют собирать и обрабатывать данные в беспрецедентных масштабах и с беспрецедентной скоростью. Когда алгоритмы распознавания образов, разрабатываемые в Китае, России, Великобритании, США и других странах, будут соединены с точными системами вооружения, они еще больше увеличат тактическое преимущество беспилотных летательных аппаратов (БПЛА) и других дистанционно управляемых платформ. Однако, согласно МО, интегрируемое в эти системы программное обеспечение "глубокого обучения" призвано дополнять, а не заменять человека-оператора. Вместо этого он служит сокращению требуемого времени реакции и повышает эффективность боеприпасов.
   Для чисто вычислительных задач анализ больших данных и машинное обучение теперь могут заменить человеческие возможности. Например, в одном июньском отчете 2016 года говорилось, что американская компания разработала систему ИИ (называемую "Альфа"), которая преобладала в боевых симуляциях против ветерана ВВС. В интервью разработчик ALPHA объяснил, что он может обрабатывать огромное количество данных датчиков и использует математическое моделирование для определения тактических ответов. Однако он использует подход, называемый "нечеткой логикой" (сродни промышленным приложениям систем управления, которые действуют на входы датчиков), а не подход нейронных сетей, который будет стремиться эмулировать человеческий мозг. Таким образом, сегодняшнее тактическое преимущество связано с гораздо большими возможностями обработки данных, а не с "умными" машинами как таковыми.
   В рамках своей программы исследований "технологии потенциала" Европейское оборонное агентство (EDA) также изучает большие данные в области оборонного моделирования и имитационных сред. Помимо повышения боевой эффективности, научные исследования и разработки (НИОКР) в области применения военного ИИ позволят создать новые адаптивные методики обучения личного состава (например, летчиков-истребителей). Кроме того, широкие возможности обработки информации C4ISR почти наверняка создадут новые оперативные возможности. Оборонный сектор Китая сделал прорыв в технологии "роения" БПЛА, включая демонстрацию 1000 БПЛА E Hang, летающих в строю на авиасалоне Гуанчжоу в феврале 2017 года. Потенциальные сценарии могут включать конкурирующие рои БПЛА, пытающиеся препятствовать сети C4ISR друг друга, одновременно привлекая кинетические цели.
   Как сказал Европейский Совет по международным отношениям ` "ИИ будет частью будущего войны, первоначально через автономное оружие, которое может находить и поражать цели независимо и действовать роями". Переход к скоординированным сетям небольших беспилотных платформ создаст оперативные проблемы для крупных централизованных систем вооружений, которые доминировали в войне двадцатого века. Это также будет иметь последствия для военной доктрины, оборонных закупок и командиров комбатантов, особенно с учетом того, что сокращение людских и финансовых затрат на единицу таких БПЛА делает их более расходуемыми в боевых сценариях.
   Можно легко представить себе большее число прикладных программ ИИ для систем вооружений тактического и/или оперативного значения в наземной, морской, воздушной и космической областях, однако наибольшее влияние машинное обучение может оказать на сам процесс принятия военных решений. В 2017 году инициатива Innovate UK анонсировала ё6 млн (US$7,7 млн) в финансировании Министерства обороны для "новых технологий, процессов и способов работы, которые улучшают способность сотрудников обороны анализировать и использовать данные в процессе принятия решений". Вскоре машинное обучение будет использовано не только для обработки сенсорных данных и задействования военных средств, но и в попытке "перехитрить" человеческих противников. Действительно, прогнозная аналитика поведения противника является ключевой задачей операционного ИИ в долгосрочной перспективе.
   Стратегическое преимущество
   Председатель Объединенного комитета начальников штабов США генерал Джозеф Данфорд заявил в начале 2017 года `что "информационные операции, космические и кибернетические возможности и баллистические ракетные технологии ускорили скорость войны, делая конфликт сегодня быстрее и сложнее, чем в любой момент в истории". Страны имеют меньше времени для мобилизации своих ресурсов в ответ на вызовы безопасности, чем в прошлом, сказал Данфорд. Из-за этого, а также для того, чтобы опередить ускоряющуюся скорость войны, вооруженные силы будут все больше полагаться на автоматизированное принятие решений. Это особенно верно в отношении стратегических активов C4ISR и потенциала ядерного сдерживания, разрушение или уничтожение которых может представлять экзистенциальную угрозу. Более умное наступательное оружие будет вести "гонку вооружений" для большей автоматизации в обороне, чтобы свести к минимуму любое преимущество первого удара. Однако стратегический баланс вокруг ядерной безопасности опирается на определенную степень транспарентности и общей ситуационной осведомленности и явно поощряет ее. Существенное повышение неопределенности на ядерной арене может угрожать нестабильности и иметь взаимно пагубные последствия.
   Между тем интеграция потенциалов, таких, как ИИ, которые значительно повышают потенциал обычных систем, может привести к подрыву мер транспарентности и предсказуемости в отношении потенциала военных платформ, лежащих в основе мер укрепления доверия и безопасности и договорных режимов. Это может также коренным образом изменить представления об угрозе, связанные с развертыванием якобы традиционных систем противниками. Кроме того, в обычных военных конфликтах или в мирное время ИИ может использоваться для преднамеренного искажения информационных ресурсов или дестабилизации существующего положения дел.
   Президент России Владимир Путин заявил, что ИИ создает "колоссальные возможности и угрозы, которые сейчас трудно предсказать". Хотя он говорил в невоенном контексте, его утверждение справедливо и в военной сфере. Слишком рано судить, является ли ИИ преимущественно наступательным или оборонительным инструментом. Фактически, стратегический баланс может просто склониться в пользу стороны с превосходящими алгоритмами военного ИИ, поскольку они могут улучшить почти все типы систем оружия. Или, по сути, как далее заявил Путин, тот, кто возглавит разработку ИИ, станет доминирующим.
   Реальное стратегическое воздействие ИИ будет касаться его способности препятствовать или задерживать принятие решений военными и политическими лидерами. Как и в оперативной области, человеческие процессы будут целенаправленными, поскольку они по-прежнему подвержены манипулированию ИИ в среде больших данных. Недавние выборы показали, что автоматизированные усилия могут влиять на восприятие социальных медиа и даже временно создавать конкурирующие "фактические" счета. Современной военной теории присущ консерватизм, который стремится избежать потенциально катастрофических конфликтов; снижение уровня доверия к точности информации приведет к задержке принятия оборонительных решений, потенциально в интересах агрессора.
   Этическое соображение
   Этический вопрос о том, следует ли разрешать смертоносным системам автономного оружия (LAWS) принимать решения о жизни и смерти, получил большое внимание СМИ в течение 2017 года. В августе к Стивену Хокингу, Илону Маску и другим видным деятелям науки и техники присоединилось более 100 человек, которые два года назад уже предупреждали Организацию Объединенных Наций о рисках, связанных с так называемыми "роботами-убийцами". Тем не менее ряд стран продолжают разрабатывать законы, которые при желании могли бы функционировать совершенно независимо. Со своей стороны, вице-президент Объединенного комитета начальников штабов, генерал ВВС США Пол Сельва, утверждал, что люди должны оставаться в цикле принятия решений. По состоянию на 2015 год Министерство иностранных дел Соединенного Королевства не поддержало прямого запрета на использование LAWS, поскольку оно считает, что международное гуманитарное право (МГП) обеспечивает достаточное регулирование. Однако вооруженные силы Соединенного Королевства используют только те системы вооружений, которые находятся под контролем и управлением человека.
   Существует четкое различие между применением МГП или конкретных правил ведения боевых действий к законам в этой области и "жесткой привязкой" этих этических ограничений к самим системам. В этом отношении военные соображения аналогичны нынешним дебатам о том, как программировать автомобили без водителя для реагирования в наихудших сценариях, включая выбор между различными потенциально фатальными вариантами. Предполагается, что, за исключением оборонного сектора, руководящие принципы ИИ будут устанавливаться национальными военными властями, а не частными компаниями.
   2018 год и дальше
   В июле 2017 года исследование, проведенное от имени деятельности передовых исследовательских проектов разведки США, показало, что достижения в ИИ происходят намного быстрее, чем первоначально предполагалось. В докладе также ставится ИИ наравне с самолетами и ядерным оружием в качестве преобразующей технологии национальной безопасности. Соответственно, это, вероятно, потребует новой стратегической мысли, чтобы выявить ее полные последствия и создать доктринальные модели. Таким образом, ИИ понадобятся аналоги Билли Митчелла и Джулио Дуэ или Томаса Шеллинга и Германа Кана.
   План развития искусственного интеллекта следующего поколения Китая может стать началом этого процесса. Выпущенный в июле 2017 года, он излагает целостную Национальную стратегию НИОКР, экономического развития и национальной безопасности, относящуюся к ИИ. Это включает укрепление интеграции между военным и гражданским секторами, что отражает тот факт, что ИИ является технологией двойного назначения, основополагающие принципы которой применимы далеко за пределами военной сферы. Действительно, это делает практически невозможным как сдерживание его развития, так и регулирование его распространения. С китайскими, европейскими, российскими и американскими лидерами, публично заявляющими, что ИИ представляет будущее национальной власти, несомненно, будут крупномасштабные инвестиции и сопутствующие достижения в военных приложениях ИИ по всему миру.
   Алгоритмическая война изменит боевое вооружение, тактику и операции. Эффективная противоракетная оборона, обеспечиваемая за счет роящихся перехватчиков, также повлияла бы на существующую стратегическую динамику в отношении ядерного оружия. Но если недавний опыт киберопераций является каким-либо показателем, то наиболее мощным в военном отношении применением технологии ИИ в ближайшем будущем может быть манипулирование гражданскими инфраструктурами для целей принуждения и проведение операций влияния в мирное время. Начиная с 2018 года, вероятно, будут проводиться дальнейшие автоматизированные кампании в социальных сетях и использоваться инструменты машинного обучения для их обнаружения и/или пресечения. Действительно, к 2020 году можно увидеть сложные операции управления восприятием на основе ИИ - возможно, даже фальсификацию или подделку сенсорных данных - чтобы ввести стратегическую неопределенность в процессы принятия решений противника.
   Алгоритмы анализа больших данных и машинного обучения уже доступны и значительно расширяют возможности обработки информации; оборонный сектор, несомненно, будет использовать эти инновации. Кроме того, военные применения выйдут далеко за рамки совершенствования конкретных систем вооружений, а качественные изменения в тактике и операциях потребуют пересмотра стратегической доктрины. Автоматизированное принятие решений будет играть все более важную роль на всех уровнях командно-контрольного процесса, от роящихся миниатюрных БПЛА до национального командования. Подлинный ИИ в научном смысле (т. е. по-настоящему независимые логические системы, которые могут неотличимо отражать человеческие мыслительные процессы и, в свою очередь, создавать свои собственные алгоритмы машинного обучения), возможно, еще не скоро, но еще не слишком рано начинать устанавливать нормативные пределы для законов через МГП и военные правила ведения боевых действий, в ожидании этой возможности. Некоторые технологи считают, что эти решения нужно будет решать гораздо раньше, чем мы думаем.
   Россия: модернизация стратегических сил
   Ядерное оружие уже давно играет фундаментальную роль в Стратегии национальной безопасности России. Москва рассматривает их как важнейший аспект стратегического сдерживания, который также включает в себя обычные и невоенные потенциалы, позволяющие ей поддерживать стратегическую стабильность и предотвращать военные конфликты. Это говорит о том, что Россия не рассматривает свой ядерный потенциал в узко военном плане, а полагается на него, чтобы позиционировать себя как одного из гарантов стабильной международной системы.
   Однако это не означает, что ядерное оружие не играет военной роли. Военная доктрина России, последнее обновление которой было в 2014 году, говорится, что страна оставляет за собой право использовать ядерное оружие в ответ на применение ядерного оружия или другого оружия массового уничтожения, против России или ее союзников, и в условиях, когда агрессию с применением обычного оружия поставит под угрозу само существование государства. Хотя эта формулировка указывает на то, что диапазон условий применения российского ядерного оружия относительно ограничен, она достаточно тонка, чтобы позволить Москве предположить, что она может прибегнуть к ядерному оружию в ряде сценариев. В то время как российское политическое и военное руководство четко понимает катастрофические последствия крупномасштабного ядерного обмена, Москва, как представляется, сохраняет некоторую неопределенность в отношении своих намерений и возможностей, что очень затрудняет полное исключение возможности ограниченного применения ядерного оружия в некоторых случаях. Действительно, в ходе своих военных учений Россия практиковала сценарии, связанные с применением такого оружия.
   Оборонная промышленность
   Учитывая роль ядерного оружия в Стратегии национальной безопасности, неудивительно, что Россия выделяет значительные ресурсы на поддержание и модернизацию своих ядерных сил. В финансово неурожайные 90-е годы Россия сосредоточилась на сохранении ключевых компонентов своего стратегического арсенала, сохранении ключевых оборонно-промышленных предприятий, консолидации развития и производства в России (хотя при поддержке оборонных предприятий Украины продолжалось обслуживание некоторых устаревших систем).
   Эти усилия позволили России объединить ключевые элементы военно-промышленной инфраструктуры советской эпохи, сохранить значительное количество военно-исследовательских и проектных институтов, задействованных в разработке передовых военных систем. В этот период Москва также разработала широкую схему своей программы ядерной модернизации, которая помогла ей сохранить свои стратегические силы при ограниченных финансовых ресурсах. По мере того как в 2000-х годах выделялось все больше средств, усилия по модернизации активизировались и впоследствии были расширены за счет включения ряда новых программ. В значительной степени это расширение было обусловлено оборонной промышленностью, хотя факторы, которые помогли оправдать усилия по модернизации, включали необходимость поддержания численного паритета с Соединенными Штатами и противодействия разработкам противоракетной обороны США.
   Сегодня ключевыми предприятиями, занимающимися разработкой и производством стратегических систем России, являются Московский институт теплотехники, ведущий разработку баллистических ракет наземного и морского базирования (РС-12М2 "Тополь-М" (SS-27 мод 1), РС-24 " Ярс "(SS-27 мод 2) и "Булава"), и Воткинский машиностроительный завод, выпускающий ракеты. Государственный ракетный центр им.Макеева является ведущим разработчиком жидкотопливных ракет, в том числе модификаций баллистической ракеты подводных лодок (БРПЛ) Р-29РМ "Синева" (SS-N-23), и новой шахтной установки "Сармат". Эти ракеты производятся на Красноярском машиностроительном заводе. Конструкторское бюро Туполева является основным подрядчиком работ по текущему ассортименту стратегических бомбардировщиков. Модернизация старых бомбардировщиков проводится на нескольких заводах, но планируется, что новое авиационное производство будет сосредоточено на авиационном заводе Горбунова в Казани.
   Аналитики поставили под сомнение демографический профиль рабочей силы в оборонной промышленности России и необходимость сделать отрасль привлекательным вариантом карьеры для молодых инженеров. Хотя оборонные предприятия можно рассматривать как надежный карьерный путь в период более широких экономических трудностей, в настоящее время эти отрасли должны конкурировать за таланты. Это нашло отражение в повышении заработной платы, отмеченном в последние годы. И хотя российские оборонно-стратегические предприятия, похоже, сохранили часть своего опыта, остаются проблемы, например, в передаче необходимого набора навыков и опыта молодому поколению инженеров.
   Между тем ракетная программа "Булава" столкнулась с некоторыми трудностями на этапах разработки и серийного производства, разработка ракеты "Сармат" отстает от графика на несколько лет, и отрасли еще предстоит продемонстрировать, что она может возобновить производство стратегических бомбардировщиков. Однако, несмотря на то, что экономические проблемы могут поставить под угрозу некоторые элементы более широкого военного модернизационного движения России, и хотя временные рамки могут соскользнуть, намерение, скорее всего, завершит осуществляемые в настоящее время программы стратегической модернизации.
   Войска стратегического назначения
   Наземные системы
   Межконтинентальные баллистические ракеты наземного базирования (МБР) составляют главную опору российской стратегической ядерной триады. Россия осуществляет активную программу модернизации МБР, которая в последние годы ускорилась. Ракетный комплекс в центре этой модернизации - это моноблочная ракета "Тополь-М" (SS-27 mod 1), которая была развернута в 1997-2009 гг., когда Россия была ограничена в развертывании РГЧ версии договором о сокращении стратегических наступательных вооружений (СНВ). Когда срок действия истек в 2009 году, Россия перешла на развертывание РС-24 Ярс (SS-27 mod 2), который представляет собой версию Тополь-М (возможно, несколько модернизированную), использующую несколько независимо нацеливаемых боеголовок (MIRVs). Обе эти ракеты развернуты в шахтах, а также на дорожно-мобильных пусковых установках. По состоянию на начало 2017 года в России насчитывалось 78 моноблочных ракет "Тополь-М" и 96 многоблочных МБР "Ярс". Ожидается, что развертывание ракет " Ярс " будет продолжено в рамках процесса модернизации.
   Относительно новые ракеты "Тополь-М" и "Ярс " несут около половины всех боеголовок МБР в арсенале России. Другая половина развернута на старых МБР, которые были введены в начале 1980-х годов. Одна из этих ракет, УР-100НУТТХ (SS-19 mod 3), находится в процессе вывода из активной службы.
   Другой, тяжелый комплекс Р-36М2 (SS-18 Satan mod 5), в настоящее время развернут в двух ракетных дивизиях. Каждая ракета несла десять боеголовок, 46 МБР этого типа имели 460 развернутых боеголовок. Ожидается, что эти ракеты останутся на вооружении примерно до 2020 года. После этого они будут заменены на "Сармат", новую жидкотопливную шахтную МБР, которая в настоящее время находится в стадии разработки. "Сармат", однако, не обязательно является адекватной заменой своего тяжелого предшественника, поскольку его характеристики ближе к характеристикам УР-100НУТТХ (SS-19); это связано, по мнению аналитиков, с тем, что Р-36М2 был построен на Украине и что, как следствие, "Сармат" является, по сути, самой тяжелой ракетой, которую Россия в настоящее время может произвести. При стартовой массе около половины от Р-36M2, "Сармат", вероятно, будет иметь меньший метательный вес и может нести менее десяти боеголовок.
   Хотя ожидается, что большинство ракет "Сармат" будут нести ядерные боеголовки, он также, по-видимому, является пусковой установкой для российского гиперзвукового глиссадного носителя (HGV), который часто называют проектом 4202 или Ю-71. В настоящее время носитель Ю-71 проходит летные испытания, которые могут привести к первоначальному развертыванию в 2020-х годах. HGV не обязательно будет иметь ядерное оружие.
   Хотя развертывание МБР с РГЧ ИН часто считается политически дестабилизирующим шагом, Россия, похоже, считает, что "Сармат" имеет важное значение для противодействия противоракетной обороне США. По его расчетам, даже если лишь небольшое число этих ракет сможет пережить нападение, они могут обеспечить адекватный ответный удар. Гиперзвуковой носитель также, как представляется, имеет преодоление противоракетной обороны в качестве своей основной миссии.
   Помимо двух основных программ развития МБР - " Ярс " и "Сармат" - Россия работает над возрождением идеи строительства железнодорожной мобильной МБР. Несмотря на то, что проект, известный как "Баргузин", не был включен в более раннюю государственную программу вооружения, разработка продолжается, и первое испытание ракеты на выброс состоялось в ноябре 2016 года.
   Еще одна разрабатываемая ракета, известная как РС-26 "Рубеж", номинально считается МБР, поскольку на одном из летных испытаний она продемонстрировала дальность более 5500 км. "Рубеж", однако, считается ракетой средней дальности, которая базируется на первых двух ступенях "Ярса". Россия завершила летные испытания ракеты в 2014 году и изначально планировалось начать развертывание в 2015 году в ракетных частях под Иркутском и в Едровый/Выползово. Однако развертывание было отложено и, как ожидается, начнется не раньше середины 2018 года. Возможно, что он будет развернут с ракетными дивизионами, которые управляют МБР "Ярс", возможно, отражая мнение о том, что "Рубеж" может состоять из двух ступеней "Ярс"; если это так, совместное развертывание двух разных ракет имело бы больше смысла, поскольку могут быть общие черты с точки зрения подготовки, технического обслуживания и материально-технического обеспечения.
   Морские системы
   В 2014 году ВМФ России получил третью баллистическую ракетную подводную лодку проекта 955 класса "Борей". Эта поставка была частью программы модернизации стратегического флота Москвы, которая предусматривает строительство восьми подводных лодок этого класса. Четвертая подводная лодка, которая, как ожидается, войдет в состав флота в 2019 году - и последующие лодки, которые в настоящее время находятся на различных стадиях строительства - представляется модернизированной конструкцией, называемой проектом 955A "Борей-A". Каждая подводная лодка несет 16 твердотопливных БРПЛ "Булава", до шести боеголовок на каждой ракете. Ожидается, что эта программа строительства будет завершена в 2021 году.
   Тем временем Россия продолжает обслуживать и эксплуатировать подводные лодки с баллистическими ракетами проекта 667БДР (Delta III) и проекта 667БДРМ (Delta IV). Эти подводные лодки были построены в 1970-х и 1980-х годах и поддерживаются в эксплуатации регулярными капитальными ремонтами. Оба класса несут жидкотопливные БРПЛ. Три подводные лодки "Delta-III", которые в настоящее время находятся на вооружении, рассчитаны на поставку ракет Р-29Р (SS-N-18), построены в 1980-х годах. Для оснащения подводных лодок класса "Delta-IV" Россия вновь запустила линию по производству БРПЛ Р-29РМУ2 "Синева" (SS-N-23) и разработала модернизированный вариант этой ракеты, известный как Р-29РМУ2.1 "Лайнер". Эта последняя ракета, принятая на вооружение в 2014 году, как говорят, способна нести до десяти боеголовок, хотя она, возможно, развернута только с четырьмя, как "Синева".
   Представляется вероятным, что подводные лодки типа "Delta-III" будут выведены из эксплуатации после их замены новым проектом 955 "Борей", хотя лодки класса "Delta-IV", вероятно, останутся в эксплуатации в течение некоторого времени после 2025 года. Однако планы будущего строительства подводных лодок не ясны. Скорее всего, Россия продолжит линию проекта 955 наряду с разработкой новой подводной лодки с твердотопливной ракетой. Учитывая отрывочные результаты испытаний "Булавы", не исключено, что и ракета будет новой. В то же время некоторые сообщения предполагают, что Россия, возможно, разрабатывает новую жидкотопливную БРПЛ, которая потребует другой линии развития; в то время как промышленность может поддержать этот вариант, флот, как полагают, более осторожен. Однако на момент подготовки настоящего доклада не было принято никакого решения относительно направления программы БРПЛ.
   Стратегическая авиация
   До недавнего времени стратегический флот России включал 16 Ту-160 и более 50 бомбардировщиков Ту-95МС. Эти самолеты первоначально были построены в качестве платформ стратегического оружия, с ядерными ракетами воздушного базирования Х-55 (AS-15) в качестве основного вооружения. Недавний капитальный ремонт и модернизация парка Ту-160 дали этим самолетам возможность использовать и обычные вооружения. Оба самолета могут нести КРВБ Х-555, который является обычной версией Х-55. Они также могут нести новый обычную КРВБ Х-101 и его ядерную версию, которая известна как Х-102. Способность Ту-160 и Ту-95МС использовать обычные КРВБ (Х-555, а также Х-101) впервые была продемонстрирована в 2015 году, когда эти самолеты использовались для поражения целей в Сирии.
   В настоящее время планы модернизации стратегической авиации России включают два основных проекта: создание нового дальнего бомбардировщика "ПАК-ДА" и возобновление производства Ту-160; эта новая модификация обозначена как Ту-160М2. ПАК-ДА, между тем, как сообщается, является дозвуковым летательным аппаратом, хотя есть только скудная информация о проекте. Для того чтобы позволить своим бомбардировщикам вести боевые действия, Россия, как сообщается, работает над новой КРВБ, известным как Х-БД, с дальностью, которая будет значительно больше, чем у Х-101/-102. ПАК-ДА может провести свой первый полет в 2020-х годах. Попав на вооружение, он заменит старые бомбардировщики Ту-95МС, хотя ВВС пока не указали, сколько новых бомбардировщиков он хотел бы приобрести. Ожидается, что первый Ту-160М2 также будет готов в 2019 году, серийное производство начнется в 2021 году, а ВВС рассматривают заказ до 50 самолетов.
   Раннее предупреждение и противоракетная оборона
   Помимо модернизации всех элементов стратегической триады, Россия модернизирует свою систему раннего предупреждения и работает над модернизацией стратегических систем противоракетной обороны. Сеть радаров раннего предупреждения в стране прошла капитальный ремонт со строительством серии РЛС нового поколения России: модернизация 17 радаров стратегических сил, известных как "Воронеж-М", "Воронеж-ДМ" и "Воронеж-СМ". Строительство первого из них началось в 2005 году, а через несколько лет оно вступило в строй. В 2017 году Россия объявила о полном радиолокационном освещении всех подходов к своей территории.
   В 2015 году они запустили первый спутник "Тундра", являющийся частью новой космической системы раннего предупреждения, известной как ЭКС. За этим последовал второй запуск в середине 2017 года. Эти спутники развернуты на высокоэллиптических орбитах и могут обеспечивать частичное покрытие потенциальных зон запуска баллистических ракет. После завершения работы система будет включать в себя до десяти спутников на высокоэллиптических орбитах, а также геостационарные спутники. Нынешние планы предусматривают десять новых запусков спутников раннего предупреждения к 2020 году. Однако это новая система, поэтому Москва, возможно, ждет, как будут функционировать первые спутники, в то время как существуют также вероятные проблемы, связанные с производственными мощностями, не говоря уже о задаче запуска еще восьми спутников до 2020 года.
   Россия также модернизирует систему противоракетной обороны, развернутую вокруг Москвы. Новая система, иногда именуемая А-235 или "Самолет-М", представляется скромной модернизацией нынешней системы А-135, включающей в себя боевую РЛС Дон-2Н и 68 ракет-перехватчиков малой дальности 53Т6 "Амур" (SH-8 Gazelle). Известно, что эта система является ядерной, хотя не исключено, что Россия может рассчитывать на развертывание преемника без ядерных боеголовок. В 2017 году Россия провела испытание того, что оказалось модифицированным перехватчиком 53Т6, хотя неизвестно, было ли это испытание частью программы разработки А-235.
   Другим важным проектом является разработка, как утверждается, антиспутниковой системы, известной как "Нудол". Россия проводит испытания пусковой установки с 2014 года, и эта программа также может быть частью проекта противоракетной обороны А-235.
   Нестратегические ядерные вооружения
   Россия имеет значительные нестратегические ядерные силы, которые включают в себя различные системы доставки. К ним относятся бомбардировщики, баллистические и крылатые ракеты малой дальности, используемые сухопутными войсками, системы противовоздушной обороны, крылатые ракеты и торпеды, используемые военно-морским флотом, и оружие, используемое военно-воздушными силами и силами береговой обороны. По оценкам, нынешний активный арсенал России включает около 2000 ядерных боеголовок, закрепленных за нестратегическими системами доставки. Согласно официальным заявлениям, все нестратегические ядерные вооружения России хранятся в централизованных хранилищах. Однако Россия так и не уточнила, на какие объекты распространяется это определение. В настоящее время Россия имеет по меньшей мере 12 национальных хранилищ и, по оценкам, 35 базовых объектов, которые могут использоваться для хранения и поддержания ядерного оружия в течение длительного периода времени. За исключением МБР и БРПЛ (и, возможно, некоторых крылатых ракет), ядерное оружие не развертывается на средствах его доставки и хранится на некотором расстоянии от оперативных баз.
   Разработка и развертывание новых систем доставки ядерного оружия, несомненно, идет полным ходом, хотя большинство новых систем рассчитаны на использование двойного потенциала. Одним из крупных проектов в этой области является разработка системы "Искандер-М", включающей баллистическую ракету малой дальности и крылатую ракету малой дальности. Широко распространено мнение, что эта система обладает ядерным потенциалом и, по-видимому, использовалась в некоторых учениях для имитации ядерных ударов. Россия скоро завершит развертывание "Искандер-М" во всех 12 армейских и военно-морских ракетных бригадах, где они заменяют старые ракеты "Точка-У".
   Еще одной важной программой является развитием семейства крылатых ракет большой дальности, которые могут быть развернуты на подводных лодках, надводных кораблях и, возможно, на наземных пусковых установок. Это семейство включает в себя ракету дальнего действия, известную как 3М14, крылатая ракета наземной атаки (LACM), которая является частью системы вооружения "Калибр". Начиная с 2015 года Россия неоднократно демонстрировала возможности этой ракеты в атаках на объекты в Сирии. Ракеты "Калибр" запускались с надводных кораблей, развернутых в Каспийском море, а также с подводных лодок, развернутых в Средиземном море. Россия объявила о плане размещения ракет "Калибр" на ряде надводных кораблей и подводных лодок. Первая многоцелевая подводная лодка проекта 885 Yasen-class "Северодвинск" продемонстрировала возможность запуска ракет "Калибр" в рамках испытательного режима.
   Более старые типы подводных лодок модифицируются, чтобы нести эти ракеты в своих торпедных отсеках; "Ясень", напротив, считается, что имеет смесь вертикальных пусковых труб и ракетных торпедных труб. Ракета "Калибр" может оказаться в центре обвинений в несоблюдении Договора о ядерных силах средней и меньшей дальности (РСМД), выдвинутых против России Вашингтоном в 2014 году. По данным Вашингтона, Россия испытала, произвела и начала развертывание крылатой ракеты наземного базирования (КРНБ) дальностью от 500 км до 5500 км в нарушение своих обязательств по договору РСМД, которые Москва отрицает. Хотя США не раскрыли детали предполагаемого нарушения, возможно, что Россия адаптировала в КРМБ, запущенную подводной лодкой, к колесной наземной пусковой установке и поэтому, возможно, разработала КРНБ, который очень похож на "Калибр". Если это так, то это развертывание представляет собой нарушение Договора о РСМД; до сих пор дипломатические попытки решить вопрос не увенчались успехом.

Chapter Two. Comparative defence statistics


    []

    []

   Armed unmanned aerial vehicles: production and procurement
    []

   Key defence statistics
    []
    []



Chapter Three. North America


   UNITED STATES
   On 20 January 2017, Donald Trump became the 45th President of the United States. The administration quickly moved to take action on the issues Trump had emphasised in his campaign, including tackling perceived disparities over burden-sharing within the transatlantic alliance. In the campaign, Trump had questioned the relevance of NATO. During a May 2017 speech in Brussels, the president returned to the theme, chiding the Alliance's European members for not spending enough on defence. Meanwhile, issues including ongoing investigations into ties with Russia during the 2016 presidential campaign, White House staff turnover, and delays in naming senior and mid-level national-security officials all played a part in a troubled start for the administration.
   That said, some coherence in national-security policy had begun to emerge by late August. In addition to Secretary of Defense James Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, the shuffling of key players (Lt.-Gen. H.R. McMaster for Michael Flynn as National Security Advisor; John F. Kelly for Reince Priebus as White House Chief of Staff) provided for experienced advice regarding national-security priorities and introduced greater process into the administration's national-security decision-making. Nonetheless, the president's proclivity to comment on policy matters on social media, at times contradicting existing policy (such as on the issue of transgender service members), played a part in unsettling his own appointees, not to mention allies and partners. In addition, key positions in the departments of defense and state (and elsewhere) were only slowly being filled, with the result that career civil servants, and military officers in the case of the Department of Defense (DoD), still occupied many of these posts.
   Although debates within the administration persist regarding what should be expected of the United States' allies, Trump has moderated his criticism and increasingly adopted policies similar to those of past administrations. The European Reassurance Initiative continues, with a funding increase under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 budget, and in June 2017 Trump delivered a speech in Warsaw assuring Poland of US support. A key milestone came on 21 August 2017, when the president announced his decision to send additional troops to Afghanistan, although their role in the country is expected to be less expansive than in the past: `We are not nation building again', said Trump, `we are killing terrorists'.
   Afghanistan is only one of the security challenges facing the US, its allies and partners. As Mattis noted in his testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee in June 2017, these fall into four main areas: `filling in the holes from trade-offs made during 16 years of war ... the worsening security environment, contested operations in multiple domains, and the rapid pace of technological change'. Mattis also stressed that it is a `more volatile security environment than any I have experienced during my four decades of military service'.
   China and Russia
   It has become increasingly apparent that the period of uncontested US strategic primacy is over. In its early days in office, the Obama administration sought cooperation with China and a `reset' with Russia. But by the time Obama left office, policymakers were openly talking about an era characterised by great power competition. Indeed, for the first time in decades, in China and Russia Washington faces states that can contest the employment of US military power in their respective regions. Moreover, both China and Russia are active beyond their home territories.
   China's military modernisation has been proceeding for some time, while its growing reach has also been increasingly apparent, most notably in the activation of its first military base abroad, in Djibouti in 2017, and growing numbers of naval patrols. In some areas, China's defence-technology developments are seen as the `pacing threat' for US defence planners. At the same time, Russia's military modernisation continues, albeit with relatively fewer resources. Overall, Russia intends to generate more usable military forces held at higher states of readiness, and there is particular focus on modernising its strategic, ground and air forces, and its electronic-warfare and precision-strike capabilities, including those from maritime platforms. Perhaps most worryingly for the US, Beijing and Moscow do not appear averse to cooperation (see p. 9). Russia's arms sales to China continue, and the countries' navies held joint exercises in September 2017.
   US policymakers developing the new National Defense Strategy and conducting the Nuclear Posture Review find themselves increasingly thinking about the requirements of deterring China and Russia with both conventional and nuclear capabilities. The DoD is also considering the requirements of military competition, short of the use of force. Defence planners must increasingly think about the requirements of a conflict with China or Russia. Though still unlikely, it is perhaps a less remote prospect than it appeared several years ago.
   Multiple concurrent challenges
   Aside from growing competition with China and Russia, the US faces a range of other demands. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Joseph Dunford, reinforcing Mattis's statements in his own testimony before Congress, explained that China and Russia were two of the five challenges facing the DoD; also on the list were `Iran, North Korea, and Violent Extremist Organisations [VEOs]'. These issues `most clearly represent the challenges facing the US military. They serve as a benchmark for our global posture, the size of the force, capability development, and risk management.'
   A belligerent North Korea, intent on further developing intercontinental ballistic missiles and nuclear-weapons capability; a still-revolutionary Iranian regime pursuing regional hegemony and destabilising its neighbours; an unstable Afghanistan; and the spread of extremist ideologies in Europe, Africa and Asia would individually place significant demands on the DoD. Their concurrence, however, combined with challenges from China and Russia, have placed significant strain on resources. Confronting these multiple challenges is becoming increasingly difficult, given the growing capability of potential adversaries, as well as the effects of the Budget Control Act (BCA) of 2011 (see p. 38). These issues are exacerbated by the fact that, for many years, the US defence budget has operated on the basis of `continuing resolutions', which make long-term investment difficult and increase costs. Consequently, Dunford stressed that, `as a result of sustained operational tempo and budget instability, today the military is challenged to meet operational requirements and sustain investment in capabilities required to preserve - or in some cases restore - our competitive advantage'. He continued by saying that the US military `requires a balanced inventory of advanced capabilities and sufficient capacity to act decisively across the range of military operations'. Furthermore, the US could not `choose between a force that can address ... Violent Extremist Organisations, and one that can deter and defeat state actors with a full range of capabilities'.
   The war against extremist organisations has accelerated during the Trump administration, most notably against the Islamic State, otherwise known as ISIS or ISIL. During their operations against ISIS, Iraq's security forces benefited from military advisers and capabilities from the US and other nations - most notably air, artillery and intelligence. US forces remain engaged in training operations in Iraq.
   At the same time, the Trump administration is extremely wary of Iran and came into office vowing to overturn the Obama administration's deal, which aims to keep Tehran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Countering Iran was one of the objectives of the president's trip to Saudi Arabia in May 2017, while he also hailed the total of US$110 billion in arms deals with Riyadh, although this included previously approved sales agreed under the Obama administration (see p. 320). Meanwhile, although US forces remain in Syria, tackling ISIS and training members of the Syrian Democratic Forces, US policy towards the Assad regime is no longer an unequivocal `Assad must go'.
   Perhaps the most vexing near-term challenge facing US policymakers, however, is North Korea. The prospect of a nuclear-armed North Korea, with the ability to hit the US mainland, looms large and the Kim regime is no longer just a regional threat. Escalating rhetoric from the White House and Pyongyang caused increasing concern but was accompanied by more measured responses. In a joint press conference with US ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley on 15 September, McMaster called for international support for new United Nations sanctions to curb North Korea's provocations and nuclear ambitions. He stressed that, although Washington prefers a diplomatic solution to end North Korea's nuclear capabilities, the US possesses military options.
   Finally, in August 2017, Trump directed the elevation of US Cyber Command to a unified combatant command, reflecting the growing importance of defensive and offensive cyber activities in military operations, as well as the requirements in the FY2017 National Defense Authorization Act. The new command will, like other combatant commands, report directly to the secretary of defense and be better positioned to advocate for investments and resources. The remaining question is when Cyber Command will be separated from the National Security Agency (NSA). Congress has dictated that the separation can only take place when the secretary of defense certifies that Cyber Command is ready to operate independently. A key argument for this separation was voiced by Eric Rosenbach, chief of staff to former secretary of defense Ashton Carter, who remarked that the separation would enable Cyber Command to generate its own capabilities and `gain independence from NSA so that it's a true war fighting command and not an organisation subservient to the intelligence community'. At the time of writing, Admiral Michael Rogers remained in charge of both organisations.
   Alliance relationships
   Alliance relationships have been central to post Second World War US national-security strategy. However, recent years have seen growing criticism of allies' lack of willingness to more fully contribute to their own security in an increasingly dangerous security environment. The degree of burden-sharing by Washington's European NATO allies has been central to this discourse, but criticism has not been limited to Europe. President Barack Obama voiced frustration over this issue during the latter years of his term, while Trump's statements during the 2016 presidential campaign and his early months in office sharpened these criticisms. As he argued in his inaugural visit to Europe in May 2017 (referencing NATO's account of states meeting the target to spend 2% of GDP on defence), `23 of the 28 member nations are still not paying what they should be paying and what they're supposed to be paying for their defense'.
   The health of Washington's alliance relationships varied in the initial months of the Trump administration. Accounts of a tense telephone call between Trump and Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull briefly cast a pall over an important defence relationship in the Asia-Pacific, in contrast to the close relationship with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. In both cases, however, the high degree of institutionalisation in the alliances, and the large measure of shared interests and values, argued for continuity.
   Both Australia and Japan were already increasing their defence expenditures before Trump assumed office, as were some European NATO members, in response to the growing threat from Russia, revelations of deep deficiencies among NATO armed forces and previous encouragement from the US. Nonetheless, many of Washington's allies face real long-term constraints on their defence capacity due to limited economic growth.
   Readiness issues
   Readiness continues to be a concern for all the US military services. The high tempo of global operations in recent years - with ongoing deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq; counter-terrorism operations; humanitarian and disaster-relief missions; heightened deployments to South Korea; and increased activity to reassure allies, partners and friends in the face of greater competition with China and Russia - has resulted in a dilemma, according to former army vice chief of staff General Dan Allyn, whereby the services are `consuming readiness as fast as we build it'. The two separate accidents involving the destroyers USS Fitzgerald and USS John S. McCain, which left 17 sailors dead, were stark evidence of these stresses on the armed forces.
   Mattis emphasised the problem in remarks to the Senate Armed Services Committee:
   Worn equipment and constrained supplies have forced our personnel to work overtime while deployed or preparing to deploy. That too has placed an added burden on the men and women who serve and on their families. This further degrades readiness in a negative spiral, for those not in the fight are at a standstill, unable to train as their equipment is sent forward to cover shortfalls or returned for extensive rework.
   Readiness challenges are also exacerbated by budget uncertainty and funding reliant on the passage of continuing resolutions. There is some relief in the FY2017 budget, with modest increases in funding and end-strength in all the services (see pp. 35-9). A broader question posed by the funding challenges and the diverse range of current and emerging security problems revolves around what kind of armed forces, postured against which threats, are required.
    []

   After a protracted focus on counter-insurgency and stabilisation operations, much investment in the past decade has been in training, organising, equipping and sustaining these missions. Furthermore, a generation of US military officers has been immersed in wars against insurgents and terrorists and have not been trained to fight competent, well-armed state actors. At the same time, much of the equipment in many of the services is either ageing or inadequate for future challenges, such as against peer adversaries (for example, the army's mine-resistant anti-ambush protected (MRAP) vehicles).
   In addition, much of the current US force structure dates back to the military build-up initiated during the Cold War. The outlook is perhaps most positive for aviation, with the air force fielding the F-35A Lightning II and development of the B-21 Raider bomber proceeding. That said, as Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson noted: `While we continue to extend the life of old aircraft, materials suffer fatigue and maintaining old equipment is time consuming and expensive.' The navy's most recent Force Structure Assessment calls for a fleet of 355 ships by 2030, which will require sustained effort and resources to achieve. Meanwhile, key ground-combat systems are all modernised versions of designs from the 1980s or earlier. Indeed, a constant refrain from US military leaders is that US dominance in all of the domains (land, air, sea, space and cyber) is now contested and, in some areas, overmatched.
   Finally, the armed forces are based mainly in the continental US. In Eastern Europe, there is only one rotational armoured brigade combat team (BCT) to provide deterrence against possible Russian aggression and reassurance to allies. The ability to reinforce or deploy in times of crisis is increasingly problematic, given Russian anti-access/area-denial capabilities. Therefore, a debate has begun about whether or not more US forces should be forward deployed to Europe to provide constant capabilities and deterrence.
   Modernisation challenges
   The US needs to redress current readiness shortfalls while modernising an ageing force. This feat would be challenging even without the financial constraints noted above. As a result, the US and, increasingly, its allies are placing greater emphasis on military innovation and high-leverage capabilities. The `third offset strategy', which had been championed by former deputy defence secretary Robert Work, seeks to sustain the United States' advantage through the pursuit of new technology and military doctrine. Indeed, innovation is all the more important in an era in which the US margin of superiority is narrowing. The DoD is increasing its investment in new space capabilities; advanced sensors, communications and munitions for power projection in contested environments; missile defence and cyber capabilities. The department is also investing in new technologies such as unmanned undersea vehicles, advanced sea mines, high-speed strike weapons, advanced aeronautics, autonomous systems, electromagnetic rail guns and high-energy lasers. Some of these technologies could have a profound effect, although many of them have yet to prove themselves in an operational setting and are unlikely to be deployed before the 2020s, at the earliest.
   US Army
   The US Army has arguably been the service most affected by the past 16 years of war. Understandably, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were the focus of army training, equipping and organising. These demands remain, albeit on a smaller scale than during the troop surges in Iraq and Afghanistan. Nevertheless, they create a constant requirement for BCTs and headquarters units. In their testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee in May 2017, Acting Secretary of the Army Robert Speer and Army Chief of Staff Mark Milley described the scale of the Army's commitments: `Today, the United States Army assigns or allocates over 187,000 Soldiers to meet combatant commanders' needs.'
   Indeed, maintaining army readiness in the face of recurring deployments, budget uncertainty and decreasing end-strength has been a challenge for several years. Declining end-strength (the army reduced by 100,000 soldiers and 15 BCTs during the Obama administration), continuing resolutions and the constraints of the BCA 2011 have required the army `to pay short-term bills at the expense of long term commitments'. As a consequence, the two army leaders stressed that the service has underfunded modernisation efforts, resulting in `an Army potentially outgunned, outranged, and outdated on a future battlefield with near-peer competitors'. Other senior army officers echoed this assessment, adding that the `continued failure to fund modernization will leave the US with a 20th century Army to handle the geostrategic environment of the 21st century'.
   However, the army's end-strength picture has improved in the FY2017 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), with an increase in personnel numbers to 1,018,000 (476,000 active; 343,000 National Guard; 199,000 reserve), up from a planned 980,000. As with everything else in the NDAA, these numbers are contingent on avoiding sequestration cuts. If those are enacted in FY2018 and beyond, the army's end-strength will drop to 920,000.
   At the same time, the army's first priority is to restore readiness for combat with near-peer competitors. To this end, unit rotations to the National Training Center, and home-station training, are now better resourced. The army also began an Associated Units Pilot Programme that is teaming active, national-guard and reserve-army-aviation units in order to enhance training.
   Meanwhile, the mission to support train-and advise missions in Afghanistan and Iraq continues. To better meet this ongoing demand, the army is creating six Security Force Assistance Brigades (SFABs) and establishing a training school for these at the Maneuver Center of Excellence at Fort Benning, Georgia. These units are smaller than normal BCTs, and are mainly composed of officers and senior non-commissioned officers. As well as providing the army with units focused on training and advising, the SFABs make a cadre available that can be expanded in the event that the army needs to grow rapidly.
   The army is also investing in Europe. It has accelerated the growth of pre-positioned stocks to provide equipment for a division headquarters, two armoured BCTs, one field-artillery brigade and support units. One armoured BCT is now always deployed to Europe, increasing the total to three, including a Stryker BCT in Germany and an air borne infantry BCT in Italy. Additionally, the Stryker BCT's vehicles are being enhanced with 30mm cannons and Javelin anti-tank missiles. However, despite this renewed emphasis on Europe, a recent after-action review following a deployment of the Italy-based 173rd Airborne BCT into Eastern Europe revealed significant problems.
   Equipment modernisation is also one of the army's biggest challenges. It still relies for its principal combat capabilities on upgraded versions of the `Big 5' systems procured in the 1980s: the Abrams main battle tank, the Bradley infantry fighting vehicle (IFV), the Apache attack helicopter and Black Hawk medium transport helicopter, and the Patriot surface-to-air missile system. Investments in the past decade have focused on counter-insurgency and counterterrorism operations, and resulted in large purchases of MRAPs, more medevac Black Hawks and more personal-protection equipment for soldiers. The army has identified gaps in ten areas, realised through a new Strategic Portfolio Analysis Review (SPAR), that must be closed to regain the overmatch required to deter and defeat near-peer adversaries: air and missile defence; long-range fires; munitions; BCT mobility, lethality and protection; air and ground active protection systems; assured position, navigation and timing; electronic warfare; offensive and defensive cyber; assured communications; and vertical lift.
   These modernisation priorities compete with readiness and manpower. Indeed, readiness is the army's first priority and accounts for 24% of its budget, while the FY2017 president's budget allocates nearly 60% to manpower. This leaves only 16% of funding available to close significant capability gaps. Consequently, the army has opted to equip for the near term and restore readiness at the expense of preparing for the future. It has increased its investment in science and technology, but much of the modernisation funding is directed at improving the Abrams tank, the Bradley IFV, the Stryker armoured vehicle, the Paladin howitzer, the guided multiple launch rocket system and the existing aviation fleet. New programmes will only begin if needed to address extremely high-risk capability gaps. Accordingly, the army is attempting to accelerate efforts in the ten capability areas identified by SPAR. It has also slowed the procurement of new systems in order to keep existing production lines open in the event of increased funding. However, in the absence of additional resources, the army's combat-vehicle modernisation strategy faces a 30-year initial-fielding timeline. Aviation modernisation is a good example of these trade-offs in practice. In its January 2016 report, the National Commission on the Future of the Army recommended retaining 24 Apache attack-helicopter units, but to meet this target the army is slowing Black Hawk modernisation. The timeline for Apache modernisation has also lengthened from FY2026 to FY2028, and for Black Hawks from FY2028 to FY2030.
   Meanwhile, the army established the Rapid Capabilities Office in 2016 to address critical mid-term capability gaps. This office works with selected industry partners to acquire equipment and services quickly and at less cost in areas such as positioning, navigation and timing; electronic warfare; counter electronic warfare; automation; and cyber. To support its programmes, the army requested a base budget of US$137.2 bn for FY2018, an increase of 5.3% compared to the FY2017 request of US$130.3 bn.
   In February 2017, the army and Marine Corps jointly published the `Multi-Domain Battle: Combined Arms for the 21st Century' white paper. This paper `describes an approach for ground combat operations against a sophisticated peer enemy threat in the 2025-2040 timeframe'. It forms the basis for much of the war-gaming and concept-development work undertaken by the US Army Training and Doctrine Command, based on the assessment that `US ground combat forces, operating as part of joint, inter organizational, and multinational teams, are currently not sufficiently trained, organized, equipped, nor postured to deter or defeat highly capable peer enemies to win in future war'. Importantly, unlike after Vietnam when the army focused almost exclusively on NATO, it is now focused on providing forces and capabilities across the range of military operations, as shown by its creation of SFABs. However, the central challenge for the army - as well as the other services - is how to meet increased demands within existing resource constraints.
   US Air Force
   Although the United States Air Force (USAF) remains the world's most capable air arm, able to conduct operations at global reach, it continues to be affected by significant challenges. It retains too many ageing aircraft in its inventory and does not have enough air and ground crew to operate and maintain them, nor does it have enough guided munitions to meet inventory needs.
   The USAF has been involved in sustained combat operations since 2001, and during 2016 and 2017 undertook the majority of the air missions against ISIS in Iraq and Syria. However, the continuing tempo of operations impacts the service life of the aircraft, and sometimes the personnel, being employed. Indeed, repeated operational deployment is inevitably a factor in the decision by some personnel to leave the armed forces. Nearly US$1bn per annum is reportedly being spent by the air force to retain personnel, including incentive pay and bonuses. As of mid-2017, the air force was said to be 3,000 personnel below strength in terms of aircraft-maintenance staff, and around 1,200 short of tactical-combat-aircraft pilots.
   Although the air force is buying the F-35A Lightning II at a lower annual rate than it would like, the type is now at least in the inventory. The USAF deployed the aircraft to Europe for the first time in April 2017, with eight aircraft landing at RAF Lakenheath in the United Kingdom; two F-35As were then flown on a training mission to Amari air base in Estonia. However, managing its legacy fighter fleets to eke out as much remaining service life as possible is still an issue for the air force. In April 2017 the USAF signed off on a service-life-extension programme for the F-16 Fighting Falcon, increasing its service life from 8,000 to 12,000 hours. This would, notionally at least, allow the aircraft to remain in the inventory until 2048. Planned production rates for the F-35 mean the air force will likely not receive the last of the 1,763 aircraft it wants to order until after 2040. At the same time, a decision was pending on which bidder would win the air force's T-X competition for an advanced jet fighter-trainer to replace the T-38 Talon.
   Having awarded the B-21 bomber programme to Northrop Grumman in late 2015, the air force picked Lockheed Martin and Raytheon for the competitive design and development phase of a key complementary weapon: the Long-Range Standoff (LRSO) cruise missile. The two companies were each awarded US$900 million design-maturation and risk reduction contracts lasting 54 months. The LRSO is intended to replace the AGM-86B nuclear-armed air-launched cruise missile, and is planned to enter the inventory in the late 2020s; but, as of the fourth quarter of 2017, there was scant information on the design options the two winning companies would pursue. The AGM-86B is a subsonic design, but it remained unclear whether a very-low-observable subsonic option for the LRSO was preferred, or whether a high-speed version was still being explored.
   US Navy and US Coast Guard
   A series of collisions and a grounding over a period of months in 2017 involving major US Navy surface combatants in the western Pacific fuelled concerns that the high tempo of operations was adversely affecting the navy's effectiveness and training. Seventeen US sailors died in two of the incidents, and two ballistic-missile-defence-equipped Arleigh Burke-class destroyers were severely damaged, taking them out of service for a considerable period of time. In response, the chief of naval operations launched a number of investigations, including into whether systemic failings were contributory factors. He also announced a brief global stand-down to take stock.
   To underscore the sense of overstretch, there was a further gap in aircraft-carrier presence in the Gulf at the end of 2016 and into the early weeks of 2017. In congressional testimony in April, the Pacific Command commander noted that he receives only about half the number of submarines he requests.
   Meanwhile, the debate over the future size of the navy has changed significantly. The Trump administration came to office on the back of a campaign for a 350-ship fleet, while in December 2016 the navy released its own new target of 355 ships, up from the previous target of 308 (and the current level of some 279). This new goal is clearly driven by the navy's desire to restore its ability to maintain its global presence in the face of increased competition from countries such as China and Russia. The plan included an additional aircraft carrier, 16 further large surface combatants and, perhaps most significantly, a further 18 attack submarines.
   Yet doubts have been expressed as to whether the navy can fund, build or even crew such a force, and the FY2018 navy budget request made little provision for extra shipbuilding. The navy leadership, however, continued to press the case for restoring the readiness of the existing fleet and also for rapidly augmenting the force with additional construction over the next seven years, as well as possibly retaining older ships in service for longer.
   At the same time, the growing Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) force was reorganised, with new crewing arrangements, to improve forward-deployment operations. LCS plans for 2018 include two simultaneous deployments in Singapore and, for the first time, one in Bahrain. However, the navy signalled how its thinking on its future small surface combatant had further evolved from the troubled LCS programme. In July it issued a request for information to industry for a more capable guided-missile frigate, dubbed FFG(X), with plans for a first production order in 2020, with the competition potentially open to foreign designs.
   As a further sign of the navy's response to the challenge of a more contested maritime environment, it enshrined its concept of `distributed lethality', to spread more offensive capabilities throughout the fleet, in a new surface-force strategy entitled `Back to Sea Control'. But efforts to procure a new over-the horizon anti-ship missile for its future LCS/frigate force appeared to have been hampered when most potential bidders withdrew from the competition.
   Despite these challenges, the US Navy still demonstrated that it retains a unique ability to mount operations on a global scale. In April, two destroyers launched 59 Tomahawk cruise missiles at a Syrian air base following a suspected chemical attack by the regime against a rebel-held town. And, in May, after what appeared to be a pause, it resumed freedom-of-navigation operations in the South China Sea.
   Furthermore, in August, the navy re-designated the Expeditionary Mobile Base support ship, USNS Lewis B. Puller, which was formerly operated by the Military Sealift Command. The vessel deployed to the US 5th Fleet's area of responsibility. Now the USS Lewis B. Puller, the vessel has replaced the USS Ponce in the Gulf, and the navy intends to operate the vessel flexibly, particularly in mine countermeasures and special-operations missions. The USS Ponce decommissioned in 2017, but the USS Lewis B. Puller will not inherit its Laser Weapons System.
   Figure 1 US Virginia-class nuclear-powered guided-missile submarine: design evolution
    []

   Meanwhile, the US Coast Guard (USCG) faces a growing task list. It commissioned the sixth of its new National Security Cutters, USCGC Munro, in April, is seeking to recruit an extra 5,000 personnel over five years, and has also begun design work for three new heavy and three medium icebreakers; the hope is that the first icebreaker can be delivered in 2023. These vessels are needed to replace the one (elderly) heavy and one medium icebreaker currently in service, which represent a significant shortfall in capability. The USCG commandant said that the icebreaker programme could be expanded, and the ships even armed, in response to increased tensions. He also issued a new plea for US ratification of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea to support US continental-shelf claims in the Arctic.
   DEFENCE ECONOMICS
   FY2018 Defence Budget Request
   The president's Fiscal Year (FY) 2018 budget (PB2018) requested a total of US$677.1 billion for national defence, including US$603bn in base discretionary funding for national defence, US$9.7bn in mandatory spending and an additional US$64.6bn in discretionary supplemental funding for ongoing war-related spending in the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) accounts. If Congress were to appropriate funding at this requested level, estimated FY2018 national-defence outlays would total US$652.57bn. The divergence between this total and the total request is due to lags between the appropriation, obligation and actual outlay of funds.
   The Department of Defence (DoD) would receive US$639 bn, or 95.7% of the total discretionary funding requested in FY2018, while US$21.5 bn would go to the Department of Energy for nuclear-weapons related work and the remaining US$8.3 bn would go to defence-related efforts at the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other agencies. (Discretionary spending is funded via annual appropriations acts, while mandatory funding is authorised by prior statutory authority and is thereby appropriated automatically.) The DoD's requested US$639bn in discretionary funding includes US$574.5bn in the base defence budget and US$64.6bn in OCO funding. The total FY2018 request includes US$166bn for the army, US$183bn for the air force (which by tradition includes the DoD's classified spending), US$180bn for the navy and US$110bn for defence-wide spending.
    []

   According to Secretary of Defense James Mattis, the first priority of the FY2018 budget is to `restore the readiness of the current force', while the second is to increase `capacity and lethality'. Consequently, the FY2018 defence budget includes large increases on the Obama administration's FY2017 request for operation and maintenance funding (US$21.3bn, or 8.5%), procurement (US$11.9bn, or 10.7%), and research, development, test and evaluation (RDT&E) (US$11.9bn, or 16.3%). However, Congress actually appropriated funding for the DoD at a higher level than the Obama administration's FY2017 request. Most notably, Congress funded an additional US$12bn for procurement, an increase of approximately 10% on the FY2017 request.
   Indeed, compared to the actual FY2017 funding levels, the FY2018 request would increase funding levels more modestly, growing funding for military personnel by 5%, to US$146 bn, for operation and maintenance by 6.5%, to US$271bn, and for RDT&E by 11.3%, to US$84.9 bn. The FY2018 request for US$125 bn for procurement is an increase of just US$819 million compared to the FY2017 congressional appropriation. Meanwhile, the FY2018 budget shifts additional funding into munitions, parts and spares, and modifications to current aircraft, when compared to the FY2018 plan in the FY2017 budget. The US$639 bn in total discretionary funding (including both base and OCO funding) requested for the DoD for FY2018 is an increase of 7% on the total of US$597.2 bn appropriated for FY2017. Additional force-structure growth and procurement spending are expected in the FY2019 defence-budget request, following the planned completion of the National Defense Strategy and Nuclear Posture Review in late 2017. Anticipating the FY2019 defence budget, the FY2018 budget functions partially as a one-year placeholder, as it lacks the FY2019-FY2022 budgetary years that comprise the Future Years Defense Program.
    []

   The FY2018 defence budget also includes US$64.6bn in OCO funds. In a point of continuity with the Obama administration, the funding requested for each military operation aligns very closely with the amounts requested in FY2017. The FY2018 budget requests US$45.9 bn for Operation Freedom's Sentinel in Afghanistan to support a force level of 8,448 US troops, including US$4.9bn to train and equip Afghan security forces and US$1.3bn to support NATO-led coalition forces. The Obama administration requested a total of US$46.2bn for this operation in FY2017, including an additional US$3.4bn requested in November 2017 to retain 8,400 US troops in Afghanistan instead of the planned drawdown to 5,500. President Donald Trump's announcement in July that the US will increase its force level in Afghanistan will likely require a similar level of additional funding. The FY2018 budget also requests US$13bn for Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq and Syria, including supporting 5,675 US troops in Iraq and US$1.3 bn to train and equip Iraqi forces, as well as US$500m for vetted Syrian opposition forces. The European Reassurance Initiative would receive US$4.8 bn, a US$1.4 bn increase from the US$3.4bn requested in FY2017, which would be directed to an increased US forward presence and the pre-positioning of an army division's worth of equipment.
   Trump campaigned on a promise to make the US armed forces `so big, so powerful, so strong, that nobody - absolutely nobody - is gonna mess with us' and the administration has characterised the FY2018 defence-budget request as a `historic' increase, citing the US$603bn requested in base discretionary national-defence funding as a US$52 bn, or 9.4%, increase on the Obama administration's request for US$551 bn in FY2017, and as a US$54 bn, or 10%, increase above the US$549 bn limit on national defence spending for FY2018 set by the amended Budget Control Act of 2011.
   However, the FY2018 request is a more modest US$18.5 bn, or 3%, increase over the planned US$584.5 bn in base discretionary national-defence spending in FY2018 that appeared in the FY2017 budget request for that year. Year-on-year increases in discretionary national-defence spending of 10% or more have occurred ten times since FY1978, predominantly during the FY1979-FY1985 Carter- Reagan Cold War build-up and the FY2001-FY2011 growth in national-defence spending relating to the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
    []

   The Trump administration's proposal for a total of US$667bn in discretionary national-defence spending has been criticised by legislators, including Congressman Mac Thornberry and Senator John McCain, Republican chairmen of the House and Senate armed services committees respectively, as inadequate for US national-security needs in a changing international security order. Congressional frustration has manifested itself in higher than requested troop levels and defence spending in versions of the FY2018 authorisations and appropriations bills. The Congress and Senate passed a National Defense Authorization Act in November 2017, authorising appropriations up to US$700 bn. However, the BCA would need to be lifted for it to go through.
   Meanwhile, the FY2018 State Department request for a total of US$5.1bn in Foreign Military Financing (FMF) maintains the prior year's request levels for Israel (US$3.1bn), Egypt (US$1.3bn) and Jordan (US$350m), but reduces funding for Pakistan (US$261m to US$100m). For other countries, the FY2018 FMF request includes an unallocated pool of US$200m in direct FMF assistance, a reduction of US$593 m, and instead encourages countries to apply for FMF loans. This is a sharp break in FMF policy from the Obama administration, which in FY2017 requested a total of US$703m in FMF for individual countries and regions, in addition to the funding for Egypt, Israel, Jordan and Pakistan mentioned above.
   Continued budget turmoil
   As it has every year since FY2010, the DoD began FY2017 on 1 October (2016) under a series of continuing resolutions, extending FY2016 funding levels into FY2017 with a slight adjustment for inflation. The first continuing resolution, from 1 October to 9 December 2016, postponed a debate about national-security and domestic funding until after the congressional and presidential elections in November 2016. The second resolution, running from 9 December 2016 through to 28 April 2017, allowed the incoming Trump administration to influence FY2017 defence-funding levels. In March 2017, the Trump administration submitted a request for an additional US$30 bn in FY2017, deemed a `readiness supplemental'. This additional request included US$13.5 bn in procurement funding, US$8.2 bn in operations and maintenance, US$2 bn for RDT&E and US$1 bn for military personnel, and brought the total FY2017 DoD request to US$619 bn, including US$589 bn in base-budget funding and US$69.7 bn in OCO funding. After a third short continuing resolution, Congress passed the FY2017 appropriations bill for the DoD on 5 May 2017, 216 days into the fiscal year, ending the longest stretch of budgetary uncertainty ever faced by the DoD. The final FY2017 appropriations level totalled US$597bn for the DoD, complied with the congressional budget-deal levels and included US$15.4bn of the requested US$30 bn in additional appropriations to `restore readiness'.
   The differences of opinion between and among Republicans and Democrats in Congress over the appropriate balance between defence and non-defence spending, the level of OCO funding and proper military-force structure remain unresolved. Despite widespread hopes for the swift passage of a FY2018 defence-appropriations bill, and the explicit pleas of Mattis and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General James Dunford, the federal government and DoD once again started the fiscal year under a continuing resolution, which continues the FY2017 funding levels through to 8 December 2017. Under this `strict' continuing resolution, the DoD is prohibited from starting any new programmes or adjusting any production rates, resulting in the misalignment of billions of dollars between the FY2017 budget levels and the FY2018 request.
   Despite a broad consensus among national-security policymakers for greater national defence spending, it remains limited through to FY2021 by the caps imposed on both national-defence and non-defence discretionary government spending by the Budget Control Act of 2011. Although Congress has amended the caps for each year by US$9bn-US$27bn in any one year, at the time of writing there was no deal to raise or eliminate them for FY2018 or beyond. Past deals have typically covered two fiscal years, and raised the caps equally for defence and non-defence spending, parity the Democrats have said they will insist upon for the FY2018 budget negotiations. The average amount of so-called `sequester relief', US$18.8 bn, is one-third of the US$54 bn requested in the FY2018 budget. OCO funding is not subject to these spending caps, but resistance from Republican fiscal conservatives and Democrats seeking equivalent spending increases for non-defence programmes will limit the amount of defence funding that can be funnelled through OCO. Increasing the Budget Control Act caps requires either the agreement of eight Democrat senators, or the effective elimination of the legislative filibuster, one of the last sacred cows of Senate procedure. Appropriations above the cap levels without amending the caps themselves would trigger a sequester, whereby funding for all defence activities is automatically reduced by an even proportion in order to bring total spending to the cap level. Despite the uncertain prospects for the elimination of the Budget Control Act caps and the magnitude and potential duration of a defence build-up, US defence spending appears to be past the nadir that followed the draw downs from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
   Balancing readiness, capacity and high-end capabilities
   Readiness has been a consistent motif in debates over the US defence budget and force structure over the past few years. Many senior Pentagon and congressional officials have described a `readiness crisis', while Mattis testified before the Senate Armed Services Committee that he was `shocked' at the erosion of readiness since the FY2013 sequester. However, improving readiness has become somewhat of a catch-all term for remedying training and maintenance shortfalls and increasing troop end-strength and ship and aircraft numbers in order to alleviate the strain on the force, as well as to support current levels of operational demand, invest in high-end capabilities and modernise the force against the prospect of a near-peer adversary.
   The March 2017 supplemental request and the FY2018 budget request focused on `restoring readiness', adding funding for high-end army training and pairing army training with partnership exercises with allies abroad, greater capacity for ship and aviation depot maintenance, adding to air-force pilot and maintenance-personnel numbers, and increasing funding for installation maintenance and repairs.
   Growing the capacity of the armed forces has been a major focus of the congressional defence committees. Congress rejected the FY2017 plan to reduce the army to 450,000 active-duty soldiers, instead adding 16,000; increasing the Marine Corps by 3,000, to 185,000; the air force by 4,000, to 321,000; and the reserve forces by 9,800 to a total of 813,200. If implemented, the administration's FY2018 request would grow the air force's and navy's active-duty forces by an additional 4,000 service members each, while both the House and Senate would add additional soldiers for the army. Congress has been similarly proactive in adding procurement funding (US$12.2bn was added to the US$112.2bn FY2017 procurement request) in order to bolster the armed forces' near-term force structure, particularly for ships and aircraft, and upgrading the army's groundcombat vehicles. However, substantial increases to force structure require large, long-term investments. Increasing the size of the navy to 355 ships, as called for in the December 2016 Force Structure Assessment, will require substantial new funds. Estimates for 340- and 350-ship fleets range between US$23.6bn and US$26.6bn annually in shipbuilding funds, depending on the fleet composition, well above the annual cost of US$19.7bn in the FY2017 shipbuilding plan for a 308-ship fleet.
   The FY2018 budget channels additional RDT&E investment towards high-end, innovative capabilities to meet the new challenges of great-power competition with China and Russia; continuing `Third Offset' investments in high-speed-strike and directed-energy weapons; leap-ahead improvements in turbine engines; electronic warfare and improved capacity to counter anti-access/area-denial capabilities. The budget also requests an additional US$2.2bn for classified programmes, for a total of US$22.4 bn, or 28% of all RDT&E funding, continuing a steady growth in classified RDT&E funding since FY2015. In addition, it adds funding to spur innovation, requesting US$345m and US$631m for transitioning to using new technologies and advanced innovation programmes respectively, and increases funding for the Strategic Capabilities Office from US$902 m to US$1.2 bn.
   However, the bulk of RDT&E funding is allocated to programmes currently in development or to improvements to extant systems. The longer term strategic and budgetary challenge will be to incorporate new capabilities into the force in sufficient quantities. For example, the air force has revised upwards its quantity estimate for the new low-observable bomber currently in development, the B-21 Raider, from 80-100 to at least 100. These anticipated investments in new high-end capabilities will add to the procurement `bow wave' of existing systems being acquired, principally the F-35 Lightning II, the Virginia-class attack submarine, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer, the KC-46A Pegasus refuelling tanker, the F/A-18E/F Hornet combat aircraft and Ford-class aircraft carriers - the largest procurement programmes across the next five years.
   CANADA
   Canada released its defence-policy review in June 2017. This was immediately preceded by a major speech by Chrystia Freeland, the foreign-affairs minister, in which she signalled a somewhat more robust security posture, with a renewed emphasis on hard power. She also hinted at a slightly looser relationship with the United States, relying less on the US security umbrella. For Canada, `doing our fair share is clearly necessary', she said, and `Canadian diplomacy and development sometimes require the backing of hard power'. However, having this capacity, Freeland continued, `requires substantial investment'.
   In the North American context, this will amount to a limited adjustment, given the intimacy of the US-Canada defence relationship. Likewise, while the defence-policy review refocused priorities in some key areas, with a renewed emphasis on deterrence and NATO commitments, for example, there was also a strong emphasis on continuity, not least in re-committing to some long-standing procurements. Under the defence-policy review, the government set benchmarks for the scale and type of military operations to which Canada could commit in the future. Beyond its direct national and NATO commitments, these include: two sustained deployments of 500-1,500 personnel, including one as lead nation; one time limited (six to nine months) deployment of similar scale; two smaller sustained deployments of 100-500 personnel; two small time-limited deployments of similar scale; a disaster-assistance mission; and a non-combat evacuation operation.
   While the scale of even the larger missions envisaged is relatively modest, the overall ambition for Canada's commitment to peace and stability missions appears considerable. For comparison, the previous review in 2008 spoke more vaguely of a commitment to lead and/or conduct a major international operation for an extended period, and to deploy forces in response to crises elsewhere in the world for shorter periods. At the time, Canada was maintaining some 2,500 personnel on a sustained basis in Afghanistan.
   It is a measure of the difficulties and delays that have surrounded Canada's long-term procurement plans that several of these projects now carry the description `interim', in order to cover capability gaps. Plans for an interim purchase of fighters to fill an air-force capability gap appeared to be thrown into disarray by a dispute between Boeing and Ottawa, after the US firm pursued a legal complaint against Canadian firm Bombardier. The Canadian government had seemed close to an agreement with Boeing to buy 18 F/A-18E/F Super Hornets to supplement the air force's ageing CF-18 Hornets. Lockheed Martin has officially offered the F-35 Lightning II as an alternative interim fighter. However, the prospects for this and indeed the F-35's chances of fulfilling Canada's ultimate requirement for 88 new combat aircraft remain uncertain.
   The C$670 million (US$516 m) Project Resolve for an interim supply ship for the navy, based on a converted merchant-ship hull, MV Asterix, is due to see the vessel delivered by the end of 2017. The navy has been relying at various times on help from the Chilean and Spanish navies for under-way replenishment since the withdrawal of HMCS Protecteur and HMCS Preserver. The new purposebuilt Joint Support Ships (formerly known as the Queenston class, but now renamed the Protecteur class and based on the German Navy's Berlin class) are scheduled for delivery in 2021 and 2022.
   Meanwhile, the navy's surface fleet has been operating at reduced levels following the withdrawal of all the ageing Iroquois-class destroyers. Canada's 12 Halifax-class frigates started a modernisation and life extension programme in 2010. The last of these vessels to enter the programme, HMCS Toronto, completed its refit in November 2016 and was due to return to operational service only in early 2018. While the defence-policy review made a firm commitment to 15 new Canadian Surface Combatants (the previous commitment had been `up to 15'), a succession of slippages in the bidding deadline for the contract pushed back completion of the selection process from late 2017 into 2018. However, the plan is still for construction to begin `in the early 2020s'.
   A new focus of concern over future naval capability centres on the long-term plans for Canada's submarine force. Under the latest proposals, the intention is to continue to operate and, in the mid-2020s, to modernise the current four Victoria-class boats, to keep them effective until the mid-2030s. Some doubt the viability of this plan, given their age and chequered history. Nevertheless, the renewed strategic focus on the North Atlantic and particularly the Greenland-Iceland-United Kingdom gap (for which the then-Upholder-class boats were originally designed for the UK Royal Navy as very quiet, deepwater platforms) make them valuable assets for both Canada and NATO, despite concerns over their operational availability.
   International commitments and engagements
   Canada has been the recipient of some criticism, not least from Washington, over its defence-spending record, hence the emphasis on an increased commitment in the new review. Nonetheless, Canada makes a significant contribution to the Alliance as one of the four framework nations of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence in the Baltic states. Canada leads the multinational battle group in Latvia, deploying approximately 450 army personnel, alongside contributions from Albania, Italy, Poland, Slovenia and Spain. In addition, Canada temporarily deployed an artillery battery of 100 personnel and four M777 howitzers to Latvia for exercises in 2017.
   From August 2017, Canada also undertook a new rotational deployment as part of NATO's air-policing mission, with four CF-18s and 135 air-force personnel based in Romania for four months, while the navy contributes a frigate to one of NATO's standing maritime groups. The government also announced that it would extend its military-training and capacitybuilding mission in Ukraine, begun in 2014, until the end of March 2019.
   The government also extended Operation Impact, Canada's contribution to the campaign against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, until March 2019. It changed significantly in character in February 2016 after the Liberal administration enacted its pledge to end Canadian airstrikes and pull out its force of CF-18s, and has become a support and training mission. That said, Canadian personnel - including special forces - have been engaged in firefights on the ground, which indicates a greater combat element than the official characterisation would suggest.
   In addition, Canada has extended until the end of April 2021 its commitment to periodically provide forces to the coalition maritime-security mission in and around the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden, the Gulf of Oman and the Indian Ocean. Under Operation Artemis, the Canadian commitment is for up to 375 personnel, a Halifax-class frigate once every two years and a CP-140 Aurora aircraft once per year.
   At the 2017 IISS Shangri La Dialogue, Minister of National Defence Harjit Singh Sajjan also underscored the country's commitment to defence engagement in the Asia-Pacific. This included the twin deployment to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region of the frigates HMCS Winnipeg and HMCS Ottawa as Operation Poseidon Cutlass 17, which lasted nearly six months. Despite the challenges facing the navy in terms of sustained deployments, it also carried out a presence-and-engagement mission to West Africa involving two Kingston-class coastal-defence vessels - the first Canadian warship presence in the region for ten years.
   Defence economics
   Canada has faced criticism for appearing down the league table of NATO defence spenders, at just above 1% of GDP. The new government insists that it is committed to raising defence spending. Even so, the budget is still projected to reach only 1.4% of GDP by 2024-25, still significantly below the NATO minimum target of 2% (and that only because of an adjustment allowing the inclusion of defence spending from other departments, in consultation with NATO).
   The new defence review stated that the Department of National Defence budget, excluding the Department of Veterans Affairs, would rise over the next ten years from C$17.1 billion (US$13.2 bn) in 2016-17 to C$2 4bn (US$18.6 bn) by 2026-27 on an accrual basis. In cash terms, the rise would be from C$18.9bn (US$14.5bn) to C$32.7bn (US$25.2bn), or an increase of 70%, according to the government, and some C$9.5bn (US$7.3bn) above the total budget increase planned by 2027-28, under pre-review proposals. However, cash spending is then expected to fall substantially as major projects are completed.
   More significant perhaps than the overall budget forecast is the anticipated significant increase in capital or procurement spending as a percentage of the budget. This was put at 10.84% in 2016-17 and was set for a significant rise to 19.42% in 2017-18, and then to increase further to 32.17% in 2024-25. That level would significantly exceed the NATO target of 20% of defence spending being on major equipment.
   If this materialises, it would represent a major change compared to previous procurement commitments, but whether the defence budget and industrial base is ready to absorb something like a trebling in the proportion of defence resources devoted to capital programmes in less than a decade is another matter. Significantly, the defence-policy review spoke of introducing reforms to streamline the procurement process, with the aim of reducing departmental approval times by 50%.
   The main procurement questions continue to revolve around the centre piece air-force and naval recapitalisation programmes. The current government rowed back on the previous administration's plans to buy 65 F-35As to replace the air force's existing CF-18s. Instead, it has pledged to hold an open competition for new fighters, a requirement now put at 88 aircraft, although Canada has remained part of the F-35 production consortium.
   Meanwhile, the full implications that the trade dispute with Boeing may have on the planned interim purchase of 18 Super Hornets appeared uncertain. Although the US State Department approved the potential sale in September, the deal was essentially stalled by the dispute. The Canadian government stated in November 2016 that the age of the existing fleet meant that it was unable to meet its North American Aerospace Defense Command commitment for mission-ready aircraft.
   Meanwhile, in November 2016, the government announced that it had selected the Airbus C295W to fulfil its future fixed-wing search-and-rescue requirement under a C$2.4bn (US$1.8bn) contract.
   The continuing deferrals of the bidding deadline for the navy's future Canadian Surface Combatant came against the backdrop of a new and significantly higher cost estimate for the programme. The budget was announced at C$26.2bn (US$20.2bn) in 2008. However, in June 2017, the parliamentary budget office estimated that it had risen, in 2008 dollars adjusted for inflation, to C$61.82bn (US$47.6bn), 2.4 times higher than the original target (and equivalent to C$40bn (US$30.8bn) in 2017 dollars), although it also acknowledged that its estimates included a 20% margin of error and depended on the final size and specification of the ships.
   Among other naval programmes, the Quebecbased shipyard Chantier Davie, responsible for delivering the interim replenishment ship, has also submitted a proposal to meet Canada's future icebreaker requirement based on the conversion of two classes of commercial icebreaker.
  

Глава 3. Северная Америка


   СОЕДИНЕННЫЕ ШТАТЫ
   20 января 2017 года Дональд Трамп стал 45-м президентом США. Администрация быстро перешла к принятию мер по вопросам, которые Трамп подчеркнул в своей кампании, включая устранение предполагаемых различий в распределении бремени внутри трансатлантического альянса. В ходе кампании Трамп поставил под сомнение актуальность НАТО. Во время майской речи 2017 года в Брюсселе президент вернулся к теме, упрекнув европейских членов Альянса за недостаточные расходы на оборону. Между тем, вопросы, включая текущие расследования связей с Россией во время президентской кампании 2016 года, текучесть кадров Белого дома и задержки с назначением высокопоставленных и средних должностных лиц национальной безопасности, сыграли свою роль в тревожном начале для администрации.
   Тем не менее к концу августа в политике национальной безопасности наметилась определенная согласованность. В дополнение к министру обороны Джеймсу Мэттису и государственному секретарю Рексу Тиллерсону перетасовка ключевых игроков (генерал-лейтенант Х. Р. Макмастер для Майкла Флинна в качестве советника по национальной безопасности; Джон Ф. Келли Для Рейнса Приебуса в качестве начальника штаба Белого дома) обеспечила опытную консультацию относительно приоритетов национальной безопасности и ввела больший процесс в принятие решений администрации по национальной безопасности. Тем не менее, склонность президента комментировать политические вопросы в социальных сетях, иногда противоречащая существующей политике (например, по вопросу о трансгендерных членах службы), сыграла свою роль в беспокойстве его собственных назначенцев, не говоря уже о союзниках и партнерах. Кроме того, ключевые должности в департаментах обороны и государства (и в других местах) заполнялись лишь медленно, в результате чего многие из этих должностей по-прежнему занимали карьерные гражданские служащие и военные офицеры в случае Министерства обороны (МО).
   Хотя дебаты в администрации продолжаются относительно того, чего следует ожидать от союзников Соединенных Штатов, Трамп смягчил свою критику и все чаще проводил политику, аналогичную политике прошлых администраций. Европейская инициатива по заверению продолжается, с увеличением финансирования в рамках бюджета 2018 финансового года (FY), а в июне 2017 года Трамп выступил с речью в Варшаве, заверив Польшу в поддержке США. Ключевая веха наступила 21 августа 2017 года, когда президент объявил о своем решении отправить дополнительные войска в Афганистан, хотя их роль в стране, как ожидается, будет менее экспансивной, чем в прошлом: "Мы снова не строим нацию, - сказал Трамп, мы убиваем террористов".
   Афганистан является лишь одной из проблем безопасности, стоящих перед США, их союзниками и партнерами. Как отметил Мэттис в своих показаниях перед Комитетом по вооруженным силам Сената в июне 2017 года, они делятся на четыре основные области: "заполнение дыр от компромиссов, сделанных в течение 16 лет войны ... ухудшение обстановки в области безопасности, оспариваемые операции в нескольких областях и быстрые темпы технологических изменений". Мэттис также подчеркнул, что это "более нестабильная обстановка в плане безопасности, чем любая из тех, которые я испытал за четыре десятилетия моей военной службы".
   Китай и Россия
   Становится все более очевидным, что период неоспоримого стратегического превосходства США закончился. В первые дни своего правления администрация Обамы стремилась к сотрудничеству с Китаем и "перезагрузке" с Россией. Но к тому времени, как Обама покинул свой пост, политики открыто говорили об эпохе, характеризующейся Великой конкуренцией за власть. Действительно, впервые за десятилетия в Китае и России Вашингтон сталкивается с государствами, которые могут оспаривать использование военной мощи США в своих соответствующих регионах. Более того, и Китай, и Россия активно действуют за пределами своих территорий.
   Военная модернизация Китая продолжается в течение некоторого времени, в то время как ее растущий охват также становится все более очевидным, особенно в связи с активацией его первой военной базы за рубежом, в Джибути в 2017 году, и увеличением числа морских патрулей. В некоторых областях развитие оборонных технологий Китая рассматривается как "шагающая угроза" для американских военных планировщиков. В то же время продолжается военная модернизация России, хотя и с относительно меньшими ресурсами. В целом Россия намерена генерировать более эффективные вооруженные силы, находящиеся в более высокой степени готовности, и особое внимание уделяется модернизации стратегических, наземных и воздушных сил, средств радиоэлектронной борьбы и высокоточного поражения, в том числе с морских платформ. Пожалуй, наиболее тревожно для США то, что Пекин и Москва не проявляют отвращения к сотрудничеству (см. 9). Продолжаются продажи российского оружия Китаю, а в сентябре 2017 года военно-морские силы стран провели совместные учения.
   Американские политики, разрабатывающие новую Стратегию национальной обороны и проводящие Обзор ядерной политики, все чаще задумываются о требованиях сдерживания Китая и России как с помощью обычных, так и ядерных потенциалов. Министерство обороны также рассматривает требования военной конкуренции, за исключением применения силы. Планировщики обороны должны все больше думать о требованиях конфликта с Китаем или Россией. Хотя все еще маловероятно, это, возможно, менее отдаленная перспектива, чем она появилась несколько лет назад.
   Несколько параллельных задач
   Помимо растущей конкуренции с Китаем и Россией, США сталкиваются с рядом других требований. Председатель Объединенного комитета начальников штабов генерал Джозеф Данфорд, подкрепляя заявления Мэттиса в своих собственных показаниях перед Конгрессом, объяснил, что Китай и Россия являются двумя из пяти проблем, стоящих перед МО; также в списке были " Иран, Северная Корея и насильственные экстремистские организации [Веос]". Эти вопросы наиболее четко представляют проблемы, стоящие перед военными США. Они служат ориентиром для нашей глобальной позиции, размера сил, развития потенциала и управления рисками.'
   Воинственная Северная Корея, стремящаяся к дальнейшему развитию межконтинентальных баллистических ракет и потенциала ядерного оружия; все еще революционный иранский режим, преследующий региональную гегемонию и дестабилизирующий своих соседей; нестабильный Афганистан; и распространение экстремистских идеологий в Европе, Африке и Азии индивидуально поставят значительные требования к МО. Однако их согласие в сочетании с вызовами со стороны Китая и России создало значительную нагрузку на ресурсы. Противостоять этим многочисленным вызовам становится все труднее, учитывая растущий потенциал потенциальных противников, а также последствия закона о бюджетном контроле (BCA) 2011 года (см. стр. 38). Эти проблемы усугубляются тем фактом, что в течение многих лет оборонный бюджет США действовал на основе "продолжающихся резолюций", которые затрудняют долгосрочные инвестиции и увеличивают расходы. Поэтому Данфорд подчеркнул `что "в результате устойчивых оперативных темпов и бюджетной нестабильности сегодня перед военными стоит задача удовлетворить оперативные потребности и сохранить инвестиции в потенциал, необходимый для сохранения - или в некоторых случаях восстановления - нашего конкурентного преимущества". Он продолжил, сказав, что военные США "требуют сбалансированного инвентаризации передовых возможностей и достаточного потенциала, чтобы действовать решительно по всему спектру военных операций". Кроме того, США не могли "выбирать между силой, которая может противостоять ... насильственным экстремистским организациям, и силой, которая может сдерживать и побеждать государственных субъектов с полным спектром возможностей".
   Война против экстремистских организаций ускорилась во время администрации Трампа, особенно против Исламского государства, известного также как ИГИЛ или ИГИЛ. Во время своих операций против ИГИЛ иракские силы безопасности пользовались услугами военных советников и возможностями США и других стран, прежде всего авиации, артиллерии и разведки. Американские войска продолжают участвовать в тренировочных операциях в Ираке.
   В то же время администрация Трампа крайне настороженно относится к Ирану и вступила в должность, пообещав отменить сделку администрации Обамы, которая направлена на то, чтобы удержать Тегеран от получения ядерного оружия. Противодействие Ирану было одной из целей поездки президента в Саудовскую Аравию в мае 2017 года, в то время как он также приветствовал общую сумму в 110 миллиардов долларов США в оружейных сделках с Эр-Риядом, хотя это включало ранее одобренные продажи, согласованные при администрации Обамы (см. стр. 320). Между тем, хотя американские силы остаются в Сирии, борясь с ИГИЛ и обучая членов Сирийских Демократических сил, политика США в отношении режима Асада больше не является однозначным "Асад должен уйти".
   Однако, возможно, самой неприятной проблемой, стоящей перед политиками США в ближайшей перспективе, является Северная Корея. Перспектива ядерной Северной Кореи, способной нанести удар по материковой части США, становится все более реальной, и режим Кима больше не является региональной угрозой. Эскалация риторики со стороны Белого дома и Пхеньяна вызвала растущую озабоченность, но сопровождалась более взвешенными ответами. На совместной пресс-конференции с послом США в ООН Никки Хейли 15 сентября Макмастер призвал к международной поддержке новых санкций Организации Объединенных Наций для сдерживания провокаций и ядерных амбиций Северной Кореи. Он подчеркнул, что, хотя Вашингтон предпочитает дипломатическое решение для прекращения ядерного потенциала Северной Кореи, у США есть военные варианты.
   Наконец, в августе 2017 года Трамп направил повышение Киберкомандования США до единого боевого командования, отражая растущую важность оборонительной и наступательной кибер-деятельности в военных операциях, а также требования закона О национальной обороне FY2017. Новое командование, как и другие боевые командования, будет подчиняться непосредственно министру обороны и будет иметь больше возможностей для защиты инвестиций и ресурсов. Остается вопрос, когда Киберкомандование будет отделено от Агентства национальной безопасности (АНБ). Конгресс продиктовал, что разделение может произойти только тогда, когда министр обороны подтвердит, что киберкомандование готово действовать независимо. Ключевой аргумент в пользу этого разделения был озвучен Эриком Розенбахом, начальником штаба бывшего министра обороны Эштона Картера, который отметил, что разделение позволит Киберкомандованию генерировать свои собственные возможности и "получить независимость от АНБ, чтобы это было настоящее боевое командование, а не организация, подчиненная разведывательному сообществу". На момент подготовки настоящего доклада обе организации возглавлял адмирал Майкл Роджерс.
   Отношения альянса
   Отношения альянса были центральными для стратегии национальной безопасности США после Второй мировой войны. Однако в последние годы все чаще раздается критика в адрес нежелания союзников вносить более полный вклад в обеспечение своей безопасности во все более опасных условиях. Степень разделения бремени европейскими союзниками Вашингтона по НАТО была центральной в этом дискурсе, но критика не ограничивалась Европой. Президент Барак Обама выразил разочарование по этому вопросу в последние годы своего срока, в то время как заявления Трампа во время президентской кампании 2016 года и его первые месяцы на посту обострили эту критику. Как он утверждал в своем инаугурационном визите в Европу в мае 2017 года (ссылаясь на отчет НАТО о государствах, достигших цели потратить 2% ВВП на оборону), "23 из 28 стран-членов все еще не платят то, что они должны платить, и то, что они должны платить за свою оборону".
   Здоровье союзнических отношений Вашингтона варьировалось в первые месяцы администрации Трампа. Сообщения о напряженном телефонном разговоре между Трампом и премьер-министром Австралии Малькольмом Тернбуллом кратко бросают тень на важные оборонные отношения в Азиатско-Тихоокеанском регионе, в отличие от тесных отношений с премьер-министром Японии Синдзо Абэ. Однако в обоих случаях высокая степень институционализации альянсов и значительная доля общих интересов и ценностей свидетельствуют о необходимости преемственности.
   И Австралия, и Япония уже увеличивали свои расходы на оборону до вступления Трампа в должность, как и некоторые европейские члены НАТО, в ответ на растущую угрозу со стороны России, откровения о глубоких недостатках среди вооруженных сил НАТО и предыдущее поощрение со стороны США. Тем не менее, многие из союзников Вашингтона сталкиваются с реальными долгосрочными ограничениями их оборонного потенциала из-за ограниченного экономического роста.
   Вопросы готовности
   Готовность по-прежнему вызывает озабоченность у всех военных служб США. Высокие темпы глобальных операций в последние годы - с продолжающимся развертыванием в Афганистане и Ираке; контртеррористическими операциями; гуманитарными миссиями и миссиями по оказанию помощи в случае стихийных бедствий; усилением развертывания в Южной Корее; и активизацией деятельности по заверению союзников, партнеров и друзей перед лицом большей конкуренции с Китаем и Россией привели к дилемме, по словам бывшего заместителя начальника штаба армии генерала Дэна Аллина, в соответствии с которой службы "потребляют готовность так же быстро, как мы ее строим". Два отдельных несчастных случая с участием эсминцев USS Fitzgerald и USS John S. McCain, в результате которых погибли 17 моряков, были ярким свидетельством этих стрессов в Вооруженных силах.
   Мэттис подчеркнул эту проблему в своих замечаниях Комитету по вооруженным силам Сената:
   Изношенное оборудование и ограниченные поставки заставили наш персонал работать сверхурочно во время развертывания или подготовки к развертыванию. Это также накладывает дополнительное бремя на мужчин и женщин, которые служат, и на их семьи. Это еще больше ухудшает готовность по отрицательной спирали, поскольку те, кто не участвует в бою, находятся в состоянии застоя, не могут тренироваться, поскольку их оборудование отправляется вперед для покрытия дефицита или возвращается для обширной переработки.
   Проблемы готовности также усугубляются неопределенностью бюджета и финансированием, зависящим от принятия продолжающихся резолюций. В бюджете на 2017 финансовый год предусмотрено некоторое облегчение при незначительном увеличении финансирования и конечной численности всех услуг (см. стр. 35-9). Более широкий вопрос, возникающий в связи с проблемами финансирования и разнообразными текущими и возникающими проблемами в области безопасности, связан с тем, какие вооруженные силы, против каких угроз они выступают, необходимы.
   После длительного сосредоточения внимания на операциях по борьбе с повстанцами и стабилизации в последнее десятилетие значительные инвестиции были направлены на подготовку, организацию, оснащение и поддержание этих миссий. Кроме того, поколение американских военных офицеров было вовлечено в войны против повстанцев и террористов и не было обучено сражаться с компетентными, хорошо вооруженными государственными субъектами. В то же время большая часть оборудования во многих службах либо стареет, либо не отвечает будущим задачам, таким, как борьба с равными противниками (например, армейские противоминные средства защиты от засады (СРПД)).
   Кроме того, большая часть нынешней структуры сил США восходит к военному наращиванию, начатому во время Холодной войны. Перспектива, пожалуй, самая позитивная для авиации, с ВВС, выставляющими F-35A Lightning II и развитием бомбардировщика B-21 Raider. Тем не менее, как отметила секретарь ВВС Хизер Уилсон: "в то время как мы продолжаем продлевать срок службы старых самолетов, материалы страдают от усталости, а обслуживание старого оборудования занимает много времени и дорого."Последняя оценка структуры сил ВМФ требует флота в 355 кораблей к 2030 году, что потребует постоянных усилий и ресурсов для достижения. Между тем, ключевыми системами наземного боя являются все модернизированные версии конструкций с 1980-х годов или ранее. Действительно, постоянное воздержание от американских военных лидеров заключается в том, что доминирование США во всех областях (суше, воздухе, море, космосе и киберпространстве) теперь оспаривается и, в некоторых областях, превалирует.
   Наконец, вооруженные силы базируются в основном в континентальных США. В Восточной Европе существует только одна ротационная боевая группа бронетанковой бригады для обеспечения сдерживания возможной российской агрессии и заверения союзников. Способность усиливать или развертывать войска во время кризиса становится все более проблематичной, учитывая возможности России по ограничению доступа/отказу в зонах. Поэтому начались дебаты о том, следует ли направлять в Европу больше американских сил для обеспечения постоянного потенциала и сдерживания.
   Задачи модернизации
   США необходимо устранить нынешний дефицит готовности, модернизируя стареющие силы. Этот подвиг был бы сложным даже без отмеченных выше финансовых ограничений. В результате, США и, все чаще, их союзники делают больший акцент на военных инновациях и потенциале высокого рычага. "Третья компенсирующая стратегия", которую отстаивал бывший заместитель министра обороны Роберт Уорк, направлена на сохранение преимуществ Соединенных Штатов за счет использования новых технологий и военной доктрины. Действительно, инновации тем более важны в эпоху, в которой предел превосходства США сужается. МО наращивает инвестиции в новые космические возможности; передовые датчики, средства связи и боеприпасы для проецирования энергии в спорных условиях; противоракетную оборону и кибернетические возможности. Департамент также инвестирует средства в новые технологии, такие, как беспилотные подводные аппараты, современные морские мины, высокоскоростное ударное оружие, передовая аэронавтика, автономные системы, электромагнитные рельсовые пушки и высокоэнергетические лазеры. Некоторые из этих технологий могут иметь глубокий эффект, хотя многие из них еще не зарекомендовали себя в оперативной обстановке и вряд ли будут развернуты до 2020-х годов, самое раннее.
   Армия США
   Армия США, возможно, была службой, наиболее пострадавшей от последних 16 лет войны. Понятно, что войны в Афганистане и Ираке были в центре армейской подготовки, оснащения и организации. Эти требования сохраняются, хотя и в меньших масштабах, чем во время резкого увеличения численности войск в Ираке и Афганистане. Тем не менее, они создают постоянную потребность в БЦБК и подразделениях штаб-квартиры. В своих показаниях перед Комитетом по вооруженным силам Сената в мае 2017 года исполняющий обязанности секретаря армии Роберт Шпеер и начальник штаба армии Марк Милли описали масштаб обязательств армии: "сегодня армия Соединенных Штатов назначает или выделяет более 187 000 солдат для удовлетворения потребностей боевых командиров".
   Действительно, поддержание боеготовности армии перед лицом повторяющихся развертываний, бюджетной неопределенности и сокращения численности личного состава является проблемой на протяжении нескольких лет. Снижение конечной численности (армия сократилась на 100 000 солдат и 15 до н. э. во время администрации Обамы), продолжающиеся резолюции и ограничения BCA 2011 потребовали от армии "оплачивать краткосрочные счета за счет долгосрочных обязательств". Как следствие, два армейских лидера подчеркнули, что служба недофинансировала усилия по модернизации, в результате чего "армия потенциально превосходит по вооружению, превосходит и устарела на будущем поле боя с близкими конкурентами". Другие старшие армейские офицеры повторили эту оценку, добавив, что "продолжающаяся неспособность финансировать модернизацию оставит США с армией 20-го века, чтобы справиться с геостратегической средой 21-го века".
   Однако сила армии картина улучшилась в 2017ф.г. закон О Национальной авторизации обороны (NDAA), с увеличением численности персонала на 1,018,000 (476,000 активный; 343,000 Национальной гвардии; 199,000 резерв), по сравнению с плановой 980,000. Как и все остальное в NDAA, эти цифры зависят от сокращения секвестрации. Если это принято в FY2018 и за его пределами, конец года численность армии сократится до 920000.
   В то же время первоочередной задачей армии является восстановление готовности к бою с близкими конкурентами. С этой целью ротация подразделений в Национальный учебный центр и подготовка на местах в настоящее время обеспечиваются лучшими ресурсами. Кроме того, армия приступила к осуществлению экспериментальной программы по объединению действующих подразделений Национальной гвардии и подразделений резервной армии и авиации в целях повышения уровня подготовки.
   Тем временем миссия по оказанию поддержки в подготовке кадров и консультировании миссий в Афганистане и Ираке продолжается. Чтобы лучше удовлетворить этот постоянный спрос, армия создает шесть бригад содействия силам безопасности (SFABs) и создает учебную школу для них в центре маневра передового опыта в Форт-Беннинге, штат Джорджия. Эти подразделения меньше, чем обычные БКТ, и состоят в основном из офицеров и старших унтер-офицеров. Помимо предоставления армии подразделений, ориентированных на подготовку и консультирование, Сфаб предоставляют кадры, которые могут быть расширены в случае, если армии необходимо быстро расти.
   Армия также инвестирует в Европу. Она ускорила рост заранее подготовленных запасов для обеспечения оборудованием штаба дивизии, двух бронетанковых бригад, одной бригады полевой артиллерии и вспомогательных подразделений. В настоящее время один бронетанковая бригада постоянно дислоцируется в Европе, увеличив общее число до трех, включая бригаду Stryker в Германии и воздушно-десантную в Италии. Кроме того, машины Stryker усиливаются 30-мм пушками и противотанковыми ракетами Javelin. Однако, несмотря на этот новый акцент на Европе, недавний обзор действий после развертывания базирующейся в Италии 173-й воздушно-десантной бригады в Восточной Европе выявил значительные проблемы.
   Модернизация оборудования также является одной из самых больших проблем армии. Он по-прежнему полагается на свои основные боевые возможности на модернизированных версиях систем " Big 5", закупленных в 1980-х годах: основной боевой танк Abrams, боевая машина пехоты Bradley (IFV), штурмовой вертолет Apache и средний транспортный вертолет Black Hawk и зенитный ракетный комплекс Patriot. Инвестиции в последнее десятилетие были сосредоточены на проведении операций по борьбе с повстанцами и терроризмом и привели к крупным закупкам MRAP, большего числа Black Hawks и большего количества средств индивидуальной защиты для солдат. Армия выявила пробелы в десяти областях, реализованных в рамках нового Обзора стратегического портфельного анализа (SPAR), которые должны быть закрыты для восстановления избыточного соответствия, необходимого для сдерживания и поражения близких противников: воздушная и противоракетная оборона; дальний огонь; боеприпасы; мобильность, летальность и защита; воздушные и наземные системы активной защиты; гарантированное положение, навигация и расчет времени; электронная война; наступательная и оборонительная кибернетика; гарантированная связь; и вертикальный подъем.
   Эти приоритеты модернизации конкурируют с готовностью и людскими ресурсами. Действительно, готовность является первоочередной задачей армии и составляет 24% ее бюджета, в то время как бюджет президента FY2017 выделяет почти 60% на рабочую силу. Это оставляет только 16% финансирования для устранения значительных пробелов в потенциале. Следовательно, армия решила вооружиться на ближайшую перспективу и восстановить боеготовность за счет подготовки к будущему. Он увеличил свои инвестиции в науку и технику, но большая часть финансирования модернизации направлена на улучшение танка Abrams, БМП Bradley, бронетранспортера Stryker, гаубицы Paladin, управляемого многоствольного ракетного комплекса и существующего авиационного флота. Новые программы начнутся только в том случае, если возникнет необходимость в устранении крайне опасных пробелов в потенциале. Соответственно, армия пытается ускорить усилия в десяти районах, определенных SPAR. Это также замедлило закупку новых систем, с тем чтобы сохранить существующие производственные линии открытыми в случае увеличения финансирования. Однако в отсутствие дополнительных ресурсов стратегия модернизации боевых машин армии рассчитана на 30-летний первоначальный период. Модернизация авиации является хорошим примером таких компромиссов на практике. В своем январском докладе 2016 года Национальная комиссия по будущему армии рекомендовала сохранить 24 ударных вертолета Apache, но для достижения этой цели армия замедляет модернизацию Black Hawk. Сроки для модернизации Apache были также увеличены с FY2026 в FY2028, и для Black Hawk от FY2028 в FY2030.
   Между тем, армия создала офис быстрого потенциала в 2016 году для устранения критических среднесрочных пробелов в потенциале. Этот офис работает с выбранными отраслевыми партнерами для быстрого и не дорогостоящего приобретения оборудования и услуг в таких областях, как позиционирование, навигация и хронометраж; радиоэлектронная война; контрэлектронная война; автоматизация; и кибернетика. Для поддержки своих программ, армия запросила базы бюджета США 137.2 млрд. За FY2018, увеличившись на 5,3% по сравнению с просьбой FY 2017 из нас $130.3 млрд.
   В феврале 2017 года армия и Корпус морской пехоты совместно опубликовали "Многодоменную битву: комбинированное оружие для 21-го века". В этой статье "описывается подход к наземным боевым операциям против сложной угрозы противника в 2025-2040 годах". Он формирует основу для большей части военных игр и разработки концепции, проводимой командованием армии США по подготовке и доктрине, на основе оценки, что "сухопутные боевые силы США, действующие в составе ... совместных, межорганизационных и многонациональные команды в настоящее время недостаточно обучены, организованы, оснащены, чтобы сдерживать или побеждать высокопрофессиональных равных врагов, чтобы выиграть в будущей войне". Важно отметить, что в отличие от Вьетнама, когда армия сосредоточилась почти исключительно на НАТО, сейчас она сосредоточена на предоставлении сил и возможностей по всему спектру военных операций, о чем свидетельствует создание SFAB. Однако главная задача армии - равно как и других служб, заключается в том, как удовлетворить возросшие потребности в рамках существующих ресурсных ограничений.
   ВВС США
   Хотя Военно-воздушные силы Соединенных Штатов по-прежнему являются самым боеспособным воздушным подразделением в мире, способным проводить операции на глобальном уровне, они по-прежнему сталкиваются со значительными проблемами. Он сохраняет в своем арсенале слишком много устаревших самолетов и не имеет достаточного количества воздушных и наземных экипажей для их эксплуатации и обслуживания, а также не имеет достаточного количества управляемых боеприпасов для удовлетворения потребностей в инвентарных запасах.
   ВВС США участвуют в постоянных боевых операциях с 2001 года, а в течение 2016 и 2017 годов осуществляли большинство воздушных миссий против ИГИЛ в Ираке и Сирии. Тем не менее, продолжающийся темп операций влияет на срок службы самолета, а иногда и на персонал. Действительно, повторное оперативное развертывание неизбежно является фактором, определяющим решение некоторых военнослужащих покинуть вооруженные силы. Как сообщается, около $1 млрд. в год тратится на вооружение ВВС по удержанию персонала, включая стимулирующие выплаты и бонусы. По состоянию на середину 2017 года военно-воздушные силы, как утверждалось, были на 3 000 человек ниже численности персонала по обслуживанию самолетов и около 1200 пилотов тактических боевых самолетов.
   Хотя ВВС покупают F-35A Lightning II по более низкой годовой ставке, чем хотелось бы, этот тип сейчас, по крайней мере, в инвентаре. ВВС США впервые развернули самолет в Европе в апреле 2017 года, при этом восемь самолетов приземлились в RAF Lakenheath в Великобритании; два F-35A затем были отправлены в учебную миссию на авиабазу Амари в Эстонии. Тем не менее, управление своим наследием истребительных флотов, чтобы как можно больше оставшегося срока службы, по-прежнему является проблемой для ВВС. В апреле 2017 года ВВС США подписали программу продления срока службы F-16 Fighting Falcon, увеличив ее срок службы с 8 000 до 12 000 часов. Это, по крайней мере, теоретически, позволит самолету оставаться в строю до 2048 года. Запланированные темпы производства F-35 означают, что ВВС, скорее всего, не получат последний из 1763 самолетов, которые они хотят заказать, до 2040 года. В то же время еще не было принято решение о том, кто победит в конкурсе ВВС на усовершенствованный реактивный истребитель-тренажер для замены Т-38 Talon.
   Наградив Northrop Grumman программой бомбардировщика B-21 в конце 2015 года, ВВС выбрали Lockheed Martin и Raytheon для конкурсного проектирования и разработки ключевого дополнительного оружия: крылатой ракеты дальнего действия (LRSO). Обе компании были награждены контрактами на проектирование и рисковое производство на сумму 900 миллионов долларов США продолжительностью 54 месяца. LRSO предназначена для замены крылатой ракеты воздушного базирования AGM-86B с ядерным вооружением и планируется ввести в строй в конце 2020-х годов; но, по состоянию на четвертый квартал 2017 года, была скудная информация о вариантах дизайна, которые будут преследовать две компании-победители. AGM-86B является дозвуковой конструкцией, но оставалось неясным, был ли предпочтен маловысотный дозвуковой вариант для LRSO или все еще изучается высокоскоростная версия.
   ВМС США и береговая охрана США
   Серия столкновений и посадок на мель в течение нескольких месяцев в 2017 году с участием крупных надводных комбатантов ВМС США в западной части Тихого океана вызвали опасения, что высокие темпы операций отрицательно сказываются на эффективности и подготовке ВМС. Семнадцать американских моряков погибли в двух из этих инцидентов, а два оснащенных баллистическими ракетами эсминца класса Arleigh Burke получили серьезные повреждения, в результате чего они были выведены из эксплуатации на значительный период времени. В ответ на это начальник военно-морских операций начал ряд расследований, в том числе по вопросу о том, являются ли системные сбои факторами, способствующими этому. Он также объявил о краткой глобальной приостановке для подведения итогов.
   Чтобы подчеркнуть чувство перенапряжения, в конце 2016 года и в первые недели 2017 года был еще один разрыв в присутствии авианосцев в заливе. В своих апрельских показаниях в Конгрессе командующий Тихоокеанским флотом отметил, что он получает лишь около половины запрашиваемых им подводных лодок.
   Между тем, дебаты по поводу будущего размера флота существенно изменились. Администрация Трампа пришла к власти на фоне кампании за 350-корабельный флот, в то время как в декабре 2016 года флот выпустил свою собственную новую цель 355 кораблей, по сравнению с предыдущей целью 308 (и текущий уровень около 279). Эта новая цель явно обусловлена стремлением военно-морского флота восстановить свою способность поддерживать свое глобальное присутствие в условиях возросшей конкуренции со стороны таких стран, как Китай и Россия. План включал в себя дополнительный авианосец, еще 16 больших надводных кораблей и, что, возможно, наиболее важно, еще 18 ударных подводных лодок.
   Тем не менее, были выражены сомнения относительно того, может ли флот финансировать, строить или даже командовать такими силами, и запрос бюджета флота на 2010-2018 гг. Однако руководство Военно-морского флота продолжало настаивать на восстановлении готовности существующего флота, а также на быстром увеличении численности сил за счет дополнительного строительства в течение следующих семи лет, а также, возможно, на продлении срока службы старых судов.
   В то же время в целях совершенствования операций по передовому развертыванию были реорганизованы растущие силы прибрежных боевых кораблей (LCS) с новыми экипажами. Планы LCS на 2018 год включают два одновременных развертывания в Сингапуре и, впервые, в Бахрейне. Однако военно-морской флот дал сигнал о том, как его мышление о будущем малом надводном корабле эволюционировало от проблемной программы LCS. В июле он направил в промышленность запрос о предоставлении информации о более мощном фрегате с управляемыми ракетами, получившем название FFG(X), с планами на первый производственный заказ в 2020 году, при этом конкуренция потенциально открыта для иностранных проектов.
   В качестве еще одного признака реакции флота на вызов более спорной морской среды он закрепил свою концепцию "распределенной летальности", чтобы распространить больше наступательных возможностей по всему флоту, в новой стратегии надводных сил, озаглавленной "назад к морскому контролю". Однако усилия по приобретению новой загоризонтной противокорабельной ракеты для ее будущих сил LCS/фрегатов, как представляется, были затруднены, когда большинство потенциальных участников торгов вышли из конкурса.
   Несмотря на эти вызовы, ВМС США все же продемонстрировали, что сохраняют уникальную способность проводить операции в глобальном масштабе. В апреле два эсминца выпустили 59 крылатых ракет Tomahawk по сирийской авиабазе после предполагаемой химической атаки режима на удерживаемый повстанцами город. А в мае, после, казалось бы, паузы, возобновились операции по обеспечению свободы судоходства в Южно-Китайском море.
   Кроме того, в августе ВМС переименовали экспедиционный корабль мобильной базы поддержки USNS Lewis B. Puller, который ранее управлялся военным командованием Sealift. Судно развернуто в зоне ответственности 5-го флота США. Теперь Lewis B. Puller, судно заменил Ponce в заливе, и ВМС намерены гибко управлять судном, особенно в противоминных контрмерах и миссиях специальных операций. Ponce списан в 2017 году, но Lewis B. Puller не унаследует свою систему лазерного оружия.
   Между тем, береговая охрана США (USCG) сталкивается с растущим списком задач. В апреле она ввела в эксплуатацию шестой из своих новых катеров национальной безопасности, USCGC Munro, стремится набрать дополнительный персонал 5,000 в течение пяти лет, а также начал проектные работы для трех новых тяжелых и трех средних ледоколов; надежда заключается в том, что первый ледокол может быть поставлен в 2023. Эти суда необходимы для замены одного (старого) тяжелого и одного среднего ледокола, находящихся в эксплуатации в настоящее время, что представляет собой значительный дефицит возможностей. Комендант USCG заявил, что программа ледокола может быть расширена, а корабли даже вооружены в ответ на усиление напряженности. Он также выступил с новым призывом ратифицировать Конвенцию ООН по морскому праву в поддержку претензий США на континентальный шельф в Арктике.
   ЭКОНОМИКА ОБОРОНЫ
   2018 финансовый год запрос оборонного бюджета
   Президент на 2018 ф.г. бюджет (PB2018) просил общую сумму $677.1 млрд на национальную оборону, включая $603 млд в базе дискреционного финансирования национальной обороны, $9,7 млрд в обязательные расходы и дополнительные $64.6 млрд. дискреционных дополнительного финансирования текущих военных расходов в заморские непредвиденные операции (OCO) счета. Если Конгресс были соответствующего финансирования на этот требуемому уровню, по оценкам FY2018 национальной обороны расходы составит $652.57 млрд. Расхождение между этой общей суммой и общей суммой просьб объясняется задержками между ассигнованиями, обязательствами и фактическими расходами средств.
   Министерство обороны получило бы $639 млд, или 95,7% от общего дискреционного финансирования, запрошенного в FY2018, а в США - $21.5 млрд. пойдет в Министерство энергетики на работу, связанную с ядерным оружием, а остальные $8,3 млрд пойдет на оборонные усилия Федерального Бюро Расследований и другими учреждениями. (Дискреционные расходы финансируются на основе ежегодных законов о ассигнованиях, в то время как обязательное финансирование санкционируется предыдущим статутным органом и тем самым присваивается автоматически.) Министерство обороны запросило дискреционное финансирование в размере $639 млрд, включая $574,5 млрд в базовом оборонном бюджете и $64,6 млрд. Общая запрос FY2018 включает $166 млд для армии США 183 млд для ВВС (который по традиции включает группировки расходов МО), $180 млрд для Военно-морского флота США и $110 млд. для обороны в масштабах расходов.
   диагр
   По словам министра обороны Джеймса Мэттиса, первым приоритетом бюджета на FY2018 является "восстановление готовности нынешних сил", а вторым - увеличение "потенциала и летальности". Таким образом, оборонный бюджет на FY2018 включает значительное увеличение по запросу администрации Обамы на финансирование операций и технического обслуживания ($21,3 млрд, или 8,5%), закупок ($11,9 млрд, или 10,7%) и исследований, разработок, испытаний и оценки (RDT&E) ($11,9 млрд, или 16,3%). Тем не менее, конгресс фактически выделил финансирование МО на более высоком уровне, чем запрос администрации Обамы на FY2017. В частности, Конгресс финансировал дополнительно $12 млрд для закупок, увеличение примерно на 10% по просьбе FY2017.
   Действительно, по сравнению с фактическими уровнями финансирования в FY2017, запрос FY2018 увеличит уровни финансирования более скромно, увеличив финансирование военного персонала на 5%, до $146 млд, для эксплуатации и обслуживания на 6,5%, до $271 млд, и для RDT&E на 11,3%, до $84.9 млд. Запрос FY2018 на $125 млд для закупок - это увеличение всего на $819 миллионов по сравнению с ассигнованиями Конгресса FY2017. Между тем, бюджет FY2018 смены дополнительных средств на боеприпасы, запчасти и детали, а также модификации воздушных судов, по сравнению с планом FY2018 в бюджете FY2017. В $639 млд в общей сложности дискреционного финансирования (включая базы и финансирования ОСО) просит на DoD для FY2018 увеличение 7% на общую сумму $597.2 млрд, выделенных на FY2017. Дополнительный рост силовой структуры и расходы на закупки ожидаются в запросе оборонного бюджета на FY2019 после запланированного завершения Национальной оборонной стратегии и Обзора ядерного потенциала в конце 2017 года. Предвидя оборонный бюджет FY2019, бюджет FY2018 функций частично как один год заполнитель, так как она лишена FY2019-FY2022 бюджетных лет, которые составляют будущих лет программы защиты.
   табл
   Оборонный бюджет FY2018 также включает $64.6 млрд в фонды OCO. С точки зрения преемственности с администрацией Обамы финансирование, испрашиваемое для каждой военной операции, очень близко соответствует суммам, испрашиваемым в FY2017. Бюджет FY2018 просит $45.9 млрд для операции "Страж свободы" в Афганистан для поддержки сил 8,448 американских войск, в том числе и нам $4.9 млрд долл. в подготовке и оснащении афганских сил безопасности и $1,3 млрд на поддержку коалиционных сил НАТО. Администрация Обамы запросила в общей сложности $46,2 млрд на эту операцию в FY2017, включая дополнительные $3,4 млрд, запрошенные в ноябре 2017 года для удержания 8400 американских войск в Афганистане вместо запланированного сокращения до 5500. Заявление президента Дональда Трампа в июле о том, что США повысят уровень своих сил в Афганистане, вероятно, потребует аналогичного уровня дополнительного финансирования. Бюджет на FY2018 также запрашивает $13 млрд на операцию "Неотъемлемая решимость" в Ираке и Сирии, включая поддержку 5675 американских войск в Ираке и $1,3 млрд на подготовку и оснащение иракских сил, а также $500 млн для проверенных сирийских оппозиционных сил. Европейская инициатива по заверению получит $4,8 млрд - увеличение на $1,4 млрд по сравнению с $3,4 млрд, запрошенным в FY2017, которое будет направлено на увеличение передового присутствия США и предварительное размещение оборудования армейской дивизии.
   Кампания Трампа обещала сделать наши вооруженные силы, такими большими, такими мощными, такими сильными, что никто - абсолютно никто - не шутите с нами, и администрация охарактеризовала FY2018 оборонно-бюджетный запрос как `историческое' повышение, мотивируя $603 млд запрос в базе национально-оборонного финансирования $52 млд, или 9,4%, увеличение от администрацию Обамы с просьбой за $551 млд в FY2017, а в $54 млрд, или 10%, рост выше $549 млд нас лимит на расходы национальной обороны для FY2018 установленный законом внесены изменения бюджетного контроля 2011 года.
   Тем не менее, запрос FY2018 является более скромным $18.5 млд, или 3%, Увеличение по сравнению с запланированными $584.5 млд в базовых дискреционных расходах на национальную оборону в FY2018, которые появились в запросе бюджета FY2017 на этот год. Год от года увеличение дискреционных национальных оборонных расходов на 10% и более имели место десять раз с FY1978, преимущественно в FY1979-FY1985 во время "холодной войны" Картера - Рейгана и в FY2001-FY2011 рост национальных расходов на оборону, связанных с войнами в Афганистане и Ираке.
   рис
   Предложение администрации Трампа в общей сложности $667 млд в дискреционных расходах на национальную оборону было критиковано законодателями, включая конгрессмена Мака Торнберри и сенатора Джона Маккейна, республиканских председателей комитетов по вооруженным силам Палаты представителей и Сената соответственно, как недостаточное для потребностей национальной безопасности США в меняющемся порядке международной безопасности. Разочарование в Конгрессе проявилось в увеличении запрошенного численности и расходов на оборону в версии FY2018 свидетельства и бюджета. Конгресс и Сенат приняли закон О Национальной авторизации обороны в ноябре 2017 года, утверждение ассигнований на сумму $700 млд. Тем не менее, BCA необходимо будет поднять, чтобы он прошел.
   Между тем, FY2018 Государственного департамента запрос на общую сумму $5,1 млрд в рамках программы иностранного военного финансирования (FMF) сохраняет предыдущий год уровни запросов для Израиля (объеме $3,1 млрд), Египет ($1,3 млрд) и Иорданию ($350 млн), но сокращает финансирование Пакистана (с $261 м до $100 млн). Для других стран запрос FMF на 2010 финансовый год включает нераспределенный пул прямой помощи FMF в размере $200 млн, сокращение на $593 млн. Это резкий прорыв в политике FMF со стороны администрации Обамы, которая в FY2017 запросила в общей сложности $703 млн в FMF для отдельных стран и регионов, в дополнение к финансированию для Египта, Израиля, Иордании и Пакистана, упомянутых выше.
   Продолжающиеся бюджетные неурядицы
   Как и каждый год начиная с FY2010, Министерство обороны начало FY2017 1 октября (2016) в соответствии с рядом продолжающихся резолюций, расширяя уровни финансирования на FY2016 до FY2017 с небольшой поправкой на инфляцию. Первая продолжающаяся резолюция, с 1 октября по 9 декабря 2016 года, отложила дебаты о национальной безопасности и внутреннем финансировании до окончания выборов в Конгресс и президента в ноябре 2016 года. Вторая резолюция, работающая с 9 декабря 2016 года по 28 апреля 2017 года, позволила входящей администрации Трампа повлиять на уровни финансирования обороны FY2017. В марте 2017 года администрация Трампа подала запрос на дополнительный $30 млд в FY2017, который считается "дополнительным". Это дополнительный запрос, в том числе $13,5 млрд в закупках финансирования, $8,2 млрд по эксплуатации и обслуживанию, $2 млрд для RDT&E и $1 млрд для военнослужащих, а общий FY2017 DoD запрос на $619 млд, включая $589 млд на бюджетное финансирование и $69.7 млрд. в ОСО финансирования. После третьей короткой продолжающейся резолюции конгресс принял законопроект об ассигнованиях на FY2017 5 мая 2017 года, 216 дней в финансовом году, завершив самый длинный период бюджетной неопределенности, с которым когда-либо сталкивалось МО. Окончательный уровень ассигнований на FY2017 составил $597 млрд для Министерства обороны, соответствовал уровням бюджета Конгресса и включал $15,4 млрд из запрошенных $30 млрд. дол в дополнительные ассигнования на "восстановление готовности".
   Разногласия между республиканцами и демократами в Конгрессе по поводу надлежащего баланса между оборонными и не оборонными расходами, уровня финансирования OCO и надлежащей структуры Вооруженных сил остаются нерешенными. Несмотря на широко распространенные надежды на быстрое прохождение FY2018 оборонных ассигнований законопроект, и явные призывы Маттиса и председателя Объединенного комитета начальников штабов генерала Джеймса Данфорда федеральное правительство и Минобороны в очередной раз начался финансовый год в рамках продолжающейся резолюции, которая продолжает FY2017 финансирования уровнях вплоть до 8 декабря 2017 года. В соответствии с этой "строгой" постоянной резолюцией МО запрещено начинать какие-либо новые программы или корректировать какие-либо темпы производства, что приводит к рассогласованию миллиардов долларов между уровнями бюджета FY2017 и запросом FY2018.
   Несмотря на широкий консенсус среди национальной безопасности для повышения национальных военных расходов, он остается ограниченным до FY2021 по шапки навязаны национальной обороны и необоронных дискреционных расходов государства на закон по бюджетному контролю 2011 года. Хотя Конгресс внес поправки в лимиты на каждый год на $9 млрд - $27 млрд в любой год, на момент написания статьи не было никакой сделки по их повышению или отмене на FY2010 или за его пределами. Последние предложения, как правило, касаются двух финансовых лет и воспитывали одинаково крыши для защиты и необоронных расходов, паритет демократы заявили, что будут настаивать на бюджетные FY2018 переговоров. Средняя сумма так называемого секвестра милосердия', $18.8 млрд., Треть из $54 млрд, запрашиваемых в бюджете FY2018. Финансирование OCO не зависит от этих ограничений расходов, но сопротивление со стороны республиканских фискальных консерваторов и демократов, добивающихся эквивалентного увеличения расходов на программы не обороны, ограничит объем финансирования обороны, который может быть направлен через OCO. Увеличение ограничений закона О бюджетном контроле требует либо согласия восьми сенаторов-демократов, либо эффективной ликвидации Законодательного флибустьера, одной из последних священных коров Сенатской процедуры. Ассигнования сверх предельных уровней без внесения поправок в сами предельные уровни приведут к секвестру, в результате чего финансирование всей оборонной деятельности автоматически сократится на четную долю, с тем чтобы довести общий объем расходов до предельного уровня. Несмотря на неопределенные перспективы ликвидации ограничений закона О бюджетном контроле и масштабы и потенциальную продолжительность наращивания оборонных расходов США, похоже, прошли Надир, который последовал за сокращением военных расходов в Афганистане и Ираке.
   Балансировка готовности, потенциала и возможностей высокого класса
   Готовность была постоянным мотивом в дебатах по оборонному бюджету США и структуре сил в течение последних нескольких лет. Многие высокопоставленные чиновники Пентагона и Конгресса описали "кризис готовности", в то время как Мэттис свидетельствовал перед Комитетом по вооруженным силам Сената, что он был "шокирован" эрозией готовности после секвестра FY2013. Вместе с тем повышение готовности стало своего рода универсальным термином для устранения недостатков в подготовке и техническом обслуживании и увеличения численности личного состава и кораблей и самолетов, с тем чтобы облегчить нагрузку на силы, а также поддержать нынешний уровень оперативного спроса, инвестировать в высококачественные возможности и модернизировать силы с учетом перспективы близкого противника.
   В марте 2017 года дополнительного запроса и FY2018 бюджетный запрос, в котором особое внимание уделяется восстановлению готовности, добавив финансирование армии высшего класса обучения и армия обучение сопряжения с партнерства учения с союзниками за рубежом, больше возможностей для судовых и авиационных обслуживающих депо, добавив в ВВС летчиков и ремонтников - численность персонала, и увеличения финансирования для монтажа технического обслуживания и ремонта.
   Укрепление потенциала Вооруженных сил является одним из основных направлений деятельности комитетов обороны Конгресса. Конгресс отклонил FY2017 планируемое сокращение армии до 450 000 военнослужащих, вместо добавления 16,000; увеличение морской пехоты на 3000, до 185000; ВВС на 4000, до 321,000; и запасных сил на 9800 всего до 813,200. Если они будут реализованы, FY2018 запросу администрации будет расти ВВС и на действительной службе в ВМС сил еще 4000 военнослужащих в каждой, в то время как Палата представителей и Сенат будет добавить дополнительных солдат для армии. Конгресс проявил аналогичную инициативность, добавив финансирование закупок ($12,2 млрд было добавлено к $112,2 млрд в запросе на закупки за FY2017) в целях укрепления структуры Вооруженных сил в краткосрочной перспективе, особенно для кораблей и самолетов, и модернизации наземных боевых машин армии. Однако существенное увеличение структуры сил требует крупных долгосрочных инвестиций. Увеличение численности ВМС до 355 кораблей, как это предусмотрено в оценке структуры сил в декабре 2016 года, потребует значительных новых средств. Смета на 340 и 350-корабельный флот варьируются от $23.6 млрд, и $26,6 млрд ежегодно в судостроении, в зависимости от состава флота, что значительно превышает ежегодные расходы в $19,7 млрд в FY2017 кораблестроительный план на 308-корабельный флот.
   Бюджет на FY2010 направляет дополнительные инвестиции в RDT&E в направлении высококачественных инновационных возможностей для решения новых задач конкуренции великих держав с Китаем и Россией; продолжение "третьего смещения" инвестиций в высокоскоростное ударное и направленное энергетическое оружие; скачкообразные улучшения в турбинных двигателях; радиоэлектронная война и повышение потенциала противодействия возможностям анти-доступа/отказа в зоне. В бюджете также испрашивается дополнительная сумма в размере $2,2 млрд для классифицированных программ на общую сумму $22,4 млрд, или 28% от общего объема финансирования НИОКР, при сохранении устойчивого роста финансирования НИОКР с FY2015. Кроме того, он добавляет финансирование к стимулированию инноваций, запрашивая $345 млн и $631 млн для перехода на использование новых технологий и передовых инновационных программ, соответственно, и увеличивает финансирование Управления стратегического потенциала с $902 млн до $1,2 млрд.
   Однако основная часть средств, выделяемых на НИОКР, направляется на программы, которые в настоящее время разрабатываются, или на совершенствование существующих систем. Более долгосрочная стратегическая и бюджетная задача будет заключаться в том, чтобы в достаточном количестве включить в состав сил новые силы. Например, ВВС пересмотрели свою количественную оценку для нового малозаметного бомбардировщика, находящегося в разработке, B-21 Raider, с 80-100 до не менее 100. Эти предполагаемые инвестиции в новые высокотехнологичные мощности добавят к закупочной "носовой волне" приобретаемых существующих систем, главным образом F-35 Lightning II, ударную подводную лодку класса Virginia, ракетный эсминец класса Arleigh Burke, заправочный танкер KC-46A Pegasus, боевой самолет F/A-18E/F Hornet и авианосцы класса Ford -крупнейшие программы закупок в течение следующих пяти лет.
   КАНАДА
   Канада выпустила обзор оборонной политики в июне 2017 года. Непосредственно перед этим министр иностранных дел Кристия Фриленд выступила с важной речью, в которой она обозначила несколько более прочную позицию в плане безопасности с новым акцентом на жесткую власть. Она также намекнула на несколько более свободные отношения с Соединенными Штатами, меньше полагаясь на зонтик безопасности США. Для Канады "выполнение нашей справедливой доли явно необходимо", сказала она, и "канадская дипломатия и развитие иногда требуют поддержки жесткой силы". Однако, имея такую возможность, Фриленд продолжала, "требует значительных инвестиций".
   В североамериканском контексте это будет означать ограниченную корректировку, учитывая интимность оборонных отношений США и Канады. Аналогичным образом, в то время как обзор оборонной политики переориентировал приоритеты в некоторых ключевых областях с новым акцентом на сдерживание и обязательства НАТО, например, был также сделан сильный акцент на преемственности, не в последнюю очередь в повторной приверженности некоторым давним закупкам. В рамках обзора оборонной политики правительство установило ориентиры для масштабов и видов военных операций, которые Канада могла бы предпринять в будущем. Помимо своих прямых национальных и НАТО обязательства, к ним относятся: два постоянных развертывания численностью 500-1500 человек, в том числе одно в качестве ведущей страны; одно ограниченное по времени (от шести до девяти месяцев) развертывание аналогичного масштаба; два небольших постоянных развертывания численностью 100-500 человек; два ограниченных по времени развертывания аналогичного масштаба; миссия по оказанию помощи в случае стихийных бедствий; и операция по эвакуации, не связанная с боевыми действиями.
   Хотя масштабы даже более крупных запланированных миссий являются относительно скромными, общая цель приверженности Канады делу обеспечения мира и стабильности представляется значительной. Для сравнения, в предыдущем обзоре 2008 года более расплывчато говорилось о приверженности руководству и/или проведению крупной международной операции в течение длительного периода времени и развертыванию сил в ответ на кризисы в других частях мира на более короткие периоды времени. В то время Канада на постоянной основе содержала в Афганистане около 2500 сотрудников.
   О трудностях и задержках, связанных с долгосрочными планами закупок Канады, свидетельствует тот факт, что некоторые из этих проектов в настоящее время носят "промежуточный" характер, с тем чтобы восполнить пробелы в потенциале. Планы по временной покупке истребителей для заполнения пробела в возможностях ВВС оказались в беспорядке из-за спора между Boeing и Оттавой после того, как американская фирма подала юридическую жалобу на канадскую фирму Bombardier. Канадское правительство, похоже, было близко к соглашению с Boeing о покупке 18 F/A-18E/F Super Hornet в дополнение к старым CF-18 Hornet ВВС. Lockheed Martin официально предложил F-35 Lightning II в качестве альтернативного временного истребителя. Однако перспективы этого и, действительно, шансы F-35 на выполнение окончательного требования Канады к 88 новым боевым самолетам остаются неопределенными.
   Проект C$670 млн (US$516 млн) для временного корабля снабжения ВМС, основанного на преобразованном корпусе торгового судна MV Asterix, должен увидеть судно, поставленное к концу 2017 года. Военно-морской флот в разное время полагался на помощь чилийского и испанского флотов для пополнения запасов с момента вывода HMCS Protecteur и HMCS Preserver. Новые корабли совместной поддержки (ранее известные как класс Queenston, но теперь переименованные в класс Protecteur и основанные на классе Berlin ВМС Германии) запланированы к поставке в 2021 и 2022 годах.
   Между тем, после вывода всех устаревших эсминцев класса Iroquois надводный флот ВМС понизил уровень. В Канаде 12 фрегатов Halifax -класса начали программу модернизации и продления жизни в 2010 году. Последнее из этих судов, вошедшее в программу, HMCS Toronto, завершило ремонт в ноябре 2016 года и должно было вернуться в оперативную службу только в начале 2018 года. В то время как обзор оборонной политики принял твердое обязательство в отношении 15 новых канадских надводных кораблей (предыдущее обязательство было "до 15"), череда проскальзываний в крайнем сроке торгов по контракту отодвинула завершение процесса с конца 2017 года на 2018 год. Однако строительство планируется начать `в начале 2020-х годов".
   Новый фокус озабоченности по поводу будущего военно-морского потенциала сосредоточен на долгосрочных планах подводных сил Канады. В соответствии с последними предложениями, планируется продолжить эксплуатацию и в середине 2020-х годов модернизировать нынешние четыре лодки класса Victoria, чтобы сохранить их в строю до середины 2030-х годов. Некоторые сомневаются в жизнеспособности этого плана, учитывая их возраст и пеструю историю. Тем не менее, возобновление стратегического внимания к Северной Атлантике и особенно разрыву между Гренландией, Исландией и Соединенным Королевством (для которого лодки тогдашнего класса были первоначально разработаны для Королевского флота Великобритании как очень тихие, глубоководные платформы) делают их ценными активами как для Канады, так и для НАТО, несмотря на опасения по поводу их оперативной доступности.
   Международные обязательства и обязательства
   Канада подверглась некоторой критике, не в последнюю очередь со стороны Вашингтона, в связи с рекордными расходами на оборону, в связи с чем в новом обзоре делается упор на усиление приверженности. Тем не менее Канада вносит значительный вклад в Альянс в качестве одной из четырех рамочных стран расширенного передового присутствия НАТО в странах Балтии. Канада возглавляет многонациональную боевую группу в Латвии, развернув около 450 военнослужащих, наряду с Албанией, Италией, Польшей, Словенией и Испанией. Кроме того, Канада временно развернула артиллерийскую батарею из 100 человек и четыре гаубицы M777 в Латвии для учений в 2017 году.
   С августа 2017 года Канада также предприняла новое ротационное развертывание в рамках миссии воздушной полиции НАТО с четырьмя CF-18 и 135 сотрудниками ВВС, базирующимися в Румынии в течение четырех месяцев, в то время как ВМС предоставляют фрегат одной из постоянных морских групп НАТО. Правительство также объявило, что продлит свою миссию по военной подготовке и наращиванию потенциала в Украине, начатую в 2014 году, до конца марта 2019 года.
   Правительство также продлило операцию Impact, вклад Канады в кампанию против Исламского государства, также известного как ИГИЛ, до марта 2019 года. Он значительно изменился по своему характеру в феврале 2016 года после того, как либеральная администрация приняла свое обещание прекратить канадские авиаудары и вывести свои силы CF-18, и стала миссией поддержки и обучения. Тем не менее, канадский персонал, включая силы специального назначения, участвовал в перестрелках на местах, что свидетельствует о большем боевом элементе, чем предполагает официальная характеристика.
   Кроме того, Канада продлила до конца апреля 2021 года свое обязательство периодически предоставлять силы коалиционной миссии по безопасности на море в Красном море, Аденском заливе, Оманском заливе и Индийском океане и вокруг них. В рамках операции Artemis канадские обязательства включают до 375 человек, фрегат класса Halifax -один раз в два года и самолет CP-140 Aurora - один раз в год.
   В 2017 IISS Шангри-Ла Диалог, министр национальной обороны Харджит Сингх Саджан также подчеркнул приверженность страны к взаимодействию обороны в Азиатско-Тихоокеанском регионе. Это включало двойное развертывание в Индо-Азиатско-Тихоокеанском регионе фрегатов HMCS Winnipeg и HMCS Ottawa в операции Poseidon Cutlass 17, которая длилась почти шесть месяцев. Несмотря на проблемы, стоящие перед военно-морским флотом в плане устойчивого развертывания, он также осуществил миссию присутствия и взаимодействия в Западной Африке с участием двух судов береговой обороны класса Kingston -первое канадское военное присутствие в регионе за десять лет.
   Военная экономика
   Канада столкнулась с критикой за появление в таблице Лиги оборонных трат НАТО, чуть выше 1% ВВП. Новое правительство настаивает на том, что оно привержено повышению расходов на оборону. Несмотря на это, бюджет по-прежнему прогнозируется достичь только 1,4% ВВП к 2024-25 годам, что все еще значительно ниже минимального целевого показателя НАТО в 2% (и это только из-за корректировки, позволяющей включать расходы на оборону из других департаментов, в консультации с НАТО).
   В новом обзоре обороны говорится, что бюджет Департамента национальной обороны, за исключением Департамента по делам ветеранов, увеличится в течение следующих десяти лет с C$17,1 млрд (US$13,2 млрд) в 2016-17 годах до C$24 млрд. В денежном выражении рост будет от C$18,9 млрд (US$14,5 млрд) до C$32,7 млрд (US$25.2 млрд.), или увеличение на 70%, по данным правительства, C$9,5 млрд (US$7,3 млрд) выше общего увеличения бюджета, планируемых 2027-28, под предварительно рассмотреть предложения. Однако ожидается, что после завершения крупных проектов объем денежных расходов существенно сократится.
   Возможно, более значительным, чем общий бюджетный прогноз, является ожидаемое значительное увеличение капитальных или закупочных расходов в процентах от бюджета. Это было поставлено на 10.84% в 2016-17 и было установлено для значительного роста до 19.42% в 2017-18, а затем для дальнейшего увеличения до 32.17% в 2024-25. Этот уровень значительно превысит целевой показатель НАТО в 20% оборонных расходов на основное оборудование.
   Если это произойдет, то это будет представлять собой серьезное изменение по сравнению с предыдущими обязательствами по закупкам, но готов ли оборонный бюджет и промышленная база поглотить что-то вроде утроения доли оборонных ресурсов, выделяемых на капитальные программы, менее чем за десятилетие-это другой вопрос. Важно отметить, что в обзоре оборонной политики говорилось о проведении реформ по рационализации процесса закупок с целью сокращения времени утверждения департаментов на 50%.
   Основные вопросы закупок по-прежнему связаны с программами рекапитализации военно-воздушных и военно-морских сил. Нынешнее правительство вернулось к планам предыдущей администрации купить 65 F-35As для замены существующих CF-18 ВВС. Вместо этого он пообещал провести открытый конкурс на новые истребители, требование теперь поставлено на 88 самолетов, хотя Канада осталась частью производственного консорциума F-35.
   Между тем, полные последствия, которые торговый спор с Boeing может иметь для запланированной промежуточной покупки 18 Super Hornet, оказались неопределенными. Хотя Госдеп США одобрил потенциальную продажу в сентябре, сделка по существу застопорилась из-за спора. Канадское правительство заявило в ноябре 2016 года, что возраст существующего флота означает, что он не может выполнить свои обязательства североамериканского командования аэрокосмической обороны для самолетов, готовых к полету.
   Между тем, в ноябре 2016 года правительство объявило, что оно выбрало Airbus C295W для выполнения своих будущих поисково-спасательных требований по контракту C$2.4 млд (US$1.8 млд).
   Продолжающиеся отсрочки сроков проведения торгов для будущего канадского надводного корабля ВМС произошли на фоне новой и значительно более высокой сметы расходов по программе. Бюджет был объявлен в C$26.2 млрд (US$20.2 млрд) в 2008 году. Однако в июне 2017 года парламентское бюджетное управление подсчитало, что в 2008 году оно выросло, с поправкой на инфляцию, до C$61,82 млрд (US$47,6 млрд), что в 2,4 раза выше первоначальной цены (и эквивалентно C$40 млрд (US$30,8 млрд) в 2017 году), хотя оно также признало, что его оценки включают 20% погрешности и зависят от окончательного размера и спецификации судов.
   Среди других военно-морских программ Квебекская верфь Chantier Davie, отвечающая за поставку судна для временного пополнения запасов, также представила предложение по удовлетворению будущих потребностей Канады в ледоколах на основе преобразования двух классов коммерческих ледоколов.

   CANADA
    []
   Capabilities
   The government has sought to emphasise its commitments to NATO and North American defence, and also its enhanced support and training role in the coalition against ISIS following Canada's withdrawal from combat air operations. A major defence-policy review published in June 2017 promised to increase regular and reserve forces. It also pledged to finally deliver on a range of delayed procurements aimed at making the services more suitable to future operations, with particular enhancements to cyber and intelligence capabilities. The review raised the target for a new-generation fighter to 88 aircraft, but a trade dispute with Boeing appeared to stall an interim buy of the F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Spending cuts in recent years have particularly affected the procurement schedules of major programmes, sustainment, readiness and the maintenance of forces, but the navy moved to fill the gap in afloat-tanker support with the expected delivery of an interim auxiliary (a converted container ship) in 2018, pending the arrival of the new Protecteur class in 2021. Repeated delays in the procurement process for the new surface combatant, however, raised doubts about the schedule for that programme. Canada's leadership of a NATO battle group in Latvia, as part of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence, to which it contributed 450 troops, underscored a continuing capability to deploy medium-sized formations. Canada is also sustaining a frigate deployment to NATO maritime forces in Europe. The deployment of two frigates to the Asia-Pacific region displayed an increased desire to maintain influence there. (See pp. 39-42.)
Потенциал
Правительство стремилось подчеркнуть свои обязательства перед НАТО и североамериканской обороной, а также свою более активную роль в поддержке и подготовке коалиции против ИГИЛ после ухода Канады из боевых воздушных операций. Крупный обзор оборонной политики, опубликованный в июне 2017 года, обещал увеличить регулярные и резервные силы. Она также обязалась, наконец, осуществить ряд задержанных закупок, направленных на то, чтобы сделать эти услуги более пригодными для будущих операций, с особым повышением кибернетического и разведывательного потенциала. Обзор поднял численность истребителей нового поколения до 88 самолетов, но торговый спор с Boeing, похоже, приостановил временную покупку F/A-18E/F Super Hornet. Сокращение расходов в последние годы особенно повлияло на графики закупок основных программ, обеспечения, готовности и поддержания сил, но ВМС перешли к заполнению пробела в поддержке на плаву танкеров с ожидаемой поставкой временного вспомогательного (преобразованного контейнерного судна) в 2018 году, в ожидании прибытия нового класса Protecteur в 2021 году. Однако неоднократные задержки в процессе закупок нового надводного боевого корабля вызывают сомнения в отношении графика осуществления этой программы. Руководство Канадой боевой группой НАТО в Латвии в рамках расширенного передового присутствия НАТО, в которое она предоставила 450 военнослужащих, подчеркнуло сохраняющуюся способность развертывать формирования среднего размера. Канада также поддерживает развертывание фрегатов в составе морских сил НАТО в Европе. Развертывание двух фрегатов в Азиатско-Тихоокеанском регионе продемонстрировало возросшее желание сохранить там свое влияние. (См. стр. 39-42.)

ACTIVE 63,000 (Army 34,800 Navy 8,300 Air Force 19,900) Paramilitary 4,500
RESERVE 30,000 (Army 23,450 Navy 4,600 Air 1,950)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES SPACE SURVEILLANCE 1 Sapphire

Army 34,800
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Mechanised
   1 (1st) mech bde gp (1 armd regt, 2 mech inf bn, 1 lt inf bn, 1 arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt, 1 log bn)
   2 (2nd & 5th) mech bde gp (1 armd recce regt, 2 mech inf bn, 1 lt inf bn, 1 arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt, 1 log bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 engr regt
   3 MP pl
AIR DEFENCE
   1 SAM regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 82: 42 Leopard 2A4 (trg role); 20 Leopard 2A4M (being upgraded); 20 Leopard 2A6M (61 Leopard 1C2 in store)
   RECCE ~120 LAV-25 Coyote
   IFV 635: 226 LAV-III Kodiak (incl 33 RWS); 409 LAV 6.0;
   APC 443
   APC (T) 268: 235 M113; 33 M577 (CP)
   APC (W) 175 LAV Bison (incl 10 EW, 32 amb, 32 repair, 64 recovery)
   AUV 245: 7 Cougar; 238 TAPV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 8: 5 Buffalo; 3 Leopard 2 AEV
   ARV 13: 2 BPz-3 Buffel; 11 Leopard 2 ARV
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   RCL 84mm 1,075 Carl Gustav
ARTILLERY 287
   TOWED 163 105mm 126: 98 C3 (M101); 28 LG1 MkII; 155mm 37 M777
   MOR 124: 81mm 100; SP 81mm 24 LAV Bison
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES ISR Light Skylark
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence Starburst

Reserve Organisations 23,450
Canadian Rangers 5,000 Reservists
Provide a limited military presence in Canada's northern, coastal and isolated areas. Sovereignty, public-safety and surveillance roles
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE
   Other
   5 (patrol) ranger gp (187 patrols)

Army Reserves 18,450 Reservists
Most units have only coy-sized establishments
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   10 bde gp HQ
MANOEUVRE
   Reconnaissance
   18 recce regt (sqn)
   Light
   51 inf regt (coy)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   16 fd arty regt (bty)
   3 indep fd arty bty
   10 cbt engr regt (coy)
   1 EW regt (sqn)
   4 int coy
   10 sigs regt (coy)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   10 log bn (coy)
   3 MP coy

Royal Canadian Navy 8,300; 4,600 reserve (12,900 total)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES SSK 4:
   4 Victoria (ex-UK Upholder) with 6 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT (3 currently non-operational)
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS FRIGATES
   FFGHM 12:
   12 Halifax with 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84 Block II Harpoon AShM, 2 octuple Mk48 VLS with RIM-7P Sea Sparrow SAM/RIM-162 ESSM SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Phalanx CIWS, 1 57mm gun (capacity 1 SH-3 (CH-124) Sea King ASW hel)
   (rolling modernisation programme until 2017)
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES MCO 12 Kingston
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 10
   AGOR 1 Quest
   AX 9: AXL 8 Orca; AXS 1 Oriole

Reserves 4,600 reservists 24 units tasked with crewing 10 of the 12 MCOs, harbour defence & naval control of shipping

Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) 19,900
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   4 sqn with F/A-18A/B Hornet (CF-18AM/BM)
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   2 sqn with SH-3 Sea King (CH-124)
MARITIME PATROL
   2 sqn with P-3 Orion (CP-140 Aurora)
SEARCH & RESCUE/TRANSPORT
   4 sqn with AW101 Merlin (CH-149 Cormorant); C-130E/H/H-30/J-30 (CC-130) Hercules
   1 sqn with DHC-5 (CC-115) Buffalo
TANKER/TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with A310/A310 MRTT (CC-150/CC-150T)
   1 sqn with KC-130H
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-17A (CC-177) Globemaster
   1 sqn with CL-600 (CC-144B)
   1 (utl) sqn with DHC-6 (CC-138) Twin Otter
TRAINING
   1 sqn with F/A-18A/B Hornet (CF-18AM/BM)
   1 sqn with P-3 Orion (CP-140 Aurora)
   1 sqn with SH-3 Sea King (CH-124)
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   5 sqn with Bell 412 (CH-146 Griffon)
   3 (cbt spt) sqn with Bell 412 (CH-146 Griffon)
   1 (Spec Ops) sqn with Bell 412 (CH-146 Griffon - OPCON Canadian Special Operations Command)
   1 sqn with CH-47F (CH-147F) Chinook
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 95 combat capable
   FGA 77: 59 F/A-18A (CF-18AM) Hornet; 18 F/A-18B (CF-18BM) Hornet
   ASW 18 P-3 Orion (CP-140M Aurora)
   TKR/TPT 7: 2 A310 MRTT (CC-150T); 5 KC-130H
   TPT 59: Heavy 5 C-17A (CC-177) Globemaster III;
   Medium 35: 10 C-130E (CC-130) Hercules; 6 C-130H (CC-130) Hercules; 2 C-130H-30 (CC-130) Hercules; 17 C-130J-30 (CC-130) Hercules;
   Light 10: 6 DHC-5 (CC-115) Buffalo; 4 DHC-6 (CC-138) Twin Otter; PAX 9: 3 A310 (CC-150 Polaris); 6 CL-600 (CC-144B/C)
   TRG 4 DHC-8 (CT-142)
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 37: 26 SH-3 (CH-124) Sea King; 11 CH-148 Cyclone
   MRH 68 Bell 412 (CH-146 Griffon)
   TPT 29: Heavy 15 CH-47F (CH-147F) Chinook; Medium 14 AW101 Merlin (CH-149 Cormorant)
RADARS 53
AD RADAR NORTH WARNING SYSTEM 47: 11 AN/FPS-117 (range 200nm); 36 AN/FPS-124 (range 80nm)
STRATEGIC 6: 4 Coastal; 2 Transportable
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   ASM AGM-65 Maverick
   AAM IR AIM-9L Sidewinder; SARH AIM-7M Sparrow
   ARH AIM-120C AMRAAM
BOMBS
   Laser-guided: GBU-10/GBU-12/GBU-16 Paveway II; GBU-24 Paveway III

NATO Flight Training Canada
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   TRG 45: 26 T-6A Texan II (CT-156 Harvard II); 19 Hawk 115 (CT-155) (advanced wpns/tactics trg)

Contracted Flying Services - Southport
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   TPT Light 7 Beech C90B King Air
   TRG 11 G-120A
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 9 Bell 412 (CH-146)
   TPT Light 7 Bell 206 Jet Ranger (CH-139)

Canadian Special Operations Forces Command 1,500
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF regt (Canadian Special Operations Regiment)
   1 SF unit (JTF 2)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 CBRN unit (Canadian Joint Incident Response Unit - CJIRU)
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 (spec ops) sqn, with Bell 412 (CH-146 Griffon - from the RCAF)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
   NBC VEHICLES 4 LAV Bison NBC
HELICOPTERS MRH 10 Bell 412 (CH-146 Griffon)

Canadian Forces Joint Operational Support Group
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 engr spt coy
   1 (close protection) MP coy
   1 (joint) sigs regt
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 (spt) log unit
   1 (movement) log unit

Paramilitary 4,500

Canadian Coast Guard 4,500
Incl Department of Fisheries and Oceans; all platforms are designated as non-combatant
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 67
   PSOH 1 Leonard J Cowley
   PSO 1 Sir Wilfred Grenfell (with hel landing platform)
   PCO 13: 2 Cape Roger; 1 Gordon Reid; 9 Hero; 1 Tanu
   PCC 1 Harp
   PB 51: 1 Post; 1 Quebecois; 1 Vakta; 10 Type-300A; 36 Type-300B; 1 S. Dudka; 1 Simmonds (on loan from RCMP)
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT UCAC 4 Type-400
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 43
   ABU 7
   AG 4
   AGB 15
   AGOR 9 (coastal and offshore fishery vessels)
   AGOS 8
HELICOPTERS TPT 37: Medium 1 S-61; Light 36: 3 Bell 206L Long Ranger; 4 Bell 212; 15 Bell 429; 14 Bo-105

Royal Canadian Mounted Police
In addition to the below, the RCMP also operates more than 370 small boats under 10 tonnes
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PB 3: 1 Inkster; 2 Nadon

Cyber
In June 2017, Canada's defence-policy review said that Canada `will develop the capability to conduct active cyber operations focused on external threats to Canada in the context of government-authorized military missions'. This was because a `purely defensive' cyber posture was `no longer sufficient'. In November 2017, the first transferees were stood up in the new `cyber operator' role; civilian recruitment will start in 2018 and reservist recruitment in 2019. Canada published a cyber-security strategy in October 2010 and an action plan on implementation in 2013. The Canadian Forces Network Operation Centre is the `national operational cyber defence unit' permanently assigned to support Canadian forces' operations. The armed forces' Information Management Group (IMG) is responsible for electronic warfare and network defence. The Canadian Force Information Operations Group, under the IMG, commands the Canadian Forces Information Operations Group Headquarters; the Canadian Forces Electronic Warfare Centre; the Canadian Forces Network Operation Centre, which is the `national operational cyber defence unit' permanently assigned to support Canadian Forces operations; and other units.
Кибер
В июне 2017 года в обзоре оборонной политики Канады говорилось, что Канада "будет развивать способность проводить активные кибер операции, ориентированные на внешние угрозы Канаде в контексте санкционированных правительством военных миссий". Это было потому, что "чисто оборонительная" кибер позиция была "уже недостаточной". В ноябре 2017 года в новой роли "кибер оператора" были выставлены первые кандидаты; гражданский набор начнется в 2018 году, а набор резервистов в 2019 году. Канада опубликовала Стратегию кибербезопасности в октябре 2010 года и план действий по ее реализации в 2013 году. Оперативный центр сети канадских сил является "национальным оперативным подразделением кибер защиты", постоянно назначаемым для поддержки операций канадских сил. Ответственность за ведение радиоэлектронной борьбы и сетевую оборону несет группа по управлению информацией вооруженных сил (IMG). Группа канадских сил по информационным операциям, действующая под руководством IMG, командует штабом группы канадских сил по информационным операциям; центром радиоэлектронной борьбы канадских сил; оперативный центр сети канадских сил, который является "национальным оперативным подразделением кибер защиты", постоянно назначаемым для поддержки операций канадских сил; и другие подразделения.

DEPLOYMENT
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 1
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 3
CARIBBEAN: Operation Caribbe 1 MCO
CYPRUS: UN UNFICYP (Operation Snowgoose) 1
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO (Operation Crocodile) 8
EGYPT: MFO (Operation Calumet) 70; 1 MP team
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve (Impact) 280; 1 SF trg gp; 1 med unit; 1 hel flt with 4 Bell 412 (CH-146 Griffon) hel
KUWAIT: Operation Inherent Resolve (Impact) 1 P-3 Orion (CP-140M); 1 A310 MRTT (C-150T); 1 C-130J-30 Hercules (CC-130J)
LATVIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence (Operation Reassurance) 450; 1 mech inf bn HQ; 1 mech inf coy(+)
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 1: 1 FFGHM
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO (Operation Jade) 4 obs
PACIFIC OCEAN: Operation Caribbe 1 MCO
ROMANIA: NATO Air Policing 135; 4 F/A-18A Hornet (CF-18)
SERBIA: NATO KFOR Joint Enterprise (Operation Kobold) 6; OSCE Kosovo 5
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS (Operation Soprano) 5; 5 obs
UKRAINE: Operation Unifier 200; OSCE Ukraine 22
UNITED STATES: Operation Renaissance 1 C-17A Globemaster III (C-177A)

FOREIGN FORCES
United Kingdom 370; 1 trg unit; 1 hel flt with SA341 Gazelle
United States 150

   UNITED STATES
    []


Capabilities
The US remains the world's most capable military power. Its forces are well trained and uniquely designed for power projection and intervention on a global scale across the full spectrum of operations. However, the arrival of a new administration has led to a recalibration of key strategic directions. The Pentagon has been working on a new national-defence strategy that is likely to address the US global role in an era of diminishing Western technological advantage. A new Nuclear Posture Review seems likely to retain the triad, but could adjust aspects of the very ambitious and costly nuclear-modernisation programme. The previous administration's plans for a `rebalance' to the Asia-Pacific have continued, against the backdrop of increased tensions over North Korea. US forces have shown their power-projection capabilities on a number of occasions. A ballistic-missile-defence review was also under way. However, the Pentagon remains concerned with continuing global instability in the form of transnational, hybrid and regional insurgencies; China's military modernisation; increasing Russian assertiveness; and tackling ISIS in Iraq and Syria. In August, the US increased its commitment of combat forces in Afghanistan as part of a renewed strategy. Congress backed a US$700 bn National Defense Authorisation Act, but funding for this remained uncertain. Readiness remains a major concern, with senior Pentagon officials warning of continuing significant shortfalls in terms of being ready to engage in high-intensity combat against a peer competitor. The fatal collisions suffered by the US Navy in the western Pacific underscored those concerns. Readiness, retention and equipment recapitalisation are also priorities for the army. As of the first half of 2017, senior military officials were concerned that against a peer or near-peer competitor, the army could soon risk being `outgunned, outranged and outdated' unless key modernisation programmes are adequately funded. President Trump has also initiated a defence-industrial-base study to identify key vulnerabilities. At the same time, while the administration's first defence-budget request continued the focus on innovation to sustain technological advantage - a theme of the previous government - there remained less clarity on its view towards the `Third Offset'. The US continues active development of its defensive and offensive cyber capabilities. (See pp. 27-39.)
Потенциал
США остаются самой способной военной державой в мире. Их силы хорошо обучены и уникально разработаны для применения силы и вмешательства в глобальном масштабе по всему спектру операций. Однако появление новой администрации привело к пересмотру ключевых стратегических направлений. Пентагон работает над новой стратегией национальной обороны, которая, вероятно, будет учитывать глобальную роль США в эпоху уменьшения западных технологических преимуществ. Новый Обзор ядерного потенциала, по-видимому, сохранит триаду, но может скорректировать аспекты весьма амбициозной и дорогостоящей программы ядерной модернизации. Планы предыдущей администрации по "перебалансировке" Азиатско-Тихоокеанского региона продолжались на фоне усиления напряженности в отношении Северной Кореи. Вооруженные силы США неоднократно демонстрировали свои возможности по применению силы. Проводится также обзор системы противоракетной обороны. Однако Пентагон по-прежнему обеспокоен сохраняющейся глобальной нестабильностью в форме транснациональных, гибридных и региональных мятежей; Военная модернизация Китая; повышение Российской самоуверенности; и борьба с ИГИЛ в Ираке и Сирии. В августе США увеличили свою приверженность боевым силам в Афганистане в рамках обновленной стратегии. Конгресс поддержал разрешение $700 млрд на национальную оборону, но финансирование этого остается неопределенным. Готовность по-прежнему вызывает серьезную озабоченность, поскольку старшие должностные лица Пентагона предупреждают о продолжающихся значительных недостатках с точки зрения готовности участвовать в интенсивной борьбе против равного конкурента. Фатальные столкновения, от которых пострадали ВМС США в западной части Тихого океана, подчеркнули эту озабоченность. Готовность, удержание и реконструкция техники также являются приоритетами для армии. По состоянию на первую половину 2017 года старшие военные чиновники были обеспокоены тем, что против равного или близкого конкурента армия вскоре может рисковать быть "безоружной, отставшей и устаревшей", если ключевые программы модернизации не будут должным образом финансироваться. Президент Трамп также инициировал исследование оборонно-промышленной базы для выявления ключевых уязвимостей. В то же время, хотя в первом запросе администрации в отношении оборонного бюджета основное внимание по-прежнему уделялось инновациям в целях сохранения технологических преимуществ - теме предыдущего правительства, - его мнение относительно "третьего зачета" оставалось менее ясным. США продолжают активное развитие своих оборонительных и наступательных кибер возможностей. (См. с. 27-39.)

ACTIVE 1,348,400 (Army 476,250 Navy 323,950 Air Force 322,800 US Marine Corps 184,400 US Coast Guard 41,000)
RESERVE 857,950 (Army 537,900 Navy 100,550 Air Force 174,450 Marine Corps Reserve 38,700 US Coast Guard 6,350)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

US Strategic Command
HQ at Offutt AFB (NE). Five missions: US nuclear deterrent; missile defence; global strike; info ops; ISR

US Navy
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES STRATEGIC SSBN
   14 Ohio SSBN with up to 24 UGM-133A Trident D-5/D-5LE nuclear SLBM, 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
US Air Force Global Strike Command
FORCES BY ROLE
MISSILE
   9 sqn with LGM-30G Minuteman III
BOMBER
   6 sqn (incl 1 AFRC) with B-52H Stratofortress (+1 AFRC sqn personnel only)
   2 sqn with B-2A Spirit (+1 ANG sqn personnel only)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SURFACE-TO-SURFACE MISSILE LAUNCHERS
   ICBM Nuclear 400 LGM-30G Minuteman III (1 Mk12A or Mk21 re-entry veh per missile)
AIRCRAFT
   BBR 90: 20 B-2A Spirit; 70 B-52H Stratofortress
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   ALCM Nuclear AGM-86B

Strategic Defenses - Early Warning
North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) - a combined US-CAN org
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
RADAR
NORTH WARNING SYSTEM 50: 14 AN/FPS-117 (range 200nm); 36 AN/FPS-124 (range 80nm)
SOLID STATE PHASED ARRAY RADAR SYSTEM (SSPARS) 5:
   2 AN/FPS-123 Early Warning Radar located at Cape Cod AFS (MA) and Clear AFS (AK);
   3 AN/FPS-132 Upgraded Early Warning Radar located at Beale AFB (CA), Thule (GL) and Fylingdales Moor (UK)
SPACETRACK SYSTEM 10: 1 AN/FPS-85 Spacetrack Radar at Eglin AFB (FL);
   6 contributing radars at Cavalier AFS (ND), Clear (AK), Thule (GL), Fylingdales Moor (UK), Beale AFB (CA) and Cape Cod (MA);
   3 Spacetrack Optical Trackers located at Socorro (NM), Maui (HI), Diego Garcia (BIOT)
PERIMETER ACQUISITION RADAR ATTACK CHARACTERISATION SYSTEM (PARCS) 1 AN/FPQ-16 at Cavalier AFS (ND)
DETECTION AND TRACKING RADARS 5 located at Kwajalein Atoll, Ascension Island, Australia, Kaena Point (HI), MIT Lincoln Laboratory (MA)
GROUND BASED ELECTRO OPTICAL DEEP SPACE SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM (GEODSS) Socorro (NM), Maui (HI), Diego Garcia (BIOT)
STRATEGIC DEFENCES - MISSILE DEFENCES
   SEA-BASED: Aegis engagement cruisers and destroyers
   LAND-BASED: 40 ground-based interceptors at Fort Greely (AK); 4 ground-based interceptors at Vandenburg AFB (CA)

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES 134
   COMMUNICATIONS 42: 3 AEHF; 6 DSCS-III; 2 Milstar-I; 3 Milstar-II; 5 MUOS; 1 PAN-1 (P360); 5 SDS-III; 2 SDS-IV; 6 UFO; 9 WGS SV2
   NAVIGATION/POSITIONING/TIMING 31: 12 NAVSTAR Block IIF; 19 NAVSTAR Block IIR/IIRM
   METEOROLOGY/OCEANOGRAPHY 6 DMSP-5
   ISR 15: 4 FIA Radar; 5 Evolved Enhanced/Improved Crystal (visible and infrared imagery); 2 Lacrosse (Onyx radar imaging satellite);
   1 NRO L-76; 1 ORS-1; 1 TacSat-4; 1 TacSat-6
   ELINT/SIGINT 27: 2 Mentor (advanced Orion); 3 Advanced Mentor; 4 Mercury; 1 NRO L-67; 1 Trumpet; 4 Improved Trumpet;
   12 SBWASS (Space Based Wide Area Surveillance System; Naval Ocean Surveillance System)
   SPACE SURVEILLANCE 6: 4 GSSAP; 1 SBSS (Space Based Surveillance System); 1 ORS-5
   EARLY WARNING 7: 4 DSP; 3 SBIRS Geo-1

US Army 476,250
FORCES BY ROLE
Sqn are generally bn sized and tp are generally coy sized
COMMAND
   3 (I, III & XVIII AB) corps HQ
   1 (2nd) inf div HQ
SPECIAL FORCES (see USSOCOM)
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
   1 (1st) armd div (2 (2nd & 3rd ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn);
   1 (1st SBCT) mech bde (1 armd recce sqn, 3 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 MRL bde HQ; 1 log bde; 1 (hy cbt avn) hel bde)
   1 (1st) cav div (3 (1st-3rd ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 MRL bde (1 MRL bn);
   1 log bde; 1 (hy cbt avn) hel bde)
   1 (1st) inf div (2 (1st & 2nd ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 log bde; 1 (cbt avn) hel bde)
   1 (3rd) inf div (2 (1st & 2nd ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 lt inf bn; 1 MRL bde HQ;
   1 log bde; 1 (cbt avn) hel bde)
Mechanised
   1 (4th) inf div (1 (3rd ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn);
   1 (1st SBCT) mech bde (1 armd recce sqn, 3 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn);
   1 (2nd IBCT) lt inf bde (1 recce sqn, 3 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 MRL bde HQ; 1 log bde; 1 (hy cbt avn) hel bde)
   1 (7th) inf div (2 (1st & 2nd SBCT, 2nd ID) mech bde (1 armd recce sqn, 3 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn))
   1 (1st SBCT, 25th ID) mech bde (1 armd recce sqn, 3 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
   2 (2nd & 3rd CR) mech bde (1 armd recce sqn, 3 mech sqn, 1 arty sqn, 1 cbt engr sqn, 1 CSS sqn)
Light
   1 (10th Mtn) inf div (3 (1st-3rd IBCT) lt inf bde (1 recce sqn, 3 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 log bde; 1 (cbt avn) hel bde)
   1 (25th) inf div (2 (2 & 3rd IBCT) inf bde (1 recce sqn, 2 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 log bde; 1 (cbt avn) hel bde)
   1 (Sy Force Assist) inf bde(-)
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (82nd) AB div (3 (1st-3rd AB BCT) AB bde (1 recce bn, 3 para bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 (cbt avn) hel bde; 1 log bde)
   1 (101st) air aslt div (3 (1st-3rd AB BCT) AB bde (1 recce bn, 3 para bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn); 1 (cbt avn) hel bde; 1 log bde)
   1 (173rd AB BCT) AB bde (1 recce bn, 2 para bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
   1 (4th AB BCT, 25th ID) AB bde (1 recce bn, 2 para bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
Other
   1 (11th ACR) trg armd cav regt (OPFOR) (2 armd cav sqn, 1 CSS bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   3 MRL bde (2 MRL bn)
   1 MRL bde (4 MRL bn)
   4 engr bde
   2 EOD gp (2 EOD bn)
   10 int bde
   2 int gp
   4 MP bde
   1 NBC bde
   3 (strat) sigs bde
   4 (tac) sigs bde
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   2 log bde
   3 med bde
   1 tpt bde
HELICOPTER
   2 (cbt avn) hel bde
   1 (cbt avn) hel bde HQ
AIR DEFENCE
   5 SAM bde

Reserve Organisations

Army National Guard 343,600 reservists
Normally dual-funded by DoD and states. Civilemergency responses can be mobilised by state governors. Federal government can mobilise ARNG for major domestic emergencies and for overseas operations
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   8 div HQ
SPECIAL FORCES
(see USSOCOM)
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 armd recce sqn
Armoured
   3 (ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
   1 (ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
   1 (ABCT) armd bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt spt bn, 1 CSS bn)
   1 armd bn
Mechanised
   2 (SBCT) mech bde (1 armd recce sqn, 3 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
Light
   7 (IBCT) lt inf bde (1 recce sqn, 3 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
   1 (IBCT) lt inf bde (2 recce sqn, 2 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt spt bn, 1 CSS bn)
   8 (IBCT) lt inf bde (1 recce sqn, 2 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 CSS bn)
   4 (IBCT) lt inf bde (1 recce sqn, 2 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 cbt spt bn, 1 CSS bn)
   8 lt inf bn
Air Manoeuvre
   1 AB bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   8 arty bde
   1 SP arty bn
   8 engr bde
   1 EOD regt
   3 int bde
   3 MP bde
   1 NBC bde
   2 (tac) sigs bde
   18 (Mnv Enh) cbt spt bde
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   10 log bde
   17 (regional) log spt gp
HELICOPTER
   8 (cbt avn) hel bde
   5 (theatre avn) hel bde
AIR DEFENCE
   3 SAM bde

Army Reserve 194,300 reservists
Reserve under full command of US Army. Does not have state-emergency liability of Army National Guard
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
(see USSOCOM)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   4 engr bde
   4 MP bde
   2 NBC bde
   2 sigs bde
   3 (Mnv Enh) cbt spt bde
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   9 log bde
   11 med bde
HELICOPTER
   1 (theatre avn) hel bde

Army Stand-by Reserve 700 reservists
Trained individuals for mobilization

EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 2,384: 775 M1A1 SA Abrams; 1,609 M1A2 SEPv2 Abrams (~3,500 more M1A1/A2 Abrams in store)
   ASLT 134 M1128 Stryker MGS
   RECCE 1,745: ~1,200 M3A2/A3 Bradley; 545 M1127 Stryker RV (~800 more M3 Bradley in store)
   IFV 2,834: ~2,500 M2A2/A3 Bradley; 334 M7A3/SA BFIST (OP) (~2,000 more M2 Bradley in store)
   APC 10,746
   APC (T) ~5,000 M113A2/A3 (~8,000 more in store)
   APC (W) 2,812: 1,972 M1126 Stryker ICV; 348 M1130 Stryker CV (CP); 188 M1131 Stryker FSV (OP); 304 M1133 Stryker MEV (Amb)
   PPV 2,934: 2,633 MaxxPro Dash; 301 MaxxPro LWB (Amb)
   AUV 9,016: 2,900 M1117 ASV; 465 M1200 Armored Knight (OP); 5,651 M-ATV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 531: 113 M1 ABV; 250 M9 ACE; 168 M1132 Stryker ESV
   ARV 1,110+: 360 M88A1; 750 M88A2 (~1,000 more M88A1 in store); some M578
   VLB 60: 20 REBS; 40 Wolverine HAB
   MW 3+: Aardvark JSFU Mk4; 3+ Hydrema 910 MCV-2; M58/M59 MICLIC; M139; Rhino
   NBC VEHICLES 234 M1135 Stryker NBCRV
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP 1,133: 133 M1134 Stryker ATGM; ~1,000 M1167 HMMWV TOW
   MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin
ARTILLERY 5,393
   SP 155mm 947: 900 M109A6; 47 M109A7 (~500 more M109A6 in store)
   TOWED 1,339: 105mm 821 M119A2/3; 155mm 518 M777A2
   MRL 227mm 600: 375 M142 HIMARS; 225 M270A1 MLRS
   MOR 2,507: 81mm 990 M252; 120mm 1,076 M120/M1064A3; SP 120mm 441 M1129 Stryker MC
SURFACE-TO-SURFACE MISSILE LAUNCHERS
   SRBM Conventional MGM-140A/B ATACMS; MGM-168 ATACMS (All launched from M270A1 MLRS or M142 HIMARS MRLs)
RADAR LAND 209+: 98 AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder (arty); 56 AN/TPQ-37 Firefinder (arty); 55 AN/TPQ-53 (arty); AN/MLQ-40 Prophet;
   AN/MLQ-44 Prophet Enhanced
AMPHIBIOUS 116
PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS 8
   LSL 8 Frank Besson (capacity 15 Abrams MBT)
LANDING CRAFT 70
   LCU 34 LCU-2000
   LCM 36 LCM 8 (capacity either 1 MBT or 200 troops)
AIRCRAFT
   ISR 19: 14 RC-12X Guardrail; 5 RC-12 Guardrail (trg)
   ELINT 8: 5 EO-5C ARL-M (COMINT/ELINT); 2 EO-5B ARL-C (COMINT); 1 TO-5C (trg)
   TPT 156: Light 152: 113 Beech A200 King Air (C-12 Huron); 28 Cessna 560 Citation (UC-35A/B); 11 SA-227 Metro (C-26B/E);
   PAX 4: 1 Gulfstream IV (C-20F); 2 Gulfstream V (C-37A); 1 Gulfstream G550 (C-37B)
   TRG 4 T-6D Texan II
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 603: 400 AH-64D Apache; 203 AH-64E Apache
   SAR 244: 19 HH-60L Black Hawk; 225 HH-60M Black Hawk (medevac)
   TPT 2,807: Heavy 450: 60 CH-47D Chinook; 390 CH-47F Chinook;
   Medium 1,896: 300 UH-60A Black Hawk; 975 UH-60L Black Hawk; 621 UH-60M Black Hawk; Light 461: 396 UH-72A Lakota; 65 UH-1H/V Iroquois
   TRG 86 TH-67 Creek
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES 361
   CISR Heavy 125 MQ-1C Gray Eagle
   ISR Medium 236 RQ-7B Shadow
AIR DEFENCE SAM 1,183+
   Long-range 480 MIM-104D/E/F Patriot PAC-2 GEM/PAC-2 GEM-T/PAC-3/PAC-3 MSE
   Short-range NASAMS
   Point-defence 703+: FIM-92 Stinger; 703 M1097 Avenger
MISSILE DEFENCE Long-range 42 THAAD
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   ASM AGM-114 Hellfire

US Navy 323,950
Comprises 2 Fleet Areas, Atlantic and Pacific. 5 Fleets: 3rd - Pacific; 4th - Caribbean, Central and South America; 5th - Indian Ocean, Persian Gulf, Red Sea; 6th - Mediterranean; 7th - W. Pacific; plus Military Sealift Command (MSC); Naval Reserve Force (NRF). For Naval Special Warfare Command, see US Special Operations Command
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES 68
STRATEGIC SSBN 14
   14 Ohio opcon US STRATCOM with up to 24 UGM-133A Trident D-5/D-5LE nuclear SLBM, 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
TACTICAL 54
   SSGN 47:
   4 Ohio (mod) with total of 154 Tomahawk LACM , 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
   7 Los Angeles with 1 12-cell VLS with Tomahawk LACM, 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
   22 Los Angeles (Imp) with 1 12-cell VLS with Tomahawk LACM, 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
   10 Virginia Flight I/II with 1 12-cell VLS with Tomahawk LACM, 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 ADCAP mod 6 HWT
   4 Virginia Flight III with 2 6-cell VLS with Tomahawk LACM, 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 ADCAP mod 6 HWT
   SSN 7:
   4 Los Angeles with 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
   3 Seawolf with 8 single 660mm TT with up to 45 Tomahawk LACM/Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 107
AIRCRAFT CARRIERS CVN 11
   1 Gerald R. Ford with 2 octuple Mk29 mod 5 GMLS with RIM-162D ESSM SAM, 2 Mk49 mod 3 GMLS with RIM-116 SAM,
   2 Phalanx Mk15 CIWS (typical capacity 75+ F/A-18E/F Super Hornet FGA ac, F-35C Lightning II FGA ac (IOC planned 08/2018),
   E-2D Hawkeye AEW&C ac, EA-18G Growler EW ac, MH-60R Seahawk ASW hel, MH-60S Knighthawk MRH hel)
   10 Nimitz with 2-3 octuple Mk29 lnchr with RIM-7M/P Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 SAM,
   2 Phalanx Mk15 CIWS (typical capacity 55 F/A-18 Hornet FGA ac; 4 EA-18G Growler EW ac; 4 E-2C/D Hawkeye AEW ac; 6 H-60 Seahawk hel)
CRUISERS CGHM 23:
   22 Ticonderoga with Aegis Baseline 5/6/8/9 C2, 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84 Harpoon AShM, 2 61-cell Mk41 VLS with SM-2ER SAM/SM-3 SAM/SM-6
   SAM/Tomahawk LACM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 2 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 2 127mm guns (capacity 2 SH-60B Seahawk ASW hel)
   1 Zumwalt with 20 4-cell Mk57 VLS with RIM-162 ESSM SAM/SM-2ER SAM/ASROC ASW/Tomahawk LACM, 2 155mm guns
   (capacity 2 MH-60R Seahawk ASW hel or 1 MH-60R Seahawk ASW hel and 3 Fire Scout UAV)
DESTROYERS 64
DDGHM 36 Arleigh Burke Flight IIA with Aegis Baseline 6/7 C2, 1 29-cell Mk41 VLS with ASROC ASW/SM-2ER SAM/SM-3 SAM/SM-6 SAM/Tomahawk
   LACM, 1 61-cell Mk41 VLS with ASROC ASW/SM-2ER SAM/SM-3 SAM/SM-6 SAM/Tomahawk LACM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT,
   2 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 1 127mm gun (capacity 2 SH-60B Seahawk ASW hel)
DDGM 28 Arleigh Burke Flight I/II with Aegis Baseline 5/9 C2, 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84 Harpoon AShM, 1 32-cell Mk41 VLS with ASROC
   ASW/SM-2ER SAM/SM-3 SAM/SM-6 SAM/Tomahawk LACM, 1 64-cell Mk41 VLS with ASROC ASW/SM-2 ER SAM/Tomahawk LACM,
   2 Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 RAM SAM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 2 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 1 127mm gun,
   1 hel landing platform (of which two suffered major damage in collisions)
FRIGATES FFHM 9:
   4 Freedom with 1 21-cell Mk49 lnchr with RIM-116 SAM, 1 57mm gun (capacity 2 MH-60R/S Seahawk hel or 1 MH-60 with 3 MQ-8 Fire Scout UAV)
   5 Independence with 1 11-cell Sea RAM lnchr with RIM-116 SAM, 1 57mm gun (capacity 1 MH-60R/S Seahawk hel and 3 MQ-8 Fire Scout UAV)
   (1 fitted with 2 twin lnchr with RGM-84D Block 1C Harpoon AShM for trials)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 57
   PCFG 10 Cyclone with 1 quad Mk 208 lnchr with BGM-176B Griffin B SSM
   PCF 3 Cyclone
   PBF 2 Mk VI
   PBR 42
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 11
   MCO 11 Avenger with 1 SLQ-48 MCM system, 1 SQQ-32(V)3 Sonar (mine hunting)
COMMAND SHIPS LCC 2 Blue Ridge with 2 Phalanx Mk15 CIWS (capacity 3 LCPL; 2 LCVP; 700 troops; 1 med hel)
   (of which 1 vessel partially crewed by Military Sealift Command personnel)
AMPHIBIOUS
PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS 31
   LHA 1 America with 2 octuple Mk29 GMLS with RIM-162D ESSM SAM; 2 Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 RAM SAM, 2 Phalanx Mk15 CIWS
   (capacity 6 F-35B Lightning II FGA ac; 12 MV-22B Osprey tpt ac; 4 CH-53E Sea Stallion hel; 7 AH-1Z Viper/UH-1Y Iroquois hel; 2 MH-60 hel)
   LHD 8 Wasp with 2 octuple Mk29 GMLS with RIM-7M/RIM-7P Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 RAM SAM, 2 Phalanx Mk15 CIWS
   (capacity: 6 AV-8B Harrier II FGA; 4 CH-53E Sea Stallion hel; 6 MV-22B Osprey tpt ac; 4 AH-1W/Z hel; 3 UH-1Y hel; 3 LCAC(L); 60 tanks;
   1,687 troops)
   LPD 10 San Antonio with 2 21-cell Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 SAM (capacity 2 CH-53E Sea Stallion hel or 2 MV-22 Osprey; 2 LCAC(L); 14 AAAV;
   720 troops)
   LSD 12:
   4 Harpers Ferry with 2 Mk 49 GMLS with RIM-116 SAM, 2 Phalanx Mk15 CIWS, 1 hel landing platform (capacity 2 LCAC(L); 40 tanks; 500 troops)
   8 Whidbey Island with 2 Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 SAM, 2 Phalanx Mk15 CIWS, 1 hel landing platform (capacity 4 LCAC(L); 40 tanks; 500 troops)
LANDING CRAFT 245
   LCU 32 LCU-1600 (capacity either 2 M1 Abrams MBT or 350 troops)
   LCP 108: 75 LCPL; 33 Utility Boat
   LCM 25: 10 LCM-6; 15 LCM-8
   LCAC 80 LCAC(L) (capacity either 1 MBT or 60 troops (undergoing upgrade programme))
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 14
   AFDL 1 Dynamic
   AGOR 5 (all leased out): 1 Ocean; 3 Thomas G. Thompson; 1 Kilo Moana
   ARD 2
   AX 1 Prevail
   ESB 1 Lewis B. Puller (capacity 4 MH-53/MH-60 hel)
   SSA 2 (for testing)
   SSAN 1 (for propulsion plant training)
   UUV 1 Cutthroat (for testing)

Naval Reserve Forces 100,550
   Selected Reserve 57,800
   Individual Ready Reserve 42,750

Naval Inactive Fleet
Notice for reactivation: 60-90 days minimum (still on naval vessel register)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AMPHIBIOUS 8
   LHA 3 Tarawa
   LPD 5 Austin
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT AOE 1 Supply

Military Sealift Command (MSC)
Fleet Oiler (PM1)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 15
   AOR 15 Henry J. Kaiser with 1 hel landing platform

Special Mission (PM2)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 24
   AGM 3: 1 Howard O. Lorenzen; 1 Invincible (commercial operator); 1 Sea-based X-band Radar
   AGOR 6 Pathfinder
   AGOS 5: 1 Impeccable (commercial operator); 4 Victorious
   AGS 1 Waters
   AS 9 (long-term chartered, of which 1 C-Champion, 1 C-Commando, 1 Malama, 1 Dolores Chouest, 1 Dominator, 4 Arrowhead)

Prepositioning (PM3)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 28
   AG 2: 1 V Adm K.R. Wheeler; 1 Fast Tempo
   AK 4: 2 LTC John U.D. Page; 1 Maj. Bernard F. Fisher; 1 CPT David I. Lyon
   AKEH 2 Lewis and Clark
   AKR 10: 2 Bob Hope; 1 Stockham; 7 Watson
   AKRH 5 2nd Lt John P. Bobo
   AP 3: 2 Guam; 1 Westpac Express
   ESD 2 Montf
  
Service Support (PM4)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 10
   ARS 2 Safeguard
   AH 2 Mercy with 1 hel landing platform
   AS 2 Emory S Land
   ATF 4 Powhatan

Sealift (PM5)
(At a minimum of 4 days' readiness)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 23
   AOT 6 (long-term chartered, of which 1 Empire State; 1 Galveston; 1 Lawrence H. Gianella; 1 Maersk Peary; 1 SLNC Pax; 1 SLNC Goodwill)
   AK 7: 1 Ocean Crescent; 3 Sgt Matej Kocak; 1 1st Lt Harry L. Martin; 1 LCpl Roy M. Wheat; 1 Sea Eagle (long-term chartered)
   AKR 10: 5 Bob Hope; 2 Gordon; 2 Shughart; 1 Watson

Fleet Ordnance and Dry Cargo (PM6)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 14
   AOE 2 Supply
   AKEH 12 Lewis and Clark

Afloat Staging Command Support (PM7)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 1
   ARC 1 Zeus

Expeditionary Fast Transport (PM8)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 8
EPF 8 Spearhead


US Maritime Administration (MARAD)
National Defense Reserve Fleet

EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 20
   AGOS 2 General Rudder
   AGM 2: 1 Pacific Collector; 1 Pacific Tracker
   AK 7: 2 Cape Ann (breakbulk); 1 Cape Chalmers (break-bulk); 2 Cape Farewell; 1 Cape Nome (breakbulk); 1 Del Monte (breakbulk)
   AOT 3 Paul Buck
   AP 4: 1 Empire State VI; 1 Golden Bear; 1 Kennedy; 1 State of Maine
   AX 2: 1 Freedom Star; 1 Kings Pointer

Ready Reserve Force
Ships at readiness up to a maximum of 30 days
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 46
   ACS 6: 2 Flickertail State; 1 Gopher State; 3 Keystone State
   AK 4: 2 Wright (breakbulk); 2 Cape May (heavy lift)
   AKR 35: 1 Adm W.M. Callaghan; 4 Algol; 4 Cape Capella; 1 Cape Decision; 4 Cape Ducato; 1 Cape Edmont; 1 Cape Henry; 2 Cape Hudson; 2 Cape Knox;
   4 Cape Island; 1 Cape Orlando; 1 Cape Race; 1 Cape Trinity; 2 Cape Trinity; 2 Cape Victory; 2 Cape Washington
   AOT 1 Petersburg

Augmentation Force
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 (active) log bn (Navy Cargo Handling)
   6 (reserve) log bn (Navy Cargo Handling)

Naval Aviation 98,600
10 air wg. Average air wing comprises 8 sqns: 4 with F/A-18; 1 with MH-60R; 1 with EA-18G; 1 with E-2C/D; 1 with MH-60S
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   4 sqn with F/A-18C Hornet
   19 sqn with F/A-18E Super Hornet
   11 sqn with F/A-18F Super Hornet
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   11 sqn with MH-60R Seahawk
   1 ASW/CSAR sqn with HH-60H Seahawk
   3 ASW/ISR sqn with MH-60R Seahawk; MQ-8B Fire Scout
   ELINT
   1 sqn with EP-3E Aries II
   ELINT/ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   13 sqn with EA-18G Growler
MARITIME PATROL
   4 sqn with P-3C Orion
   7 sqn with P-8A Poseidon
   1 sqn (forming) with P-8A Poseidon
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   6 sqn with E-2C Hawkeye
   3 sqn with E-2D Hawkeye
COMMAND & CONTROL
   2 sqn with E-6B Mercury
MINE COUNTERMEASURES
   2 sqn with MH-53E Sea Dragon
TRANSPORT
   2 sqn with C-2A Greyhound
TRAINING
   1 (FRS) sqn with EA-18G Growler
   1 (FRS) sqn with C-2A Greyhound; E-2C/D Hawkeye; TE-2C Hawkeye
   1 sqn with E-6B Mercury
   2 (FRS) sqn with F/A-18A/A+/B/C/D Hornet; F/A-18E/F Super Hornet
   2 (FRS) sqn with F-35C Lightning II
   1 (FRS) sqn with MH-53 Sea Dragon
   2 (FRS) sqn with MH-60S Knight Hawk; HH-60H Seahawk
   2 (FRS) sqn with MH-60R Seahawk
   1 sqn with P-3C Orion
   1 (FRS) sqn with P-3C Orion; P-8A Poseidon
   6 sqn with T-6A/B Texan II
   2 sqn with T-44C Pegasus
   5 sqn with T-45C Goshawk
   3 hel sqn with TH-57B/C Sea Ranger
   1 (FRS) UAV sqn with MQ-8B Fire Scout; MQ-8C Fire Scout
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   14 sqn with MH-60S Knight Hawk
   1 tpt hel/ISR sqn with MH-60S Knight Hawk; MQ-8B Fire Scout
   ISR UAV
   1 sqn with MQ-4C Triton
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 987 combat capable
   FGA 736: 22 F-35C Lightning II; 10 F-16A Fighting Falcon; 4 F-16B Fighting Falcon; 10 F/A-18A/A+ Hornet; 9 F/A-18B Hornet; 90 F/A-18C Hornet;
   30 F/A-18D Hornet; 290 F/A-18E Super Hornet; 271 F/A-18F Super Hornet
   ASW 120: 65 P-3C Orion; 55 P-8A Poseidon
   EW 131 EA-18G Growler*
   ELINT 9 EP-3E Aries II
   AEW&C 80: 50 E-2C Hawkeye; 30 E-2D Hawkeye
   C2 16 E-6B Mercury
   TKR 3: 1 KC-130R Hercules; 1 KC-130T Hercules; 1 KC-130J Hercules
   TPT Light 61: 4 Beech A200 King Air (C-12C Huron); 6 Beech A200 King Air (UC-12F Huron); 8 Beech A200 King Air (UC-12M Huron);
   34 C-2A Greyhound; 2 DHC-2 Beaver (U-6A); 7 SA-227-BC Metro III (C-26D)
   TRG 582: 44 T-6A Texan II; 232 T-6B Texan II; 7 T-38C Talon; 55 T-44C Pegasus; 242 T-45C Goshawk; 2 TE-2C Hawkeye
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 225 MH-60R Seahawk
   MRH 271 MH-60S Knight Hawk (Multi Mission Support)
   MCM 28 MH-53E Sea Dragon
   ISR 3 OH-58C Kiowa
   CSAR 11 HH-60H Seahawk
   TPT 13: Heavy 2 CH-53E Sea Stallion; Medium 3 UH-60L Black Hawk; Light 8: 5 UH-72A Lakota; 2 UH-1N Iroquois; 1 UH-1Y Venom
   TRG 119: 43 TH-57B Sea Ranger; 76 TH-57C Sea Ranger
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES ISR 91
   Heavy 41: 1 MQ-4C Triton; 20 MQ-8B Fire Scout; 16 MQ-8C Fire Scout; 4 RQ-4A Global Hawk (under evaluation and trials);
   Medium 35 RQ-2B Pioneer; Light 15 RQ-21A Blackjack
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9M Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; SARH AIM-7 Sparrow; ARH AIM-120C-5/C-7/D AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65F Maverick; AGM-114B/K/M Hellfire; AShM AGM-84D Harpoon; AGM-119A Penguin 3; ARM AGM-88B/C/E HARM/AARGM
   ALCM Conventional AGM-84E/H/K SLAM/SLAMER
BOMBS
   Laser-guided: GBU-10/12/16 Paveway II; GBU-24 Paveway III
   INS/GPS guided: GBU-31/32/38 JDAM; Enhanced Paveway II; GBU-54 Laser JDAM; AGM-154A/C/C-1 JSOW

Naval Aviation Reserve
FORCES BY ROLE

FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with F/A-18A+ Hornet
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   1 sqn with MH-60R Seahawk
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   1 sqn with EA-18G Growler
MARITIME PATROL
   2 sqn with P-3C Orion
TRANSPORT
   5 log spt sqn with B-737-700 (C-40A Clipper)
   2 log spt sqn with Gulfstream III/IV (C-20D/G); Gulfstream V/G550 (C-37A/B)
   4 sqn with C-130T Hercules
   1 sqn with KC-130T Hercules
TRAINING
   2 (aggressor) sqn with F-5F/N Tiger II
   1 (aggressor) sqn with F/A-18A+ Hornet
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with HH-60H Seahawk
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 77 combat capable
   FTR 31: 2 F-5F Tiger II; 29 F-5N Tiger II
   FGA 29 F/A-18A+ Hornet
   ASW 12 P-3C Orion
   EW 5 EA-18G Growler*
   TKR 5 KC-130T Hercules
   TPT 41: Medium 18 C-130T Hercules;
   PAX 23: 15 B-737-700 (C-40A Clipper); 1 Gulfstream III (C-20D); 3 Gulfstream IV (C-20G); 1 Gulfstream V (C-37A); 3 Gulfstream G550 (C-37B)
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 7 MH-60R Seahawk
   MCM 7 MH-53E Sea Dragon
   CSAR 16 HH-60H Seahawk

US Marine Corps 184,400
3 Marine Expeditionary Forces (MEF), 3 Marine Expeditionary Brigades (MEB), 7 Marine Expeditionary Units (MEU) drawn from 3 div. An MEU usually consists of a battalion landing team (1 SF coy, 1 lt armd recce coy, 1 recce pl, 1 armd pl, 1 amph aslt pl, 1 inf bn, 1 arty bty, 1 cbt engr pl), an aviation combat element (1 medium-lift sqn with attached atk hel, FGA ac and AD assets) and a composite log bn, with a combined total of about 2,200 personnel. Composition varies with mission requirements
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
(see USSOCOM)
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   3 (MEF) recce coy
Amphibious
   1 (1st) mne div (2 armd recce bn, 1 recce bn, 1 tk bn, 2 mne regt (4 mne bn), 1 mne regt (3 mne bn), 1 amph aslt bn, 1 arty regt (3 arty bn, 1 MRL bn),
   1 cbt engr bn, 1 EW bn, 1 int bn, 1 sigs bn)
   1 (2nd) mne div (1 armd recce bn, 1 recce bn, 1 tk bn, 3 mne regt (3 mne bn), 1 amph aslt bn, 1 arty regt (2 arty bn), 1 cbt engr bn, 1 EW bn, 1 int bn,
   1 sigs bn)
   1 (3rd) mne div (1 recce bn, 1 inf regt (3 inf bn), 1 arty regt (2 arty bn), 1 cbt spt bn (1 armd recce coy, 1 amph aslt coy, 1 cbt engr coy), 1 EW bn, 1 int bn,
   1 sigs bn)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   3 log gp
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 447 M1A1 Abrams
   IFV 502 LAV-25
   APC APC (W) 207 LAV variants (66 CP; 127 log; 14 EW)
   AAV 1,200 AAV-7A1 (all roles)
   AUV 2,429: 1,725 Cougar; 704 M-ATV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 42 M1 ABV
   ARV 185: 60 AAVRA1; 45 LAV-R; 80 M88A1/2
   MW 38 Buffalo
   VLB 6 Joint Aslt Bridge
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP 106 LAV-AT
   MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin; FGM-172B SRAW-MPV; TOW
ARTILLERY 1,501
   TOWED 812: 105mm: 331 M101A1; 155mm 481 M777A2
   MRL 227mm 40 M142 HIMARS
   MOR 649: 81mm 535 M252; SP 81mm 65 LAV-M; 120mm 49 EFSS
RADAR LAND 23 AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder (arty)
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHCILES
   ISR Light 100 BQM-147 Exdrone
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger

Marine Corps Aviation 34,700
3 active Marine Aircraft Wings (MAW) and 1 MCR MAW
Flying hours 365 hrs/yr on tpt ac; 248 hrs/yr on ac; 277 hrs/yr on hel
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   1 sqn with F/A-18A++ Hornet
   6 sqn with F/A-18C Hornet
   4 sqn with F/A-18D Hornet
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   5 sqn with AV-8B Harrier II
   2 sqn with F-35B Lightning II
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   2 sqn with EA-6B Prowler
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE/TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with Beech A200/B200 King Air (UC-12F/M Huron); Beech 350 King Air (UC-12W Huron); Cessna 560 Citation Ultra/Encore (UC-35C/D);
   DC-9 Skytrain (C-9B Nightingale); Gulfstream IV (C-20G); HH-1N Iroquois
TANKER
   3 sqn with KC-130J Hercules
TRANSPORT
   14 sqn with MV-22B Osprey
   2 sqn (forming) with MV-22B Osprey
TRAINING
   1 sqn with AV-8B Harrier II; TAV-8B Harrier
   1 sqn with F/A-18B/C/D Hornet
   1 sqn with F-35B Lightning II
   1 sqn with MV-22B Osprey
   1 hel sqn with AH-1W Cobra; AH-1Z Viper; HH-1N Iroquois; UH-1Y Venom
   1 hel sqn with CH-53E Sea Stallion
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   3 sqn with AH-1W Cobra; UH-1Y Venom
   4 sqn with AH-1Z Viper; UH-1Y Venom
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   8 sqn with CH-53E Sea Stallion
   1 (VIP) sqn with MV-22B Osprey; VH-3D Sea King; VH-60N Presidential Hawk
   ISR UAV
   2 sqn with RQ-21A Blackjack
   1 sqn with RQ-7B Shadow
AIR DEFENCE
   2 bn with M1097 Avenger; FIM-92 Stinger (can provide additional heavy-calibre support weapons)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 455 combat capable
   FGA 437: 50 F-35B Lightning II; 6 F-35C Lightning II; 45 F/A-18A++ Hornet; 7 F/A-18B Hornet; 107 F/A-18C Hornet; 92 F/A-18D Hornet;
   114 AV-8B Harrier II; 16 TAV-8B Harrier
   EW 18 EA-6B Prowler*
   TKR 45 KC-130J Hercules
   TPT 20: Light 17: 5 Beech A200/B200 King Air (UC-12F/M Huron); 5 Beech 350 King Air (C-12W Huron);
   7 Cessna 560 Citation Ultra/Encore (UC-35C/D); PAX 3: 2 DC-9 Skytrain (C-9B Nightingale); 1 Gulfstream IV (C-20G)
   TRG 3 T-34C Turbo Mentor
   TILTROTOR TPT 277 MV-22B Osprey
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 153: 77 AH-1W Cobra; 76 AH-1Z Viper
   SAR 4 HH-1N Iroquois
   TPT 280: Heavy 139 CH-53E Sea Stallion; Medium 19: 8 VH-60N Presidential Hawk (VIP tpt); 11 VH-3D Sea King (VIP tpt); Light 122 UH-1Y Venom
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR 60: Medium 20 RQ-7B Shadow; Light 40 RQ-21A Blackjack
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger; M1097 Avenger
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9M Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; SARH AIM-7P Sparrow; ARH AIM-120C AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65E/F IR Maverick; AGM-114 Hellfire; AGM-176 Griffin; AShM AGM-84D Harpoon; ARM AGM-88 HARM
   LACM AGM-84E/H/K SLAM/SLAM-ER
BOMBS
   Laser-guided GBU-10/12/16 Paveway II; INS/GPS guided GBU-31 JDAM; AGM-154A/C/C-1 JSOW

Reserve Organisations
Marine Corps Reserve
38,700
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   2 MEF recce coy
Amphibious
   1 (4th) mne div (1 armd recce bn, 1 recce bn, 2 mne regt (3 mne bn), 1 amph aslt bn, 1 arty regt (2 arty bn, 1 MRL bn), 1 cbt engr bn, 1 int bn, 1 sigs bn)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log gp

Marine Corps Aviation Reserve 12,000 reservists
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   1 sqn with F/A-18A++ Hornet
TANKER
   2 sqn with KC-130J/T Hercules
TRANSPORT
   2 sqn with MV-22B Osprey
TRAINING
   1 sqn with F-5F/N Tiger II
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with AH-1W Cobra; UH-1Y Venom
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with CH-53E Sea Stallion
ISR UAV
   1 sqn with RQ-7B Shadow
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 23 combat capable
   FTR 12: 1 F-5F Tiger II; 11 F-5N Tiger II
   FGA 11 F/A-18A++ Hornet
   TKR 20: 7 KC-130J Hercules; 13 KC-130T Hercules
   TPT Light 7: 2 Beech 350 King Air (UC-12W Huron); 5 Cessna 560 Citation Ultra/Encore (UC-35C/D)
TILTROTOR TPT 12 MV-22B Osprey
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 37 AH-1W Cobra
   TPT 32: Heavy 6 CH-53E Sea Stallion; Light 26 UH-1Y Venom
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Medium 8 RQ-7B Shadow

Marine Stand-by Reserve 700 reservists
Trained individuals available for mobilisation

US Coast Guard 41,000 (military) 8,500 (civilian)
9 districts (4 Pacific, 5 Atlantic)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 158
   PSOH 24: 1 Alex Haley; 13 Famous; 4 Hamilton; 6 Legend
   PCO 38: 14 Reliance (with 1 hel landing platform); 24 Sentinel (Damen 4708)
   PCC 23 Island
   PBI 73 Marine Protector
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 79
   ABU 52: 16 Juniper; 4 WLI; 14 Keeper; 18 WLR
   AG 13: 1 Cosmos; 4 Pamlico; 8 Anvil
   AGB 13: 9 Bay; 1 Mackinaw; 1 Healy; 2 Polar (of which one in reserve)
   AXS 1 Eagle

US Coast Guard Aviation
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   SAR 20: 11 HC-130H Hercules; 9 HC-130J Hercules
   TPT 34: Medium 14 C-27J Spartan; Light 18 CN235-200 (HC-144A - MP role); PAX 2 Gulfstream V (C-37A)
HELICOPTERS
   SAR 154: 52 MH-60T Jayhawk; 102 AS366G1 (MH-65C/D) Dauphin II

US Air Force (USAF) 322,800
Flying hours Ftr 160, bbr 260, tkr 300, airlift 340. Almost the entire USAF (plus active force ANG and AFR) is divided into 10 Aerospace Expeditionary Forces (AEF), each on call for 120 days every 20 months. At least 2 of the 10 AEFs are on call at any one time, each with 10,000-15,000 personnel, 90 multi-role ftr and bbr ac, 31 intra-theatre refuelling aircraft and 13 aircraft for ISR and EW missions

Global Strike Command (GSC)
   2 active air forces (8th & 20th); 8 wg
FORCES BY ROLE
SURFACE-TO-SURFACE MISSILE
   9 ICBM sqn with LGM-30G Minuteman III
BOMBER
   4 sqn with B-1B Lancer
   2 sqn with B-2A Spirit
   5 sqn (incl 1 trg) with B-52H Stratofortress
COMMAND & CONTROL
   1 sqn with E-4B
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   3 sqn with UH-1N Iroquois

Air Combat Command (ACC)
   2 active air forces (9th & 12th); 12 wg. ACC numbered air forces provide the air component to CENTCOM, SOUTHCOM and NORTHCOM
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   3 sqn with F-22A Raptor
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   4 sqn with F-15E Strike Eagle
   4 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon (+6 sqn personnel only)
   1 sqn with F-35A Lightning II
   1 sqn with F-35A Lightning II (forming)
GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with A-10C Thunderbolt II (+1 sqn personnel only)
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   1 sqn with EA-18G Growler (personnel only - USN aircraft)
   2 sqn with EC-130H Compass Call
   ISR
   2 sqn with E-8C J-STARS (personnel only)
   5 sqn with OC-135/RC-135/WC-135
   2 sqn with U-2S
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   5 sqn with E-3B/C/G Sentry
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE
   2 sqn with HC-130J Combat King II
   2 sqn with HH-60G Pave Hawk
TRAINING
   1 sqn with A-10C Thunderbolt II
   1 sqn with E-3B/C Sentry
   2 sqn with F-15E Strike Eagle
   1 sqn with F-22A Raptor
   1 sqn with RQ-4A Global Hawk; TU-2S
   2 UAV sqn with MQ-1B Predator
   3 UAV sqn with MQ-9A Reaper
COMBAT/ISR UAV
   4 sqn with MQ-1B Predator
   1 sqn with MQ-1B Predator/MQ-9A Reaper
   2 sqn with MQ-9A Reaper
   2 sqn with RQ-170 Sentinel
ISR UAV
   2 sqn with EQ-4B/RQ-4B Global Hawk

Pacific Air Forces (PACAF)
Provides the air component of PACOM, and commands air units based in Alaska, Hawaii, Japan and South Korea. 3 active air forces (5th, 7th, & 11th); 8 wg
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   2 sqn with F-15C/D Eagle
   2 sqn with F-22A Raptor (+1 sqn personnel only)
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   5 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with A-10C Thunderbolt II
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   2 sqn with E-3B/C Sentry
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with HH-60G Pave Hawk
TANKER
   1 sqn with KC-135R (+1 sqn personnel only)
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with B-737-200 (C-40B); Gulfstream V (C-37A)
   2 sqn with C-17A Globemaster
   1 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules
   1 sqn with Beech 1900C (C-12J); UH-1N Huey
TRAINING
   1 (aggressor) sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon

United States Air Forces Europe (USAFE)
Provides the air component to both EUCOM and AFRICOM. 1 active air force (3rd); 5 wg
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   1 sqn with F-15C/D Eagle
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   2 sqn with F-15E Strike Eagle
   3 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with HH-60G Pave Hawk
TANKER
   1 sqn with KC-135R Stratotanker
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules
   2 sqn with Gulfstream V (C-37A); Learjet 35A (C-21A);
B-737-700 (C-40B)

Air Mobility Command (AMC)
Provides strategic and tactical airlift, air-to-air refuelling and aero medical evacuation. 1 active air force (18th); 12 wg and 1 gp
FORCES BY ROLE
TANKER
   4 sqn with KC-10A Extender
   9 sqn with KC-135R/T Stratotanker (+2 sqn with personnel only)
TRANSPORT
   1 VIP sqn with B-737-200 (C-40B); B-757-200 (C-32A)
   1 VIP sqn with Gulfstream V (C-37A)
   1 VIP sqn with VC-25 Air Force One
   2 sqn with C-5M Super Galaxy
   8 sqn with C-17A Globemaster III (+1 sqn personnel only)
   1 sqn with C-130H Hercules (+1 sqn personnel only)
   5 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules (+1 sqn personnel only)
   1 sqn with Gulfstream V (C-37A)
   2 sqn with Learjet 35A (C-21A)

Air Education and Training Command
   1 active air force (2nd), 10 active air wg and 1 gp
FORCES BY ROLE
TRAINING
   1 sqn with C-17A Globemaster III
   1 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules
   4 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
   4 sqn with F-35A Lightning II
   1 sqn with KC-46A Pegasus (forming)
   1 sqn with KC-135R Stratotanker
   5 (flying trg) sqn with T-1A Jayhawk
   10 (flying trg) sqn with T-6A Texan II
   10 (flying trg) sqn with T-38C Talon
   1 UAV sqn with MQ-1B Predator

EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SURFACE-TO-SURFACE MISSILE LAUNCHERS
ICBM Nuclear 400 LGM-30G Minuteman III (1 Mk12A or Mk21 re-entry veh per missile)
AIRCRAFT 1,478 combat capable
   BBR 139: 61 B-1B Lancer; 20 B-2A Spirit; 58 B-52H Stratofortress
   FTR 265: 96 F-15C Eagle; 10 F-15D Eagle; 159 F-22A Raptor
   FGA 903: 211 F-15E Strike Eagle; 456 F-16C Fighting Falcon; 114 F-16D Fighting Falcon; 122 F-35A Lightning II
   ATK 141 A-10C Thunderbolt II
   EW 14 EC-130H Compass Call
   ISR 41: 2 E-9A; 4 E-11A; 2 OC-135B Open Skies; 27 U-2S; 4 TU-2S; 2 WC-135 Constant Phoenix
   ELINT 22: 8 RC-135V Rivet Joint; 9 RC-135W Rivet Joint; 3 RC-135S Cobra Ball; 2 RC-135U Combat Sent
   AEW&C 31: 18 E-3B Sentry; 6 E-3C Sentry; 7 E-3G Sentry
   C2 4 E-4B
   TKR 156: 126 KC-135R Stratotanker; 30 KC-135T Stratotanker
   TKR/TPT 59 KC-10A Extender
   CSAR 15 HC-130J Combat King II
   TPT 332: Heavy 197: 35 C-5M Super Galaxy; 162 C-17A Globemaster III; Medium 87 C-130J/J-30 Hercules;
   Light 21: 4 Beech 1900C (C-12J); 17 Learjet 35A (C-21A);
   PAX 22: 4 B-737-700 (C-40B); 4 B-757-200 (C-32A); 12 Gulfstream V (C-37A); 2 VC-25A Air Force One
   TRG 1,129: 178 T-1A Jayhawk; 445 T-6A Texan II; 506 T-38A/C Talon
HELICOPTERS
   CSAR 75 HH-60G Pave Hawk
   TPT Light 62 UH-1N Huey
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES 350
   CISR Heavy 310: 110 MQ-1B Predator (being withdrawn); 200 MQ-9A Reaper
   ISR Heavy 42: 3 EQ-4B; 29 RQ-4B Global Hawk; ~10 RQ-170 Sentinel
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9 Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; SARH AIM-7M Sparrow; ARH AIM-120C/D AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65D/G Maverick; AGM-130A; AGM-176 Griffin
   ALCM Nuclear AGM-86B (ALCM); Conventional AGM-86C (CALCM); AGM-86D (penetrator); AGM-158 JASSM; AGM-158B JASSM-ER
   ARM AGM-88A/B HARM
   EW MALD/MALD-J
BOMBS
   Laser-guided GBU 10/12/16 Paveway II, GBU-24 Paveway III
   INS/GPS guided GBU 31/32/38 JDAM; GBU-54 Laser JDAM; GBU-15 (with BLU-109 penetrating warhead or Mk84);
   GBU-39B Small Diameter Bomb (250lb); GBU-43B MOAB; GBU-57A/B MOP; Enhanced Paveway III

Reserve Organisations

Air National Guard 105,650 reservists
FORCES BY ROLE
BOMBER
   1 sqn with B-2A Spirit (personnel only)
FIGHTER
   5 sqn with F-15C/D Eagle
   1 sqn with F-22A Raptor (+1 sqn personnel only)
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   11 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
GROUND ATTACK
   4 sqn with A-10C Thunderbolt II ISR
   1 sqn with E-8C J-STARS
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with HC-130P/N Combat King
   1 sqn with HC-130J Combat King II (forming)
   1 sqn with MC-130P Combat Shadow
   3 sqn with HH-60G Pave Hawk
TANKER
   17 sqn with KC-135R Stratotanker (+1 sqn personnel only)
   3 sqn with KC-135T Stratotanker
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with B-737-700 (C-40C)
   5 sqn with C-17A Globemaster (+2 sqn personnel only)
   13 sqn with C-130H Hercules
   1 sqn with C-130H/LC-130H Hercules
   2 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules
   1 sqn with Learjet 35A (C-21A)
   1 sqn with WC-130H Hercules
TRAINING
   1 sqn with C-130H Hercules
   1 sqn with F-15C/D Eagle
   4 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
   1 sqn with MQ-9A Reaper
COMBAT/ISR UAV
   1 sqn with MQ-1B Predator
   10 sqn with MQ-9A Reaper
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 473 combat capable
   FTR 157: 127 F-15C Eagle; 10 F-15D Eagle; 20 F-22A Raptor
   FGA 354: 309 F-16C Fighting Falcon; 45 F-16D Fighting Falcon
   ATK 86 A-10C Thunderbolt II
   ISR 16 E-8C J-STARS
   ELINT 11 RC-26B Metroliner
   CSAR 6: 2 HC-130N Combat King; 3 HC-130P Combat King; 1 HC-130J Combat King II
   TKR 172: 148 KC-135R Stratotanker; 24 KC-135T Stratotanker
   TPT 213: Heavy 42 C-17A Globemaster III;
   Medium 166: 124 C-130H Hercules; 20 C-130J/J-30 Hercules; 10 LC-130H Hercules; 4 MC-130P Combat Shadow; 8 WC-130H Hercules;
   Light 2 Learjet 35A (C-21A); PAX 3 B-737-700 (C-40C)
HELICOPTERS CSAR 18 HH-60G Pave Hawk
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES CISR Heavy 70:
   35 MQ-1B Predator; 35 MQ-9A Reaper

Air Force Reserve Command 68,800 reservists
FORCES BY ROLE
BOMBER
   1 sqn with B-52H Stratofortress (personnel only)
FIGHTER
   2 sqn with F-22A Raptor (personnel only)
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   2 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon (+1 sqn personnel only)
   1 sqn with F-35A Lightning II (personnel only)
GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with A-10C Thunderbolt II (+2 sqn personnel only)
ISR
   1 (Weather Recce) sqn with WC-130J Hercules
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   1 sqn with E-3B/C Sentry (personnel only)
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with HC-130N Combat King
   2 sqn with HH-60G Pave Hawk
TANKER
   4 sqn with KC-10A Extender (personnel only)
   7 sqn with KC-135R Stratotanker (+2 sqn personnel only)
TRANSPORT
   1 (VIP) sqn with B-737-700 (C-40C)
   2 sqn with C-5M Super Galaxy (+1 sqn personnel only)
   2 sqn with C-17A Globemaster (+9 sqn personnel only)
   7 sqn with C-130H Hercules
   1 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules
   1 (Aerial Spray) sqn with C-130H Hercules
TRAINING
   1 (aggressor) sqn with A-10C Thunderbolt II; F-15C/E Eagle; F-16 Fighting Falcon; F-22A Raptor (personnel only)
   1 sqn with A-10C Thuinderbolt II
   1 sqn with B-52H Stratofortress
   1 sqn with C-5M Super Galaxy
   1 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
   5 (flying training) sqn with T-1A Jayhawk; T-6A Texan II; T-38C Talon (personnel only)
COMBAT/ISR UAV
   2 sqn with MQ-1B Predator/MQ-9A Reaper (personnel only)
ISR UAV
   1 sqn with RQ-4B Global Hawk (personnel only)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 126 combat capable
   BBR 18 B-52H Stratofortress
   FGA 53: 49 F-16C Fighting Falcon; 4 F-16D Fighting Falcon
   ATK 55 A-10C Thunderbolt II
   ISR 10 WC-130J Hercules (Weather Recce)
   CSAR 6 HC-130N Combat King
   TKR 70 KC-135R Stratotanker
   TPT 86: Heavy 24: 6 C-5M Super Galaxy; 18 C-17A Globemaster III; Medium 58: 48 C-130H Hercules; 10 C-130J-30 Hercules;
   PAX 4 B-737-700 (C-40C)
HELICOPTERS CSAR 16 HH-60G Pave Hawk

Civil Reserve Air Fleet
Commercial ac numbers fluctuate
AIRCRAFT TPT 517 international (391 long-range and 126 short-range); 36 national

Air Force Stand-by Reserve 16,858 reservists
Trained individuals for mobilisation

US Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) 63,150; 6,550 (civilian)
Commands all active, reserve and National Guard Special Operations Forces (SOF) of all services based in CONUS Joint Special Operations Command Reported to comprise elite US SOF, including Special Forces Operations Detachment Delta (`Delta Force'), SEAL Team 6 and integral USAF support

US Army Special Operations Command 34,100
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   5 SF gp (4 SF bn, 1 spt bn)
   1 ranger regt (3 ranger bn; 1 cbt spt bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 civil affairs bde (5 civil affairs bn)
   1 psyops gp (3 psyops bn)
   1 psyops gp (4 psyops bn)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 (sustainment) log bde (1 sigs bn)
HELICOPTER
   1 (160th SOAR) hel regt (4 hel bn)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 12 Pandur
   AUV 640 M-ATV
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 50 AH-6M/MH-6M Little Bird
   TPT 130: Heavy 68 MH-47G Chinook; Medium 62 MH-60L/M Black Hawk
UAV
   CISR Heavy 12 MQ-1C Gray Eagle
   ISR Light 29: 15 XPV-1 Tern; 14 XPV-2 Mako
   TPT Heavy 28 CQ-10 Snowgoose

Reserve Organisations
Army National Guard
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   2 SF gp (3 SF bn)
Army Reserve
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   2 psyops gp
   4 civil affairs comd HQ
   8 civil affairs bde HQ
   32 civil affairs bn (coy)

US Navy Special Warfare Command 9,850
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   8 SEAL team (total: 48 SF pl)
   2 SEAL Delivery Vehicle team

Reserve Organisations
Naval Reserve Force
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   8 SEAL det
   10 Naval Special Warfare det
   2 Special Boat sqn
   2 Special Boat unit
   1 SEAL Delivery Vehicle det

US Marine Special Operations Command (MARSOC) 3,000
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF regt (3 SF bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 int bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 spt gp

Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) 16,200
FORCES BY ROLE
GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with AC-130U Spectre
   2 sqn with AC-130W Stinger II
TRANSPORT
   3 sqn with CV-22B Osprey
   1 sqn with DHC-8; Do-328 (C-146A)
   2 sqn with MC-130H Combat Talon
   3 sqn with MC-130J Commando II
   3 sqn with PC-12 (U-28A)
TRAINING
   1 sqn with M-28 Skytruck (C-145A)
   1 sqn with CV-22A/B Osprey
   1 sqn with HC-130J Combat King II; MC-130J Commando II
   1 sqn with Bell 205 (TH-1H Iroquois)
   1 sqn with HH-60G Pave Hawk; UH-1N Huey
COMBAT/ISR UAV
   2 sqn with MQ-9 Reaper
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 27 combat capable
   ATK 27: 2 AC-130J Ghostrider; 13 AC-130U Spectre; 12 AC-130W Stinger II
   CSAR 3 HC-130J Combat King II
   TPT 97: Medium 49: 14 MC-130H Combat Talon II; 35 MC-130J Commando II;
   Light 48: 9 Do-328 (C-146A); 4 M-28 Skytruck (C-145A); 35 PC-12 (U-28A)
TILT-ROTOR 49 CV-22A/B Osprey
HELICOPTERS
   CSAR 3 HH-60G Pave Hawk
   TPT Light 34: 24 Bell 205 (TH-1H Iroquois); 10 UH-1N Huey
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES CISR Heavy 30 MQ-9 Reaper

Reserve Organisations
Air National Guard
FORCES BY ROLE
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   1 sqn with C-130J Hercules/EC-130J Commando Solo
ISR
   1 sqn with Beech 350ER King Air (MC-12W Liberty)
TRANSPORT
   1 flt with B-737-200 (C-32B)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   EW 3 EC-130J Commando Solo
   ISR 13 Beech 350ER King Air (MC-12W Liberty)
   TPT 5: Medium 3 C-130J Hercules; PAX 2 B-757-200 (C-32B)

Air Force Reserve
FORCES BY ROLE
TRAINING
   1 sqn with AC-130U Spectre (personnel only)
   1 sqn with M-28 Skytruck (C-145A) (personnel only)
COMBAT/ISR UAV
   1 sqn with MQ-9 Reaper (personnel only)

Cyber
   The Department of Defense (DoD) Cyber Strategy, released in 2015, named cyber as the primary strategic threat to the US, `placing it above terrorism' for the first time since 9/11. The US has well-developed cyber capabilities, and there are military-cyber elements within each service branch, under US Cyber Command. Cyber Command was elevated to a unified combatant command in August 2017, and the secretary of defense directed a review into the possibility of splitting Cyber Command from the NSA. Cyber Command requested a budget of US$647m for FY2018, representing a 16% increase on the previous year. Its Cyber Mission Force (CMF) of 133 teams reached IOC in October 2016 and is expected to reach FOC in 2018. The US Air Force plans to merge offensive and defensive cyber operations into a full-spectrum cyber capability called the Cyber Operations Squadron by 2026. The US Army released a field manual for cyber and electronic warfare (EW) in April 2017, and announced in May that it would develop a department wide EW strategy. High-level DoD cyber exercises include the defence-focused Cyber Flag and Cyber Guard series, which involve broader actors from across government and includes critical-national-infrastructure scenarios. DARPA's Plan X programme has been funding research on cyber warfare since 2013 and, according to the army, `gives commanders a way to see and respond to key cyber terrain in the same way they react to actions on the physical battlefield, and enables synchronizing cyber effects with key related war-fighting functions such as intelligence, signal, information operations and electronic warfare'. In March 2017, the Defense Science Board reported that to improve cyber deterrence the DoD should conduct tailored cyber-deterrence campaigns, boost the cyber resilience of select military systems to improve second strike capabilities and improve attribution capabilities across government. In October 2012, then-president Barack Obama signed Presidential Policy Directive 20 (PPD-20), the purpose of which was to establish clear standards for US federal agencies in confronting threats in cyberspace. This document was made public in the Snowden leaks. It is notable for the distinction it draws between defensive and offensive cyber operations. According to PPD-20, the US `shall identify potential targets of national importance where [offensive cyber-effects operations] can offer a favorable balance of effectiveness and risk as compared with other instruments of national power, establish and maintain [offensive cyber-effects operations] capabilities integrated as appropriate with other US offensive capabilities, and execute those capabilities in a manner consistent with the provisions of this directive'. PPD-20 states that presidential approval is required for any cyber operations with `significant consequences'. In April 2017, government officials announced that offensive cyber capabilities had been employed against ISIS.
Кибер

Кибер стратегия Министерства обороны (МО), выпущенная в 2015 году, назвала кибер как основную стратегическую угрозу США, "поставив ее выше терроризма" впервые с 9/11. США имеют хорошо развитые кибер возможности, и в каждой отрасли обслуживания есть военно-кибернетические элементы под кибер командованием США. Киберкомандование было повышено до единого боевого командования в августе 2017 года, и министр обороны направил обзор возможности разделения Киберкомандования от АНБ. Киберкомандование запросил бюджет США$647m для FY2018, что на 16% больше, чем в предыдущем году. Его кибер миссия (CMF) из 133 команд достигла МОК в октябре 2016 года и, как ожидается, достигнет FOC в 2018 году. ВВС США планируют к 2026 году объединить наступательные и оборонительные кибер операции в кибернетическую эскадрилью полного спектра, получившую название Cyber Operations Squadron. Армия США выпустила полевое руководство по кибер и радиоэлектронной войне (РЭБ) в апреле 2017 года и объявила в мае, что она разработает общепартийную стратегию РЭБ. Кибер-учения Минобороны высокого уровня включают серию кибер флагов и кибер гвардии, ориентированных на оборону, в которых участвуют более широкие субъекты со всего правительства и которые включают критические сценарии национальной инфраструктуры. Программа DARPA Plan X финансирует исследования по кибервойне с 2013 года и, по словам армии, "дает командирам возможность видеть и реагировать на ключевые киберпространства так же, как они реагируют на действия на физическом поле боя, и позволяет синхронизировать киберэффекты с ключевыми связанными с войной функциями, такими как разведка, сигнал, информационные операции и электронная война". В марте 2017 года Совет по оборонной науке сообщил, что для улучшения кибер сдерживания Министерство обороны должно проводить индивидуальные кампании кибер сдерживания, повышать кибер устойчивость отдельных военных систем для улучшения возможностей второго удара и улучшения возможностей атрибуции по всему правительству. В октябре 2012 года тогдашний президент Барак Обама подписал директиву 20 (PPD-20), целью которой было установление четких стандартов для федеральных агентств США в противодействии угрозам в киберпространстве. Этот документ был обнародован в утечках Сноудена. Он примечателен различие проводит между оборонительных и наступательных кибер операций. По данным ППД-20, США должны определить потенциальных объектов национального значения, где [наступательные кибер операции] могу предложить выгодное соотношение эффективности и риска по сравнению с другими инструментами национальной мощи, установления и поддержания [наступательные кибер операции] функции комплексной мере необходимости, с другими нам наступательные возможности, и выполняют эти функции в соответствии с положениями настоящей директивы'. PPD-20 заявляет, что президентское одобрение требуется для любых кибер операций со "значительными последствиями". В апреле 2017 года правительственные чиновники объявили, что против ИГИЛ были использованы наступательные кибер возможности.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 7,000; 1 div HQ; 1 div HQ (fwd); 1 spec ops bn; 2 AB bde; 1 EOD bn; 1 cbt avn bde;
   1 FGA sqn with F-16C Fighting Falcon; 1 ISR gp with MC-12W
   US Central Command Operation Freedom's Sentinel 8,000
   EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
   F-16C Fighting Falcon; RC-12X Guardrail; EC-130H Compass Call; MC-12W Liberty; C-130 Hercules; AH-64 Apache; CH-47 Chinook;
   UH-60 Black Hawk; HH-60 Pave Hawk; RQ-7B Shadow; MQ-1 Predator; MQ-9 Reaper
ARABIAN SEA: US Central Command Navy 5th Fleet: 1 SSGN
   Combined Maritime Forces TF 53: 1 AE; 2 AKE; 1 AOH; 3 AO
ARUBA: US Southern Command 1 Forward Operating Location
ASCENSION ISLAND: US Strategic Command 1 detection and tracking radar at Ascension Auxiliary Air Field
ATLANTIC OCEAN: US Northern Command
   US Navy: 6 SSBN; 22 SSGN; 6 CVN; 8 CGHM; 14 DDGHM; 10 DDGM; 2 FFHM; 3 PCFG; 4 LHD; 4 LPD; 6 LSD
AUSTRALIA: US Pacific Command 1,250; 1 SEWS at Pine Gap; 1 comms facility at Pine Gap; 1 SIGINT stn at Pine Gap
   US Strategic Command 1 detection and tracking radar at Naval Communication Station Harold E Holt
BAHRAIN: US Central Command 5,000; 1 HQ (5th Fleet); 2 AD bty with MIM-104E/F Patriot PAC-2/3
BELGIUM: US European Command 900
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 6
BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY: US Strategic Command 300; 1 Spacetrack Optical Tracker at Diego Garcia;
   1 ground-based electro optical deep space surveillance system (GEODSS) at Diego Garcia
   US Pacific Command 1 MPS sqn (MPS-2 with equipment for one MEB) at Diego Garcia with 2 AKRH; 3 AKR; 1 AKEH; 1 ESD;
   1 naval air base at Diego Garcia, 1 support facility at Diego Garcia
BULGARIA: US European Command 300; 2 armd/armd inf coy; M1 Abrams; M2 Bradley
CAMEROON: US Africa Command 300; MQ-1C Gray Eagle
CANADA: US Northern Command 150
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: UN MINUSCA 8
COLOMBIA: US Southern Command 50
CUBA: US Southern Command 950 (JTF-GTMO) at GuantАnamo Bay
CURACAO: US Southern Command 1 Forward Operating Location
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 3
DJIBOUTI: US Africa Command 4,700; 1 tpt sqn with C-130H/J-30 Hercules; 1 spec ops sqn with MC-130H/J; PC-12 (U-28A);
   1 CSAR sqn with HH-60G Pave Hawk; 1 CISR UAV sqn with MQ-9A Reaper; 1 naval air base
EGYPT: MFO 410; elm 1 ARNG inf bn; 1 ARNG spt bn
EL SALVADOR: US Southern Command 1 Forward Operating Location (Military, DEA, USCG and Customs personnel)
GERMANY: US Africa Command 1 HQ at Stuttgart
   US European Command 37,450; 1 Combined Service HQ (EUCOM) at Stuttgart-Vaihingen
   US Army 23,000
   FORCES BY ROLE
   1 HQ (US Army Europe (USAREUR)) at Heidelberg;
   1 div HQ (fwd); 1 SF gp; 1 armd recce bn; 2 armd bn;
   1 mech bde(-); 1 arty bn; 1 (cbt avn) hel bde(-); 1 (cbt avn) hel bde HQ; 1 int bde; 1 MP bde; 1 sigs bde; 1 spt bde; 1 (APS) armd bde eqpt set
   EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
   M1 Abrams; M2/M3 Bradley; Stryker, M109; M777; AH-64D/E Apache; CH-47F Chinook; UH-60L/M Black Hawk; HH-60M Black Hawk
   US Navy 1,000
   USAF 12,300
   FORCES BY ROLE
   1 HQ (US Air Force Europe (USAFE)) at Ramstein AB; 1 HQ (3rd Air Force) at Ramstein AB;
   1 ftr wg at Spangdahlem AB with 1 ftr sqn with 24 F-16C/D Fighting Falcon;
   1 tpt wg at Ramstein AB with 14 C-130J-30 Hercules; 2 Gulfstream V (C-37A); 5 Learjet 35A (C-21A); 1 B-737-700 (C-40B)
   USMC 1,150
GREECE: US European Command 400; 1 naval base at Makri; 1 naval base at Soudha Bay; 1 air base at Iraklion
GREENLAND (DNK): US Strategic Command 160; 1 AN/FPS-132 Upgraded Early Warning Radar and 1 Spacetrack Radar at Thule
GUAM: US Pacific Command 6,000; 3 SSGN; 1 MPS sqn (MPS-3 with equipment for one MEB) with 2 AKRH; 4 AKR; 1 ESD; 1 AKEH;
   1 bbr sqn with 6 B-1B Lancer; 1 tkr sqn with 12 KC-135R Stratotanker; 1 tpt hel sqn with MH-60S; 1 SAM bty with THAAD; 1 air base; 1 naval base
HONDURAS: US Southern Command 380; 1 avn bn with CH-47F Chinook; UH-60 Black Hawk
HUNGARY: US European Command 100; 1 armd recce tp; M3 Bradley
IRAQ: US Central Command Operation Inherent Resolve 9,000;
   1 armd div HQ; 2 inf coy; 1 mne coy; 1 SP arty bty with 4 M109A6; 1 fd arty bty with 4 M777A2; 1 MRL bty with 4 M142 HIMARS; 1 EOD pl;
   1 atk hel sqn with AH-64D Apache
ISRAEL: US Strategic Command
1 AN/TPY-2 X-band radar at Mount Keren
ITALY: US European Command 12,050
   US Army 4.400; 1 AB IBCT(-)
   US Navy 3,600; 1 HQ (US Navy Europe (USNAVEUR)) at Naples; 1 HQ (6th Fleet) at Gaeta; 1 MP sqn with 4 P-8A Poseidon at Sigonella
   USAF 3,850; 1 ftr wg with 2 ftr sqn with 21 F-16C/D Fighting Falcon at Aviano
   USMC 200
JAPAN: US Pacific Command 39,950
   US Army 2,900; 1 corps HQ (fwd); 1 SF gp; 1 avn bn; 1 SAM bn
   US Navy 11,700; 1 HQ (7th Fleet) at Yokosuka; 1 base at Sasebo; 1 base at Yokosuka
   FORCES BY ROLE
   3 FGA sqn at Atsugi with 10 F/A-18E Super Hornet; 1 FGA sqn at Atsugi with 10 F/A-18F Super Hornet; 1 EW sqn at Atsugi with 5 EA-18G Growler;
   1 AEW&C sqn at Atsugi with 5 E-2D Hawkeye; 2 ASW hel sqn at Atsugi with 12 MH-60R; 1 tpt hel sqn with 12 MH-60S
   EQUIPMENT BY TYPE 1 CVN; 3 CGHM; 2 DDGHM; 7 DDGM (2 non-op); 1 LCC; 4 MCO; 1 LHD; 1 LPD; 2 LSD
   USAF 11,450
   FORCES BY ROLE
   1 HQ (5th Air Force) at Okinawa - Kadena AB; 1 ftr wg at Misawa AB with (2 ftr sqn with 22 F-16C/D Fighting Falcon);
   1 wg at Okinawa - Kadena AB with (2 ftr sqn with 27 F-15C/D Eagle; 1 FGA sqn with 12 F-35A Lightning II; 1 tkr sqn with 15 KC-135R Stratotanker;
   1 AEW&C sqn with 2 E-3B/C Sentry; 1 CSAR sqn with 10 HH-60G Pave Hawk);
   1 tpt wg at Yokota AB with 10 C-130H Hercules; 3 Beech 1900C (C-12J);
   1 Spec Ops gp at Okinawa - Kadena AB with (1 sqn with 5 MC-130H Combat Talon; 1 sqn with 5 MC-130J Commando II);
   1 ISR sqn with RC-135 Rivet Joint; 1 ISR UAV flt with 5 RQ-4A Global Hawk
   USMC 13,600
   FORCES BY ROLE
   1 mne div; 1 mne regt HQ; 1 arty regt HQ; 1 recce bn; 1 mne bn; 1 amph aslt bn; 1 arty bn; 1 FGA sqn with 12 F/A-18C Hornet;
   1 FGA sqn with 12 F/A-18D Hornet; 1 FGA sqn with 12 F-35B Lightning II; 1 tkr sqn with 12 KC-130J Hercules; 2 tpt sqn with 12 MV-22B Osprey
   US Strategic Command 1 AN/TPY-2 X-band radar at Shariki; 1 AN/TPY-2 X-Band radar at Kyogamisaki
JORDAN: US Central Command Operation Inherent Resolve 2,500: 1 FGA sqn with 12 F-15E Strike Eagle;
   1 AD bty with MIM-104E/F Patriot PAC-2/3; 6 MQ-1B Predator; 2 MQ-9A Reaper
KOREA, REPUBLIC OF: US Pacific Command 28,500
   US Army 19,200
   FORCES BY ROLE
   1 HQ (8th Army) at Seoul; 1 div HQ (2nd Inf) located at Tongduchon; 1 armd bde; 1 (cbt avn) hel bde; 1 MRL bde; 1 AD bde; 1 SAM bty with THAAD
   EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
   M1 Abrams; M2/M3 Bradley; M109; M270 MLRS; AH-64 Apache; OH-58D Kiowa Warrior; CH-47 Chinook; UH-60 Black Hawk;
   MIM-104 Patriot/FIM-92A Avenger; 1 (APS) armd bde eqpt set
   US Navy 250
   USAF 8,800
   FORCES BY ROLE
   1 (AF) HQ (7th Air Force) at Osan AB; 1 ftr wg at Osan AB with (1 ftr sqn with 20 F-16C/D Fighting Falcon;
   1 atk sqn with 24 A-10C Thunderbolt II); 1 ftr wg at Kunsan AB with (2 ftr sqn with 20 F-16C/D Fighting Falcon); 1 ISR sqn at Osan AB with U-2S
   USMC 250
KUWAIT: US Central Command 14,300; 1 armd bde; 1 ARNG (cbt avn) hel bde; 1 spt bde; 1 UAV sqn with MQ-9A Reaper;
   4 AD bty with MIM-104E/F Patriot PAC-2/3; 1 (APS) armd bde set; 1 (APS) inf bde set
LATVIA: US European Command 60; 1 tpt hel flt; 5 UH-60M Black Hawk
LIBERIA: UN UNMIL 2
LIBYA: UN UNSMIL 1 obs
LITHUANIA: NATO Baltic Air Policing 4 F-15C Eagle
MALI: UN MINUSMA 26
MARSHALL ISLANDS: US Strategic Command 1 detection and tracking radar at Kwajalein Atoll
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: US European Command US Navy 6th Fleet: 1 CGHM; 4 DDGM; 1 LHD; 1 LPD; 1 LCC
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 2 obs
MOLDOVA: OSCE Moldova 3
NETHERLANDS: US European Command 410
NIGER: US Africa Command 800
NORWAY: US European Command 330; 1 (USMC) MEU eqpt set; 1 (APS) SP 155mm arty bn set
PACIFIC OCEAN: US Pacific Command
   US Navy 3rd Fleet: 8 SSBN; 22 SSGN; 7 SSN; 4 CVN; 10 CGHM; 20 DDGHM; 8 DDGM; 7 FFHM; 3 MCO; 3 LHD; 4 LPD; 3 LSD
PERSIAN GULF: US Central Command Navy 5th Fleet: 1 CGHM; 1 LHA; 1 LPD; 1 LSD; 10 PCFG; 6 (Coast Guard) PCC
   Combined Maritime Forces CTF-152: 4 MCO; 1 ESB
PHILIPPINES: US Pacific Command 100
POLAND: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 850; 1 mech bn
   US European Command 2,100; 1 armd bde HQ; 1 armd cav sqn(-); 1 SP arty bn; M1 Abrams; M3 Bradley; M109;
   1 ATK hel flt with 4 AH-64E Apache; 1 tpt hel flt with 4 UH-60 Black Hawk
PORTUGAL: US European Command 200; 1 spt facility at Lajes
QATAR: US Central Command 8,000: 1 bbr sqn with 6 B-52H Stratofortress; 1 ISR sqn with 4 RC-135 Rivet Joint; 1 ISR sqn with 4 E-8C JSTARS;
   1 tkr sqn with 24 KC-135R/T Straotanker; 1 tpt sqn with 4 C-17A Globemaster; 4 C-130H/J-30 Hercules; 2 AD bty with MIM-104E/F Patriot PAC-2/3
   US Strategic Command 1 AN/TPY-2 X-band radar
ROMANIA: US European Command 1,000; 1 armd inf bn HQ; 1 armd/armd inf coy; M1 Abrams; M2 Bradley; 1 tpt hel flt with UH-60L Black Hawk
SAUDI ARABIA: US Central Command 500
SERBIA: NATO KFOR Joint Enterprise 675; elm 1 ARNG inf bde HQ; 1 ARNG inf bn; 1 hel flt with UH-60
   OSCE Kosovo 5
SINGAPORE: US Pacific Command 220; 1 log spt sqn; 1 spt facility
SOMALIA: US Africa Command 500
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 7
SPAIN: US European Command 3,200; 1 air base at MorСn; 1 naval base at Rota
SYRIA: US Central Command Operation Inherent Resolve 1,700+; 1 ranger unit; 1 arty bty with M777A2; 1 MRL bty with M142 HIMARS
THAILAND: US Pacific Command 300
TURKEY: US European Command 2,700; 1 atk sqn with 12 A-10C Thunderbolt II; 1 tkr sqn with 14 KC-135; 1 CISR UAV sqn with MQ-1B Predator UAV;
   1 ELINT flt with EP-3E Aries II; 1 air base at Incirlik; 1 support facility at Ankara; 1 support facility at Izmir
   US Strategic Command 1 AN/TPY-2 X-band radar at Kurecik
UKRAINE: 310 (trg mission)
   OSCE Ukraine 68
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: US Central Command 5,000: 1 ftr sqn with 6 F-22A Raptor; 1 ISR sqn with 4 U-2; 1 AEW&C sqn with 4 E-3 Sentry;
   1 tkr sqn with 12 KC-10A; 1 ISR UAV sqn with RQ-4 Global Hawk; 2 AD bty with MIM-104E/F Patriot PAC-2/3
UNITED KINGDOM: US European Command 8,300
   FORCES BY ROLE
   1 ftr wg at RAF Lakenheath with 1 ftr sqn with 24 F-15C/D Eagle, 2 ftr sqn with 23 F-15E Strike Eagle; 1 ISR sqn at RAF Mildenhall with OC-135/RC-135;
   1 tkr wg at RAF Mildenhall with 15 KC-135R/T Stratotanker; 1 CSAR sqn with 8 HH-60G Pave Hawk;
   1 Spec Ops gp at RAF Mildenhall with (1 sqn with 8 CV-22B Osprey; 1 sqn with 8 MC-130J Commando II)
   US Strategic Command 1 AN/FPS-132 Upgraded Early Warning Radar and 1 Spacetrack Radar at Fylingdales Moor

FOREIGN FORCES
Canada Operation Renaissance 1 C-17A Globemaster III (C-177A)
Germany Air Force: trg units with 40 T-38 Talon; 69 T-6A Texan II; 24 Tornado IDS; Missile trg at Fort Bliss (TX)
Netherlands 1 hel trg sqn with AH-64D Apache; CH-47D Chinook
Singapore Air Force: trg units with F-16C/D; 12 F-15SG; AH-64D Apache; 6+ CH-47D Chinook hel

   Arms procurements and deliveries - North America
   Selected events in 2017
   United Technologies agreed the purchase of avionics firm Rockwell Collins for US$30 billion. The new venture will be known as Collins Aerospace Systems.
   Boeing and Northrop Grumman each received a US$328 million contract for the Technology Maturation and Risk Reduction phase of the US Air Force's Ground Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD) programme to replace the Minuteman III ICBM.
   Lockheed Martin and Boeing were each awarded a US$900m contract to begin design and development of options for a new Long-Range Standoff (LRSO) missile to replace the US Air Force's AGM-86B air-launched cruise missile.
   The US Navy issued a request for information for its FFG(X) requirement. The navy currently has a requirement for 20 vessels and plans to award a production contract in 2020.
   Boeing and Lockheed Martin withdrew from the US Navy's Over-the-Horizon Weapon System (OTH-WS) competition, leaving the Kongsberg and Raytheon partnership as the only industrial team currently involved.
   The B-21 Raider bomber project completed its preliminary design review.
   Northrop Grumman agreed the purchase of aerospace and defence company Orbital ATK for US$9.2bn.
   The US Army took delivery of the first of six M1A2 SEPv3 Abrams main battle tank (MBT) prototypes from General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS). It is planned that all M1A2 SEPv2 MBTs will be upgraded to this standard. GDLS was also awarded a contract to produce seven SEPv4 prototypes. The SEPv4 standard is planned to enter service in 2025.
   Закупки и поставки оружия - Северная Америка
   Некоторые события в 2017 году
   United Technologies договорилась о покупке авионики фирмы Rockwell Collins за $30 млд. Новое предприятие будет известно как Collins Aerospace Systems.
   Boeing и Northrop Grumman получили по контракту на 328 миллионов долларов США для этапа технического созревания и снижения рисков программы наземного стратегического сдерживания (GBSD) ВВС США для замены МБР Minuteman III.
   Lockheed Martin и Boeing получили по контракту на 900 млн долларов США для начала проектирования и разработки вариантов новой ракеты дальнего радиуса действия (LRSO), которая заменит крылатую ракету AGM-86B ВВС США.
   ВМС США выдали запрос на информацию для своего требования FFG(X). ВМС в настоящее время имеет потребность в 20 судах и планирует заключить контракт на производство в 2020 году.
   Boeing и Lockheed Martin вышли из соревнований ВМС США по системе вооружения Over-The-Horizon (OTH-WS), оставив партнерство Kongsberg и Raytheon единственной промышленной командой в настоящее время.
   Проект бомбардировщика B-21 Raider завершил предварительный обзор конструкции.
   Northrop Grumman договорился о покупке аэрокосмической и оборонной компании Orbital ATK за $ 9,2 млрд.
   Армия США приняла поставку первого из шести прототипов основного боевого танка M1A2 SEPv3 Abrams (MBT) от General Dynamics Land Systems (GDLS). Планируется, что все M1A2 SEPv2 MBTs будут обновлены до этого стандарта. GDLS также получила контракт на производство семи прототипов SEPv4. Стандарт SEPv4 планируется ввести в эксплуатацию в 2025 году.
    []

    []

    []



Chapter Four. Europe


   Throughout 2017, a diverse threat environment and political uncertainty about the cohesiveness of NATO and the European Union continued to put pressure on European governments to strengthen their defence capabilities. In response to this, national governments have launched a series of collaborative initiatives and have adjusted their force postures and strategy. At the same time, many of these governments are augmenting defence budgets that have slowly begun to recover from the extended period of cuts in the last decade.
   Public-opinion polling across all EU member states published in December 2016 by the European Commission revealed that alongside unemployment and social inequality, migration and terrorism were seen as the main challenges to Europe. A series of terrorist attacks in Belgium, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United Kingdom strained law-enforcement agencies and the armed forces. In some countries, troops were deployed to assist civilian authorities with homeland-security tasks, such as patrolling and presence missions. The attacks also raised questions about the preparedness of civil emergency authorities to deal with multiple events in a short time frame. Migration to Europe via several Mediterranean routes continued, although it did not reach the levels recorded in 2015. European countries continued to deploy coastguard and naval assets in response, and some (including Austria, Bulgaria and Hungary) contemplated deploying ground troops to help secure their land borders. As a result of this blending of internal and external security tasks, the requirement for closer coordination between civilian and military actors emerged as a more comprehensive challenge for domestic security than was anticipated.
   Meanwhile, the challenge posed by an assertive Russia continued to animate defence discussions in many EU and NATO member states. A series of exercises around and including Zapad 2017 served to demonstrate a more balanced and rounded Russian military capability, including progress in command and control, and the integration of increasingly advanced technology. Turkey's unclear course following the failed July 2016 coup attempt, particularly its deteriorating relations with several other European states (not least Germany) and renewed interest in a closer relationship with Russia, exacerbated the uncertainty. By the end of 2017, there was still little clarity on how the UK's exit from the EU would affect security and defence. With `Brexit' due to take effect in March 2019, government officials across EU member states were keen to ensure that it would not negatively affect security and defence cooperation: threat assessments across the continent consistently stressed the need for cooperation to tackle contemporary challenges and risks.
   The inauguration of Donald Trump as president of the United States left many European leaders uncertain about the durability of the transatlantic bond underpinning European security. Initially vague about NATO's collective-defence guarantee (enshrined in Article 5 of the North Atlantic Treaty), President Trump appeared to make US commitment contingent on increased European defence spending, notably chiding other leaders on this topic when he opened NATO's new headquarters in May 2017. Nonetheless, Trump used a speech in Warsaw on 6 July to declare that the US stood `firmly behind Article 5', both in terms of words and actions. Indeed, in its FY2018 budget, the US Department of Defense increased the funding allocated to its European Reassurance Initiative, and continued rotational troop deployments in NATO's eastern member states. Even so, Trump's rhetoric gave NATO members pause for thought.
   Following a meeting of NATO heads of state and government in Brussels, German Chancellor Angela Merkel had concluded on 28 May, with reference to the new US administration and Brexit, that `the times in which we could completely rely on others are, to a certain extent, over' and that `we Europeans truly have to take our fate into our own hands'. While her comments were expressed during an election rally and were therefore mostly intended for domestic consumption, they resonated throughout the Alliance, indicating that cohesion remained fragile, despite efforts to galvanise NATO into tackling the challenges posed by a deteriorating security environment on its eastern and southern flanks.
   Merkel's comments also fed into a growing sense of the need to strengthen the security and defence dimension of the EU in the face of adaptation pressures, including the evolving external threat picture and the internal perception that European cooperation had run out of steam. Following the Brexit referendum and several closely fought election campaigns in which eurosceptic candidates posed serious challenges to more mainstream parties, several leaders - including those of the French, German and Italian governments - identified security and defence as a policy area in which closer European collaboration could be seen as benefiting European citizens. Indeed, a reflection paper on the future of Europe released by the European Commission in June 2017 argued that `enhancing European security is a must. Member states will be in the driving seat, defining and implementing the level of ambition, with the support of the EU institutions. Looking to the future, they must now decide the path they want to take and speed they want to go at to protect Europe's citizens.' On 19 June, in the foreword to an implementation report on the EU Global Strategy, High Representative of the Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy and Vice-President of the European Commission Federica Mogherini argued that, in security and defence, `more has been achieved in the last ten months than in the last ten years'.
   Defence collaboration in the EU
   Recent initiatives to strengthen the EU's security and defence dimension have worked towards three principal goals: developing practical proposals to encourage and enable member states to cooperate; building EU-level institutions; and making EU funding available for defence purposes.
   Some of the proposals - such as that for the European Tactical Airlift Centre (ETAC), inaugurated in the Spanish city of Zaragoza on 8 June 2017 - have been implemented without gaining much public attention. ETAC permanently established a programme that was initiated by the European Defence Agency (EDA) in 2011 to design and plan advanced tactical-airlift-training activities. The centre is jointly owned by 11 nations and training will be carried out in multiple locations. Although small in terms of personnel numbers, and focused on a narrow field of activity, ETAC is a good example of the use of pooled resources to address interoperability challenges; indeed, the model could be expanded to other training areas.
   More wide-ranging proposals have the potential to drive future collaboration. One was the plan to activate Permanent Structured Cooperation (PESCO) in defence by the end of 2017. PESCO featured in the 2009 Lisbon Treaty, but thereafter lay dormant. The concept envisages a group of EU member states pursuing far-reaching defence cooperation within the EU framework. The principal reason why PESCO has lain dormant is a failure to determine how to be inclusive and effective at the same time. Critics maintained that if the criteria governing access to PESCO were too demanding, it would exclude some member states and thereby create divisions within the EU. Yet if the criteria were not demanding enough, any resulting collaboration would likely be ineffective. Nonetheless, on 22 June, the European Council agreed to launch PESCO and, in November, member states notified the council and the high representative of their intention to participate. Other challenges presented by the effort include how to structure defence cooperation with EU member states that do not participate in PESCO, and how to bureaucratically enable multiple projects to proceed in parallel under the overall PESCO structure.
   Another idea that stemmed from the EU Global Strategy was the Coordinated Annual Review on Defence (CARD). The ultimate aim of this initiative is to improve the harmonisation of defence planning by establishing a voluntary exchange of information on national defence plans and contributions to the EDA's Capability Development Plan (CDP). The EDA would then analyse the information submitted and prepare a report for a `steering board' consisting of national ministers of defence. The exercise is designed to highlight opportunities for collaboration and sharpen member states' focus on capability areas included in the CDP. The CARD concept is to be tested from the end of 2017 to 2019. The potential benefits of CARD could be bolstered by the EDA's plan to launch a `Cooperative Financial Mechanism'. Member states endorsed this idea, in principle, in May, with a view to establishing it in 2018. Participating member states would contribute to a fund that they could then use to pay for research and development (R&D) or collaborative acquisition projects. The EDA would release funds based on decisions by a steering board, while the mechanism would provide loans to governments that would otherwise struggle to join this kind of cooperative effort. It would therefore make a small contribution towards aligning member states' disparate procurement and spending cycles.
   A more significant change is that Commission funding can now be used to finance European defence. The first steps in this process began with small research projects in 2015 and 2016. These paved the way for the Preparatory Action on Defence Research (PADR), which consists of ~90 million (US$102m) spread over three years (2017-19) for defence R&D. The third step will be to implement the European Defence Fund (EDF).
   The EDF contains three distinct mechanisms. The first is the `research window', under which the EU will `offer direct funding (grants) for research in innovative defence products and technologies'. The PADR sets the scene for this. Full funding is expected to begin after 2020, through a dedicated EU programme under the next Multiannual Financial Framework (MFF) - the financial framework regulating the EU budget. The estimated research budget will be ~500m (US$564m) annually throughout the 2021-27 MFF. However, only defence R&D projects involving at least three member states will be eligible for funding.
   Meanwhile, a `capability window' will support the joint development and acquisition of defence capabilities. Contributions will mainly come from member states, but the Commission will co-finance some development costs through the European Defence Industrial Development Programme. The capability window will initially run from 2019 to 2020, have a budget of ~500m (US$564m) over the two years and accept only projects involving at least three companies from at least two member states. EU funds could cover all the costs of projects in development, but only up to 20% for prototypes.
   Lastly, the EDF's `financial toolbox' includes various mechanisms to help member states overcome differences in the timing of their budget and procurement processes, and to facilitate access to finance for small- and medium-sized enterprises. From a political standpoint, these measures have come to symbolise the Commission's determination to step up its role in defence. If rolled out as planned, they would position the Commission as an increasingly important player in Europe's defence-industrial landscape.
   The generation of EU-level institutions has proved more contentious. A Military Planning and Conduct Capability (MPCC) was finally approved in June 2017, one month after it had been vetoed by the UK. The MPCC, which sits within the EU Military Staff (EUMS) and works under the direction of the EUMS director general, will assume strategic-level command of the EU's non-executive military missions, such as the training missions in the Central African Republic, Mali and Somalia. It has a staff of 25, who will also liaise with their counterparts in the Civilian Planning and Conduct Capability. At the time of writing, the ultimate effect of these initiatives remained uncertain, but it was clear that many ideas about closer European defence cooperation, long discussed in governments and think tanks, were being put into practice at an accelerating pace.
   NATO: settling into new realities
   NATO's southern and eastern flanks are increasingly seen as persistent sources of instability and conflict. At its 2014 and 2016 summit meetings in Wales and Warsaw (see The Military Balance 2017, pp. 65-8), the Alliance began to drive a fresh round of adaptation to these changing external circumstances. There has been a renewed focus on collective defence as the Alliance's core mission, and a particular focus on measures to increase capabilities in NATO's Eastern European member states by way of forward presence, improved rapid-reaction capabilities and reinvestment in the ability to conduct rapid reinforcement missions within a contested environment. Significant capability challenges remain, particularly in relation to integrated air and missile defence and interoperability. In November, NATO announced an adapted command structure, including a command for the Atlantic and a command to `improve the movement of military forces across Europe'. NATO decided on 25 May 2017 to formally join the coalition fighting the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, in Iraq and Syria. Giving the organisation a seat at the table was intended to improve information sharing and facilitate the provision of extra flight hours for AWACS surveillance aircraft and air-to-air refuelling assets.
   After 2014, NATO enlargement and the Alliance's Resolute Support mission in Afghanistan had drawn reduced attention, in comparison to previous years. However, Montenegro officially became the 29th NATO member state on 5 June 2017, when the accession instrument was deposited with the US Department of State. While the move was of little military significance, it sent an important political message that NATO's door, in principle, remained open amid calls to rethink the wisdom of continued enlargement. Meanwhile, Resolute Support, NATO's mission to train, advise and assist the Afghan security forces, faced persistent challenges. In the first half of 2017, there was increasing evidence that the Taliban insurgency was gaining ground; this led to NATO's decision on 29 June to reinforce the operation, particularly aircrew and special-forces training. Media reports at the time suggested NATO wanted member states to contribute 2,000-3,000 additional troops to the mission. On a visit to Afghanistan on 27-28 September 2017, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg stated, `NATO doesn't quit when the going gets tough'. In November he indicated that troop numbers would rise from 13,000 to 16,000, and that NATO's financial support for Afghanistan's national-security forces was secure until 2020.
   US pressure on European allies to spend more on defence intensified after President Trump took office. During the presidential campaign, Trump had expressed his frustration at what he considered to be inadequate efforts by European governments to spend at least 2% of their GDP on defence - the target that NATO members agreed in 2014 to meet by 2024. During the NATO meeting of heads of state and government on 25 May 2017, the first attended by Trump, all members of the Alliance agreed to develop and submit to NATO annual national plans detailing the measures they were taking to meet NATO obligations on spending, troop contributions and capabilities. This decision was meant to signal to the US that NATO was a serious organisation worth investing in. Secretary-General Stoltenberg said that `the annual national plans will help us keep up the momentum, to invest more and better in our defence'. Trump noted that `we should recognize that with these chronic underpayments and growing threats, even 2 percent of GDP is insufficient to close the gaps in modernizing, readiness, and the size of forces. We have to make up for the many years lost. Two percent is the bare minimum for confronting today's very real and very vicious threats.' While many NATO member states have indeed begun to increase their defence spending, this seems to be motivated more by changing threat perceptions than US pressure. Nonetheless, the need to explain each nation's NATO commitments more clearly to electorates will be felt across Europe.
   DEFENCE ECONOMICS
   A favourable economic context
   The macroeconomic situation continues to improve across Europe. In the euro area, 2017 was the fifth consecutive year of growth. In general, the continent's economic indicators improved, with a continued fall in unemployment and an increase in private consumption. These trends were enabled not only by the European Central Bank's low-interestrate policies, which favoured credit growth, but also by increasing (though still relatively low) oil prices. The European Commission forecast growth of 1.9% for EU member states in 2017 and 2018. Central and Eastern European states experienced particularly strong growth in 2017, as seen in rates of 5.5% in Romania, 3.8% in Poland and 3.8% in Latvia. Some Southern European economies also performed well, with a return to growth in Greece (1.8%) and another year of strong growth in Spain (3.1%), albeit with Italy experiencing the slowest rate this year in the eurozone (1.5%). However, the long-term consequences of the financial crisis are still felt in many countries. Emergency expenditure and fiscal-stimulus packages, adopted in response to the crisis from 2008 onwards, have generated a legacy of high debt levels and fiscal imbalances. This legacy has prevented governments from significantly raising public expenditure. However, the picture is not uniform. In Northern and Central Europe, the ratio of debt to GDP is lower than in Western and Southern Europe. For instance, Latvia's and Lithuania's debt represents around 40% of their GDP, similar to Denmark and Sweden. In contrast, the level of debt- to-GDP is around 100% in Belgium, France and Spain, and even higher in Italy (133%) and Portugal (129%).
   Defence spending: the upturn continues
   In 2017 European defence spending increased by 3.6% in real terms (in constant 2010 US$). This is a sustained trend, observed since 2015, and driven by economic improvements and changing threat perceptions. Real-terms defence spending increased particularly in Germany (6.9%), Poland (3.2%), Romania (41.2%) and in Baltic countries. Nonetheless, while defence spending is rising across the continent, there are sub-regional variations. Western states aiming to play a global security role are attempting to maintain these levels, despite budgetary constraints. In Central and Eastern Europe, increased budgets are allowing states to redefine their European security roles.
   In France, the new government led by Emmanuel Macron, elected in spring 2017, announced during the summer that it would cut the 2017 defence budget by ~850 million (US$959m), despite expectations to the contrary. This decision was taken in order to support the EU's goal to limit public deficits to under 3% of GDP. The announced cuts will primarily affect equipment programmes, likely delaying deliveries, as well as ongoing projects such as modernisation of the Mirage 2000D combat aircraft. However, in the wake of this announcement, the government declared that the defence budget would grow in 2018, by ~1.8 billion (US$2bn), with the objective of reaching NATO's 2% of GDP target in 2025 (one year later than the target date agreed on in Wales in 2014). Within a context of budget restraint, some media reports assert that Macron may be ready to reconsider the extent of French military engagements at home and abroad, to allow for a closer alignment between means and ambitions. Public-security considerations, however, would likely loom large in any such decision.
   The UK finds itself in a similar situation as France, with an increase in total spending, but an apparent overstretch in commitments. UK defence spending increased from ё38.8bn (US$52.6bn) in 2016 to ё39.7bn (US$50.7bn) in 2017. This meant a nominal growth of 2.3% but, given exchange-rate fluctuations in 2017, a fall of 3.5% in current US dollars. In real terms, this still represented an increase of 0.5%. While the government announced a ё178bn (US$228bn) equipment strategy for 2016-26, including ё82bn (US$105bn) for new equipment, doubts were raised throughout 2017 about the feasibility of these plans. Both the National Audit Office and the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee cautioned that the cost of the Defence Equipment Plan had been underestimated. The main causes identified were the lack of detailed plans for savings; the fall in sterling, which has increased the cost of purchasing equipment from the United States; and the fact that ё10bn (US$13bn) of headroom funds have already been allocated. The risk is that should new emergency requirements arise, the Ministry of Defence will have little flexibility to acquire any significant new capabilities from within its budget.
   While the UK and France struggle to maintain capabilities to match their global ambitions, increased spending elsewhere in Europe is enabling military modernisation. In its financial plan for 2017- 21, released in June 2017, the German government announced that military expenditure would increase from ~37bn (US$41.7bn) in 2017 to ~42.4bn (US$50bn) in 2021. This would mean that defence spending would reach 1.16% of GDP by 2021, according to IMF forecasts. To meet the NATO 2% goal by that date, however, the budget would need to rise to more than ~70bn (US$79bn). For the time being, the extra funds are expected to support the broader modernisation of the German armed forces. To this end, the Bundestag approved a series of defence programmes in June 2017, in advance of the September elections. This included the modernisation of 104 Leopard 2 main battle tanks (MBTs) and the acquisition of five K-130 frigates. There was also some focus on procurements relevant to multinational cooperation, such as the life-extension programme for NATO's AWACS fleet; and Germany's share of the European Defence Agency's (EDA) Multinational Multi-Role Tanker Transport Fleet programme, which, the EDA announced, would expand its projected fleet from two aircraft to seven. (The aircraft will be NATO owned and will operate as pooled assets.) In June, Germany and Norway joined the Netherlands and Luxembourg in the project.
   Although European states are primarily boosting spending due to their own threat perceptions, US pressure has also had an effect. The Romanian government increased its budget, from RON11.2bn (US$2.8bn) in 2016 to RON16.3bn (US$4bn) in 2017, a nominal rise of 46%. This allows Romania to meet the NATO target in 2017, with defence spending of 2.03% of GDP. The Romanian government plans to increase spending to RON20.3bn (US$5bn) by 2020. This shift comes with an increased focus on equipment procurement. In 2017 capital expenses took up 48.2% of the total defence budget. Besides meeting NATO targets, Romania has sent other signals to NATO, and Washington in particular. For instance, the government aims to purchase 36 F-16 combat aircraft from the US, having previously acquired 12 second-hand F-16s from Portugal. Current plans also involve the acquisition of the Patriot air-defence system from Raytheon and the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS) from Lockheed Martin.
    []
 []

    []

   Procurement trends: modernisation under way
   It is estimated that around US$42bn, or around 19% of total EU member state defence spending (US$225bn), was allocated to procurement in 2016, including R&D.
   Procurement notably increased in Eastern and Northern Europe, following Russia's annexation of Crimea in 2014. Countries in these regions are trying to reduce their dependence on legacy Russian equipment in favour of Western materiel. For instance, Bulgaria, Poland and Slovakia still operate Russianbuilt MiG-29 Fulcrum combat aircraft, while Croatia and Romania still operate MiG-21 Fishbeds. Poland is considering the procurement of F-35 or F-16 combat aircraft, and Romania favours the F-16, while Bulgaria is going to issue another tender for its combat-aircraft requirement. Meanwhile, Croatia's combat-aircraft tender was sent to Greece, Israel and the US for F-16s, South Korea for the FA-50 and Sweden for the Gripen. Air defence is also being addressed. Poland is buying the Patriot system, while the Baltic states, constrained by relatively small budgets, are reportedly considering the joint procurement of an air-defence capability.
   As Central and Northern European countries look to modernise their arsenals by swapping out their Russian systems, Western and Southern European countries are adding new capabilities. Armed unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) are a case in point. The UK has operated US-built weapons capable UAVs since 2007, with its MQ-9A Reapers. In late 2016, the British government announced that these systems would be replaced by the Protector MQ-9 variant, which would be capable of carrying MBDA's Brimstone 2 missiles and Raytheon's Paveway IV guided bombs. In 2015 the US authorised Italy to arm its MQ-9 Reapers with Hellfire missiles, although it remains unclear whether this has been carried out. Other European countries are following suit. The German defence ministry intends to lease Heron TP UAVs from Israel; these could be armed, although the decision to do so was postponed in June 2017. Brimstone is a potential candidate weapon. Meanwhile, summer 2017 saw the French defence ministry announce that its Reapers would be armed in the short term - potentially with Hellfire or Brimstone missiles.
   Industry: manoeuvres in the naval sector
   Europe's shipbuilding sector showed divergent trends in 2017. France and Italy, for instance, are eyeing consolidation. In 2016 South Korea's STX Offshore and Shipbuilding filed for bankruptcy. This company owned a 66.6% share in STX Europe, which itself owned French shipbuilding firm STX France/ Chantiers de l'Atlantique, located in Saint-Nazaire. The yard in Saint-Nazaire built the Mistral-class amphibious assault ships and is the only facility in France capable of building aircraft carriers. After the bankruptcy, the only candidate to take over the French shipyard was Italy's Fincantieri. With the French state retaining 33.4% of the shares in STX France/Chantiers de l'Atlantique, the French and Italian governments agreed in April 2017 to an ownership structure. However, the new French government initially refused to accept this arrangement, announcing in July that it would temporarily nationalise STX France to forestall potential job losses. In late September 2017, Paris and Rome reached a new deal on the joint ownership of STX France, announcing a road map for June 2018 to discuss a future alliance between Naval Group and Fincantieri that could provide a focal point for further efforts to consolidate Europe's fragmented shipbuilding industry.
   Meanwhile, the UK government sought to stimulate competition in order to sustain several domestic naval shipyards, in contrast to its previous strategy of consolidation, which had left BAE Systems as a near-monopoly supplier in the UK. The thrust of the UK's National Shipbuilding Strategy, released in September 2017, was to encourage different private UK shipyards to bid to build the new Type-31e frigate (perhaps in distributed blocks, which would be assembled in a single location). Similarly, Germany ordered five Type-K130 frigates from a consortium of domestic shipyards (comprising Lurssen Werft & Co. KG, ThyssenKrupp Marine Systems and German Naval Yards Kiel) - although it did so for legal rather than economic reasons. This focus on competition in Germany and the UK would seem to indicate that naval shipbuilding in Europe will resist consolidation in the near term, despite recent efforts in this direction in France and Italy.
   FRANCE
   After winning the May presidential election, and with his new political party La Republique en Marche victorious in the June parliamentary election, there was international interest not only in Emmanuel Macron's defence views but also the degree to which they would form part of his ambitious reform agenda. However, one of the administration's first moves was to cut ~850 million (US$959m) from the 2017 budget, thereby delaying some equipment programmes, in order to try to comply with EU budget rules (see p. 72). General Pierre de Villiers, then chief of defence staff, voiced his opposition to the plan, arguing that French forces were overstretched in view of their operational commitments. Following a dispute with the administration that spilled into the public domain, de Villiers resigned. In July, he was replaced by General FranГois Lecointre, former chief of the prime minister's military cabinet.
   Nonetheless, at the same time as reducing the 2017 budget, Macron has also said that he wants France to reach, by 2025, the NATO target to spend 2% of GDP on defence; this would take the budget to more than ~53 billion (US$63bn). Moreover, he announced a defence-budget increase of ~1.6bn (US$1.8bn) between 2018 and 2022. However, to reach this target by 2025, defence spending would then have to increase by at least ~3.5bn (US$3.9bn) each year between 2022 and 2025 (following the 2022 presidential elections). Many observers believe such sharp increases are unlikely to occur.
   Integral to the budget debate is not simply the cost of operations and equipment, but also the cost of modernising France's sea- and air-launched nuclear weapons and related delivery systems. It is estimated that the cost of this process will increase from ~3.9bn (US$4.4bn) in 2017 to ~6bn (US$6.8bn) per year in 2020-25, but decrease thereafter - with these outlays likely to come at the expense of conventional procurements.
   The capability of the new generation of French nuclear-powered ballistic-missile submarines is crucial for the navy (submarine construction is supposed to begin in 2019), but so too is the capability of future versions of the M51 submarine-launched missile. The new M51.2 should be delivered in 2020, and the M51.3 in 2025, while research into the M51.4 is due to start in 2022. For the air component, a midlife upgrade of the current ASMPA missile, called ASMPA-R, is planned for 2022; it is understood that a decision will be made in 2018 about a successor weapon. This successor programme is currently designated ASN4G, and is planned for delivery in 2035. The design is likely to involve a choice between a hypersonic platform and one incorporating stealthy features. While it is expected that the significant outlays associated with this modernisation will come at the expense of conventional capabilities, at the time of writing no decisions on this had been announced.
   Compounding these issues is the question of overstretch, which has been gradually acknowledged by political leaders. In early September 2017, the chief of defence staff declared in Toulon at the `Defence Summer University' that the French armed forces have been used at `130% of their capabilities and now need time to regenerate'. Several ongoing operations - principally, the domestic Sentinelle operation, as well as combat missions in Mali and those against the Islamic State, otherwise known as ISIS or ISIL, have added to France's already extensive deployments. Sentinelle, which began after the Charlie Hebdo attacks in 2015, has mobilised over 10,000 troops in France on surveillance and protection duties designed to prevent terrorist attacks. As the operation has been criticised by defence specialists (and many in the armed forces) for draining resources, it was announced that operational commitments would change at the end of 2017. The two other major operations are Barkhane in the Sahel and Chammal, France's contribution to the anti-ISIS coalition - which involve around 4,000 personnel and 1,200 personnel respectively.
   Immediately after his election, Macron commissioned a strategic defence review. Completed in early October 2017, this was a shorter and less ambitious process than the 2008 and 2013 white books. It maintained many of the key themes in these reports, and also stressed that challenges in cyberspace and from disruptive technologies meant that France had to maintain the capability for independent opposed entry operations. In addition, it emphasised France's commitment to NATO but also expressed support for EU security tools and the EU's Common Security and Defence Policy.
   In a major speech on the EU in September, Macron laid out his European credentials, making reference to a `European autonomous capacity for action, complementary to NATO', which should be in place `by the beginning of the next decade'. He went on to call for a joint intervention capability, a common defence fund and a common doctrine, with moves towards the creation of a `shared strategic culture'. Macron has also called for closer cooperation between France and Germany in the military sphere, announcing with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in July that the two countries would explore the potential development of a new combat aircraft. It was also announced that both countries would reinforce other areas of defence cooperation, including a possible European maritime-patrol aircraft, a medium-altitude long endurance unmanned aerial vehicle and a joint C-130J transport-aircraft unit from 2021.
   NORWAY
   Norway's armed forces are undergoing a period of significant readjustment in order to deal with a new security environment in which the country has to balance its response to a resurgent Russia while also maintaining its active international engagement. A long-term defence plan, approved by parliament in November 2016, highlighted the need to procure new and more advanced capabilities; improve combat readiness, logistics support and force protection; and strengthen host-nation support to sustain NATO forces. Defence funding is being increased, and it is planned that around 25% of the budget will be allocated to investments, but, without a further significant increase in defence funding, the budget will not reach NATO's 2% defence-spending pledge by 2024. Nonetheless, Norway's armed forces are on a new course, with the balance of military striking power - and the core of Norway's deterrent capacity - shifting to the air and maritime domains.
   Security policy
   Russia's assertive security and military policies, and the ongoing modernisation of its conventional and nuclear forces, combine to make it more capable of power projection. In Europe's High North, Russia's military posture underscores the asymmetrical character of the Norwegian-Russian relationship. Russia's military-modernisation process has improved readiness (which would reduce warning times for its opponents in any military contingency), while the country also has the capability to carry out covert and cyber operations. In a worst-case scenario, the concern is that Russia could seek a fait accompli before NATO allies decide to engage or reinforcements arrive, supported by anti-access capabilities that effectively act as a strategic challenge to transatlantic defence. These capabilities hold at risk NATO's ability to rapidly reinforce its eastern and northern allies, and potentially imperil the link between North America and Europe. One aspect that troubles Norwegian defence officials relates to Russia's strategies to protect its nuclear-powered ballistic-missile submarines. In a major conflict, Russia might attempt to defend its strategic submarines in an Arctic `bastion' by establishing sea control in northern waters and sea denial down to the Greenland-Iceland-United Kingdom gap. Norway's defence planners, including its defence minister, have expressed concern that `Russia is revitalising the bastion-defence concept'. Another capability challenge relates to the advanced weapons being introduced into Russian service, including precision-guided systems such as the S-400 (SA-21 Growler) air-defence system, the Iskander (SS-26 Stone) short-range ballistic-missile system and the Kalibr (SS-N-30) and Kh-101 cruise missiles. All of these systems are being deployed across Russia's military districts, and some of them have been used on operations.
   Nonetheless, stability and cooperation remain key objectives for both Norway and Russia in the north; Norway's policy towards Russia combines deterrence and defence with reassurance and collaboration. For instance, in peacetime, Norway does not allow large Alliance exercises in its northernmost county, Finnmark, and there are limits on NATO air operations from Norwegian bases close to the Russian border. In March 2014, Norway suspended most of its bilateral military cooperation with Russia, but, within the limits set by these sanctions, the two countries continue to work together in areas such as coastguard and border-guard activities, search and rescue, and efforts to uphold the Incidents at Sea Agreement. Furthermore, growing tension between Russia and the West has not led to a breakdown of the direct line between Norwegian Joint Headquarters and Russia's Northern Fleet.
   NATO
   NATO remains the cornerstone of Norwegian security and defence policy. Over the past ten years, however, Norwegian officials have argued that the Alliance has focused too narrowly on international crisis-management operations.
   Norway's launch of the Core Area Initiative in 2008 marked a return to traditional thinking. This underlined the importance of collective defence and a better balancing of core functions in the EuroAtlantic area with out-of-area operations. Since then, Norway has worked systematically to rebuild the credibility of Article 5 in two principal ways. The first is by stressing the need to reform NATO's command structure; prepare for high-end operations; more closely bind together NATO headquarters and national and multinational headquarters; and increase the Alliance's regional focus. Secondly, when preparing for NATO's 2016 Warsaw Summit, Norway - in cooperation with France, Iceland and the UK - launched new proposals aimed at strengthening NATO's posture and activities in the North Atlantic. From Norway's perspective, NATO needs to reintroduce one joint headquarters with primary responsibility for the area. (Allied Command Atlantic, commonly known as SACLANT, was replaced in 2003 by Allied Command Transformation.) Norway also feels that more extensive training and Article 5 exercises are required. In October-November 2018, Norway will host the next iteration of NATOЄs Trident Juncture exercise, the largest exercise in Norway since Strong Resolve in 2002. It will involve around 35,000 participants from up to 30 countries and will offer the opportunity to test plans for reinforcements and Oslo's `total defence' concept, as part of joint and combined operations with allies and partners.
   While NATO remains important to Norway, cooperation in smaller groups and strategic partnerships with selected countries is gaining momentum. Partnership with the United States is still the `alliance within the Alliance' for Oslo, despite uneasiness with US policy under President Donald Trump. Bilateral military cooperation is being expanded in a number of fields. Intelligence and surveillance is one key component of this relationship, based on US technological and financial support for a number of signals-intelligence activities run by the Norwegian Intelligence Service. Another important component is the pre-positioned materiel for the US Marine Corps in central Norway (Marine Corps Prepositioning Program-Norway). In any conflict in Northern Europe, these assets would support a Marine Air-Ground Task Force and, if need be, facilitate the subsequent arrival of an expeditionary brigade. In addition to the US, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK, and potentially France and Poland are identified as strategic partners.
   Nordic defence cooperation is also growing in significance, with NORDEFCO, established in 2009, an institutional framework for many activities in this area. The project was initially driven by the prospect of financial savings through common equipment procurement, based mostly on Swedish systems. Now, however, there are more dynamic developments in operations. A web of agreements and arrangements between Nordic countries and with major Western states are combining incrementally to prepare them to operate together in a crisis, should respective governments decide to do so.
   Defence policy and military strategy
   The long-term defence plan for 2017-20, entitled `Capable and Sustainable', prioritises readiness, availability and sustainability, as well as investments in core or strategic capabilities. Three main categories are particularly significant:
   Detection and identification
   Significant resources are being spent on improving intelligence and surveillance. These include major improvements to the Norwegian Intelligence Service, including the modernisation of ground-based listening stations and the procurement of a new and more capable Marjata IV intelligence-collection vessel for operations in the Barents Sea. Moreover, five new P-8A Poseidon maritime-patrol aircraft will replace Norway's ageing P-3C Orions. Meanwhile, to enhance protection against digital threats, the government is considering establishing a `digital border defence', designed to improve the Norwegian Intelligence Service's ability to monitor cable-routed signals passing Norway's border. There will be substantial procurement, maintenance and operational costs for all these systems.
   Strike capability
   Norway will soon invest heavily in combat platforms with the mobility and firepower to influence the strategic decisions of potential aggressors. These include up to 52 F-35A Lightning II combat aircraft, with a weapons suite that includes the Joint Strike Missile, developed by Norwegian defence manufacturer Kongsberg. Norway's F-35s are planned to reach initial operational capability in 2019 and full operational capability in 2025. Furthermore, four new submarines built in Germany will, in 2026-30, replace the navy's six Ula-class submarines.
   Enhancing defensive capability
   The NASAMS II air-defence system will be upgraded and equipped with new short- and medium-range missiles. Norway also plans to enhance NASAMS II by introducing longer-range missiles in 2024- 28. They will be concentrated around the two air bases at ьrland and Evenes, in order to protect Norwegian forces `and the areas that will serve as potential staging areas for allied reinforcements', according to the long-term defence-plan document. The concept of intertwined national and allied defence efforts in the High North is strongly emphasised in the plan.
   These capabilities amount to a fundamental change in Norway's military capabilities, whereby maritime and air-striking power are set to become central to Norway's force structure and at the core of its deterrent. This marks a significant shift from the Cold War, when Norway relied on a number of army brigades, supported by sea and air power, whose main mission was to fight defensively in northern Norway until reinforced by allies. This de facto conceptual change has, however, been the subject of less debate than the size of the land forces.
   The armed forces
   The overall peacetime strength of Norway's armed forces, including conscripts, is approximately 24,000 personnel. In addition, the Home Guard consists of approximately 38,000 high-readiness trained reserves. A key priority in the years to come is to improve combat readiness, logistics support and force protection, and to incorporate new and more advanced capabilities. At the same time, the defence effort is dependent on revitalising the total defence concept, which encompasses mutual support and cooperation between the armed forces and civilian authorities in situations ranging from peace to war; Trident Juncture 2018 will be a litmus test of this complex structure.
   The chief of defence has full command over the armed forces, while the chief of the joint headquarters maintains operational command. The role of the service-branch chiefs changed in 2017. While they had earlier been responsible for force generation and were referred to as `inspector generals', they have now gained additional responsibility for operational leadership at the tactical level and become chiefs of the service branches.
   Recently, three significant reforms have affected Norway's personnel and competency structures. Firstly, universal conscription was introduced in 2015, making military service compulsory for women as well as men. (In 2017 more than 25% of the conscript intake was female.) Secondly, a new personnel structure was introduced in 2016, supplementing the existing category of `officers' with an `other ranks' category. This reform brought the Norwegian armed forces in line with most other NATO countries; commissioned officers will comprise 30% of overall personnel numbers. Thirdly, a reform of defence-education structures was launched in 2017, driven by the need to reduce annual costs by approximately NOK500 million (US$59.3m) and streamline military education according to military requirements. As a consequence, the current six colleges and the officer-training system will be merged into one organisational structure, encompassing both the military's higher academic education and its vocational education.
   Army
   The army's principal capability rests in its three manoeuvre battalions, with associated combat support and combat service support, which form part of Brigade North; two battalions are in the north of the country, and one in the south. The force structure also includes His Majesty the King's Guard (a light infantry battalion) and one light infantry battalion, which patrols Norway's border with Russia.
   The army is facing major challenges, notably due to ageing equipment and insufficient readiness and availability. In November 2016, the defence minister initiated a Land Forces Study that was intended to provide an in-depth review of the mission, concept and structure of the land forces, within the fiscal framework set by the long-term plan. Recommendations based on the study were presented to parliament in October 2017. The mission and conceptual framework of the army have been clarified. Professional units will continue with high staffing levels, while conscription and reserves will be better utilised, with longer military service for the most demanding roles. The plans include modernising and procuring new CV90 armoured personnel carriers, establishing a ground-based air-defence capability in Brigade North and procuring a new artillery system. Instead of fully upgrading the Leopard 2A4 main battle tanks (MBTs), Norway plans to procure new MBTs from 2025, either in the form of a newer version of the Leopard or a new-generation tank that might be lighter and more mobile. The new security challenges have led to a renewed focus on presence in Finnmark. A cavalry battalion will be formed at Porsanger. This comes in addition to the earlier decision to strengthen the Border Guard with a new ranger company. Also, the Home Guard in the area will be strengthened and co-located with the army under a unified Land Forces Command Finnmark.
   Navy
   The navy is modernising, and intends to build a fleet around fewer, more capable platforms. These include five modern Fridtjof Nansen destroyers, which entered service between 2006 and 2011; a new logistics-support vessel (with replenishment-at-sea capability), which is planned to be delivered in 2018; the acquisition of four new submarines to replace the Ula-class boats (for which the German-designed Type 212NG was selected in 2017); and three new seagoing coastguard vessels to replace the Nordkapp class. Due to high costs, the acquisitions will be combined with cuts in other areas. The six modern Skjold-class missile-armed fast patrol boats, the last of which entered service in 2013, are planned to be phased out around 2025, when the navy's F-35As will be operational. Also, Norway plans to reduce the number of mine-countermeasures vessels in its navy from six to four, a shift that likely heralds the gradual transfer of this capability to autonomous systems deployed from support vessels.
   Meanwhile, the acquisition of 14 NH90 maritime helicopters will significantly boost naval capability, but this has proven to be one of the most difficult procurements since the turn of the century, with significant supplier delays. The first eight helicopters have been delivered - the last are due in 2018-19 - and all of them are expected to reach full operational capability by 2022 or soon after.
   In recent years, much of the navy has been operating at a high tempo, which has proven challenging. The new long-term defence plan outlines measures to increase the responsiveness and endurance of Norway's maritime forces. This includes increasing the number of total frigate crews from three and a half to five, which will allow for the continuous operation of a minimum of four vessels, in contrast to the original plan to operate three.
   Air force
   The acquisition of up to 52 F-35A combat aircraft will shape the future of the air force. With accompanying reforms to the base and support structure, the new aircraft will serve as the catalyst for adjusting the entire air-force structure. The first aircraft arrived in Norway in November 2017. The main base for the F-35s will be ьrland Air Station in central Norway, while a forward operating base will be established at Evenes Air Station in the north, with aircraft assigned to NATO's Quick Reaction Alert role. By concentrating activity in fewer bases with enhanced protection, and improving the skills of aircrews and ground crews, more resources will become available for operational activity. Yet the concentration strategy has proven controversial, especially in relation to the prospective closure of AndЬya Air Station in the north, which is currently home to Norway's maritime-patrol aircraft. Norway plans to co-locate the new P-8As with combat aircraft at Evenes.
    []

   Other capabilities
   The Home Guard forms the core of Norway's territorial-defence structure. Its main tasks are to secure important infrastructure and other areas, support the main combat services and allied forces, and assist civilian authorities in civil emergencies. Parliament decided in 2017 to reduce the number of personnel in the Home Guard from approximately 45,000 to 38,000 - with 3,000 held at very high readiness - and to disband the Naval Home Guard. Home Guard districts and units will see more varied levels of ambition, and there will be an increase in its presence and operational capability in the north. As the Special Operation Forces remain important in national contingencies and in contributions to international operations, there are few changes envisaged for these formations.
   The government is also restructuring and modernising cyber and other information and communications technology (ICT) entities in the defence sector. The armed forces are increasingly reliant on ICT, particularly the ability to maintain freedom of action in the cyber domain. Most ICT entities will be unified within the framework of Norwegian Cyber Defence.
   DEFENCE ECONOMICS
   Revenues from petroleum continue to form a substantial part of the Norwegian economy, but growth in these revenues is expected to slow. Norwegian petroleum production peaked in the middle of the last decade, and the fall in oil prices has affected revenues. In 2014-16, the government's net cash flow from the petroleum sector fell by more than 60%. In addition, an ageing population will likely increase government spending on pensions and health services, which could further strain public finances.
   At the same time, the continued supply of petroleum revenues will still contribute to an increase in the Government Pension Fund Global. As the figures stand, the fund's growth will provide a basis to increase the government's budgets (in a normal economic situation) by between NOK3billion (US$400m) and NOK4bn (US$500m) per year in the next 10-15 years - a significant contribution, albeit much less than in the previous 15 years, when the fund increased revenues by an average of NOK12bn (US$1.4bn) per year, when measured in fixed 2017 kroner.
   However, Norway's long-term defence plan rests on a substantial increase in funding. In total, the government recommends additional funding over the coming 20 years of approximately NOK180bn (US$21.3bn) , and as a part of this, a gradual increase over the first four years to NOK7.8bn (US$900m) by 2020. Approximately 25% of the defence budget will be allocated to investments, in order to finance the modernisation plans, while more resources will be allocated to alleviate shortfalls in maintenance and to improve readiness, availability and sustainability. The air force will see significantly higher growth than the other armed services because of the heavy investment in aircraft and combat bases. However, despite the increase in defence spending, the budget will remain below 1.55% of GDP in 2017, so substantial additional funding will be necessary by 2024 to meet NATO's 2% defence-spending pledge.
   In addition to increased funding, the long-term plan foresees internal efficiency savings, estimated at NOK1.8bn (US$200m) by the end of 2020. This will allow funding to be reallocated to other high-priority areas within the defence sector.
   Defence industry
   Despite having a relatively small defence-industrial base, Norway's defence industry possesses a number of very advanced technologies and capabilities, producing several leading products and systems in the international market. The industry has a total annual turnover of around NOK12bn (US$1.4bn), and more than 70% of its revenue is generated from customers outside Norway.
   The main capabilities are in the following areas:
   Missiles (Naval Strike Missile and Joint Strike Missile)
   Ground-based air defence
   Rocket motors
   Remote-weapon stations
   Advanced ammunition and shoulder launched weapons
   Personal reconnaissance systems (nano UAVs)
   Underwater systems
   Command, control and communication systems
   Secure information systems, including cryptographic equipment
   Soldier systems
   Kongsberg is Norway's main supplier of defence and aerospace-related systems. The Norwegian state owns a 50.001% share in the company, which in turn owns a 49.9% stake in Finland's leading defence supplier, Patria Oyj. Kongsberg's product and system portfolio comprises various command-and-control systems for land-, air- and sea-based defence; maritime and land-based surveillance systems for civilian, military and other public installations; and several types of tactical radio and other communications systems, predominantly developed and delivered for land-based defence. It also produces the Penguin anti-ship missile and the new Naval Strike Missile. One of Kongsberg's major export successes is the Protector remote-weapon station. The firm also makes advanced composites and other engineering products for the aircraft and helicopter market.
   Nammo is an international aerospace and defence company headquartered in Norway, and the second largest of Norway's defence firms. The group is owned on a 50/50 basis by the Norwegian government and Patria Oyj. Nammo operates from more than 30 sites and offices in 14 countries. It manufactures ammunition and rocket engines for both military and civilian customers, as well as shoulder-launched munitions systems; military and sports ammunition; rocket motors for military and aerospace applications; and demilitarisation services.
   UNITED KINGDOM
   In Europe, the United Kingdom is equalled only by France in its ability to project credible combat power but, while its forces remain relatively well balanced, many key capabilities are close to critical mass - `the minimum threshold of operational effectiveness', according to the UK House of Commons Defence Committee. Indeed, plans to field an improved `Joint Force 2025' face considerable challenges in delivery, not least in terms of affordability, and in sustaining or increasing personnel numbers. Due to these factors, the 'national security capability review', announced by the government after the June 2017 election, may result in further reductions in military capability.
   Nonetheless, UK forces continue to be deployed on global operations, playing a major role in the US-led campaign against the Islamic State, also known as ISIS or ISIL, and modestly increasing their presence in Afghanistan. As part of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence, a battalion-strength UK force led a multinational battle group deployed to Estonia, which incorporated a French company. In addition, the UK-led Joint Expeditionary Force was broadened beyond NATO member states to include Sweden and Finland.
   An increase in domestic terrorist attacks saw special forces deployed to assist counter-terrorism police. Troops were rapidly mobilised to assist police on two occasions - although in both instances they were quickly demobilised. The scale of destruction in the Caribbean wrought by Hurricane Irma was unanticipated, even though some disaster-relief capabilities had been pre-positioned on a logistics ship in the Caribbean. British force levels in the region were rapidly increased to some 2,000 troops, with the deployment of helicopters, engineers and marines by air - along with the helicopter carrier HMS Ocean, on what was likely its final mission.
   Armed services
   Army reorganisation continued in 2017, with the Specialised Infantry Group (the new dedicated capability-building formation) achieving initial operational capability. The army's existing signal brigades are to be grouped into a single formation along with the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance brigade, and 77 Brigade, in order to better conduct `information manoeuvre'. It was announced that MBDA's Common Anti-air Modular Missile would be bought to replace Rapier in the ground-based air defence role, but the requirement for a new mechanised infantry vehicle remained unfulfilled.
   HMS Queen Elizabeth, the first of two new aircraft carriers, began sea trials, while work progressed on readying the other, HMS Prince of Wales. The government announced a new national shipbuilding strategy, which included the construction of eight Type-26 anti-submarine frigates and five lighter Type-31e general-purpose frigates, cost-capped at ё250 million (US$320m) each and optimised for export. Meanwhile, plans were announced to test a laser weapon, Dragonfire, on a warship.
   The Royal Air Force (RAF) marks the centenary of its foundation in 2018. In 2017, it remained heavily committed to the campaign against ISIS, and to national and NATO air policing, while delivery of A400M Atlas transport aircraft continued. RAF Typhoon squadrons should begin to receive the Meteor rocket-ramjet-powered air-to-air missile in 2018. This missile will provide considerably greater performance than the AIM-120C AMRAAM presently fielded on the aircraft. The first of the UK's F-35B Lightning II combat aircraft are due to embark on the Queen Elizabeth in 2018, and the first P-8A Poseidon maritime-patrol aircraft will be delivered in 2019.
   Defence economics
   The UK increased defence spending from ё38.8billion (US$52.6bn) in 2016 to ё39.7bn (US$50.7bn) in 2017. This meant a nominal 2.3% increase, but given the fall in exchange rates in 2017, in current US dollars this meant a fall of 3.5% in dollar purchasing power, although in real terms (constant 2010 US dollars), this still meant a 0.5% increase in the budget. However, since the UK economy was projected to achieve growth of 1.7% in 2017, according to the IMF, this meant that the country's ratio of defence spending to GDP was 1.98% that year. Moreover, reports by the National Audit Office and the House of Commons Public Accounts Committee pointed towards a major shortfall in funding for the Defence Equipment Plan, partly resulting from the fall in the value of the pound.
   The armed forces continued to be undermanned by more than 5%, with deficiencies of 5.9% in the army, 5.4% in the RAF and 2.7% in the Royal Navy (RN), particularly in the warfare, submarine, medical, logistics and engineering trades. While the Ministry of Defence has ambitious plans to improve recruitment and retention, these focus on the long term and these shortages call into doubt the plans to sustain the size of the RAF and RN.
   Overall, there were multiple indications that the defence budget was coming under increased pressure, especially in relation to funding for personnel and future equipment. The government announced that the national security capability review would 'include [an] examination of the policy and plans which support implementation of the national security strategy, and help to ensure that the UK's investment in national security capabilities is as joined-up, effective and efficient as possible, to address current national security challenges'. Given that the 2017 terrorist attacks highlighted pressure on police numbers and counter-terrorism capabilities, many analysts expect that the review will examine further reductions in armed-forces capability and personnel. While the government announced ambitious plans to sustain and increase defence cooperation with Europe after leaving the EU, any economic shock resulting from Brexit would put public spending, and therefore the defence budget, under further pressure.
   Internationalisation of the German armed forces
   The Bundeswehr has long been involved in bilateral and multilateral cooperation. The Franco-German Brigade is the best-known example. Created in 1989, it brings together French and German army units under a joint command. A French unit had been based in Germany, but this was disbanded in 2014 following French army restructuring. However, Germany's 291st Light Infantry Battalion continues to be stationed in France, while the brigade also has a binational logistics battalion.
   In 1995 Germany and the Netherlands set up the 1st German-Dutch Corps. More recently, a flurry of cooperation initiatives involving the Czech Republic, the Netherlands and Romania have underlined the fact that the German armed forces are systematically strengthening existing links, or creating new ties, with European partners for the purposes of capability development and to generate formations for operations.
   Other European nations are considering similar arrangements with Germany. Indeed, plans for cooperation with Poland were already well developed before a new Polish government, elected in October 2015, decided to slow the projects.
   The intellectual basis for these more recent initiatives, even though they have not all been directly inspired by it, is the Framework Nations Concept (FNC), a German proposal agreed on by NATO member states at the Alliance's 2014 summit. Since then, Germany, Italy and the United Kingdom have organised collaborative initiatives under the FNC banner, although these efforts differ in focus. The German approach has been, firstly, to try to organise clusters of countries around capability-development goals and, since 2015, to provide large formations for NATO operations. At the time of writing, 16 European NATO nations, plus non-NATO members Austria and Finland, had joined in one format or another.
   After the 2016 German defence white paper, and in light of the deteriorating security situation in Europe, systematic cooperation with European partners has turned into a core planning assumption for the German armed forces as they try to regenerate capabilities relevant to core NATO collective-defence tasks. While some observers assume that Berlin is pursuing a federalist European agenda, it would be more accurate to characterise the use of multiple binational- and multilateral-cooperation formats as a pragmatic approach to help Germany and other participating countries meet relevant NATO obligations.
   Media discourse on Germany's initiatives often uses the term `integration' to describe the subordination of one nation's unit to the command structures of another. It is more accurate to describe this practice as an `association' or `affiliation' of units, even though cooperation of this kind creates mutual dependency. While all states preserve their legal national sovereignty over the units involved, their political autonomy in deployment decisions will likely be somewhat restricted in situations where partners disagree on the wisdom of a particular operation. Nonetheless, over time, and as long as the political will exists, international cooperation like this should improve inter-operability and, to a degree, help harmonise military requirements.
   NATO-EU relations
   Since establishing a `strategic partnership' arrangement in 2002, the European Union and NATO have tried to give this cooperation practical meaning. However, the EU's decision to grant EU membership to Cyprus in 2004, and Turkey's resulting decision to effectively block formal exchanges between the two organisations, put the brakes on a relationship that all major stakeholders consider, at least in principle, to be one that should be characterised by complementarity and mutual benefit.
   The deteriorating security environment in Europe, particularly the `hybrid' challenges perceived in the south and east, has provided a new impulse for cooperation. Governments are responding to the perception that tackling modern challenges requires a broad spectrum of civilian-military instruments and that electorates are seeking effectiveness and efficiency from national defence budgets. Against this backdrop, NATO and the EU adopted a Joint Declaration at the Alliance's 2016 Warsaw Summit. The declaration focused on seven areas: hybrid threats; cyber security and defence; security and defence capacity-building in partner countries; enabling defence industrial research activities; coordinating maritime operations and maritime situational awareness; coordinating exercises; and coherent and complementary defence capability development. In December 2016, a catalogue of 42 action items spanning the seven priority areas was presented to the staffs of both organisations to take forward from 2017.
   A progress report published on 14 June 2017, and endorsed by the NATO and EU councils, suggests that `cooperation between the two organisations is now becoming the established norm, a daily practice, fully corresponding to the new level of ambition' promoted by the 2016 Joint Declaration. It is premature to speak of a substantive breakthrough, but practical and meaningful progress has been made since the declaration was signed in Poland. For example, the EU and NATO are working on a joint intelligence assessment on aspects of hybrid challenges, and have encouraged interaction between their respective analysis cells. In addition, both the EU's External Action Service and the NATO Secretariat have been involved in the new Helsinki-based European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats, even though neither is a formal member of the centre. Meanwhile, the organisations' respective cyber-emergency-response teams have begun to develop a relationship, and are sharing cyber security concepts. NATO and the EU are also actively looking to coordinate some of their hybrid-scenario-response exercises under the Parallel and Coordinated Exercises initiative.
   Security and defence capacity-building has been a priority for both organisations, although in the past these activities have not been well coordinated and some operations have even revealed a degree of residual institutional competition. In the capacity-building arena, NATO and the EU decided to pursue three pilot projects in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Moldova and Tunisia to test mechanisms for closer coordination; part of the planning for these mechanisms involves the allocation of EU funding to NATO programmes.
   Overall, cooperation between NATO and the EU has proceeded pragmatically since mid-2016. While the structures enabling interaction between the two have grown stronger, in many cases they are still informal because the Cyprus question has not yet been resolved. Furthermore, the EU, which has a wider range of tools available for conflict prevention and crisis management than does NATO, is still struggling with internal coherence and capacity. If the trajectory observed in 2017 persists, NATO-EU collaboration will soon come up against political limitations that only member states, not Brussels-based institutions, can overcome.

Глава Четвертая. Европа


   На протяжении всего 2017 года различные угрозы и политическая неопределенность в отношении сплоченности НАТО и Европейского Союза продолжали оказывать давление на европейские правительства в целях укрепления их оборонного потенциала. В ответ на это национальные правительства приступили к осуществлению ряда совместных инициатив и скорректировали свои силовые установки и стратегию. В то же время многие из этих правительств увеличивают оборонные бюджеты, которые медленно начали восстанавливаться после продолжительного периода сокращений в последнее десятилетие.
   Опрос общественного мнения во всех государствах - членах ЕС, опубликованный в декабре 2016 года Европейской комиссией, показал, что наряду с безработицей и социальным неравенством миграция и терроризм рассматриваются как основные проблемы для Европы. Серия террористических нападений в Бельгии, Франции, Германии, Испании, Швеции, Турции и Соединенном Королевстве привела к напряженности в правоохранительных органах и вооруженных силах. В некоторых странах были развернуты войска для оказания гражданским властям помощи в выполнении задач по обеспечению национальной безопасности, таких, как патрулирование и миссии присутствия. В связи с этими нападениями также возникли вопросы о готовности органов гражданской обороны к реагированию на многочисленные события в короткие сроки. Миграция в Европу по нескольким средиземноморским маршрутам продолжалась, хотя и не достигла уровня 2015 года. Европейские страны продолжали развертывать в ответ береговую охрану и военно-морские силы, а некоторые (включая Австрию, Болгарию и Венгрию) рассматривали возможность развертывания сухопутных войск для обеспечения безопасности своих сухопутных границ. В результате такого сочетания внутренних и внешних задач в области безопасности потребность в более тесной координации между гражданскими и военными субъектами стала более всеобъемлющей проблемой для внутренней безопасности, чем предполагалось.
   Между тем, вызов, брошенный напористой Россией, продолжал оживлять оборонные дискуссии во многих государствах-членах ЕС и НАТО. Серия учений включая "Запад-2017" послужила демонстрацией более сбалансированного и округленного российского военного потенциала, включая прогресс в командовании и управлении, а также интеграцию все более передовых технологий. Неясный курс Турции после неудавшейся попытки переворота в июле 2016 года, особенно ухудшение ее отношений с несколькими другими европейскими государствами (не в последнюю очередь Германией) и возобновление интереса к более тесным отношениям с Россией, усугубили неопределенность. К концу 2017 года все еще было мало ясности о том, как выход Великобритании из ЕС повлияет на безопасность и оборону. С "Brexit", который должен вступить в силу в марте 2019 года, правительственные чиновники в странах-членах ЕС стремились обеспечить, чтобы это не повлияло негативно на сотрудничество в области безопасности и обороны: оценки угроз на континенте последовательно подчеркивали необходимость сотрудничества для решения современных проблем и рисков.
   Инаугурация Дональда Трампа в качестве президента Соединенных Штатов оставила многих европейских лидеров неуверенными в прочности трансатлантических связей, лежащих в основе европейской безопасности. Первоначально расплывчатый о гарантии коллективной обороны НАТО (закрепленной в статье 5 Североатлантического договора), президент Трамп, по-видимому, поставил обязательство США в зависимость от увеличения европейских оборонных расходов, в частности, упрекнув других лидеров по этой теме, когда он открыл новую штаб-квартиру НАТО в мае 2017 года. Тем не менее, Трамп использовал речь в Варшаве 6 июля, чтобы заявить, что США "твердо стоят за статьей 5", как с точки зрения слов, так и действий. Действительно, в своем бюджете на 2018 финансовый год Министерство обороны США увеличило финансирование, выделенное на его Европейскую инициативу по заверению, и продолжило ротационное развертывание войск в восточных государствах-членах НАТО. Тем не менее, риторика Трампа дала членам НАТО паузу для размышлений.
   После встречи глав государств и правительств НАТО в Брюсселе 28 мая канцлер Германии Ангела Меркель со ссылкой на новую администрацию США и Brexit пришла к выводу, что "времена, когда мы могли полностью полагаться на других, в определенной степени закончились" и что "мы, европейцы, действительно должны взять свою судьбу в свои руки". Хотя ее замечания были высказаны во время предвыборного митинга и поэтому предназначались главным образом для внутреннего потребления, они нашли отклик во всем альянсе, указывая на то, что сплоченность остается хрупкой, несмотря на усилия, направленные на то, чтобы побудить НАТО к решению проблем, связанных с ухудшением обстановки в плане безопасности на ее восточном и южном флангах.
   Комментарии Меркель также способствовали растущему чувству необходимости укрепления безопасности и оборонного измерения ЕС перед лицом адаптационного давления, включая меняющуюся картину внешней угрозы и внутреннее восприятие того, что европейское сотрудничество вышло из строя. После референдума по Brexit и нескольких тесно сражавшихся избирательных кампаний, в которых кандидаты - евроскептики создавали серьезные проблемы для более основных партий, несколько лидеров, включая правительства Франции, Германии и Италии, определили безопасность и оборону в качестве политической области, в которой более тесное европейское сотрудничество может рассматриваться как выгодное для европейских граждан. Действительно, документ о будущем Европы, выпущенный Европейской комиссией в июне 2017 года, утверждал, что " укрепление европейской безопасности является обязательным. Государства-члены будут играть ведущую роль в определении и реализации уровня амбиций при поддержке учреждений ЕС. Глядя в будущее, они должны сейчас решить, какой путь они хотят избрать и на какой скорости они хотят идти, чтобы защитить граждан Европы. 19 июня в предисловии к докладу об осуществлении глобальной стратегии ЕС высокий представитель Союза по иностранным делам и политике безопасности и вице-президент Европейской Комиссии Федерика Могерини заявила, что в области безопасности и обороны "за последние десять месяцев было достигнуто больше, чем за последние десять лет".
   Оборонное сотрудничество в ЕС
   Недавние инициативы по укреплению аспектов безопасности и обороны ЕС были направлены на достижение трех основных целей: разработка практических предложений по поощрению и предоставлению государствам-членам возможности сотрудничать; создание институтов на уровне ЕС; и предоставление финансирования ЕС для целей обороны.
   Некоторые из предложений - например, в отношении Европейского Тактического центра воздушных перевозок (ETAC), который был открыт в испанском городе Сарагоса 8 июня 2017 года, - были реализованы без особого внимания общественности. ЕТАК на постоянной основе учредила программу, которая была инициирована Европейским агентством обороны в 2011 году для разработки и планирования передовых тактических воздушных учебных мероприятий. Центр находится в совместном владении 11 стран, и обучение будет проводиться в нескольких местах. Хотя численность персонала невелика и сосредоточена на узкой области деятельности, ETAC является хорошим примером использования Объединенных ресурсов для решения проблем совместимости; действительно, модель может быть распространена на другие области обучения.
   Более широкие предложения могут стимулировать будущее сотрудничество. Одним из них был план активизации Постоянного структурированного сотрудничества (PESCO) в области обороны до конца 2017 года. PESCO фигурировал в Лиссабонском договоре 2009 года, но после этого дремал. Концепция предусматривает создание группы государств-членов ЕС, осуществляющих широкомасштабное оборонное сотрудничество в рамках ЕС. Основная причина, по которой PESCO бездействует, заключается в неспособности определить, как быть инклюзивным и эффективным одновременно. Критики утверждали, что если критерии, регулирующие доступ к PESCO, будут слишком жесткими, то это исключит некоторые государства-члены и тем самым создаст разногласия внутри ЕС. Тем не менее, если эти критерии не будут достаточно требовательными, любое сотрудничество в результате, скорее всего, окажется неэффективным. Тем не менее 22 июня Европейский совет согласился запустить PESCO, а в ноябре государства-члены уведомили Совет и высокого представителя о своем намерении принять в нем участие. Другие проблемы, связанные с этими усилиями, включают в себя то, как структурировать оборонное сотрудничество с государствами-членами ЕС, которые не участвуют в PESCO, и как бюрократически позволить нескольким проектам действовать параллельно в рамках общей структуры PESCO.
   Еще одной идеей, вытекающей из глобальной стратегии ЕС, является скоординированный ежегодный обзор по вопросам обороны (CARD). Конечная цель этой инициативы заключается в улучшении гармонизации оборонного планирования путем налаживания добровольного обмена информацией о национальных оборонных планах и взносах в план развития потенциала (CDP). Затем EDA проанализирует представленную информацию и подготовит доклад для "руководящего совета" в составе национальных министров обороны. Это мероприятие призвано высветить возможности для сотрудничества и заострить внимание государств-членов на областях потенциала, включенных в CDP. Концепция карты должна быть протестирована с конца 2017 по 2019 год. Потенциальные преимущества CARD могут быть подкреплены планом EDA по запуску "кооперативного финансового механизма". Государства - члены одобрили эту идею в принципе в мае с целью ее создания в 2018 году. Участвующие государства-члены вносили бы взносы в фонд, который они могли бы затем использовать для оплаты исследований и разработок (НИОКР) или проектов совместных закупок. EDA будет выделять средства на основе решений руководящего совета, в то время как механизм будет предоставлять займы правительствам, которые в противном случае будут бороться за присоединение к такого рода совместным усилиям. Поэтому она внесет небольшой вклад в согласование несопоставимых циклов закупок и расходов государств-членов.
   Более существенное изменение заключается в том, что финансирование комиссии теперь может использоваться для финансирования европейской обороны. Первые шаги в этом процессе начались с небольших исследовательских проектов в 2015 и 2016 годах. Они проложили путь для подготовительных действий по оборонным исследованиям (PADR), которые состоят из 90 миллионов евро (US$102 млн), распределенных в течение трех лет (2017-19) для оборонных НИОКР, третьим шагом будет реализация Европейского фонда обороны (EDF).
   EDF содержит три различных механизма. Первое-это "окно исследований", в рамках которого ЕС будет "предлагать прямое финансирование (гранты) для исследований в области инновационных оборонных продуктов и технологий". PADR устанавливает сцену для этого. Ожидается, что полное финансирование начнется после 2020 года в рамках специальной программы ЕС в рамках следующих многолетних финансовых рамок (МFF) - финансовых рамок, регулирующих бюджет ЕС. Сметный бюджет исследований будет составлять 500 млн евро (US$564 млн) ежегодно в течение 2021-27 MFF. Однако только оборонные проекты НИОКР с участием по меньшей мере трех государств-членов будут иметь право на финансирование.
   Между тем, `окно возможностей' будет поддерживать совместную разработку и закупку средств защиты. Взносы будут поступать главным образом от государств-членов, однако комиссия будет софинансировать некоторые расходы на цели развития через Европейскую программу оборонно-промышленного развития. Окно возможностей будет первоначально работать с 2019 по 2020 год, иметь бюджет ~500m (US$564m) в течение двух лет и принимать только проекты с участием по крайней мере трех компаний из по крайней мере двух государств-членов. Средства ЕС могли бы покрыть все расходы на проекты в разработке, но только до 20% для прототипов.
   Наконец, "финансовый инструментарий" ЕDF включает в себя различные механизмы, призванные помочь государствам - членам преодолеть различия в сроках их бюджетных и закупочных процессов и облегчить доступ к финансированию для малых и средних предприятий. С политической точки зрения эти меры стали символом решимости комиссии повысить свою роль в области обороны. Если они будут развернуты, как планировалось, то комиссия будет позиционироваться как все более важный игрок в оборонно-промышленном ландшафте Европы.
   Формирование институтов на уровне ЕС оказалось более спорным. Военный потенциал планирования и поведения (MPCC) был окончательно утвержден в июне 2017 года, через месяц после того, как он был наложен вето Великобританией. MPCC, который входит в состав военного штаба ЕС (EUMS) и работает под руководством генерального директора EUMS, возьмет на себя командование на стратегическом уровне неисполнительными военными миссиями ЕС, такими, как учебные миссии в Центральноафриканской Республике, Мали и Сомали. В его состав входят 25 сотрудников, которые будут также поддерживать связь со своими коллегами по вопросам гражданского планирования и поведения. На момент подготовки настоящего доклада конечный результат этих инициатив оставался неопределенным, однако было ясно, что многие идеи о более тесном европейском оборонном сотрудничестве, долго обсуждавшиеся в правительствах и аналитических центрах, претворяются в жизнь ускоренными темпами.
   НАТО: освоение новых реалий
   Южный и Восточный фланги НАТО все чаще рассматриваются как постоянные источники нестабильности и конфликтов. На своих встречах на высшем уровне 2014 и 2016 годов в Уэльсе и Варшаве (см. военный баланс 2017, стр. 65-8) альянс начал новый раунд адаптации к этим меняющимся внешним обстоятельствам. Было вновь обращено внимание на коллективную оборону как основную миссию Североатлантического союза, и особое внимание на меры по наращиванию потенциала в восточноевропейских государствах-членах НАТО путем обеспечения передового присутствия, укрепления потенциала быстрого реагирования и реинвестирования в способность проводить миссии быстрого подкрепления в оспариваемых условиях. Сохраняются значительные проблемы с потенциалом, особенно в том, что касается комплексной противовоздушной и противоракетной обороны и оперативной совместимости. В ноябре НАТО объявила о создании адаптированной командной структуры, включающей командование Атлантическим океаном и командование по "улучшению передвижения вооруженных сил по Европе". 25 мая 2017 года НАТО приняла решение официально присоединиться к коалиции, борющейся с Исламским государством, также известным как ИГИЛ, в Ираке и Сирии. Предоставление организации места за столом было призвано улучшить обмен информацией и облегчить предоставление дополнительных летных часов для самолетов наблюдения системы АВАКС и средств дозаправки "воздух-воздух".
   После 2014 года расширение НАТО и решительная миссия Североатлантического союза по поддержке Афганистана привлекли к себе меньше внимания, чем в предыдущие годы. Однако, Черногория официально стала 29-м государством-членом НАТО 5 июня 2017 года, когда документ о присоединении был сдан на хранение в Государственный департамент США. Хотя этот шаг не имел большого военного значения, он послал важный политический сигнал о том, что дверь НАТО в принципе остается открытой на фоне призывов переосмыслить мудрость дальнейшего расширения. Между тем, перед миссией НАТО по подготовке, консультированию и оказанию помощи афганским силам безопасности стоят постоянные проблемы. В первой половине 2017 года все больше свидетельствовало о том, что повстанческое движение "Талибан" набирает силу; это привело к решению НАТО от 29 июня усилить операцию, особенно подготовку летного состава и специальных сил. В то время средства массовой информации сообщали, что НАТО хотела бы, чтобы государства-члены предоставили миссии дополнительные войска в количестве 2000-3000 человек. Во время визита в Афганистан 27-28 сентября 2017 года Генеральный секретарь НАТО Йенс Столтенберг заявил: "НАТО не уходит, когда становится трудно". В ноябре он указал, что численность войск возрастет с 13 000 до 16 000 человек и что финансовая поддержка НАТО афганским силам национальной безопасности будет обеспечена до 2020 года.
   Давление США на европейских союзников, чтобы тратить больше на оборону, усилилось после вступления в должность президента Трампа. Во время президентской кампании Трамп выразил свое разочарование тем, что он считал неадекватными усилиями европейских правительств потратить по крайней мере 2% своего ВВП на оборону - цель, которую члены НАТО согласились выполнить в 2014 году к 2024 году. Во время встречи глав государств и правительств НАТО 25 мая 2017 года, на которой впервые присутствовал Трамп, все члены альянса договорились разработать и представить НАТО ежегодные национальные планы с подробным описанием мер, которые они принимают для выполнения обязательств НАТО по расходам, воинским взносам и возможностям. Это решение должно было сигнализировать США о том, что НАТО - серьезная организация, в которую стоит инвестировать. Генеральный секретарь Столтенберг сказал `что "ежегодные национальные планы помогут нам сохранить динамику, инвестировать больше и лучше в нашу оборону". Трамп отметил `что " мы должны признать, что с этими хроническими недоплатами и растущими угрозами даже 2 процента ВВП недостаточно для закрытия пробелов в модернизации, готовности и размере сил. Мы должны наверстать упущенное за многие годы. Два процента - это минимум для противостояния сегодняшним очень реальным и очень порочным угрозам". В то время как многие государства-члены НАТО действительно начали увеличивать свои оборонные расходы, это, похоже, больше мотивировано изменением восприятия угрозы, чем давлением США. Тем не менее, необходимость более четко разъяснить избирателям обязательства каждой страны по НАТО будет ощущаться по всей Европе.
   ЭКОНОМИКА ОБОРОНЫ
   Благоприятный экономический контекст
   Макроэкономическая ситуация в Европе продолжает улучшаться. В еврозоне 2017 год стал пятым годом роста подряд. В целом экономические показатели континента улучшились в результате продолжающегося снижения уровня безработицы и роста частного потребления. Эти тенденции были обусловлены не только политикой Европейского центрального банка с низкими процентами, которая благоприятствовала росту кредитования, но и ростом (хотя все еще относительно низких) цен на нефть. Еврокомиссия прогнозирует рост на 1,9% для стран-членов ЕС в 2017 и 2018 годах. В 2017 году в странах Центральной и Восточной Европы наблюдался особенно сильный рост, который составил 5,5% в Румынии, 3,8% в Польше и 3,8% в Латвии. Некоторые южно-европейские экономики также показали хорошие результаты, с возвратом к росту в Греции (1,8%) и еще один год сильного роста в Испании (3,1%), хотя Италия испытывает самые медленные темпы в этом году в еврозоне (1,5%). Однако долгосрочные последствия финансового кризиса все еще ощущаются во многих странах. Чрезвычайные расходы и пакеты мер финансового стимулирования, принятые в связи с кризисом начиная с 2008 года, породили наследие высокого уровня задолженности и бюджетного дисбаланса. Это наследие не позволило правительствам существенно увеличить государственные расходы. Однако картина неоднородна. В Северной и Центральной Европе отношение долга к ВВП ниже, чем в Западной и Южной Европе. Например, долг Латвии и Литвы составляет около 40% их ВВП, подобно Дании и Швеции. В отличие от этого, уровень долга к ВВП составляет около 100% в Бельгии, Франции и Испании и даже выше в Италии (133%) и Португалии (129%).
   Расходы на оборону: подъем продолжается
   В 2017 году европейские оборонные расходы выросли на 3,6% в реальном выражении (в неизменном 2010 году -$). Это устойчивая тенденция, наблюдаемая с 2015 года и обусловленная экономическими улучшениями и изменением восприятия угроз. Расходы на оборону в реальном выражении увеличились, в частности, в Германии (6,9%), Польше (3,2%), Румынии (41,2%) и странах Балтии. Тем не менее, в то время как расходы на оборону растут по всему континенту, существуют субрегиональные различия. Западные государства, стремящиеся играть роль глобальной безопасности, пытаются сохранить эти уровни, несмотря на бюджетные ограничения. В Центральной и Восточной Европе увеличение бюджетов позволяет государствам пересмотреть свою роль в области европейской безопасности.
   Во Франции новое правительство во главе с Эммануэлем Макроном, избранным весной 2017 года, объявило летом, что оно сократит оборонный бюджет 2017 года на 850 миллионов евро (959 миллионов долларов США), несмотря на ожидания обратного. Это решение было принято для того, чтобы поддержать цель ЕС ограничить государственный дефицит менее чем до 3% ВВП. Объявленные сокращения в первую очередь затронут программы оснащения, что, вероятно, приведет к задержке поставок, а также текущие проекты, такие как модернизация боевых самолетов Mirage 2000D. Однако после этого заявления правительство заявило, что оборонный бюджет вырастет в 2018 году на 1,8 млрд. евро (2 млрд. долл.США) с целью достижения целевого показателя НАТО в 2% ВВП в 2025 году (на год позже целевой даты, согласованной в Уэльсе в 2014 году). В контексте бюджетных ограничений некоторые средства массовой информации утверждают, что Макрон, возможно, готов пересмотреть масштабы военных действий Франции внутри страны и за рубежом, чтобы обеспечить более тесную увязку между средствами и амбициями. Однако соображения общественной безопасности, вероятно, будут иметь большое значение в любом таком решении.
   Великобритания оказалась в аналогичной ситуации с Францией, с увеличением общих расходов, но очевидным перенапряжением обязательств. Расходы Великобритании на оборону увеличились с ё38,8 млрд ($52,6 млрд) в 2016 году до ё39,7 млрд ($50,7 млрд) в 2017 году. Это означало номинальный рост на 2,3%, но, учитывая колебания обменного курса в 2017 году, падение на 3,5% в текущих долларах США. В реальном выражении, это по-прежнему представляет собой увеличение на 0.5%. В то время как правительство объявило о стратегии оборудования ё178 млд (US$228 млд) на 2016-26, в том числе ё82 млд ($105 млд) для нового оборудования, сомнения были подняты в течение 2017 о целесообразности этих планов. Как Национальная ревизионная служба, так и Комитет по государственным счетам Палаты общин высказали предостережение о том, что стоимость плана оборонного оборудования была занижена. Основными выявленными причинами были отсутствие подробных планов экономии; падение курса фунта стерлингов, что привело к увеличению стоимости закупки оборудования у Соединенных Штатов; и тот факт, что ё10 млд (US$13 млд) из средств уже выделены. Риск заключается в том, что в случае возникновения новых чрезвычайных потребностей Министерство обороны не будет обладать достаточной гибкостью для приобретения каких-либо значительных новых возможностей из своего бюджета.
   В то время как Великобритания и Франция борются за сохранение потенциала, соответствующего их глобальным амбициям, увеличение расходов в других странах Европы способствует военной модернизации. В своем финансовом плане на 2017-21, выпущенном в июне 2017 года, правительство Германии объявило, что военные расходы увеличатся с 37 млд евро (US$41.7 млд) в 2017 году до 42.4 млд евро (US$50 млд) в 2021 году. Это будет означать, что расходы на оборону достигнут 1,16% ВВП к 2021 году, согласно прогнозам МВФ. Однако для достижения цели НАТО в размере 2% к этой дате бюджет должен будет увеличиться до более чем 70 млрд. евро ($79 млрд). В настоящее время ожидается, что дополнительные средства будут направлены на поддержку более широкой модернизации вооруженных сил Германии. С этой целью Бундестаг утвердил ряд оборонных программ в июне 2017 года, в преддверии сентябрьских выборов. Это включало модернизацию 104 основных боевых танков Leopard 2 и приобретение пяти фрегатов К-130. Был также сделан определенный акцент на закупках, имеющих отношение к многонациональному сотрудничеству, таких, как программа продления срока службы флота АВАКС НАТО; и доля Германии в многонациональной многоцелевой программе танкерного транспортного флота Европейского агентства обороны (EDA), которая, как объявила EDA, расширит свой прогнозируемый флот с двух самолетов до семи. (Самолет будет принадлежать НАТО и будет действовать как Объединенные активы.) В июне Германия и Норвегия присоединились к Нидерландам и Люксембургу в проекте.
   Хотя европейские государства в первую очередь увеличивают расходы из-за собственного восприятия угрозы, давление США также оказало влияние. Румынское правительство увеличило свой бюджет с RON 11.2 млд (US$2.8 млд) в 2016 в RON 16.3 млд (US$4 млд) в 2017, номинальный рост 46%. Это позволяет Румынии достичь цели НАТО в 2017 году, при этом расходы на оборону составляют 2,03% ВВП. Румынское правительство планирует увеличить расходы на RON 20.3 млд (US$5 млд) к 2020 году. Этот сдвиг связан с уделением повышенного внимания закупкам оборудования. В 2017 году капитальные расходы составили 48,2% от общего оборонного бюджета. Помимо достижения целей НАТО Румыния направила НАТО и другие сигналы, в частности Вашингтону. Например, правительство намерено закупить 36 боевых самолетов F-16 у США, предварительно приобретя 12 подержанных F-16 у Португалии. Текущие планы также включают приобретение системы ПВО "Патриот" у Raytheon и артиллерийской ракетной системы высокой мобильности (HIMARS) у Lockheed Martin.
   рисунки
   Тенденции в области закупок: проводимая модернизация
   По оценкам, в 2016 году на закупки, включая НИОКР, было выделено около $42 млрд, или около 19% от общих оборонных расходов государств-членов ЕС ($225 млрд).
   Закупки заметно увеличились в Восточной и Северной Европе после аннексии Россией Крыма в 2014 году. Страны этих регионов пытаются снизить зависимость от устаревшей российской техники в пользу западной. Например, Болгария, Польша и Словакия по-прежнему эксплуатируют российские боевые самолеты МиГ-29, а Хорватия и Румыния МиГ-21. Польша рассматривает вопрос о закупке боевых самолетов F-35 или F-16, а Румыния выступает за F-16, в то время как Болгария собирается выставить еще один тендер на свои боевые самолеты. Тем временем хорватский тендер на боевые самолеты был направлен в Грецию, Израиль и США для F-16, Южную Корею для FA-50 и Швецию для Gripen. ПВО тоже решается. Польша покупает систему Patriot, в то время как прибалтийские государства, ограниченные относительно небольшими бюджетами, как сообщается, рассматривают возможность совместных закупок средств ПВО.
   В то время как страны Центральной и Северной Европы стремятся модернизировать свои арсеналы путем замены своих российских систем, страны Западной и Южной Европы добавляют новые возможности. Примером могут служить вооруженные беспилотные летательные аппараты (БПЛА). Великобритания эксплуатирует БПЛА американского производства с 2007 года, со своими MQ-9A Reapers. В конце 2016 года британское правительство объявило, что эти системы будут заменены на вариант Protector MQ-9, который будет способен нести ракеты MBDA Brimstone 2 и управляемые бомбы Raytheon Paveway IV. В 2015 году США уполномочили Италию вооружить свои MQ-9 Reapers ракетами Hellfire, хотя остается неясным, было ли это выполнено. Другие европейские страны следуют этому примеру. Министерство обороны Германии намерено арендовать у Израиля беспилотники Heron TP; они могут быть вооружены, хотя решение об этом было отложено в июне 2017 года. Brimstone - потенциальное оружие. Между тем, летом 2017 года Министерство обороны Франции объявило, что его Reaprs будут вооружены в краткосрочной перспективе - потенциально ракетами Hellfire или Brimstone.
   Промышленность: маневры в военно-морском секторе
   В 2017 году судостроительный сектор Европы продемонстрировал различные тенденции. Франция и Италия, например, смотрят на консолидацию. В 2016 году южнокорейский оффшор STX и судостроение подали на банкротство. Эта компания владела 66,6% акций STX Europe, которая сама владела французской судостроительной фирмой STX France/ Chantiers de l'Atlantique, расположенной в Сен-Назере. Верфь в Сен-Назере построила десантные корабли класса Mistral и является единственным во Франции объектом, способным строить авианосцы. После банкротства единственным кандидатом на захват французской верфи был итальянский Fincantieri. С французским государством, сохранившим 33,4% акций STX France / Chantiers de l'Atlantique, французское и итальянское правительства договорились в апреле 2017 года О структуре собственности. Однако новое французское правительство первоначально отказалось принять это соглашение, объявив в июле, что оно временно национализирует STX France, чтобы предотвратить потенциальные потери рабочих мест. В конце сентября 2017 года Париж и Рим достигли нового соглашения о совместном владении STX France, объявив о дорожной карте на июнь 2018 года для обсуждения будущего альянса между Naval Group и Fincantieri, который может стать координационным центром для дальнейших усилий по консолидации фрагментированной судостроительной промышленности Европы.
   В то же время правительство Великобритании стремилось стимулировать конкуренцию, с тем чтобы сохранить несколько отечественных верфей, в отличие от своей предыдущей стратегии консолидации, которая оставила BAE Systems в качестве почти монопольного поставщика в Великобритании. Основной целью национальной судостроительной стратегии Великобритании, выпущенной в сентябре 2017 года, было поощрение различных частных верфей Великобритании к участию в тендере на строительство нового фрегата типа-31 (возможно, в распределенных блоках, которые будут собраны в одном месте). Аналогичным образом, Германия заказала пять фрегатов типа К130 у консорциума отечественных верфей (в составе Lurssen Werft & Co. KG, Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems и немецкие военно-морские верфи Kiel) - хотя это было сделано по юридическим, а не экономическим причинам. Этот акцент на конкуренции в Германии и Великобритании, по-видимому, указывает на то, что морское судостроение в Европе будет сопротивляться консолидации в ближайшем будущем, несмотря на недавние усилия в этом направлении во Франции и Италии.
   ФРАНЦИЯ
   После победы на президентских выборах в мае и победы его новой политической партии "Республика на марше" на июньских парламентских выборах международный интерес проявился не только к оборонным взглядам Эммануэля Макрона, но и к тому, в какой степени они станут частью его амбициозной программы реформ. Тем не менее, одним из первых шагов администрации было сокращение ~850 миллионов евро (US$959 млн) из бюджета 2017, тем самым задерживая некоторые программы вооружения, чтобы попытаться выполнить бюджетные правила ЕС (см. стр. 72). Генерал Пьер де Вилье, тогдашний начальник штаба обороны, высказался против этого плана, заявив, что французские силы перегружены ввиду своих оперативных обязательств. После спора с администрацией, который выплеснулся в общественное достояние, де Вильерс подал в отставку. В июле его сменил генерал Франсуа Лекуантр, бывший глава Военного кабинета премьер-министра.
   Тем не менее, в то же время, как сокращение бюджета 2017 года, Макрон также сказал, что он хочет, чтобы Франция достигла к 2025 году цели НАТО потратить 2% ВВП на оборону; это займет бюджет более чем на ~53 млрд евро (US$63 млд). Кроме того, он объявил об увеличении оборонного бюджета на 1,6 млрд евро ($1,8 млрд) между 2018 и 2022 годами. Однако для достижения этой цели к 2025 году расходы на оборону должны будут увеличиваться по меньшей мере на 3,5 млрд. евро ($3,9 млрд) ежегодно в период между 2022 и 2025 годами (после президентских выборов 2022 года). Многие наблюдатели считают, что такой резкий рост маловероятен.
   Неотъемлемой частью обсуждения бюджета является не только стоимость операций и оборудования, но и стоимость модернизации французского ядерного оружия морского и воздушного базирования и связанных с ним систем доставки. По оценкам, стоимость этого процесса увеличится с 3,9 млрд евро ($4,4 млрд) в 2017 году до 6 млрд евро ($6,8 млрд) в год в 2020-25 годах, но затем снизится - причем эти расходы, скорее всего, придут за счет обычных закупок.
   Возможности нового поколения французских атомных подводных лодок с баллистическими ракетами имеют решающее значение для Военно-морского флота (строительство подводных лодок должно начаться в 2019 году), но также и возможности будущих версий подводной ракеты M51. Новые M51.2 должны быть поставлены в 2020 году, а M51.3 в 2025 году, исследования М51.4 должен начаться в 2022 году. Что касается воздушной составляющей, то на 2022 год запланирована модернизация нынешней ракеты ASMPA-R среднего возраста, которая будет называться ASMPA-R; понятно, что решение о преемнике будет принято в 2018 году. Эта последующая программа в настоящее время назначена ASN4G и планируется к осуществлению в 2035 году. Конструкция, вероятно, будет включать выбор между гиперзвуковой платформой и платформой, включающей скрытые функции. Хотя ожидается, что значительные расходы, связанные с этой модернизацией, будут приходиться на счет обычных возможностей, на момент написания доклада никаких решений по этому вопросу не было объявлено.
   Эти проблемы усугубляются проблемой перенапряжения, которая постепенно признается политическими лидерами. В начале сентября 2017 года начальник штаба обороны заявил в Тулоне в "Летнем университете обороны", что французские вооруженные силы были использованы на "130% своих возможностей и теперь нуждаются во времени для регенерации". Несколько текущих операций - главным образом, внутренняя операция "Сентинелл", а также боевые миссии в Мали и против Исламского государства, иначе известного как ИГИЛ, добавили к уже обширному развертыванию Франции. Sentinelle, которая началась после нападений Charlie Hebdo в 2015 году, мобилизовала более 10 000 военнослужащих во Франции для наблюдения и защиты, призванных предотвратить террористические нападения. Поскольку операция была подвергнута критике со стороны специалистов обороны (и многих в Вооруженных силах) за истощение ресурсов, было объявлено, что оперативные обязательства изменятся в конце 2017 года. Две другие крупные операции Barkhane в Сахеле и Chammal, вклад Франции в антиигиловской коалиции, в которых участвуют около 4000 человек и 1200 человек соответственно.
   Сразу после своего избрания Макрон поручил провести обзор стратегической обороны. Завершенный в начале октября 2017 года, это был более короткий и менее амбициозный процесс, чем белые книги 2008 и 2013 годов. Она сохранила многие из ключевых тем в этих докладах, а также подчеркнула, что проблемы в киберпространстве и подрывные технологии означают, что Франция должна сохранить потенциал для независимых операций по противодействию проникновению. Кроме того, она подчеркнула приверженность Франции НАТО, но также выразила поддержку инструментам безопасности ЕС и общей политике ЕС в области безопасности и обороны.
   В своей важной речи по ЕС в сентябре Макрон изложил свои европейские полномочия, сославшись на "европейский автономный потенциал действий, дополняющий НАТО", который должен быть создан "к началу следующего десятилетия". Далее он призвал к совместному потенциалу вмешательства, общему оборонному фонду и общей доктрине с шагами в направлении создания "общей стратегической культуры". Макрон также призвал к более тесному сотрудничеству между Францией и Германией в военной сфере, объявив в июле с канцлером Германии Ангелой Меркель, что обе страны изучат возможность разработки нового боевого самолета. Было также объявлено, что обе страны будут укреплять другие области сотрудничества в области обороны, включая возможный европейский самолет морского патрулирования, беспилотный летательный аппарат средней высоты и совместное транспортно-авиационное подразделение C-130J с 2021 года.
   НОРВЕГИЯ
   Вооруженные силы Норвегии переживают период значительной перестройки, с тем чтобы справиться с новой обстановкой в области безопасности, в которой страна должна сбалансировать свою реакцию на возрождение России, сохраняя при этом свое активное международное участие. В долгосрочном плане обороны, утвержденном парламентом в ноябре 2016 года, подчеркивается необходимость приобретения новых и более передовых потенциалов; повышения боевой готовности, материально-технической поддержки и защиты сил; и укрепления поддержки принимающей страны для поддержания сил НАТО. Финансирование обороны увеличивается, и планируется, что около 25% бюджета будет выделено на инвестиции, но без дальнейшего значительного увеличения финансирования обороны бюджет не достигнет 2% оборонных расходов НАТО к 2024 году. Тем не менее, вооруженные силы Норвегии находятся на новом курсе, когда баланс военной ударной мощи - и ядро сдерживающего потенциала Норвегии - смещается в воздушную и морскую сферы.
   Политика безопасности
   Напористая политика России в области безопасности и военной политики, а также продолжающаяся модернизация ее обычных и ядерных сил делают ее более способной к проецированию силы. На севере Европы военная позиция России подчеркивает асимметричный характер норвежско-российских отношений. Процесс военной модернизации России повысил готовность (что уменьшило бы время предупреждения для ее противников в любой военной ситуации), в то время как страна также имеет возможность проводить тайные и кибероперации. В наихудшем случае, опасение состоит в том, что Россия может стремиться к свершившемуся факту до того, как союзники по НАТО решат вступить в бой или прибудут подкрепления, поддерживаемые потенциалом противодействия доступу, который эффективно действует как стратегический вызов трансатлантической обороне. Эти возможности ставят под угрозу способность НАТО быстро укреплять своих восточных и северных союзников и потенциально ставят под угрозу связь между Северной Америкой и Европой. Один из аспектов, который беспокоит норвежских военных, связан со стратегиями России по защите своих атомных подводных лодок с баллистическими ракетами. В крупном конфликте Россия может попытаться защитить свои стратегические подводные лодки в Арктическом "бастионе", установив морской контроль в северных водах и отказ в море вплоть до разрыва между Гренландией, Исландией и Соединенным Королевством. Норвежские военные планировщики, включая министра обороны, выразили обеспокоенность тем, что "Россия возрождает концепцию Бастионной обороны". Еще одна проблема, связанная с потенциалом, связана с внедрением на вооружение России передовых вооружений, включая высокоточные системы ПВО С-400 (SA-21 Growler), баллистические ракеты малой дальности Искандер (SS-26 Stone), крылатые ракеты Калибр (SS-N-30) и Х-101. Все эти системы дислоцируются по военным округам России, некоторые из них используются в операциях.
   Тем не менее, стабильность и сотрудничество остаются ключевыми целями как для Норвегии, так и для России на севере; политика Норвегии в отношении России сочетает сдерживание и оборону с уверенностью и сотрудничеством. Например, в мирное время Норвегия не допускает крупных учений Альянса в своем самом северном графстве Финнмарк, и существуют ограничения на воздушные операции НАТО с норвежских баз вблизи российской границы. В марте 2014 года Норвегия приостановила большую часть своего двустороннего военного сотрудничества с Россией, но в рамках, установленных этими санкциями, две страны продолжают работать вместе в таких областях, как береговая охрана и пограничная деятельность, поисково-спасательные работы и усилия по поддержанию Соглашения об инцидентах на море. Кроме того, растущая напряженность между Россией и Западом не привела к разрыву прямой линии между объединенным штабом Норвегии и Северным флотом России.
   НАТО
   НАТО остается краеугольным камнем норвежской политики в области безопасности и обороны. Однако в течение последних десяти лет норвежские официальные лица утверждали, что Альянс слишком узко фокусируется на международных операциях по регулированию кризисов.
   Начало осуществления Норвегией инициативы в основной области в 2008 году ознаменовало собой возвращение к традиционному мышлению. Это подчеркивает важность коллективной обороны и более сбалансированного выполнения основных функций в Евроатлантическом регионе с операциями за его пределами. С тех пор Норвегия систематически работает над восстановлением доверия к статье 5 двумя основными способами. Первый заключается в том, чтобы подчеркнуть необходимость реформирования структуры командования НАТО; подготовки к операциям высокого уровня; более тесной увязки штаб-квартир НАТО и национальных и многонациональных штабов; и усиления региональной направленности Североатлантического союза. Во - вторых, при подготовке Варшавского саммита НАТО 2016 года Норвегия - в сотрудничестве с Францией, Исландией и Великобританией - выдвинула новые предложения, направленные на укрепление позиций и деятельности НАТО в Северной Атлантике. С точки зрения Норвегии, НАТО необходимо вновь создать один совместный штаб, несущий главную ответственность за этот район. (Allied Command Atlantic, широко известный как SACLANT, был заменен в 2003 году преобразованием командования союзников.) Норвегия также считает, что необходимы более интенсивная подготовка и учения по статье 5. В октябре-ноябре 2018 года Норвегия примет у себя следующую итерацию учений NATO Trident Juncture, крупнейшего учения в Норвегии со времен Strong Resolve в 2002 году. В нем примут участие около 35 000 участников из 30 стран и будет предоставлена возможность опробовать планы подкреплений и концепцию "тотальной обороны" Осло в рамках совместных и комбинированных операций с союзниками и партнерами.
   Хотя НАТО по-прежнему имеет важное значение для Норвегии, набирает обороты сотрудничество в рамках небольших групп и стратегическое партнерство с отдельными странами. Партнерство с Соединенными Штатами по-прежнему является "альянсом в Альянсе" для Осло, несмотря на беспокойство по поводу политики США при президенте Дональде Трампе. Расширяется двустороннее военное сотрудничество в ряде областей. Разведка и наблюдение являются одним из ключевых компонентов этих отношений, основанных на технической и финансовой поддержке США ряда мероприятий по разведке сигналов, проводимых норвежской разведывательной службой. Еще одним важным компонентом является заранее поставленная техника для Корпуса морской пехоты США в центральной Норвегии (программа подготовки Корпуса морской пехоты-Норвегия). В любом конфликте в Северной Европе эти средства будут поддерживать оперативную группу морской авиации и, в случае необходимости, способствовать последующему прибытию экспедиционной бригады. Помимо США, в качестве стратегических партнеров определены Германия, Нидерланды, Великобритания и потенциально Франция и Польша.
   Растет также значение сотрудничества северных стран в области обороны, при этом в 2009 году была создана НОРДЕФКО-институциональная основа для многих мероприятий в этой области. Первоначально проект был обусловлен перспективой финансовой экономии за счет общих закупок оборудования, основанных главным образом на шведских системах. Однако в настоящее время наблюдается более динамичное развитие операций. Сеть соглашений и договоренностей между странами Северной Европы и крупными западными государствами постепенно объединяется, чтобы подготовить их к совместной работе в условиях кризиса, если соответствующие правительства решат сделать это.
   Оборонная политика и военная стратегия
   В долгосрочном плане обороны на 2017-20 годы, озаглавленном "способный и устойчивый", приоритет отдается готовности, доступности и устойчивости, а также инвестициям в основной или стратегический потенциал. Особенно важны три основные категории:
   Обнаружение и идентификация
   Значительные ресурсы расходуются на совершенствование разведки и наблюдения. Они включают в себя значительные усовершенствования норвежской разведывательной службы, включая модернизацию наземных станций прослушивания и приобретение нового и более боеспособного разведывательного судна Marjata IV для операций в Баренцевом море. Кроме того, пять новых морских патрульных самолетов P-8A "Посейдон" заменят устаревшие норвежские самолеты P-3C "Орион". Между тем, для усиления защиты от цифровых угроз правительство рассматривает вопрос о создании "цифровой пограничной обороны", призванной повысить способность норвежской разведывательной службы отслеживать сигналы, передаваемые по кабелю через границу Норвегии. Все эти системы будут сопряжены с существенными закупочными, эксплуатационными и эксплуатационными расходами.
   Ударная способность
   Норвегия вскоре будет вкладывать значительные средства в боевые платформы с мобильностью и огневой мощью, чтобы влиять на стратегические решения потенциальных агрессоров. К ним относятся до 52 боевых самолетов F-35A Lightning II с комплексом вооружения, который включает в себя совместную ударную ракету, разработанную норвежским оборонным производителем Kongsberg. Норвежские F-35 планируют выйти на начальную боеспособность в 2019 году и полную боеспособность в 2025 году. Кроме того, четыре новые подводные лодки, построенные в Германии, в 2026-30 годах заменят шесть подводных лодок класса Ula ВМС.
   Укрепление обороноспособности
   В NASAMS II и системы ПВО будут модернизированы и оснащены новыми малой и средней дальности. Норвегия также планирует повысить NASAMS II путем введения ракет большей дальности в 2024- 28. Они будут сосредоточены вокруг двух авиабаз в Эрланде и Эвенесе, чтобы защитить норвежские силы "и районы, которые будут служить потенциальными плацдармами для союзнических подкреплений", согласно долгосрочному плану обороны. В плане особо подчеркивается концепция взаимосвязанных национальных и союзнических оборонительных усилий на высоком севере.
   Эти возможности представляют собой фундаментальное изменение в военном потенциале Норвегии, в результате чего морская и воздушная ударная мощь должна стать центральным элементом структуры Вооруженных сил Норвегии и ядром ее сдерживающего фактора. Это знаменует собой значительный сдвиг от холодной войны, когда Норвегия опиралась на ряд армейских бригад, поддерживаемых морской и воздушной мощью, основной миссией которых было оборонительное сражение в Северной Норвегии до тех пор, пока союзники не подкрепят их. Однако это концептуальное изменение де-факто вызвало меньше споров, чем численность сухопутных сил.
   Вооруженные силы
   Общая численность Вооруженных сил Норвегии в мирное время, включая призывников, составляет приблизительно 24 000 человек. Кроме того, ополчение состоит примерно из 38 000 подготовленных резервов высокой степени готовности. Одним из ключевых приоритетов в предстоящие годы является повышение боевой готовности, материально-технической поддержки и защиты сил, а также включение новых и более передовых потенциалов. В то же время оборонные усилия зависят от оживления общей концепции обороны, которая включает взаимную поддержку и сотрудничество между Вооруженными силами и гражданскими властями в ситуациях от мира до войны; Trident Juncture 2018 станет лакмусовой бумажкой этой сложной структуры.
   Начальник обороны имеет полное командование вооруженными силами, в то время как начальник Объединенного штаба сохраняет оперативное командование. Роль начальников служб-филиалов изменилась в 2017 году. Хотя ранее они отвечали за формирование сил и назывались "генеральными инспекторами", теперь они получили дополнительную ответственность за оперативное руководство на тактическом уровне и стали начальниками подразделений Службы.
   В последнее время три важные реформы затронули структуры персонала и компетентности Норвегии. Во-первых, в 2015 году была введена всеобщая воинская повинность, что сделало военную службу обязательной как для женщин, так и для мужчин. (В 2017 году более 25% призывников составляли женщины.) Во-вторых, в 2016 году была введена новая кадровая структура, дополняющая существующую категорию "офицеры" категорией "прочие звания". Эта реформа привела норвежские вооруженные силы в соответствие с большинством других стран НАТО; офицеры будут составлять 30% от общей численности персонала. В-третьих, в 2017 году была начата реформа оборонно-образовательных структур, обусловленная необходимостью сокращения ежегодных расходов примерно на 500 млн. норвежских крон ($59,3 млн) и рационализации военного образования в соответствии с военными потребностями. В результате шесть нынешних колледжей и система подготовки офицеров будут объединены в одну организационную структуру, охватывающую как высшее военное образование, так и профессиональное образование.
   Армия
   Основным потенциалом армии являются три ее маневровых батальона с соответствующей боевой поддержкой и поддержкой боевой службы, которые входят в состав бригады "Север"; два батальона находятся на севере страны и один - на юге. Структура сил также включает гвардию Его Величества Короля (батальон легкой пехоты) и один батальон легкой пехоты, который патрулирует границу Норвегии с Россией.
   Армия сталкивается с серьезными проблемами, в частности из-за устаревшего оборудования и недостаточной готовности и доступности. В ноябре 2016 года министр обороны инициировал исследование Сухопутных войск, которое должно было обеспечить углубленный обзор миссии, концепции и структуры сухопутных войск в рамках бюджетных рамок, установленных долгосрочным планом. Рекомендации по итогам исследования были представлены парламенту в октябре 2017 года. Миссия и концептуальные рамки армии были уточнены. Профессиональные подразделения будут по-прежнему иметь высокий уровень укомплектования, в то время как призыв и резервы будут использоваться более эффективно, с более длительной военной службой для выполнения наиболее сложных функций. Эти планы включают модернизацию и закупку новых бронетранспортеров CV90, создание наземного потенциала противовоздушной обороны в бригаде "Север" и закупку новой артиллерийской системы. Вместо того, чтобы полностью модернизировать основные боевые танки Leopard 2A4, Норвегия планирует закупить новые MBT с 2025 года либо в виде более новой версии Leopard, либо в виде танка нового поколения, который может быть легче и более мобильным. Новые проблемы в области безопасности привели к новому акценту на присутствие в Финнмарке. В Порсангере будет сформирован кавалерийский батальон. Это происходит в дополнение к ранее принятому решению укрепить пограничную охрану новой ротой рейнджеров. Кроме того, в этом районе будет усилена и размещена совместно с армией гвардия тыла под единым командованием Сухопутных войск Финнмарк.
   Флот
   Флот модернизируется и намерен построить флот из меньшего количества более способных платформ. Они включают пять современных эсминцев типа Фритьоф Нансен, которые поступили на вооружение в период между 2006 и 2011; новая организация - судно обеспечения (с возможностью пополнения на море), которые планируется достичь в 2018 году; приобретение четырех новых подводных лодок, чтобы заменить лодки Ula -класса (немецкий тип 212NG был выбран в 2017 году); и три новых морских судов береговой охраны, чтобы заменить Nordkapp класс. Из-за высоких затрат приобретения будут сочетаться с сокращениями в других областях. Шесть современных ракетных быстроходных патрульных катеров класса Skjold, последний из которых поступил на вооружение в 2013 году, планируется вывести из эксплуатации около 2025 года, когда будут введены в строй F-35As ВМФ. Кроме того, Норвегия планирует сократить число противоминных судов в своем военно-морском флоте с шести до четырех, что, вероятно, предвещает постепенную передачу этого потенциала автономным системам, развернутым с судов поддержки.
   Между тем, приобретение 14 морских вертолетов NH90 значительно повысит военно-морской потенциал, но это оказалось одной из самых сложных закупок с начала века, со значительными задержками с поставщиками. Первые восемь вертолетов были поставлены - последние должны быть поставлены в 2018-19 годах, - и ожидается, что все они достигнут полной боевой готовности к 2022 году или вскоре после этого.
   В последние годы большая часть военно-морского флота работает в высоких темпах, что оказалось сложной задачей. В новом долгосрочном плане обороны намечены меры по повышению оперативности и выносливости морских сил Норвегии. Это включает увеличение общего числа экипажей фрегатов с трех с половиной до пяти, что позволит обеспечить непрерывную эксплуатацию как минимум четырех судов в отличие от первоначального плана эксплуатации трех.
   Военно-воздушные силы
   Приобретение до 52 боевых самолетов F-35A определит будущее ВВС. С сопутствующими реформами базовой и вспомогательной структуры новый самолет будет служить катализатором для корректировки всей структуры ВВС. Первый самолет прибыл в Норвегию в ноябре 2017 года. Основной базой для F-35 будет авиабаза Эрланд в центральной Норвегии, а передовая оперативная база будет создана на авиабазе Эвенес на севере, с самолетами, назначенными на роль быстрого реагирования НАТО. За счет концентрации деятельности на меньшем количестве баз с усиленной защитой и повышения квалификации летных и наземных экипажей для оперативной деятельности будет выделяться больше ресурсов. Однако стратегия концентрации оказалась противоречивой, особенно в связи с предполагаемым закрытием авиабазы Андойя на севере страны, где в настоящее время базируются норвежские самолеты морского патрулирования. Норвегия планирует совместно разместить новые P-8As с боевыми самолетами в Эвенесе.
   Другие возможности
   Ополчение составляет ядро структуры территориальной обороны Норвегии. Его основными задачами являются обеспечение безопасности важных объектов инфраструктуры и других районов, поддержка основных боевых служб и союзнических сил, а также оказание помощи гражданским властям в чрезвычайных ситуациях гражданского характера. В 2017 году парламент принял решение сократить численность личного состава внутренней гвардии с приблизительно 45 000 до 38 000 человек - с 3000 человек, находящихся в очень высокой готовности, - и расформировать военно-морскую внутреннюю гвардию. В округах и подразделениях ополчения будут наблюдаться более разнообразные амбиции, а их присутствие и оперативный потенциал на севере возрастут. Поскольку силы специальных операций по-прежнему играют важную роль в национальных чрезвычайных ситуациях и в обеспечении участия в международных операциях, в отношении этих формирований предусматриваются незначительные изменения.
   Правительство также осуществляет реструктуризацию и модернизацию кибернетических и других информационно-коммуникационных технологий (ИКТ) в оборонном секторе. Вооруженные силы все больше полагаются на ИКТ, особенно на способность сохранять свободу действий в киберпространстве. Большинство подразделений ИКТ будут объединены в рамках норвежской киберзащиты.
   ЭКОНОМИКА ОБОРОНЫ
   Доходы от нефти по-прежнему составляют значительную часть норвежской экономики, но рост этих доходов, как ожидается, замедлится. Добыча нефти в Норвегии достигла своего пика в середине последнего десятилетия, и падение цен на нефть сказалось на доходах. В 2014-16 гг. чистый денежный поток правительства от нефтяного сектора снизился более чем на 60%. Кроме того, старение населения, вероятно, приведет к увеличению государственных расходов на пенсионное обеспечение и медицинское обслуживание, что может еще больше затруднить государственные финансы.
   В то же время продолжающееся поступление доходов от продажи нефти будет по-прежнему способствовать увеличению государственного Пенсионного фонда во всем мире. Как показывают цифры, рост фонда обеспечит основу для увеличения государственных бюджетов (в нормальной экономической ситуации) между NOK 3 млд (US$400 млн) и NOK 4 млд (US$500 млн) в год в ближайшие 10-15 лет - значительный вклад, хотя и намного меньше, чем в предыдущие 15 лет, когда фонд увеличил доходы в среднем на NOK12 млд (US$1.4 млн) в год, если измерять фиксированных кронах 2017.
   Однако долгосрочный план обороны Норвегии основан на существенном увеличении финансирования. В общем, правительство рекомендует дополнительные средства в течение ближайших 20 лет примерно NOK180 млд ($21.3 млрд), и как часть этого, постепенное увеличение в течение первых четырех лет NOK7.8 млрд ($ 900 млн) к 2020 году. Примерно 25% оборонного бюджета будет выделено на инвестиции для финансирования планов модернизации, в то время как больше ресурсов будет выделено на устранение недостатков в обслуживании и повышение готовности, доступности и устойчивости. Военно-воздушные силы увидят значительно более высокий рост, чем другие вооруженные силы из-за больших инвестиций в самолеты и боевые базы. Однако, несмотря на увеличение оборонных расходов, бюджет останется ниже 1,55% ВВП в 2017 году, поэтому к 2024 году потребуется существенное дополнительное финансирование для выполнения 2% оборонных расходов НАТО.
   Помимо увеличения объема финансирования, долгосрочный план предусматривает экономию средств на внутренней эффективности, которая оценивается в NOK1.8 млрд. ($200 млн) к концу 2020 года. Это позволит перераспределить финансирование на другие приоритетные направления в оборонном секторе.
   Оборонная промышленность
   Несмотря на относительно небольшую оборонно-промышленную базу, норвежская оборонная промышленность обладает рядом весьма передовых технологий и возможностей, производя ряд ведущих продуктов и систем на международном рынке. Общий годовой оборот отрасли составляет около NOK12 млд ($1.4 млд), и более 70% ее доходов генерируется клиентами за пределами Норвегии.
   Основные возможности в следующих областях:
   Ракеты (морская ударная ракета и совместная ударная ракета)
   Наземное ПВО
   Ракетные двигатели
   Станции дистанционного оружия
   Усовершенствованные боеприпасы и оружие, запускаемое с плеча
   Персональные разведывательные системы (нано БПЛА)
   Подводная система
   Системы командования, управления и связи
   Защищенные информационные системы, включая криптографическое оборудование
   Системы солдат
   Kongsberg является основным поставщиком Норвегии оборонных и аэрокосмических систем. Норвежское государство владеет 50,001% акций компании, которая, в свою очередь, владеет 49,9% акций ведущего поставщика обороны Финляндии, Patria Oyj. Портфель продуктов и систем Kongsberg включает различные системы командования и управления для сухопутной, воздушной и морской обороны; морские и наземные системы наблюдения для гражданских, военных и других общественных объектов; и несколько типов тактических радио- и других систем связи, преимущественно разработанных и поставляемых для сухопутной обороны. Он также производит противокорабельную ракету Penguin и новую морскую ударную ракету. Одним из главных экспортных успехов Kongsberg является станция дистанционного оружия Protector. Фирма также производит передовые композиты и другую инженерную продукцию для рынка самолетов и вертолетов.
   Nammo - международная аэрокосмическая и оборонная компания со штаб-квартирой в Норвегии и вторая по величине оборонная фирма Норвегии. Группа принадлежит на 50/50 норвежскому правительству и Patria Oyj. Nammo работает с более чем 30 сайтов и офисов в 14 странах. Она производит боеприпасы и ракетные двигатели как для военных, так и для гражданских заказчиков, а также системы боеприпасов, запускаемых с плеча; военные и спортивные боеприпасы; ракетные двигатели для военных и аэрокосмических целей; и услуги по демилитаризации.
   СОЕДИНЕННОЕ КОРОЛЕВСТВО
   В Европе Соединенное Королевство сравнимо только с Францией в своей способности использовать надежную боевую мощь, но, хотя его силы остаются относительно хорошо сбалансированными, многие ключевые возможности близки к критической массе - "минимальному порогу оперативной эффективности", согласно Комитету Обороны Палаты общин Великобритании. Действительно, планы развертывания усовершенствованных "Совместных Сил 2025 года" сталкиваются со значительными проблемами в плане их доставки, не в последнюю очередь с точки зрения доступности, а также в плане сохранения или увеличения численности персонала. Из-за этих факторов "обзор потенциала национальной безопасности", объявленный правительством после выборов в июне 2017 года, может привести к дальнейшему сокращению военного потенциала.
   Тем не менее, силы Великобритании продолжают развертываться в глобальных операциях, играя важную роль в кампании под руководством США против Исламского государства, также известного как ИГИЛ, и скромно увеличивая свое присутствие в Афганистане. В рамках расширенного передового присутствия НАТО силы Соединенного Королевства в составе батальона возглавляли многонациональную боевую группу, развернутую в Эстонии, в состав которой входила французская рота. Кроме того, возглавляемые Великобританией Объединенные экспедиционные силы были расширены за пределы государств-членов НАТО и включали Швецию и Финляндию.
   Увеличение числа внутренних террористических нападений привело к развертыванию специальных сил для оказания помощи контртеррористической полиции. Войска были быстро мобилизованы для оказания помощи полиции в двух случаях - хотя в обоих случаях они были быстро демобилизованы. Масштабы разрушений в Карибском бассейне, вызванных ураганом "Ирма", были неожиданными, несмотря на то, что некоторые средства по оказанию помощи в случае стихийных бедствий были заранее размещены на судне снабжения в Карибском бассейне. Численность британских сил в регионе была быстро увеличена до примерно 2000 военнослужащих, при этом вертолеты, инженеры и морские пехотинцы были развернуты по воздуху - вместе с вертолетоносцем HMS Ocean, что, вероятно, было его последней миссией.
   Вооруженные силы
   Реорганизация армии продолжилась в 2017 году, при этом Специализированная пехотная группа (новое специализированное формирование по наращиванию потенциала) достигла первоначального оперативного потенциала. Существующие в армии сигнальные бригады должны быть сгруппированы в единое целое вместе с бригадой разведки, наблюдения и разведки и 77-й бригадой для лучшего проведения "информационного маневра". Было объявлено, что общая зенитная модульная ракета MBDA будет закуплена для замены "рапиры" в качестве противовоздушной обороны наземного базирования, однако потребность в новой механизированной пехотной машине осталась невыполненной.
   HMS Queen Elizabeth, первый из двух новых авианосцев, начал морские испытания, в то время как работа продвигалась по подготовке другого, HMS Prince of Wales. Правительство объявило о новой национальной стратегии в области судостроения, которая включала строительство восьми противолодочных фрегатов типа 26 и пяти более легких фрегатов общего назначения типа 31е, стоимость которых составляла ё250 млн ($320 млн) каждый и которые были оптимизированы для экспорта. Тем временем было объявлено о планах испытать лазерное оружие Dragonfire на военном корабле.
   Королевские ВВС (RAF) отмечают столетие своего основания в 2018 году. В 2017 году он по-прежнему твердо привержен кампании против ИГИЛ, а также национальной и воздушной полиции НАТО, в то время как поставка транспортных самолетов A400M Atlas продолжалась. Эскадрильи RAF Typhoon должны начать получать ракету Meteor с воздушно-реактивным двигателем "воздух-воздух" в 2018 году. Эта ракета обеспечит значительно большую производительность, чем AIM-120C AMRAAM, в настоящее время размещенную на самолете. Первый из британских боевых самолетов F-35B Lightning II должен поступить на борт Queen Elizabeth в 2018 году, а первый морской патрульный самолет P-8A Poseidon будет доставлен в 2019 году.
   Военная экономика
   Великобритания увеличила расходы на оборону с ё38,8 млрд ($52,6 млрд) в 2016 году до ё39,7 млрд ($50,7 млрд) в 2017 году. Это означало номинальное увеличение на 2,3%, но, учитывая падение обменных курсов в 2017 году, в текущих долларах США это означало падение покупательной способности доллара на 3,5%, хотя в реальном выражении (постоянные доллары США 2010 года) это все равно означало увеличение бюджета на 0,5%. Однако, поскольку экономика Великобритании, по прогнозам, достигнет роста в 1,7% в 2017 году, по данным МВФ, это означало, что отношение оборонных расходов страны к ВВП в этом году составило 1,98%. Кроме того, в докладах Национального ревизионного управления и Комитета по государственным счетам Палаты общин указывалось на серьезный дефицит финансирования плана по оборонному имуществу, частично обусловленный падением стоимости фунта.
   Численность Вооруженных сил по-прежнему оставалась недостаточной более чем на 5%, при этом дефицит составлял 5,9% в армии, 5,4% в Королевских ВВС и 2,7% в Королевском флоте, особенно в военной, подводной, медицинской, материально-технической и инженерной областях. Хотя Министерство обороны имеет амбициозные планы по улучшению набора и удержания персонала, они сосредоточены на долгосрочной перспективе, и эти недостатки вызывают сомнения в планах сохранения размера RAF и RN.
   В целом имеются многочисленные признаки того, что на оборонный бюджет оказывается все большее давление, особенно в том, что касается финансирования персонала и будущего оборудования. Правительство объявило, что обзор потенциала национальной безопасности "будет включать [рассмотрение] политики и планов, которые поддерживают осуществление стратегии национальной безопасности и помогают обеспечить, чтобы инвестиции Соединенного Королевства в потенциал национальной безопасности были как можно более объединенными, эффективными и действенными для решения текущих проблем национальной безопасности". Учитывая, что террористические нападения 2017 года подчеркнули давление на численность полиции и контртеррористический потенциал, многие аналитики ожидают, что в обзоре будут рассмотрены дальнейшие сокращения потенциала Вооруженных сил и персонала. В то время как правительство объявило о амбициозных планах по поддержанию и расширению оборонного сотрудничества с Европой после выхода из ЕС, любой экономический шок в результате Brexit поставит государственные расходы, и, следовательно, оборонный бюджет, под дополнительное давление.
   Интернационализация вооруженных сил Германии
   Бундесвер уже давно участвует в двустороннем и многостороннем сотрудничестве. Наиболее известным примером является франко-германская бригада. Созданный в 1989 году, она объединяет французские и немецкие армейские подразделения под одним командованием. Французское подразделение базировалось в Германии, но было расформировано в 2014 году после реорганизации французской армии. Однако 291-й легкий пехотный батальон Германии продолжает дислоцироваться во Франции, в то время как бригада также имеет двусторонний батальон материально-технического обеспечения.
   В 1995 году Германия и Нидерланды создали 1-й германо-голландский корпус. Совсем недавно шквал инициатив по сотрудничеству с участием Чешской Республики, Нидерландов и Румынии подчеркнул тот факт, что германские вооруженные силы систематически укрепляют существующие связи или создают новые связи с европейскими партнерами в целях развития потенциала и создания формирований для операций.
   Другие европейские страны рассматривают возможность заключения аналогичных соглашений с Германией. Действительно, планы сотрудничества с Польшей уже были хорошо разработаны до того, как новое польское правительство, избранное в октябре 2015 года, решило замедлить проекты.
   Интеллектуальной основой для этих более недавних инициатив, хотя они и не все были непосредственно вдохновлены ею, является концепция рамочных Наций (FNC), немецкое предложение, согласованное государствами-членами НАТО на саммите Альянса в 2014 году. С тех пор Германия, Италия и Соединенное Королевство организовали совместные инициативы под знаменем FNC, хотя эти усилия различаются по направленности. Немецкий подход заключается, во-первых, в том, чтобы попытаться организовать кластеры стран вокруг целей развития потенциала и, начиная с 2015 года, обеспечить крупные формирования для операций НАТО. На момент подготовки настоящего доклада в том или ином формате к нему присоединились 16 европейских стран НАТО, а также Австрия и Финляндия, не являющиеся членами НАТО.
   После "Белой книги" по обороне Германии 2016 года и в свете ухудшения ситуации в области безопасности в Европе систематическое сотрудничество с европейскими партнерами превратилось в основное предположение планирования для Вооруженных сил Германии, поскольку они пытаются восстановить возможности, относящиеся к основным задачам коллективной обороны НАТО. Хотя некоторые наблюдатели предполагают, что Берлин преследует федералистскую европейскую повестку дня, было бы точнее охарактеризовать использование нескольких форматов двустороннего и многостороннего сотрудничества как прагматический подход, чтобы помочь Германии и другим участвующим странам выполнить соответствующие обязательства НАТО.
   В дискуссии средств массовой информации об инициативах Германии часто используется термин "интеграция" для описания подчинения одного подразделения страны командным структурам другого. Точнее будет описать эту практику как "ассоциацию" или "принадлежность" единиц, даже если сотрудничество такого рода создает взаимную зависимость. Хотя все государства сохраняют свой правовой национальный суверенитет над соответствующими подразделениями, их политическая автономия при принятии решений о развертывании, вероятно, будет несколько ограничена в ситуациях, когда партнеры расходятся во мнениях относительно целесообразности той или иной конкретной операции. Тем не менее со временем, пока существует политическая воля, такое международное сотрудничество должно способствовать улучшению взаимодействия и в определенной степени гармонизации военных потребностей.
    []


   Отношения НАТО-ЕС
   С момента создания в 2002 году механизма "стратегического партнерства" Европейский Союз и НАТО пытаются придать этому сотрудничеству практический смысл. Однако решение ЕС предоставить членство в ЕС Кипру в 2004 году и принятое Турцией в результате этого решение эффективно блокировать официальные обмены между двумя организациями тормозят отношения, которые все основные заинтересованные стороны считают, по крайней мере в принципе, такими, которые должны характеризоваться взаимодополняемостью и взаимной выгодой.
   Ухудшение обстановки в области безопасности в Европе, особенно "гибридные" вызовы, воспринимаемые на юге и востоке, придали новый импульс сотрудничеству. Правительства реагируют на представление о том, что для решения современных проблем требуется широкий спектр гражданских и военных инструментов и что избиратели стремятся к эффективности и действенности национальных оборонных бюджетов. На этом фоне НАТО и ЕС приняли Совместную декларацию на Варшавском саммите Альянса 2016 года. Декларация была посвящена семи областям: гибридные угрозы; кибербезопасность и оборона; укрепление потенциала в области безопасности и обороны в странах-партнерах; стимулирование оборонно-промышленных исследований; координация морских операций и повышение осведомленности о морской обстановке; координация учений; и последовательное и взаимодополняющее развитие оборонного потенциала. В декабре 2016 года сотрудникам обеих организаций был представлен каталог из 42 пунктов действий, охватывающих семь приоритетных областей, которые будут перенесены с 2017 года.
   Доклад о ходе работы, опубликованный 14 июня 2017 года и одобренный советами НАТО и ЕС, предполагает, что "сотрудничество между двумя организациями теперь становится установленной нормой, повседневной практикой, полностью соответствующей новому уровню амбиций", продвигаемому Совместной декларацией 2016 года. Говорить о существенном прорыве пока преждевременно, но со времени подписания декларации в Польше был достигнут практический и значимый прогресс. Например, ЕС и НАТО работают над совместной оценкой разведывательных данных по аспектам гибридных проблем и поощряют взаимодействие между их соответствующими аналитическими ячейками. Кроме того, как Служба внешних действий ЕС, так и секретариат НАТО участвуют в работе нового Европейского Центра передового опыта по противодействию гибридным угрозам, базирующегося в Хельсинки, хотя ни один из них не является официальным членом Центра. Между тем, соответствующие группы реагирования на кибер чрезвычайные ситуации организаций начали развивать отношения и обмениваются концепциями кибербезопасности. НАТО и ЕС также активно стремятся координировать некоторые из своих учений по гибридному сценарию реагирования в рамках инициативы параллельных и скоординированных учений.
   Укрепление потенциала в области безопасности и обороны является одной из приоритетных задач обеих организаций, хотя в прошлом эта деятельность не была хорошо скоординирована, и некоторые операции даже выявили определенную степень остаточной институциональной конкуренции. Что касается укрепления потенциала, то НАТО и ЕС решили осуществить три экспериментальных проекта в Боснии и Герцеговине, Молдове и Тунисе для проверки механизмов более тесной координации; часть планирования этих механизмов связана с выделением ЕС финансовых средств на программы НАТО.
   В целом, с середины 2016 года сотрудничество между НАТО и ЕС осуществляется прагматично. Хотя структуры, обеспечивающие взаимодействие между ними, укрепились, во многих случаях они по-прежнему носят неофициальный характер, поскольку кипрский вопрос еще не решен. Кроме того, ЕС, который располагает более широким спектром инструментов для предотвращения конфликтов и управления кризисами, чем НАТО, все еще борется с внутренней слаженностью и потенциалом. Если траектория, наблюдаемая в 2017 году, сохранится, сотрудничество НАТО-ЕС вскоре столкнется с политическими ограничениями, которые могут преодолеть только государства-члены, а не базирующиеся в Брюсселе институты.
   ALBANIA
    []


Capabilities
Principal missions for Albania's armed forces include territorial defence, internal-security and disaster relief tasks, and small-scale peacekeeping or training deployments. Limited defence modernisation is proceeding under the Long-Term Development Plan 2016-25. In late 2017, naval forces ended a year of operations with NATO's Standing Maritime Group Two in the Aegean Sea. Tirana deployed a further two infantry contingents to Afghanistan and contributed EOD engineers to the NATO Enhanced Forward Presence Battle group in Latvia in 2017. Most of the country's Soviet-era equipment has been sold, and its military capability remains limited. The small air brigade has only a rotary-wing capability, while the naval element has only littoral capabilities. The procurement of new equipment has been limited to small numbers of helicopters. However, in 2017, Albania received HMMWVs from the United States as part of a US$12 million assistance package.
Потенциал
Основные задачи Вооруженных сил Албании включают в себя территориальную оборону, обеспечение внутренней безопасности и оказание помощи в случае стихийных бедствий, а также развертывание небольших миротворческих или учебных подразделений. Ограниченная модернизация обороны осуществляется в рамках Долгосрочного плана развития на 2016-25 годы. В конце 2017 года военно-морские силы завершили год операций со второй постоянной морской группой НАТО в Эгейском море. Тирана развернула еще два пехотных контингента в Афганистане и предоставила инженеров EOD в боевую группу расширенного передового присутствия НАТО в Латвии в 2017 году. Большая часть оборудования советской эпохи была продана, а ее военный потенциал остается ограниченным. Небольшая авиационная бригада имеет только вертолетные возможности, в то время как военно-морской элемент имеет только прибрежные возможности. Закупка нового оборудования ограничивалась небольшим количеством вертолетов. Однако, в 2017 году Албания получила HMMWVs из США в рамках пакета помощи 12 млн. долларов США.

ACTIVE 8,000 (Land Force 3,000 Naval Force 650 Air Force 550 Other 3,800) Paramilitary 500

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE


Land Force 3,000
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF bn
   1 cdo bn
MANOEUVRE
Light
   3 lt inf bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 mor bty
   1 NBC coy
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARTILLERY MOR 93: 82mm 81; 120mm 12

Naval Force 650
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PBF 5 Archangel

Coast Guard
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 22
   PB 9: 4 Iluria (Damen Stan Patrol 4207); 3 Mk3 Sea Spectre; 2 (other)
   PBR 13: 4 Type-227; 1 Type-246; 1 Type-303; 7 Type-2010

Air Force 550
Flying hours at least 10-15 hrs/yr
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
HELICOPTERS
   TPT 26: Medium 4 AS532AL Cougar; Light 22: 1 AW109; 5 Bell 205 (AB-205); 7 Bell 206C (AB-206C); 8 Bo-105; 1 H145

Regional Support Brigade 700
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 cbt spt bde (1 engr bn, 1 (rescue) engr bn, 1 CIMIC det)

Military Police
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MP bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   AUV IVECO LMV

Logistics Brigade 1,200
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log bde (1 tpt bn, 2 log bn)

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 83
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 1
LATVIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 18; 1 EOD pl
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 4
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 2: 1 PB
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 28; OSCE Kosovo 3
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 3

FOREIGN FORCES
Armenia OSCE 1
Austria OSCE 1
Bosnia-Herzegovina OSCE 1
Canada OSCE 1
Germany OSCE 2
Hungary OSCE 1
Ireland OSCE 1
Italy OSCE 1
Macedonia (FYROM) OSCE 2
Moldova OSCE 1
Montenegro OSCE 1
Serbia OSCE 2
Spain OSCE 1
United Kingdom OSCE 3

   AUSTRIA
    []

Capabilities
Defence-policy objectives are based on the 2013 National Security Strategy, the 2014 Defence Strategy and the 2015 Military Strategy. They include the provision of military capability to maintain Austria's sovereignty and territorial integrity, and enable military assistance to the civil authorities and participation in crisis-management missions abroad. The level of ambition for crisis response operations is to be able to deploy and sustain a minimum (on average) of 1,100 troops. In February 2016, Austria completed a review of its armed forces reform programme (OBH 2018). The review showed that core capability indicators had fallen significantly. But the number of soldiers deployed to international missions remained the same, increasing strain on the force. The review pointed to a security environment where migration flows, international terrorism and international military crisis-management operations threatened to overwhelm defence capacity. The initial plan called for materiel and personnel reductions. However, the review argued that personnel cuts should stop and that investment be directed towards better training and more exercises, command and control, and ISR. A new defence plan (Landesverteidigung 21.1) includes structural changes to the defence ministry, as well as at the operational and tactical command-and control level, from 2017. As a result, Austria plans to boost its rapid-response capability and to stand up three new JДger battalions. In addition, army brigades will specialise according to roles, such as rapid response, mechanised (heavy), air-mobile (light) and mountain warfare. Initial steps were taken in 2017. In July, Austria announced it would phase out its Typhoon aircraft between 2020 and 2023, which would trigger a replacement procurement.
Потенциал
Цели оборонной политики основаны на Стратегии национальной безопасности 2013 года, стратегии обороны 2014 года и военной стратегии 2015 года. Они включают в себя обеспечение военного потенциала для поддержания суверенитета и территориальной целостности Австрии, а также оказание военной помощи гражданским властям и участие в миссиях по урегулированию кризисов за рубежом. Цель операций по реагированию на кризисы заключается в том, чтобы иметь возможность развернуть и поддерживать как минимум (в среднем) 1100 военнослужащих. В феврале 2016 года Австрия завершила обзор своей программы реформирования Вооруженных сил (жBH 2018). Обзор показал, что основные показатели потенциала значительно снизились. Однако число военнослужащих, направляемых в международные миссии, остается неизменным, что увеличивает нагрузку на силы. В ходе обзора была отмечена обстановка в плане безопасности, в которой миграционные потоки, международный терроризм и международные военные операции по урегулированию кризисов угрожают превысить обороноспособность. Первоначальный план предусматривал сокращение материальных средств и персонала. Однако в обзоре утверждалось, что сокращение персонала должно быть прекращено и что инвестиции должны быть направлены на улучшение профессиональной подготовки и проведение большего числа учений, командования и управления и МСУО. Новый план обороны (Landesverteidigung 21.1) включает структурные изменения в Министерстве обороны, а также на оперативно-тактическом уровне командования и управления с 2017 года. В результате Австрия планирует укрепить свой потенциал быстрого реагирования и создать три новых егерских батальона. Кроме того, армейские бригады будут специализироваться в соответствии с такими функциями, как быстрое реагирование, механизированная (тяжелая), воздушно-мобильная (легкая) и горная война. Первые шаги были предприняты в 2017 году. В июле Австрия объявила о поэтапном отказе от своих самолетов "Тайфун" между 2020 и 2023 годами, что приведет к закупке запасных частей.

ACTIVE 22,400 (Land Forces 12,200 Air 2,800 Support 7,400)
Conscript liability 6 months recruit trg, 30 days reservist refresher trg for volunteers; 120-150 days additional for officers, NCOs and specialists.
Authorised maximum wartime strength of 55,000
RESERVE 152,200 (Joint structured 25,500; Joint unstructured 126,700) Some 7,500 reservists a year undergo refresher trg in tranches

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Land Forces 12,200
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Armoured
   1 (4th) armd inf bde (1 recce/SP arty bn, 1 tk bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 spt bn)
Mechanised
   1 (7th) mech inf bde (1 recce/SP arty bn, 2 mech inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 spt bn)
Light
   1 (Rapid Deployment) inf comd (1 recce bn, 2 inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 MP bn, 1 CBRN bn, 1 spt bn)
   1 mtn inf comd (1 mtn inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn)
   6 (regional) inf bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 56 Leopard 2A4
   AIFV 112 Ulan
   APC APC (W) 78 Pandur
   AUV 157: 29 Dingo 2; 128 IVECO LMV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 30: 20 4KH7FA-SB; 10 M88A1
   MW 6 AID2000 Trailer
   NBC VEHICLES 12 Dingo 2 AC NBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Bill 2 (PAL 2000)
ARTILLERY 120
   SP 155mm 30 M109A5жE
   MOR 120mm 90 sGrW 86 (10 more in store)

Air Force 2,800
The Air Force is part of Joint Forces Comd and consists of 2 bde; Air Support Comd and Airspace Surveillance Comd
Flying hours 160 hrs/yr on hel/tpt ac; 110 hrs/yr on ftr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   2 sqn with Typhoon
ISR
   1 sqn with PC-6B Turbo Porter
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-130K Hercules
TRAINING
   1 trg sqn with Saab 105Oe*
   1 trg sqn with PC-7 Turbo Trainer
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with Bell 212 (AB-212)
   1 sqn with OH-58B Kiowa
   1 sqn with S-70A Black Hawk
   2 sqn with SA316/SA319 Alouette III
AIR DEFENCE
   2 bn
   1 radar bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 33 combat capable
   FTR 15 Eurofighter Typhoon Tranche 1
   TPT 11: Medium 3 C-130K Hercules; Light 8 PC-6B Turbo Porter
   TRG 30: 12 PC-7 Turbo Trainer; 18 Saab 105Oe*
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 24 SA316/SA319 Alouette III
   ISR 10 OH-58B Kiowa
   TPT 32: Medium 9 S-70A Black Hawk; Light 23 Bell 212 (AB-212)
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence Mistral
   GUNS 35mm 24 Z-FIAK system (6 more in store)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES AAM IIR IRIS-T
Special Operations Forces
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   2 SF gp
   1 SF gp (reserve)
Support 7,400
Support forces comprise Joint Services Support Command and several agencies, academies and schools

Cyber
The Austrian approach to cyber security encompasses both military and civilian assets. The 2013 National Cyber Security Strategy was developed in conjunction with the Austrian National Security Strategy. A Cyber Security Steering Group coordinates on a government level. An Austrian cyber-security law, based on the EU NIS Directive, will establish structured international coordinating mechanisms. Operational-level coordination structures include the Computer Security Incident Response Capability (Federal Chancellery), the Cyber Security Centre (Ministry of the Interior) and the Cyber Defence Centre (Ministry of Defence). These structures reached IOC at the end of 2015 and FOC was planned for the end of 2017. The defence ministry's primary goal is to ensure national defence in cyberspace, as well as securing ministry and military ICT. A new Communication Information Systems & Cyber Defence (CIS&CD) Command was effective from 1 January 2017.
Кибер
Австрийский подход к кибербезопасности охватывает как военные, так и гражданские активы. Национальная стратегия кибербезопасности 2013 года была разработана совместно со Стратегией национальной безопасности Австрии. Руководящая группа по кибербезопасности координирует свою деятельность на правительственном уровне. Австрийский закон о кибербезопасности, основанный на директиве ННГ ЕС, создаст структурированные международные координационные механизмы. К числу координационных структур оперативного уровня относятся подразделения по реагированию на инциденты в области компьютерной безопасности (Федеральная канцелярия), Центр кибербезопасности (Министерство внутренних дел) и Центр киберзащиты (Министерство обороны). Эти структуры достигли МОК в конце 2015 года, а ФОК был запланирован на конец 2017 года. Главной целью министерства обороны является обеспечение национальной обороны в киберпространстве, а также защита министерских и военных ИКТ. С 1 января 2017 года вступила в силу новая команда по коммуникационным информационным системам и киберзащите (CIS & CD).

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 9
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 2
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 191; 1 inf bn HQ
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 3
CYPRUS: UN UNFICYP 4
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 183; 1 log bn
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 12; UN MINUSMA 3
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 4 obs
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 440; 1 recce coy; 2 mech inf coy; 1 log coy
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 14
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 5 ob

   BELGIUM
    []

Capabilities
In July 2016, the Belgian government published its strategic vision for defence, indicating the general direction for Belgian defence policy until 2030. Brussels intends first of all to stabilise Belgium's defence effort and then to provide for growth after 2020. The plan envisages a reduced personnel component of around 25,000. However, a large number of impending service retirements means that a gradual increase in recruitment is planned after 2017 as part of the overall move towards this number. The government is also keen to ensure that this reduction does not compromise operational capability, and so is investing in short-term requirements related to aircraft readiness, personal equipment and land-forces vehicles. Overall policy priorities remain unchanged, with defence policy based on multilateral solidarity with NATO, the EU and the UN; attacks in 2016 have again highlighted the threat from terrorism and have impelled closer counter-terror cooperation with France. Belgium is working with the Netherlands to consider the replacement of both countries' Karel Doorman (M)-class frigates. As part of the defence plan, the government envisages launching five investment projects in the short term: fighter aircraft, frigates, mine countermeasures, UAVs and land-combat vehicles. This includes plans for new light reconnaissance vehicles and upgrades to Pandur armoured personnel carriers. The navy has benefited from the acquisition of two new patrol and coastal combatants, while the air force is due to receive F-16 aircraft updates, as well as the long-awaited A400M. Belgium continues to pursue high readiness levels and deployable niche capabilities. Large numbers of Belgian troops were deployed for domestic-security operations following terrorist attacks in 2016, although Belgium maintains overseas deployments on EU and UN missions, as well as in the Middle East on missions targeting ISIS.
Потенциал
В июле 2016 года правительство Бельгии опубликовало свое стратегическое видение обороны, указав общее направление оборонной политики Бельгии до 2030 года. Брюссель намерен прежде всего стабилизировать оборонные усилия Бельгии, а затем обеспечить рост после 2020 года. План предусматривает сокращение численности персонала примерно на 25 000 человек. Вместе с тем большое число предстоящих выходов на пенсию означает, что после 2017 года планируется постепенное увеличение набора персонала в рамках общего перехода к этому числу. Правительство также стремится обеспечить, чтобы это сокращение не ставило под угрозу оперативный потенциал, и поэтому инвестирует средства в краткосрочные потребности, связанные с обеспечением готовности воздушных судов, личного оборудования и автотранспортных средств сухопутных сил. Общие приоритеты политики остаются неизменными, с оборонной политикой, основанной на многосторонней солидарности с НАТО, ЕС и ООН; нападения в 2016 году вновь подчеркнули угрозу терроризма и подтолкнули к более тесному контртеррористическому сотрудничеству с Францией. Бельгия совместно с Нидерландами рассматривает вопрос о замене фрегатов класса Karel Doorman (M) обеих стран. В рамках Плана обороны правительство планирует в краткосрочной перспективе запустить пять инвестиционных проектов: истребители, фрегаты, противоминные средства, БПЛА и наземные боевые машины. Это включает в себя планы по созданию новых легких разведывательных машин и модернизации бронетранспортеров Pandur. Военно-морской флот получил выгоду от приобретения двух новых патрульных и прибрежных комбатантов, в то время как военно-воздушные силы должны получить обновления самолетов F-16, а также долгожданный A400M. Бельгия продолжает добиваться высокого уровня готовности и развертываемого потенциала. Большое количество бельгийских войск было развернуто для операций внутренней безопасности после террористических атак в 2016 году, хотя Бельгия сохраняет зарубежные развертывания в миссиях ЕС и ООН, а также на Ближнем Востоке в миссиях, нацеленных на ИГИЛ.

ACTIVE 28,800 (Army 10,350 Navy 1,350 Air 5,850 Medical Service 1,400 Joint Service 9,850)
RESERVE 5,000

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Land Component 10,350
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 (lt) spec ops bde (1 SF gp, 1 cdo bn, 1 para bn)
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 ISR bn (2 ISR coy, 1 surv coy)
Mechanised
   1 (med) bde (4 mech bn; 1 lt inf bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty bn (1 arty bty, 1 mor bty)
   2 engr bn (1 cbt engr coy, 1 lt engr coy, 1 construction coy)
   1 EOD unit
   1 CBRN coy
   1 MP coy
   3 CIS sigs gp
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   3 log bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   ASLT 18 Piranha III-C DF90
   IFV 19 Piranha III-C DF30
   APC APC (W) 120: 36 Pandur; 64 Piranha III-C; 14 Piranha III-PC (CP); 6 Piranha III-C (amb)
   AUV 644: 208 Dingo 2 (inc 52 CP); 436 IVECO LMV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 8 Piranha III-C
   ARV 13: 4 Pandur; 9 Piranha III-C
   VLB 4 Leguan
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike-MR
ARTILLERY 105
   TOWED 105mm 14 LG1 MkII
   MOR 50: 81mm 18; 120mm 32

Naval Component 1,350
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 2
FRIGATES FFGHM 2 Leopold I (ex-NLD Karel Doorman) with 2 quad lnchr with Harpoon AShM, 1 16-cell Mk48 VLS with RIM-7P Sea Sparrow SAM,
   4 single Mk32 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Goalkeeper CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 med hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS
   PCC 2 Castor
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES
   MHC 6 Flower (Tripartite)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 3
   AGFH 1 Godetia (log spt/comd) (capacity 1 Alouette III)
   AGOR 1 Belgica
   AXS 1 Zenobe Gramme

Naval Aviation (part of the Air Component)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 4 NH90 NFH
   MRH 3 SA316B Alouette III

Air Component 5,850
Flying hours 165 hrs/yr on cbt ac. 300 hrs/yr on tpt ac. 150 hrs/yr on hel; 250 hrs/yr on ERJ
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK/ISR
   4 sqn with F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with Sea King Mk48
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with A321; ERJ-135 LR; ERJ-145 LR; Falcon 900B
   1 sqn with C-130H Hercules
TRAINING
   1 OCU sqn with F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
   1 sqn with SF-260D/M
   1 BEL/FRA unit with Alpha Jet*
   1 OCU unit with AW109
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with AW109 (ISR)
ISR UAV
   1 sqn with RQ-5A Hunter (B-Hunter)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 88 combat capable
   FTR 59: 49 F-16AM Fighting Falcon; 10 F-16BM Fighting Falcon
   TPT 17: Medium 11 C-130H Hercules; Light 4: 2 ERJ-135 LR; 2 ERJ-145 LR; PAX 2: 1 A321; 1 Falcon 900B
   TRG 61: 29 Alpha Jet*; 9 SF-260D; 23 SF-260M
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 4 NH90 NFH opcon Navy
   MRH 3 SA316B Alouette III opcon Navy
   SAR 3 Sea King Mk48 (to be replaced by NH90 NFH)
   TPT 17: Medium 4 NH90 TTH; Light 13 AW109 (ISR) (7 more in store)
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Heavy 12 RQ-5A Hunter (B-Hunter) (1 more in store)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9M Sidewinder; IRR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; ARH AIM-120B AMRAAM
BOMBS
   Laser-guided: GBU-10/GBU-12 Paveway II; GBU-24 Paveway III
   INS/GPS guided: GBU-31 JDAM; GBU-38 JDAM; GBU-54 Laser JDAM (dual-mode)
   Cyber
   A national Cyber Security Strategy was released in 2012. The defence ministry released a Cyber Security Strategy for Defence in 2014, outlining three pillars of its cyber-security capability: Cyber Defence, Cyber Intelligence and Cyber Counter-Offensive, with `full operational capacity' by 2020. A `Strategic Vision for Defence' covering the period from 2016-30 was published in June 2016. The armed forces' cyber capability falls under the military intelligence service, including defensive and offensive cyber operations. As of mid-2016, the armed forces do not have an offensive cyber capability. Military cyber personnel are based in the Cyber Security Operations Centre.
   Кибер
   В 2012 году была выпущена Национальная стратегия кибербезопасности. Министерство Обороны выпустило Стратегию кибербезопасности для обороны в 2014 году, изложив три столпа своего потенциала кибербезопасности: киберзащита, кибер-разведка и кибер-контрнаступление, с "полным оперативным потенциалом" к 2020 году. В июне 2016 года было опубликовано "стратегическое видение обороны", охватывающее период с 2016 по 30 годы. Кибернетический потенциал вооруженных сил находится в ведении Службы военной разведки, включая оборонительные и наступательные кибероперации. По состоянию на середину 2016 года, Вооруженные силы не имеют наступательные возможности. Военный кибернетический персонал базируется в оперативном центре кибербезопасности.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 60
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 9
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 2
ESTONIA: NATO Baltic Air Policing 4 F-16AM Fighting Falcon
FRANCE: NATO Air Component 28 Alpha Jet located at Cazaux/Tours
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve (Valiant Phoenix) 30
JORDAN: Operation Inherent Resolve (Desert Falcon) 110; 4 F-16AM Fighting Falcon
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 1
LITHUANIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 100; 1 tpt coy
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 171 UN MINUSMA 23
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 2 obs
NORTH SEA: NATO SNMCMG 1: 1 MHC
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 4

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 900

   BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA
    []

Capabilities
In mid-2017, Bosnia-Herzegovina adopted a `defence review, development and modernisation plan' for the period 2017-27. The document calls for a reduction in personnel and the restructuring of the Tactical Support Brigade. According to the review, the procurement of armoured vehicles and helicopters is envisaged. The reforms reportedly constitute part of the country's effort to join NATO. Bosnia's aspiration to join NATO's membership action plan remains delayed because of an unresolved defence-property issue, including defence ministry barracks and buildings. However, an August 2017 constitutional court decision reportedly may help Bosnia move forward in its aspiration. Bosnia contributes to NATO peacekeeping missions, most notably in Afghanistan.
Потенциал

В середине 2017 года Босния и Герцеговина приняла "план обзора, развития и модернизации обороны" на период 2017-27 годов. Документ предусматривает сокращение личного состава и реорганизацию бригады тактической поддержки. Согласно обзору, предусматривается закупка бронетехники и вертолетов. Эти реформы, как сообщается, являются частью усилий страны по вступлению в НАТО. Стремление Боснии присоединиться к плану действий по вступлению в НАТО по-прежнему откладывается из-за нерешенного вопроса об обороноспособности, включая оборонные казармы и здания. Однако решение Конституционного суда от августа 2017 года, как сообщается, может помочь Боснии продвинуться вперед в ее стремлении. Босния способствует НАТО

ACTIVE 10,500 (Armed Forces 10,500)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Armed Forces 10,500
   1 ops comd; 1 spt comd
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   3 inf bde (1 recce coy, 3 inf bn, 1 arty bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 cbt spt bde (1 tk bn, 1 engr bn, 1 EOD bn, 1 int bn, 1 MP bn, 1 CBRN coy, 1 sigs bn)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log comd (5 log bn)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 45 M60A3
   APC APC (T) 20 M113A2
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   VLB MTU
   MW Bozena
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP 60: 8 9P122 Malyutka; 9 9P133 Malyutka; 32 BOV-1; 11 M-92
   MANPATS 9K11 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger); 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot); 9K115 Metis (AT-7 Saxhorn); HJ-8; Milan
ARTILLERY 224
   TOWED 122mm 100 D-30
   MRL 122mm 24 APRA-40
   MOR 120mm 100 M-75

Air Force and Air Defence Brigade 800
FORCES BY ROLE
HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Bell 205; Mi-8MTV Hip; Mi-17 Hip H
   1 sqn with Mi-8 Hip; SA-342H/L Gazelle (HN-42/45M)
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   FGA (7 J-22 Orao in store)
   ATK (6 J-1 (J-21) Jastreb; 3 TJ-1(NJ-21) Jastreb all in store)
   ISR (2 RJ-1 (IJ-21) Jastreb* in store)
   TRG (1 G-4 Super Galeb (N-62)* in store)
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 13: 4 Mi-8MTV Hip; 1 Mi-17 Hip H; 1 SA-341H Gazelle (HN-42); 7 SA-342L Gazelle (HN-45M)
   TPT 21: Medium 8 Mi-8 Hip Light 13 Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois)
   TRG 1 Mi-34 Hermit
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Short-range 20 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful)
   Point-defence 7+: 6 9K31 Strela-1 (SA-9 Gaskin); 9K34 Strela-3 (SA-14 Gremlin); 1 9K35M3 Strela-10M3 (SA-13 Gopher); 9K310 (SA-16 Gimlet)
   GUNS 764
   SP 169: 20mm 9 BOV-3 SPAAG; 30mm 154: 38 M53; 116 M-53/59; 57mm 6 ZSU-57-2
   TOWED 595: 20mm 468: 32 M55A2, 4 M38, 1 M55 A2B1, 293 M55A3/A4, 138 M75; 23mm 38: 29 ZU-23, 9 GSh-23; 30mm 33 M-53;
   37mm 7 Type-55; 40mm 49: 31 L60, 16 L70, 2 M-12

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 55
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 1
ARMENIA/AZERBAIJAN: OSCE Minsk Conference 1
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 5 obs
MALI: UN MINUSMA 2
SERBIA: OSCE Kosovo 8
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 37

FOREIGN FORCES
Part of EUFOR - Operation Althea unless otherwise stated
Albania 1
Austria 191; 1 inf bn HQ
Azerbaijan OSCE 1
Bulgaria 10
Canada OSCE 3
Chile 15
Czech Republic 2 OSCE 1
Finland 4
Greece 1
Hungary 165; 1 inf coy
Ireland 5 OSCE 1
Italy 4 OSCE 6
Macedonia (FYORM) 3 OSCE 1
Netherlands OSCE 1
Poland 39
Romania 39
Russia OSCE 2
Serbia OSCE 1
Slovakia 41
Slovenia 14
Spain 2 OSCE 1
Switzerland 21
Turkey 199; 1 inf coy
United Kingdom 4; OSCE 7
United States OSCE 5

   BULGARIA
    []

Capabilities
Despite long-term plans for reform, Bulgaria's armed forces still rely heavily on Soviet-era equipment. In 2015, a development plan was adopted for the period until 2020. The emphasis in training is on those units intended for international operations and those with certain readiness levels declared to NATO and the EU. There are as-yet-unapproved plans for new or secondhand multi-role combat aircraft to replace the ageing MiG-29 fleet. Questions have reportedly been raised over the airworthiness of older aircraft. Under NATO's assurance measures, allied aircraft were deployed to patrol Bulgarian airspace in 2017 under the Enhanced Air Policing programme. Sofia aims to also acquire naval patrol boats and armoured vehicles, and modernise its warships. In 2017, Bulgaria launched a tender for the purchase of two corvettes, in an attempt to boost its capabilities in the Black Sea. Payments for its military modernisation projects, when approved, are expected to be deferred, perhaps up to 2029, in an attempt to lessen budget impact. Bulgaria hosted the Saber Guardian 2017 multinational exercise and reaffirmed its commitment to Afghanistan, Kosovo and the EUFOR mission in Bosnia-Herzegovina, sending additional personnel.
Потенциал
Несмотря на долгосрочные планы реформ, Вооруженные силы Болгарии по-прежнему в значительной степени полагаются на советскую технику. В 2015 году был принят план развития на период до 2020 года. Основное внимание в ходе подготовки уделяется подразделениям, предназначенным для международных операций, и подразделениям с определенным уровнем готовности, объявленным НАТО и ЕС. Пока еще не утверждены планы по замене устаревшего парка МиГ-29 новыми или подержанными многоцелевыми боевыми самолетами. Сообщается, что были подняты вопросы о летной годности старых самолетов. В соответствии с мерами НАТО по обеспечению безопасности самолеты союзников были развернуты для патрулирования воздушного пространства Болгарии в 2017 году в рамках Расширенной программы воздушной полиции. София стремится также приобрести морские патрульные катера и бронетранспортеры, а также модернизировать свои военные корабли. В 2017 году Болгария запустила тендер на покупку двух корветов, в попытке повысить свои возможности в Черном море. Ожидается, что выплаты по проектам военной модернизации, когда они будут утверждены, будут отложены, возможно до 2029 года, в попытке уменьшить воздействие на бюджет. Болгария принимала многонациональные учения Saber Guardian 2017 и подтвердила свою приверженность Афганистану, Косово и миссии СЕС в Боснийгерцеговине, направив дополнительный персонал.

ACTIVE 31,300 (Army 15,300 Navy 3,450 Air 6,700 Central Staff 5,850)
RESERVE 3,000 (Joint 3,000)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 16,300
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   1 recce bn
Mechanised
   2 mech bde (4 mech inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 log bn, 1 SAM bn)
Light
   1 mtn inf regt
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty regt (1 fd arty bn, 1 MRL bn)
   1 engr regt (1 cbt engr bn, 1 ptn br bn, 1 engr spt bn)
   1 NBC bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 90 T-72
   IFV 160: 90 BMP-1; 70 BMP-23
   APC 120
   APC (T) 100 MT-LB
   APC (W) 20 BTR-60
   AUV 17 M1117 ASV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV MT-LB
   ARV T-54/T-55; MTP-1; MT-LB
   VLB BLG67; TMM
   NBC VEHICLES Maritza NBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL
   SP 24 9P148 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel)
   MANPATS 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot); 9K111-1 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel); (9K11 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger) in store)
   GUNS 126: 85mm (150 D-44 in store); 100mm 126 MT-12
ARTILLERY 311
   SP 122mm 48 2S1
   TOWED 152mm 24 D-20
   MRL 122mm 24 BM-21
   MOR 120mm 215 2S11 SP Tundzha
RADARS LAND GS-13 Long Eye (veh); SNAR-1 Long Trough (arty); SNAR-10 Big Fred (veh, arty); SNAR-2/-6 Pork Trough (arty);
   Small Fred/Small Yawn (veh, arty)
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence 9K32 Strela (SA-7 Grail)?; 24 9K33 Osa (SA-8 Gecko)
   GUNS 400
   SP 23mm ZSU-23-4
   TOWED 23mm ZU-23; 57mm S-60; 100mm KS-19

Navy 3,450
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS FRIGATES 4
   FFM 3 Drazki (ex-BEL Wielingen) with 1 octuple Mk29 GMLS with RIM-7P Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 single 533mm ASTT with L5 HWT,
   1 sextuple 375mm MLE 54 Creusot-Loire A/S mor, 1 100mm gun (Fitted for but not with 2 twin lnchr with MM38 Exocet AShM)
   FF 1 Smeli (ex-FSU Koni) with 2 RBU 6000 Smerch 2 A/S mor, 2 twin 76mm guns
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 3
   PCFG 1 Mulnaya? (ex-FSU Tarantul II) with 2 twin lnchr with P-15M Termit-M (SS-N-2C Styx) AShM, 2 AK630M CIWS, 1 76mm gun
   PCT 2 Reshitelni (ex-FSU Pauk I) with 4 single 406mm TT,
   2 RBU 1200 A/S mor, 1 76mm gun
MINE COUNTERMEASURES 6
   MHC 1 Tsibar (Tripartite - ex-BEL Flower)
   MSC 3 Briz (ex-FSU Sonya)
   MSI 2 Olya (ex-FSU)
AMPHIBIOUS 1
   LCU 1 Vydra
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 8: 2 AGS; 2 AOL; 1 ARS; 2 ATF; 1 AX

Naval Aviation
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE

HELICOPTERS ASW 2 AS565MB Panther

Air Force 6,700
Flying hours 30-40 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/ISR
   1 sqn with MiG-29A/UB Fulcrum
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with An-30 Clank; C-27J Spartan; L-410UVP-E; PC-12M
TRAINING
   1 sqn with L-39ZA Albatros*
   1 sqn with PC-9M
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-24D/V Hind D/E
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with AS532AL Cougar; Bell 206 Jet Ranger; Mi-17 Hip H
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 22 combat capable
   FTR 16: 12 MiG-29A Fulcrum; 4 MiG-29UB Fulcrum (Some MiG-21bis Fishbed/MiG-21UM Mongol B in store)
   ISR 1 An-30 Clank
   TPT 7: Medium 3 C-27J Spartan; Light 4: 1 An-2T Colt; 2 L-410UVP-E; 1 PC-12M
   TRG 12: 6 L-39ZA Albatros*; 6 PC-9M (basic)
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 6 Mi-24D/V Hind D/E
   MRH 6 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT 18: Medium 12 AS532AL Cougar; Light 6 Bell 206 Jet Ranger
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES EW Yastreb-2S
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Long-range S-200 (SA-5 Gammon); S-300 (SA-10 Grumble)
   Medium-range S-75 Dvina (SA-2 Guideline)
   Short-range S-125 Pechora (SA-3 Goa); 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR R-3 (AA-2 Atoll)? R-73 (AA-11 Archer) SARH R-27R (AA-10 Alamo A)
   ASM Kh-29 (AS-14 Kedge); Kh-25 (AS-10 Karen)

Special Forces
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 spec ops bde (1 SF bn, 1 para bn)

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 160
BLACK SEA: NATO SNMCMG 2: 1 MSC
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 10
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 5
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 2: 1 FFM
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 20 OSCE Kosovo 1
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 35

FOREIGN FORCES
Italy NATO Air Policing 4 Eurofighter Typhoon


   CROATIA
    []

Capabilities
In 2017, Croatia adopted a new National Security Strategy and a Bill on its Homeland Security System. It also announced its intention to increase the military budget. Principal tasks for the armed forces include defending national sovereignty and territorial integrity and tackling terrorism. Croatia joined NATO in 2009 having reformed its armed forces to create a small professional force, with a focus on international peacekeeping duties. Zagreb aims to continue modernising the armed forces, but economic challenges have caused delays, including the replacement of ageing Soviet-era equipment. Modernisation objectives include an inshore patrol vessel, a prototype of which was launched in June 2017. There are also plans to eventually replace the MiG-21 fleet; the defence ministry aims to finish evaluating related acquisition proposals by early 2018. Exports of defence equipment, including small arms, have risen in recent years. Croatia regularly takes part in NATO exercises, and in late 2017 deployed an army contingent to Poland to join the US-led NATO battle group there.
Потенциал
В 2017 году Хорватия приняла новую Стратегию национальной безопасности и законопроект о национальной системе безопасности. Она также объявила о своем намерении увеличить военный бюджет. Основные задачи Вооруженных сил включают защиту национального суверенитета и территориальной целостности и борьбу с терроризмом. Хорватия вступила в НАТО в 2009 году, реформировав свои вооруженные силы для создания небольших профессиональных сил с упором на международные миротворческие обязанности. Загреб стремится продолжить модернизацию вооруженных сил, но экономические проблемы вызвали задержки, включая замену устаревшего оборудования советской эпохи. В задачи модернизации входит Береговое патрульное судно, прототип которого был запущен в июне 2017 года. Также планируется в конечном итоге заменить парк МиГ-21; министерство обороны намерено завершить оценку соответствующих предложений по приобретению к началу 2018 года. В последние годы увеличился экспорт оборонной техники, включая стрелковое оружие. Хорватия регулярно принимает участие в учениях НАТО, а в конце 2017 года развернула в Польше армейский контингент для присоединения к возглавляемой США боевой группе НАТО.

ACTIVE 15,650 (Army 11,250 Navy 1,300 Air 1,250 Joint 1,850) Paramilitary 3,000
Conscript liability Voluntary conscription, 8 weeks

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Joint 1,850 (General Staff)
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF bn

Army 11,250
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Armoured
   1 armd bde (1 tk bn, 1 armd bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 ADA bn, 1 cbt engr bn)
Light
   1 mot inf bde (2 mech inf bn, 2 mot inf bn, 1 fd arty bn, 1 ADA bn, 1 cbt engr bn)
Other
   1 inf trg regt
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty/MRL regt
   1 AT regt
   1 engr regt
   1 int bn
   1 MP regt
   1 NBC bn
   1 sigs regt
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log regt
AIR DEFENCE
   1 ADA regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 75 M-84
   IFV 102 M-80
   APC 222
   APC (T) 15 BTR-50
   APC (W) 150: 1 BOV-VP; 23 LOV OP; 126 Patria AMV (incl variants)
   PPV 57: 37 Maxxpro; 20 RG-33 HAGA (amb)
   AUV 151+: 4 Cougar HE; IVECO LMV; 147 M-ATV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV M84A1; WZT-3
   VLB 3 MT-55A
   MW Bozena; 1 Rhino
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP 28 POLO BOV 83
   MANPATS 9K11 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger); 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot); 9K111-1 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel); 9K115 Metis (AT-7 Saxhorn);
   Milan (reported)
ARTILLERY 217
   SP 10: 122mm 8 2S1; 155mm 2 PzH 2000 (4 more being modified for delivery)
   TOWED 64: 122mm 27 D-30; 130mm 19 M-46H1; 155mm 18 M1H1
   MRL 39: 122mm 37: 6 M91 Vulkan; 31 BM-21 Grad; 128mm 2 LOV RAK M91 R24
   MOR 104: 82mm 29 LMB M96; 120mm 75: 70 M-75; 5 UBM 52
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point 9 Strela-10
   GUNS 96
   SP 20mm 39 BOV-3 SP
   TOWED 20mm 57 M55A4

Navy 1,300
Navy HQ at Split
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 5
   PCFG 1 Koncar with 2 twin lnchr with RBS-15B Mk I AShM, 1 AK630 CIWS, 1 57mm gun
   PCG 4:
   2 Kralj with 4 single lnchr with RBS-15B Mk I AShM,
   1 AK630 CIWS, 1 57mm gun (with minelaying capability)
   2 Vukovar (ex-FIN Helsinki) with 4 single lnchr with RBS-15B Mk I AShM, 1 57mm gun
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES
   MHI 1 Korcula
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT 5:
   LCT 2 Cetina (with minelaying capability)
   LCVP 3: 2 Type-21; 1 Type-22
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT AKL 1
COASTAL DEFENCE AShM 3 RBS-15K

Marines
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Amphibious
   2 indep mne coy
   Coast Guard
FORCES BY ROLE
Two divisions, headquartered in Split (1st div) and Pula (2nd div)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PB 4 Mirna
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT
   AKL 1 PT-71
   AX 2

Air Force and Air Defence 1,250
Flying hours 50 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 (mixed) sqn with MiG-21bis/UMD Fishbed
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with An-32 Cline
TRAINING
   1 sqn with PC-9M; Z-242L
   1 hel sqn with Bell 206B Jet Ranger II
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with Mi-8MTV Hip H; Mi-8T Hip C; Mi-171Sh
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 11 combat capable
   FGA 11: 8 MiG-21bis Fishbed; 3 MiG-21UMD Fishbed
   TPT Light 2 An-32 Cline
   TRG 25: 20 PC-9M; 5 Z-242L
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 27: 11 Mi-8MTV Hip H; 16 OH-58D Kiowa Warrior
   TPT 21: Medium 13: 3 Mi-8T Hip C; 10 Mi-171Sh; Light 8 Bell 206B Jet Ranger II
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Medium Hermes 450
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Long-range S-300 (SA-10 Grumble)
   Point-defence 9K31 Strela-1 (SA-9 Gaskin); 9K34 Strela-3 (SA-14 Gremlin); 9K310 Igla-1 (SA-16 Gimlet)
RADAR AIR 11: 5 FPS-117; 3 S-600; 3 PRV-11
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR R-3S (AA-2 Atoll)?; R-60; R-60MK (AA-8 Aphid)
   ASM AGM-114 Hellfire

Special Forces Command
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   2 SF gp
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC PPV 5 Maxxpro
   AUV 15 M-ATV

Paramilitary 3,000
   Police 3,000 armed

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 94
INDIA/PAKISTAN: UN UNMOGIP 9 obs
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 1
POLAND: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 78; 1 MRL bty with BM-21 Grad
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 33; 1 hel unit with Mi-8 Hip OSCE Kosovo 1
UKRAINE: SCE Ukraine 10
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 7 obs

   CYPRUS
    []

Capabilities
Although Cyprus' National Guard contains air, land, sea and special-forces units, it is predominantly a land force. Its main objective is to deter any possible Turkish incursion, and to provide enough opposition until military support can be provided by Greece, its primary ally. The air wing has a small number of rotary- and fixed-wing utility platforms, including attack helicopters, while the maritime wing is essentially a coastal-defence and constabulary force. In 2017, Cyprus displayed its Buk M1-2 medium-range SAM systems, which have boosted its air-defence capability. Having reduced conscript liability in 2016, Nicosia began recruiting additional contract-service personnel, as part of the effort to modernise and professionalise its forces. Cyprus exercised with several international partners in 2017. Expeditionary deployments have been limited, with some officers joining EU and UN missions.
Потенциал
Хотя Национальная гвардия Кипра содержит воздушные, сухопутные, морские и специальные подразделения, она является преимущественно сухопутными силами. Его главная цель - сдержать любое возможное турецкое вторжение и оказать достаточное сопротивление до тех пор, пока военная поддержка не будет оказана Грецией, ее главным союзником. Воздушное крыло имеет небольшое число вертолетных и стационарных платформ, включая ударные вертолеты, в то время как морское крыло по существу является силами береговой обороны и полиции. В 2017 году Кипр продемонстрировал свои системы ЗРК средней дальности Бук М1-2, которые повысили его потенциал противовоздушной обороны. Сократив в 2016 году ответственность по призыву, Никосия начала набор дополнительного персонала по контракту в рамках усилий по модернизации и профессионализации своих сил. Кипр проводил учения с несколькими международными партнерами в 2017 году. Экспедиционные развертывания были ограничены:

ACTIVE 15,000 (National Guard 15,000) Paramilitary 750
Conscript liability 14 months
RESERVE 50,000 (National Guard 50,000)
Reserve service to age 50 (officers dependent on rank; military doctors to age 60)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

National Guard 15,000 (incl conscripts)
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 comd (regt) (1 SF bn)
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
   1 lt armd bde (2 armd bn, 1 armd inf bn)
Mechanised
   1 (1st) mech inf div (1 armd recce bn, 2 mech inf bn)
   1 (2nd) mech inf div (1 armd recce bn, 2 armd bn, 2 mech inf bn)
Light
   3 (4th, 7th & 8th) lt inf bde (2 lt inf regt)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty comd (8 arty bn)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 (3rd) spt bde
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 134: 82 T-80U; 52 AMX-30B2
   RECCE 69 EE-9 Cascavel
   IFV 43 BMP-3
   APC 294
   APC (T) 168 Leonidas
   APC (W) 126 VAB (incl variants)
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 3: 2 AMX-30D; 1 BREM-1
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL
   SP 33: 15 EE-3 Jararaca with Milan; 18 VAB with HOT
   MANPATS Milan
   RCL 106mm 144 M40A1
   GUNS TOWED 100mm 20 M-1944
ARTILLERY 432
   SP 155mm 24: 12 Mk F3; 12 Zuzana
   TOWED 84: 105mm 72 M-56; 155mm 12 TR-F-1
   MRL 22: 122mm 4 BM-21; 128mm 18 M-63 Plamen
   MOR 302: 81mm 170 E-44 (70+ M1/M9 in store); 107mm 20 M2/M30; 120mm 112 RT61
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Medium-range 4 9K37M1 Buk M1-2 (SA-11 Gadfly)
   Short-range 18: 12 Aspide; 6 9K322 Tor (SA-15 Gauntlet)
   Point-defence Mistral
   GUNS TOWED 60: 20mm 36 M-55; 35mm 24 GDF-003 (with Skyguard)

Maritime Wing
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 (coastal defence) AShM bty with MM40 Exocet AShM
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 4
   PBF 4: 2 Rodman 55; 2 Vittoria
COASTAL DEFENCE AShM 3 MM40 Exocet

Air Wing
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   TPT Light 1 BN-2B Islander
   TRG 1 PC-9
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 11 Mi-35P Hind
   MRH 7: 3 AW139 (SAR); 4 SA342L1 Gazelle (with HOT for anti-armour role)
   TPT Light 2 Bell 206L3 Long Ranger

Paramilitary 750+
Armed Police 500+
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   1 (rapid-reaction) paramilitary unit
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 2 VAB VTT
HELICOPTERS MRH 4: 2 AW139; 2 Bell 412SP

Maritime Police 250
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 10
   PBF 5: 2 Poseidon; 1 Shaldag; 2 Vittoria
   PB 5 SAB-12

DEPLOYMENT
LEBANON
UN UNIFIL 2

FOREIGN FORCES
Argentina UNFICYP 277; 2 inf coy; 1 hel flt
Austria UNFICYP 4
Bangladesh UNFICYP 1
Brazil UNFICYP 1
Canada UNFICYP 1
Chile UNFICYP 14
Greece Army: 950; ~200 (officers/NCO seconded to Greek Cypriot National Guard)
Hungary UNFICYP 77; 1 inf pl
Paraguay UNFICYP 14
Serbia UNFICYP 47; elm 1 inf coy
Slovakia UNFICYP 169; elm 1 inf coy; 1 engr pl
Ukraine UNFICYP 2
United Kingdom 2,260; 2 inf bn; 1 hel sqn with 4 Bell 412 Twin Huey Operation Inherent Resolve (Shader) 500: 1 FGA sqn with 6 Tornado GR4;
   6 Typhoon FGR4; 1 Sentinel R1; 1 E-3D Sentry; 1 A330 MRTT Voyager KC3; 2 C-130J Hercules
   UNFICYP 277: 1 inf coy

TERRITORY WHERE THE GOVERNMENT DOES NOT EXERCISE EFFECTIVE CONTROL
Data here represents the de facto situation on the northern section of the island. This does not imply international recognition as a sovereign state.
Capabilities
ACTIVE 3,500
(Army 3,500) Paramilitary 150
Conscript liability 15 months
RESERVE 26,000 (first line 11,000; second line 10,000; third line 5,000) Reserve liability to age 50

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army ~3,500
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   7 inf bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Milan
   RCL 106mm 36
ARTILLERY MOR 120mm 73

Paramilitary Armed Police ~150
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 (police) SF unit
   Coast Guard
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 6
   PCC 5: 2 SG45/SG46; 1 Rauf Denktash; 2 US Mk 5
   PB 1

FOREIGN FORCES
TURKEY
Army ~36,500
FORCES BY ROLE
   1 corps HQ, 1 armd bde, 2 mech inf div, 1 avn comd
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 348: 8 M48A2 (trg); 340 M48A5T1/2
   APC APC (T) 627: 361 AAPC (incl variants); 266 M113 (incl variants)
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Milan; TOW
   RCL 106mm 192 M40A1
ARTILLERY 648
   SP 155mm 90 M44T
   TOWED 102: 105mm 72 M101A1; 155mm 18 M114A2; 203mm 12 M115
   MRL 122mm 6 T-122
   MOR 450: 81mm 175; 107mm 148 M30; 120mm 127 HY-12
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 1 PB
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 3 Cessna 185 (U-17)
HELICOPTERS TPT 4 Medium 1 AS532UL Cougar
Light 3 Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois)
AIR DEFENCE GUNS TOWED 20mm Rh 202; 35mm 16 GDF-003; 40mm 48 M1

   CZECH REPUBLIC
    []

Capabilities
The Czech national-security strategy published in 2015 confirms that NATO is central to national security and asserts that stability and security in Europe have deteriorated. A direct military attack was deemed unlikely, but aggression against NATO or EU member states could not be ruled out. The Czech defence strategy, published in March 2017, confirms the overall assessment, pointing to Russian assertiveness, an arc of instability to the south and southeast of Europe, and information warfare, including cyber attacks, as drivers in the government's analysis. According to the Concept of the Czech Armed Forces 2025, adopted in December 2015, armed-forces restructuring will proceed in two phases, with recruitment and equipment procurement the focus to 2020, shifting to the modernisation of existing equipment and infrastructure in 2020-25. The long-term defence-planning guidelines for 2030, published in 2015, support an increase in active personnel to 27,000 (confirmed in the 2017 defence strategy). With defence spending on an upward trajectory since 2015, the government is trying to use these additional resources to replace legacy equipment in order to both modernise the armed forces and reduce dependence on Russia for spares and services. Recruitment is also a priority. Some units are severely under strength, achieving just 60% of their nominal strength. The government adopted an Active Reserve Law in 2016, and an increase in reserve strength is planned. In February 2017, the Czech Republic signed a letter of intent with Germany to affiliate the 4th Czech Rapid Deployment Brigade with the 10th German Armoured Division under NATO's Framework Nations Concept. Training and exercise activities are set to follow, with the aim of improving interoperability and supporting the provision of large formations for follow-on forces in NATO operations.
Потенциал
Чешская стратегия национальной безопасности, опубликованная в 2015 году, подтверждает, что НАТО занимает центральное место в национальной безопасности, и утверждает, что стабильность и безопасность в Европе ухудшились. Прямое военное нападение было сочтено маловероятным, однако агрессию против государств-членов НАТО или ЕС нельзя исключать. Чешская оборонная стратегия, опубликованная в марте 2017 года, подтверждает общую оценку, указывая на российскую напористость, дугу нестабильности на юге и юго-востоке Европы и информационную войну, включая кибератаки, в качестве драйверов в анализе правительства. В соответствии с концепцией чешских вооруженных сил 2025 года, принятой в декабре 2015 года, реорганизация вооруженных сил будет проходить в два этапа, при этом основное внимание будет уделяться набору и закупке оборудования до 2020 года, а в 2020-25 годах - модернизации существующего оборудования и инфраструктуры. Руководящие принципы долгосрочного оборонного планирования на 2030 год, опубликованные в 2015 году, поддерживают увеличение активного персонала до 27 000 человек (подтверждено в оборонной стратегии 2017 года). С учетом того, что с 2015 года расходы на оборону растут, правительство пытается использовать эти дополнительные ресурсы для замены устаревшей техники как для модернизации вооруженных сил, так и для снижения зависимости от России в запасных частях и услугах. Одним из приоритетов является также набор персонала. Некоторые блоки строго под прочностью, достигая как раз 60% из их номинальной прочности. В 2016 году правительство приняло закон об активном резерве, планируется увеличение его численности. В феврале 2017 года Чешская Республика подписала с Германией письмо о намерениях присоединить 4-ю чешскую бригаду быстрого развертывания к 10-й немецкой бронетанковой дивизии в соответствии с концепцией рамочных Наций НАТО. За этим должны последовать учебные и учебные мероприятия с целью повышения оперативной совместимости и оказания поддержки в обеспечении крупных формирований для последующих сил в операциях НАТО.

ACTIVE 23,200 (Army 12,250 Air 5,850 Other 3,650)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 12,250
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   1 ISR/EW regt (1 recce bn, 1 EW bn)
Armoured
   1 (7th) mech bde (1 tk bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 mot inf bn)
Mechanised
   1 (4th) rapid reaction bde (2 mech inf bn, 1 mot inf bn, 1 AB bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 (13th) arty regt (2 arty bn)
   1 engr regt (3 engr bn, 1 EOD bn)
   1 CBRN regt (2 CBRN bn)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log regt (2 log bn, 1 maint bn)

Active Reserve
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   14 (territorial defence) comd
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
   1 armd coy
Light
   14 inf coy (1 per territorial comd) (3 inf pl, 1 cbt spt pl, 1 log pl)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 30 T-72M4CZ (93 T-72 in store)
   RECCE (34 BPzV Svatava in store)
   IFV 222: 120 BMP-2; 102 Pandur II (inc variants); (98 BMP-1; 65 BMP-2 all in store)
   APC
   APC (T) (17 OT-90 in store)
   APC (W) (3 OT-64 in store)
   AUV 21 Dingo 2; IVECO LMV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 10 VPV-ARV (12 more in store)
   VLB 3 MT-55A (3 more in store)
   MW UOS-155 Belarty
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS 9K111-1 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel); Spike-LR
ARTILLERY 96
   SP 152mm 48 M-77 Dana (38 more in store)
   MOR 120mm 48: 40 M-1982; 8 SPM-85; (45 M-1982 in store)
RADAR LAND 3 ARTHUR

Air Force 5,850
Principal task is to secure Czech airspace. This mission is fulfilled within NATO Integrated Extended Air Defence System (NATINADS) and, if necessary, by means of the Czech national reinforced air-defence system. The air force also provides CAS for army SAR, and performs a tpt role
Flying hours 120 hrs/yr cbt ac; 150 for tpt ac
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with Gripen C/D
   1 sqn with L-159 ALCA; L-159T
TRANSPORT
   2 sqn with A319CJ; C295M; CL-601 Challenger; L-410 Turbolet; Yak-40 Codling
TRAINING
   1 sqn with L-39ZA Albatros*; L-159 ALCA; L-159T
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-24/Mi-35 Hind
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-17 Hip H; Mi-171Sh
   1 sqn with Mi-8 Hip; Mi-17 Hip H; PZL W-3A Sokol
AIR DEFENCE
   1 (25th) SAM regt (2 AD gp)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 44 combat capable
   FGA 14: 12 Gripen C; 2 Gripen D
   ATK 21: 16 L-159 ALCA; 5 L-159T
   TPT 15: Light 12: 4 C295M; 6 L-410 Turbolet; 2 Yak-40 Codling; PAX 3: 2 A319CJ; 1 CL-601 Challenger
   TRG 9 L-39ZA Albatros*
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 17: 7 Mi-24 Hind D; 10 Mi-35 Hind E
   MRH 5 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT Medium 30: 4 Mi-8 Hip; 16 Mi-171Sh; 10 PZL W3A Sokol
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Point-defence 9K35 Strela-10 (SA-13 Gopher); 9K32 Strela-2? (SA-7 Grail) (available for trg RBS-70 gunners); RBS-70
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9M Sidewinder; ARH AIM-120C-5 AMRAAM
BOMBS
   Laser-guided: GBU Paveway

Other Forces
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF gp
MANOEUVRE
Other
   1 (presidential) gd bde (2 bn)
   1 (honour guard) gd bn (2 coy)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 int gp
   1 (central) MP comd
   3 (regional) MP comd
   1 (protection service) MP comd

Cyber
In 2011, the National Security Authority (NSA) was established as the country's leading cyber-security body. The National Cyber Security Centre, government CERT (as part of the NSA) and the Cyber Security Council were subsequently established. The Cyber Security Act entered into force in January 2015. A new National Cyber Security Strategy and an Action Plan for 2015-20 were published. The former states that the country will look `to increase national capacities for active cyber defence and cyber attack countermeasures'. The National Cyber and Information Security Agency was established on 1 August 2017 as the central body of state administration for cyber security, including the protection of classified information in the area of information and communications systems and cryptographic protection, which was previously the responsibility of the NSA. The defence ministry is developing its own cyber-defence capabilities according to specific tasks based on NATO or EU documents and the requirements of the National Action Plan. The defence ministry security director also leads on cyber security.
Кибер
В 2011 году Управление национальной безопасности (УНБ) было создано в качестве ведущего органа кибербезопасности страны. Впоследствии были созданы Национальный центр кибербезопасности, правительственный сертификат (в составе УНБ) и Совет кибербезопасности. Закон о кибербезопасности вступил в силу в январе 2015 года. Были опубликованы новая национальная стратегия кибербезопасности и план действий на 2015-20 годы. В первом говорится, что страна будет стремиться "увеличить национальный потенциал для активной киберзащиты и противодействия кибератакам". Национальное агентство по кибер-и информационной безопасности было создано 1 августа 2017 года в качестве центрального органа государственного управления по кибербезопасности, в том числе по защите секретной информации в области информационно-коммуникационных систем и криптографической защиты, которая ранее входила в компетенцию УНБ. Министерство Обороны разрабатывает свой собственный потенциал киберзащиты в соответствии с конкретными задачами на основе документов НАТО или ЕС и требований Национального плана действий. Директор по безопасности министерства обороны также ведет кибербезопасность.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 267
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 2; OSCE Bosnia-Herzegovina 1
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 3 obs
EGYPT: MFO 18; 1 C295M
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 30
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 41; UN MINUSMA 1
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 9; OSCE Kosovo 1; UN UNMIK 2 obs
SYRIA/ISRAEL: UN UNDOF 2
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 15

   DENMARK
    []

Capabilities
Danish military capabilities remain compact but effective despite pressures on spending and deployments. In October 2017, the government presented a new draft defence agreement covering the period 2018-23. It envisages an increase in defence spending to deal with a deteriorating security environment. In particular, it is intended to strengthen deterrence, cyber defence and Denmark's role in international operations, as well as the armed forces' ability to support civilian authorities in national-security tasks. Specifically, Denmark plans to set up a heavy brigade by 2024 with enhanced capabilities, including ground-based air defence, and to establish a light infantry battalion to take on patrol and guard missions in support of the police. In addition, a situation centre to help respond to cyber attacks is planned. Improved ties to NATO, NORDEFCO and other regional neighbours reflect an increasing trend in this area. Denmark has contributed to the NATO Baltic Air Policing mission. A defence agreement, aimed at deterring Russia, was signed in April 2015 between Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Procurement of the F-35A Joint Strike Fighter as a replacement for the country's ageing F-16AM/BM fleet was confirmed in June 2016, with airframe numbers reduced to 27 for cost reasons. Industrial support from Terma, Denmark's largest defence company, may have been important to the decision; some key F-35 sub-components and composites are produced by the firm. The MH-60R Seahawk is replacing the ageing Lynx helicopter fleet operating on Danish naval vessels.
Потенциал
Датский военный потенциал остается компактным, но эффективным, несмотря на давление на расходы и развертывание. В октябре 2017 года правительство представило новый проект оборонного соглашения на период 2018-23 годов. Он предусматривает увеличение расходов на оборону в связи с ухудшением обстановки в плане безопасности. В частности, она призвана укрепить сдерживание, киберзащиту и роль Дании в международных операциях, а также способность вооруженных сил оказывать поддержку гражданским властям в решении задач национальной безопасности. В частности, Дания планирует создать к 2024 году тяжелую бригаду с расширенными возможностями, включая наземную противовоздушную оборону, и создать батальон легкой пехоты для патрулирования и охраны в поддержку полиции. Кроме того, планируется создать ситуационный центр для реагирования на кибератаки. Улучшение связей с НАТО, NORDEFCO и другими региональными соседями отражает растущую тенденцию в этой области. Дания внесла полицейская миссия НАТО балтийским воздухом. Оборонное соглашение, направленное на сдерживание России, было подписано в апреле 2015 года между Данией, Финляндией, Исландией, Норвегией и Швецией. Закупка совместного ударного истребителя F-35A в качестве замены устаревшего парка F-16AM/BM была подтверждена в июне 2016 года, при этом количество планеров сократилось до 27 по причинам стоимости. Промышленная поддержка со стороны термы, крупнейшей оборонной компании Дании, возможно, имела важное значение для решения; некоторые ключевые субкомпоненты F-35 и композиты производятся фирмой. MH-60R Seahawk заменяет устаревший вертолетный парк Lynx, работающий на датских военно-морских судах.

ACTIVE 16,100 (Army 8,200 Navy 2,000 Air 2,700 Joint 3,200)
Conscript liability 4-12 months, most voluntary
RESERVES 45,700 (Army 34,300 Navy 5,300 Air Force 4,750 Service Corps 1,350)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 8,200
Div and bde HQ are responsible for trg only; if necessary, can be transformed into operational formations
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   1 div HQ
   2 bde HQ
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 recce bn
   1 ISR bn
Armoured
   1 tk bn
Mechanised
   3 mech inf bn
   2 mech inf bn(-)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 SP arty bn
   1 cbt engr bn
   1 construction bn
   1 EOD bn
   1 MP bn
   1 sigs regt (1 sigs bn, 1 EW coy)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log regt (1 spt bn, 1 log bn, 1 maint bn, 1 med bn)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 34 Leopard 2A5 (23 more in store)
   IFV 44 CV9030 Mk II
   APC 314
   APC (T) 235 M113 (incl variants); (196 more in store awaiting disposal)
   APC (W) 79 Piranha III (incl variants)
   AUV 84 Eagle IV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 10 Bergepanzer 2
   VLB 6 Biber
   MW 14 910-MCV-2
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   RCL 84mm 186 Carl Gustav
ARTILLERY 24
   SP 155mm 12 M109
   MOR TOWED 120mm 12 Soltam K6B1
RADAR LAND ARTHUR
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger

Navy 2,000
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 3
DESTROYERS DDGHM 3 Iver Huitfeldt with 4 quad lnchr with RGM-84 Harpoon Block II AShM, 1 32-cell Mk41 VLS with RIM-162 ESSM SAM,
   2 12-cell Mk56 VLS with RIM-162 SAM, 2 twin 324mm TT with MU90 LWT, 1 Millennium CIWS, 2 76mm guns (capacity 1 med hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 13
   PSOH 4 Thetis 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 Super Lynx Mk90B)
   PSO 2 Knud Rasmussen with 1 76mm gun, 1 hel landing platform
   PCC 7: 1 Agdlek; 6 Diana
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 6
   MCI 4 MSF MK-I
   MSD 2 Holm
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 13
   ABU 2 (primarily used for MARPOL duties)
   AE 1 Sleipner
   AG 2 Absalon (flexible support ships) with 4 quad lnchr with RGM-84 Block 2 Harpoon 2 AShM,
   3 12-cell Mk 56 VLS with RIM-162B Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 twin 324mm TT with MU90 LWT, 2 Millennium CIWS,
   1 127mm gun (capacity 2 AW101 Merlin; 2 LCP, 7 MBT or 40 vehicles; 130 troops)
   AGS 2 Holm
   AKL 2 Seatruck
   AXL 2 Holm
   AXS 2 Svanen

Air Force 2,700
Flying hours 165 hrs/yr
Tactical Air Command
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   2 sqn with F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   1 sqn with Super Lynx Mk90B
SEARCH & RESCUE/TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with AW101 Merlin
   1 sqn with AS550 Fennec (ISR)
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules; CL-604 Challenger (MP/VIP)
TRAINING
   1 unit with MFI-17 Supporter (T-17)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 44 combat capable
   FTR 44: 34 F-16AM Fighting Falcon; 10 F-16BM Fighting Falcon (30 operational)
   TPT 8: Medium 4 C-130J-30 Hercules; PAX 4 CL-604 Challenger (MP/VIP)
   TRG 27 MFI-17 Supporter (T-17)
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 9: 6 Super Lynx Mk90B; 3 MH-60R Seahawk
   MRH 8 AS550 Fennec (ISR) (4 more non-operational)
   TPT Medium 13 AW101 Merlin (8 SAR; 5 Tpt)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; ARH AIM-120 AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65 Maverick
BOMBS
   Laser-guided EGBU-12/GBU-24 Paveway II/III; INS/GPS guided GBU-31 JDAM

Control and Air Defence Group
   1 Control and Reporting Centre, 1 Mobile Control and Reporting Centre. 4 Radar sites

Special Operations Command
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF unit
   1 diving unit

Reserves
Home Guard (Army) 34,300 reservists (to age 50)
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   2 regt cbt gp (3 mot inf bn, 1 arty bn)
   5 (local) def region (up to 2 mot inf bn)
   Home Guard (Navy) 4,500 reservists (to age 50)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 30
   PB 30: 17 MHV800; 1 MHV850; 12 MHV900 Home Guard (Air Force) 4,750 reservists (to age 50)
Home Guard (Service Corps) 1,350 reservists
   Cyber
   A National Strategy for Cyber and Information Security was released in December 2014. A Centre for Cyber Security (CFCS) was established in 2012 within the defence-intelligence service. The CFCS is Denmark's national ICT security authority with three primary responsibilities: contribute to protecting Denmark against cyber threats; assist in securing a solid and robust ICT critical infrastructure in Denmark; and warn of, protect against and counter cyber attacks. In addition to existing cyber-defence capabilities, Denmark is in the process of establishing a capacity that can execute defensive and offensive military operations in cyberspace.
   Кибер
   В декабре 2014 года была выпущена Национальная стратегия кибербезопасности и информационной безопасности. В 2012 году при Службе обороны и разведки был создан Центр кибербезопасности (ЦБК). ХФУ является национальным органом Дании по вопросам безопасности ИКТ, на который возложены три основные обязанности: содействие защите Дании от киберугроз; оказание помощи в обеспечении надежной и надежной критически важной инфраструктуры ИКТ в Дании; и предупреждение, защита от кибератак и противодействие им. В дополнение к имеющимся возможностям киберзащиты Дания находится в процессе создания потенциала, который может осуществлять оборонительные и наступательные военные операции в киберпространстве.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 100
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 190; 1 SF gp; 1 trg team
KUWAIT: Operation Inherent Resolve 20
MALI: UN MINUSMA 64; 1 avn unit
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 1: 1 DDGHM; 1 AG
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 12 obs
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 35
SEYCHELLES: Combined Maritime Forces CTF-150: 1 CL-604
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 9
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 4
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: Operation Inherent Resolve 20

   ESTONIA
    []

Capabilities
Estonian security policy is predicated on the goals of ensuring sovereignty and territorial integrity. These aims have been thrown into sharper focus since Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea and Moscow's continuing support for rebel forces in eastern Ukraine. In June 2017, the government approved the 2017-26 National Defence Development Plan (NDPP), succeeding the 2013-22 plan. The latest document reflects the worsening security environment in the Baltic region, and identifies the need for additional armoured mobility and armoured firepower, as well as increasing stocks of munitions. The army began to take delivery of Dutch army-surplus CV90 AIFVs in late 2016. Increasing the number of annual conscripts to 4,000, along with growing the total number of active personnel, are also part of the new NDPP. Given the small size and limited capabilities of the armed forces, however, the country is reliant on NATO membership as a security guarantor. A 1,000-strong NATO battlegroup based in Estonia became operational in mid-2017 as part of the Alliance's Enhanced Forward Presence. In November 2017, Estonia once again hosted NATO's Cyber Coalition exercise. The country's Amari air base also hosts a Baltic Air Policing combat-aircraft detachment drawn on a voluntary rotational basis from NATO states. Estonia is a member of the UK-led multinational Joint Expeditionary Force.
Потенциал
Политика Эстонии в области безопасности основывается на целях обеспечения суверенитета и территориальной целостности. Эти цели стали более четкими после аннексии Крыма Россией в 2014 году и продолжающейся поддержки Москвой повстанческих сил на востоке Украины. В июне 2017 года правительство утвердило план развития национальной обороны (НПРО) на 2017-26 годы, сменив план на 2013-22 годы. Последний документ отражает ухудшение обстановки в плане безопасности в Балтийском регионе и определяет необходимость в дополнительной бронетанковой мобильности и бронетанковой огневой мощи, а также увеличения запасов боеприпасов. Армия начала принимать поставки голландской армии-излишки CV90 AIFVs в конце 2016 года. Увеличение числа ежегодно призываемых на военную службу до 4000 человек наряду с увеличением общей численности активного персонала также является частью новой НПР. Однако, учитывая небольшие размеры и ограниченные возможности Вооруженных сил, страна полагается на членство в НАТО в качестве гаранта безопасности. Боевая группа НАТО численностью 1000 человек, базирующаяся в Эстонии, начала действовать в середине 2017 года в рамках расширенного передового присутствия альянса. В ноябре 2017 года, Эстония в очередной раз принял учениях Cyber коалиции НАТО. На авиабазе "Амари" также базируется подразделение Балтийской воздушной полиции, сформированное на основе добровольной ротации из государств НАТО. Эстония является членом возглавляемых Великобританией многонациональных Объединенных экспедиционных сил.

ACTIVE 6,600 (Army 5,700 Navy 400 Air 500) Defence League 15,800
Conscript liability 8 months, officers and some specialists 11 months (Conscripts cannot be deployed)
RESERVE 12,000 (Joint 12,000)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 2,500; 3,200 conscript (total 5,700)
4 def region. All units except one inf bn are reserve based
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   1 (1st) bde (1 recce coy, 3 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 spt bn)
   1 (2nd) inf bde (1 inf bn, 1 spt bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 sigs bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log bn

Defence League 15,800
15 Districts
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   IFV 14 CV9035 (incl 2 CP)
   APC 158
   APC (W) 151: 56 XA-180 Sisu; 80 XA-188 Sisu; 15 BTR-80
   PPV 7 Mamba
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 1 Leopard 1 AEV
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin; Milan
   RCL 160+; 106mm: 30 M40A1; 84mm Carl Gustav; 90mm 130 PV-1110
ARTILLERY 376
   TOWED 66: 122mm 42 D-30 (H 63); 155mm 24 FH-70
   MOR 310: 81mm 131: 41 B455; 10 NM 95; 80 M252; 120mm 179: 14 2B11; 165 M/41D
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence Mistral

Navy 300; 100 conscript (total 400)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 4
   MCCS 1 Tasuja (ex-DNK Lindormen)
   MHC 3 Admiral Cowan (ex-UK Sandown)

Air Force 500
Flying hours 120 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with An-2 Colt
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with R-44 Raven II
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 2 An-2 Colt
HELICOPTERS TPT Light 4 R-44 Raven II
Special Operations Forces
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 spec ops bn

Paramilitary
Border Guard
The Estonian Border Guard is subordinate to the Ministry of the Interior. Air support is provided by the Estonian Border Guard Aviation Corps
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 12
   PCO 2: 1 Kati; 1 Kindral Kurvits
   PCC 1 Kou (FIN Silma)
   PB 9: 1 Pikker; 1 Valve; 8 (other)
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT LCU 3
LOGISTICS & SUPPORT AGF 1 Balsam
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 2 L-410
HELICOPTERS MRH 3 AW139

Cyber
Estonia adopted a national Cyber Security Strategy in 2008 and in 2009 added a Cyber Security Council to the government's Security Committee, which supports strategic-level inter-agency cooperation. Tallinn hosts the NATO Cooperative Cyber Security Centre of Excellence and the NATO Locked Shields cyber exercise takes place annually in Estonia, as has the Cyber Coalition exercise since 2013. A Cyber Security Strategy for 2014-17 advocates greater integration of capability, saying that specialists from the armed forces and the Estonian Defence League will be integral in developing military cyber-defence capabilities. The Estonian Defence League Act explicitly integrates its (voluntary) Cyber Defence Unit into the national defence system.
Кибер
Эстония приняла национальную Стратегию кибербезопасности в 2008 году и в 2009 году добавила Совет кибербезопасности в правительственный комитет по безопасности, который поддерживает межучрежденческое сотрудничество стратегического уровня. Таллинн является принимающей стороной совместного Центра передового опыта в области кибербезопасности НАТО, и кибер-учения НАТО Locked Shields проводятся ежегодно в Эстонии, как и кибер-коалиционные учения с 2013 года. Стратегия кибербезопасности на 2014-17 годы выступает за большую интеграцию возможностей, заявляя, что специалисты из вооруженных сил и эстонской Лиги обороны будут неотъемлемой частью развития военных возможностей киберзащиты. Закон о Лиге обороны Эстонии прямо интегрирует ее (добровольное) подразделение киберзащиты в национальную систему обороны.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 6
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 7
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 38
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 4; UN MINUSMA 10
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 3 obs
MOLDOVA: OSCE Moldova 1
NORTH SEA: NATO SNMCMG 1: 1 MHC
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 2
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 5

FOREIGN FORCES
All NATO Enhanced Forward Presence unless stated
Belgium NATO Baltic Air Policing 4 F-16AM Fighting Falcon
France 300; 1 armd inf coy(+)
United Kingdom 800; 1 armd inf bn HQ; 1 armd inf coy (+); 1 engr sqn

   FINLAND
    []

Capabilities
Finland's armed forces are primarily focused on territorial defence. The conflict in eastern Ukraine has sharpened the focus on defence matters, as have incursions into Baltic states' airspace by Russian aircraft. The country's February 2017 Defence Report argues that changes in the security environment have increased the demands on the armed forces. A period of defence-budget decreases was reversed in 2016, but the 2017 report stresses that financial constraints are forcing trade-offs between long-term procurement plans and operational readiness. In October 2015, the air force launched the HX Fighter Programme to replace Finland's F/A-18s with a new combat aircraft. The government sent a request for proposals (RFP) regarding weapons and equipment to seven nations in October 2017, and will issue a request for quotations (RFQ) in spring 2018. The RFQ for the aircraft will also be issued in spring 2018, with the replacement aircraft to be selected around 2021. The programme will likely need additional funding beyond the current budget. The government has also suggested that budget cuts may result in fewer aircraft being procured than originally planned, whilst the 2018 RFP is expected to reflect the need for them to work alongside unmanned systems. Under Finland's Squadron 2020 programme, which is budgeted at ~1.2 billion, the navy will replace four patrol boats and two minelayers with corvette-sized vessels capable of operating in shallow water and very cold weather. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2019 and run until 2024, and will be undertaken by local firms, with weapons and sensors procured internationally. Finland's principal multilateral defence relationships include the EU, NATO, NORDEFCO and the Northern Group, as well as strong bilateral cooperation, with Sweden and the US in particular. In February 2017, Finland signed a cyber-defence agreement with NATO. The February 2017 defence report announced that the wartime strength of the Finnish armed forces, after full mobilisation and including Border Guard units, would rise to 280,000 troops.
Потенциал
Вооруженные силы Финляндии в основном сосредоточены на территориальной обороне. Конфликт на востоке Украины обострил внимание к вопросам обороны, равно как и вторжение российских самолетов в воздушное пространство стран Балтии. В докладе обороны страны за февраль 2017 года утверждается, что изменения в обстановке безопасности увеличили требования к вооруженным силам. В 2016 году был отменен период сокращения оборонного бюджета, но в докладе 2017 года подчеркивается, что финансовые ограничения вынуждают к компромиссам между долгосрочными планами закупок и оперативной готовностью. В октябре 2015 года ВВС запустили программу истребителей HX для замены финских F/A-18 на новые боевые самолеты. В октябре 2017 года правительство направило запрос предложений (RFP) в отношении оружия и оборудования семи странам, а весной 2018 года - запрос котировок (RFQ). RFQ для самолета также будет выпущен весной 2018 года, с заменой самолета, который будет выбран около 2021 года. Эта программа, вероятно, потребует дополнительного финансирования сверх нынешнего бюджета. Правительство также предположило, что сокращение бюджета может привести к тому, что будет закуплено меньше самолетов, чем первоначально планировалось, в то время как 2018 RFP, как ожидается, отразит необходимость их работы вместе с беспилотными системами. В рамках финской программы "эскадра-2020", бюджет которой составляет 1,2 млрд. евро, ВМС заменят четыре патрульных катера и два минных заграждения судами размером с корвет, способными работать на мелководье и в очень холодную погоду. Строительство планируется начать в 2019 году и продлится до 2024 года, и будет осуществляться местными фирмами, с оружием и датчиками, закупленными на международном уровне. Основные многосторонние оборонные отношения Финляндии включают ЕС, НАТО, NORDEFCO и Северную группу, а также тесное двустороннее сотрудничество, в частности со Швецией и США. В феврале 2017 года Финляндия подписала соглашение о киберзащите с НАТО. В феврале 2017 года в оборонном докладе было объявлено, что численность финских вооруженных сил в военное время после полной мобилизации, включая подразделения пограничной охраны, возрастет до 280 000 военнослужащих.

ACTIVE 21,500 (Army 15,300 Navy 3,500 Air 2,700) Paramilitary 2,700
Conscript liability 5.5-8.5-11.5 months
RESERVE 216,000 (Army 170,000 Navy 20,000 Air 26,000) Paramilitary 11,500
   18,000 reservists a year do refresher training: total obligation 80 days (150 for NCOs, 200 for officers) between conscript service and age 50
   (NCOs and officers to age 60)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 5,000; 10,300 conscript (total 15,300)
FORCES BY ROLE
Finland's army maintains a mobilisation strength of about 285,000. In support of this requirement, two conscription cycles, each for about 13,500 conscripts, take place each year. After conscript training, reservist commitment is to the age of 60. Reservists are usually assigned to units within their local geographical area. All service appointments or deployments outside Finnish borders are voluntary for all members of the armed services. All brigades are reserve based Reserve Organisations 170,000
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF bn
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
   2 armd BG (regt)
Mechanised
   2 (Karelia & Pori Jaeger) mech bde
Light
   3 (Jaeger) bde
   6 lt inf bde
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty bde
   1 AD regt
   7 engr regt
   3 sigs bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   Some log unit
HELICOPTER
   1 hel bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 160: 100 Leopard 2A4; 60 Leopard 2A6
   IFV 196: 94 BMP-2; 102 CV90
   APC 613
   APC (T) 142: 40 MT-LBu; 102 MT-LBV
   APC (W) 471: 260 XA-180/185 Sisu; 101 XA-202 Sisu (CP); 48 XA-203 Sisu; 62 AMV (XA-360)
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 6 Leopard 2R CEV
   ARV 27: 15 MTP-LB; 12 VT-55A
   VLB 27: 12 BLG-60M2; 6 Leopard 2S; 9 SISU Leguan
   MW Aardvark Mk 2; KMT T-55; RA-140 DS
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike-MR; Spike-LR
ARTILLERY 681
   SP 122mm 36 2S1 Gvozdika (PsH 74)
   TOWED 324: 122mm 234 D-30 (H 63); 130mm 36 M-46 (K 54); 155mm 54 K 83/GH-52 (K 98)
   MRL 56: 122mm 34 RM-70; 227mm 22 M270 MLRS
   MOR 279+: 81mm Krh/71; 120mm 261 Krh/92; SP 120mm 18 XA-361 AMOS
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 7: 5 Hughes 500D; 2 Hughes 500E
   TPT Medium 20 NH90 TTH
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Medium 11 ADS-95 Ranger
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Short-range 44: 20 Crotale NG (ITO 90); 24 NASAMS II FIN (ITO 12)
   Point-defence 16+: 16 ASRAD (ITO 05); FIM-92 Stinger (ITO 15); RBS 70 (ITO 05/05M)
   GUNS 400+: 23mm ItK 95/ZU-23-2 (ItK 61); 35mm ItK 88; SP 35mm Leopard 2 ITK Marksman

Navy 1,600; 1,900 conscript (total 3,500)
FORCES BY ROLE
Naval Command HQ located at Turku; with two subordinate Naval Commands (Gulf of Finland and Archipelago Sea); 1 Naval bde; 3 spt elm (Naval Materiel Cmd, Naval Academy, Naval Research Institute)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 20
   PCGM 4 Hamina with 4 RBS-15SF3 (MTO-85M) AShM, 1 octuple VLS with Umkhonto-IR (ITO2004) SAM, 1 57mm gun
   PBF 12 Jehu (U-700) (capacity 24 troops)
   PBG 4 Rauma with 6 RBS-15SF3 (MTO-85M) AShM
MINE WARFARE 15
MINE COUNTERMEASURES 10
   MCC 3 KatanpДД
   MSI 7: 4 Kiiski; 3 Kuha
MINELAYERS ML 5:
   2 Hameenmaa with 1 octuple VLS with Umkhonto-IR (ITO2004) SAM, 2 RBU 1200 A/S mor, up to 100-120 mines, 1 57mm gun
   3 Pansio with 50 mines
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT 51
   LCM 1 Kampela
   LCP 50
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 7
   AG 3: 1 Louhi; 2 Hylje
   AX 4: 3 Fabian Wrede; 1 Lokki

Coastal Defence
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Amphibious
   1 mne bde
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 cbt spt bde (1 AShM bty)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
COASTAL DEFENCE
   AShM 4 RBS-15K AShM
ARTY 130mm 30 K-53tk (static)
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike (used in AShM role)

Air Force 1,950; 750 conscript (total 2,700)
3 Air Comds: Satakunta (West), Karelia (East), Lapland (North)
Flying hours 90-140 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with F/A-18C/D Hornet ISR
   1 (survey) sqn with Learjet 35A
TRANSPORT
   1 flt with C295M
   4 (liaison) flt with PC-12NG
TRAINING
   1 sqn with Hawk Mk50/51A/66* (air-defence and ground-attack trg)
   1 unit with L-70 Vinka
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 109 combat capable
   FGA 62: 55 F/A-18C Hornet; 7 F/A-18D Hornet
   MP 1 F-27-400M
   ELINT 1 C295M
   TPT Light 10: 2 C295M; 3 Learjet 35A (survey; ECM
   TRG; tgt-tow); 5 PC-12NG
   TRG 76: 1 G-115EA; 31 Hawk Mk50/51A*; 16 Hawk Mk66*; 28 L-70 Vinka
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES AAM IR AIM-9 Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder; ARH AIM-120C AMRAAM
BOMBS
   INS/GPS-guided GBU-31 JDAM; AGM-154C JSOW

Paramilitary
Border Guard 2,700
Ministry of Interior. 4 Border Guard Districts and 2 Coast Guard Districts
FORCES BY ROLE
MARITIME PATROL
   1 sqn with Do-228 (maritime surv); AS332 Super Puma; Bell 412 (AB-412) Twin Huey; Bell 412EP (AB-412EP) Twin Huey;AW119KE Koala
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 45
   PSO 1 Turva with 1 hel landing platform
   PCC 3: 2 Tursas; 1 Merikarhu
   PB 41
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT UCAC 6
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 2 Do-228
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 5: 3 Bell 412 (AB-412) Twin Huey; 2 Bell 412EP (AB-412EP) Twin Huey
   TPT 9: Medium 5 AS332 Super Puma; Light 4 AW119KE Koala

Reserve 11,500 reservists on mobilization

Cyber
Finland published a national cyber-security strategy in 2013. A national implementation programme for this was published in 2014 and updated in 2017. The Implementation Programme for 2017-20 addresses the development of cyber security encompassing the state, business and the individual. An updated version of the Security Strategy for Society document was due to be published in autumn 2017. In accordance with the strategy, the Finnish Defence Forces will create a comprehensive cyber-defence capacity. Meanwhile, the defence forces published a Cyber Defence Concept in 2016 and created an internal implementation plan, in order to generate the required capabilities. The national strategy and the defence forces internal concept encompass intelligence as well as offensive and defensive cyber capabilities. FOC is planned by 2020. The cyber division is organised under the defence forces' C5 agency. The European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats was established in Helsinki on 11 April 2017.
Кибер

Финляндия опубликовала Национальную стратегию кибербезопасности в 2013 году. В 2014 году была опубликована и обновлена в 2017 году национальная программа осуществления этой программы. Программа реализации на 2017-20 годы направлена на развитие кибербезопасности, охватывающей государство, бизнес и человека. Обновленная версия документа "Стратегия безопасности для общества" должна была быть опубликована осенью 2017 года. В соответствии со стратегией, финские силы обороны создаст кибер военный потенциал. Между тем, Силы обороны опубликовали концепцию киберзащиты в 2016 году и создали внутренний план реализации для создания необходимых возможностей. Национальная стратегия и внутренняя концепция Сил обороны охватывают разведывательные, а также наступательные и оборонительные кибер возможности. FOC планируется к 2020 году. Кибер отдел организован в рамках агентства вооруженных сил С5. Европейский центр передового опыта по противодействию гибридным угрозам был создан в Хельсинки 11 апреля 2017 года.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 37
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 4
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 100; 1 trg team
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 301; elm 1 inf bn
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 1; UN MINUSMA 6
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 19 obs
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 19
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 7
SYRIA/ISRAEL: UN UNDOF 2
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 17

   FRANCE
    []

Capabilities
France continues to play a leading military role in the EU, NATO and the UN, and maintains a full-spectrum war-fighting capability. The armed forces are focused on external deployments in sub-Saharan Africa and the Middle East, and the domestic deployment on Operation Sentinelle. A Strategic Review, released in late 2017, did not question these commitments, although Sentinelle will likely be revised following criticism over its effect. The high tempo of deployments has increased the stress on equipment. There are also concerns about equipment availability. Allies and external contractors are relied on for some military air transport, raising the costs of transporting equipment to operations. France has a sophisticated defence industry, with most procurement undertaken domestically. However, President Macron has called for increased European defence cooperation. France and Germany announced that they were exploring the potential development of a new combat aircraft, and there are ongoing negotiations with Italy for a rapprochement between the two countries' main shipbuilding groups. The government has pledged to meet NATO's 2% of GDP defence spending target in 2025 and raised the defence budget by ~1.8 billion in 2018, including funds earmarked for further equipment purchases. France's deployments abroad have demonstrated its ability to support expeditionary forces independently; however, the more recent focus on domestic security has reduced training and limited the ability to deploy additional troops overseas. Nevertheless, in April 2017 France deployed personnel to Estonia as part of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence. Troops remain deployed to Djibouti and on EU anti-piracy operations in the Indian Ocean, while personnel and equipment remain active in the campaign against ISIS. (See pp. 74-5.)
Потенциал
Франция по-прежнему играет ведущую военную роль в ЕС, НАТО и ООН и поддерживает полномасштабный военный потенциал. Вооруженные силы сосредоточены на внешнем развертывании в странах Африки к югу от Сахары и на Ближнем Востоке, а внутреннее-на операции "Сентинель". Стратегический обзор, выпущенный в конце 2017 года, не ставил под сомнение эти обязательства, хотя Sentinelle, вероятно, будет пересмотрен после критики его эффекта. Высокие темпы развертывания увеличили нагрузку на оборудование. Существуют также опасения по поводу наличия оборудования. Союзники и внешние подрядчики полагаются на некоторые военные воздушные перевозки, повышая расходы на транспортировку оборудования для операций. Франция имеет оборонную промышленность, большинство закупок на внутреннем рынке. Однако президент Макрон призвал к расширению Европейского сотрудничества в области обороны. Франция и Германия объявили, что изучают возможности разработки нового боевого самолета, и ведутся переговоры с Италией о сближении основных судостроительных групп двух стран. Правительство обязалось выполнить 2% от ВВП оборонных расходов НАТО в 2025 году и увеличило оборонный бюджет на 1,8 млрд евро в 2018 году, включая средства, предназначенные для дальнейших закупок оборудования. Развертывание Франции за рубежом продемонстрировало ее способность поддерживать экспедиционные силы самостоятельно; однако в последнее время акцент на внутреннюю безопасность сократил подготовку и ограничил возможности развертывания дополнительных войск за рубежом. Тем не менее, в апреле 2017 года Франция развернула персонал в Эстонии в рамках расширенного передового присутствия НАТО. Войска по-прежнему дислоцированы в Джибути и участвуют в операциях ЕС по борьбе с пиратством в Индийском океане, а персонал и техника по-прежнему активно участвуют в кампании против ИГИЛ. (См. стр. 74-5.)

ACTIVE 202,700 (Army 112,500 Navy 35,550 Air 41,150, Other Staffs 13,500) Paramilitary 103,400
RESERVE 32,300 (Army 18,750 Navy 5,200 Air 4,800 Other Staffs 3,550) Paramilitary 40,000

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Strategic Nuclear Forces
Navy 2,200
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES STRATEGIC SSBN 4
   1 Le Triomphant with 16 M45 SLBM with 6 TN-75 nuclear warheads, 4 single 533mm TT with F17 Mod 2 HWT/SM-39 Exocet AShM (in refit until 2018/19)
   3 Le Triomphant with 16 M51 SLBM with 6 TN-75 nuclear warheads, 4 single 533mm TT with F17 Mod 2 HWT/SM-39 Exocet AShM
AIRCRAFT FGA 20 Rafale M F3 with ASMP-A msl Air Force 1,800 Air Strategic Forces Command
FORCES BY ROLE
STRIKE
   1 sqn with Mirage 2000N with ASMPA msl
   1 sqn with Rafale B with ASMPA msl
TANKER
   1 sqn with C-135FR; KC-135 Stratotanker
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 43 combat capable
   FGA 43: 23 Mirage 2000N; 20 Rafale B
   TKR/TPT 11 C-135FR
   TKR 3 KC-135 Stratotanker
Paramilitary
Gendarmerie 40

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES 9
   COMMUNICATIONS 3: 2 Syracuse-3 (designed to integrate with UK Skynet & ITA Sicral); 1 Athena-Fidus (also used by ITA)
   ISR 4: 2 Helios (2A/2B); 2 Pleiades
   EARLY WARNING 2 Spirale

Army 112,500
Regt and BG normally bn size
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   1 corps HQ (CRR-FR)
   2 div HQ
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 recce regt
Armoured
   1 (2nd) armd bde (2 tk regt, 3 armd inf regt, 1 SP arty regt, 1 engr regt)
   1 (7th) armd bde (1 tk regt, 1 armd BG, 3 armd inf regt,
   1 SP arty regt, 1 engr regt)
   1 armd BG (UAE)
Mechanised
   1 (6th) lt armd bde (2 armd cav regt, 1 armd inf regt, 1 mech inf regt, 1 mech inf regt(-), 1 SP arty regt, 1 engr regt)
   1 (FRA/GER) mech bde (1 armd cav regt, 1 mech inf regt)
   1 mech regt (Djibouti)
Light
   1 (27th) mtn bde (1 armd cav regt, 3 mech inf regt, 1 arty regt, 1 engr regt)
   3 inf regt (French Guiana & French West Indies)
   1 inf regt (New Caledonia)
   1 inf bn (CТte d'Ivoire)
   1 inf coy (Mayotte)
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (11th) AB bde (1 armd cav regt, 4 para regt, 1 arty regt, 1 engr regt, 1 spt regt)
   1 AB regt (La Reunion)
   1 AB bn (Gabon)
Amphibious
   1 (9th) amph bde (2 armd cav regt, 1 armd inf regt, 2 mech inf regt, 1 SP arty regt, 1 engr regt)
Other
   4 SMA regt (French Guiana, French West Indies & Indian Ocean)
   3 SMA coy (French Polynesia, Indian Ocean & New Caledonia)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MRL regt
   2 engr regt
   2 EW regt
   1 int bn
   1 CBRN regt
   5 sigs regt
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   5 tpt regt
   1 log regt
   1 med regt
   3 trg regt
HELICOPTER
   1 (4th) hel bde (3 hel regt)
ISR UAV
   1 UAV regt
AIR DEFENCE
   1 SAM regt

Special Operation Forces 2,200
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   2 SF regt
HELICOPTER
   1 hel regt

Reserves 18,750 reservists
Reservists form 79 UIR (Reserve Intervention Units) of about 75 to 152 troops, for `Proterre' - combined land projection forces bn, and 23 USR (Reserve Specialised Units) of about 160 troops, in specialised regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 200 Leclerc
   ASLT 248 AMX-10RC
   RECCE 1,542: 80 ERC-90F4 Sagaie; 1,462 VBL/VB2L
   IFV 629: 519 VBCI VCI; 110 VBCI VCP (CP)
   APC 2,342
   APC (T) 53 BvS-10
   APC (W) 2,289: 2,200 VAB; 89 VAB VOA (OP)
   AUV 16 Aravis
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 54 AMX-30EBG
   ARV 48+: 30 AMX-30D; 18 Leclerc DNG; VAB-EHC
   VLB 67: 39 EFA; 18 PTA; 10 SPRAT
   MW 24+: AMX-30B/B2; 4 Buffalo; 20 Minotaur
   NBC VEHICLES 40 VAB NRBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP 295: 110 VAB Milan; 185 VAB Eryx
   MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin; Milan
ARTILLERY 262+
   SP 155mm 109: 32 AU-F-1; 77 CAESAR
   TOWED 155mm 12 TR-F-1
   MRL 227mm 13 M270 MLRS
   MOR 128+: 81mm LLR 81mm; 120mm 128 RT-F-1
RADAR LAND 66: 10 Cobra; 56 RASIT/RATAC
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 13: 5 PC-6B Turbo Porter; 5 TBM-700; 3 TBM-700B
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 62: 39 Tiger HAP; 23 Tiger HAD
   MRH 117: 18 AS555UN Fennec; 99 SA341F/342M Gazelle (all variants)
   TPT 160: Heavy 8 H225M Caracal (CSAR); Medium 117: 26 AS532UL Cougar; 23 NH90 TTH; 68 SA330 Puma; Light 35 H120 Colibri (leased)
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Medium 25 SDTI (Sperwer)
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence Mistral

Navy 35,500
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES 10
STRATEGIC SSBN 4:
   1 Le Triomphant opcon Strategic Nuclear Forces with 16 M45 SLBM with 6 TN-75 nuclear warheads, 4 single 533mm TT with F17
   Mod 2 HWT/SM39 Exocet AShM (currently undergoing modernisation programme to install M51 SLBM; expected completion 2018/19)
   3 Le Triomphant opcon Strategic Nuclear Forces with 16 M51 SLBM with 6 TN-75 nuclear warheads, 4 single 533mm TT with F17
   Mod 2 HWT/SM39 Exocet AShM
TACTICAL SSN 6:
   6 Rubis with 4 single 533mm TT with F17 Mod 2 HWT/SM39 Exocet AShM
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 23
AIRCRAFT CARRIERS 1
CVN 1 Charles de Gaulle with 4 octuple VLS with Aster 15 SAM, 2 sextuple Sadral lnchr with Mistral SAM
   (capacity 35-40 Rafale M/E-2C Hawkeye/AS365 Dauphin) (In refit until late 2018)
DESTROYERS DDGHM 11:
   2 Cassard with 2 quad lnchr with MM40 Exocet Block 2 AShM, 1 Mk13 GMLS with SM-1MR SAM, 2 sextuple Sadral lnchr with Mistral SAM,
   2 single 533mm ASTT with L5 Mod 4 HWT, 1 100mm gun (capacity 1 AS565SA Panther ASW hel)
   2 Forbin with 2 quad lnchr with MM40 Exocet Block 3 AShM, 4 8-cell Sylver A50 VLS with Aster 30 SAM, 2 8-cell Sylver A50 VLS with Aster 15 SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with MU90, 2 76mm gun (capacity 1 NH90 TTH hel)
   1 Georges Leygues with 2 quad lnchr with MM40 Exocet AShM, 1 octuple lnchr with Crotale SAM, , 2 sextuple Sadral lnchr with Mistral SAM,
   2 single 533mm ASTT with L5 HWT, 1 100mm gun (capacity 2 Lynx hel)
   3 Georges Leygues (mod) with 2 quad lnchr with MM40 Exocet AShM, 1 octuple lnchr with Crotale SAM, 2 twin Simbad lnchr with Mistral SAM,
   2 single 324mm ASTT with MU90 LWT, 1 100mm gun (capacity 2 Lynx hel)
   3 Aquitaine with 2 8-cell Sylver A70 VLS with MdCN (SCALP Naval) LACM, 2 quad lnchr with MM40 Exocet Block 3 AShM, 2 8-cell Sylver A43 VLS
   with Aster 15 SAM, 2 twin B515 324mm ASTT with MU90 LWT, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 NH90 NFH hel)
FRIGATES FFGHM 11:
   6 Floreal with 2 single lnchr with MM38 Exocet AShM, 1 twin Simbad lnchr with Mistral SAM, 1 100mm gun (capacity 1 AS565SA Panther hel)
   5 La Fayette with 2 quad lnchr with MM40 Exocet Block 3 AShM, 1 octuple lnchr with Crotale SAM (space for fitting 2 octuple VLS lnchr
   for Aster 15/30), 1 100mm gun (capacity 1 AS565SA Panther/SA321 Super Frelon hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 23
   FSM 9 D'Estienne d'Orves with 1 twin Simbad lnchr with Mistral SAM, 4 single ASTT, 1 100mm gun
   PSO 3 d'Entrecasteaux with 1 hel landing platform
   PCC 6: 3 L'Audacieuse (all deployed in the Pacific or Caribbean); 3 Flamant
   PCO 5: 1 La Confiance, 1 Laperouse; 1 Le Malin; 1 Fulmar; 1 L'Adroit (Gowind)
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 18
   MCD 4 Vulcain
   MHC 3 Antares
   MHO 11 иridan
AMPHIBIOUS
PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS 3
   LHD 3 Mistral with 2 twin Simbad lnchr with Mistral SAM (capacity up to 16 NH90/SA330 Puma/AS532 Cougar/Tiger hel;
   2 LCAC or 4 LCM; 13 MBTs; 50 AFVs; 450 troops)
LANDING CRAFT 38
   LCT 4 EDA-R
   LCM 9 CTM
   LCVP 25
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 33
   ABU 1 Telenn Mor
   AG 3 Chamois
   AGE 2: 1 Corraline; 1 Laperouse (used as trials ships for mines and divers)
   AGI 1 Dupuy de Lome
   AGM 1 Monge
   AGOR 2: 1 Pourquoi pas? (used 150 days per year by Ministry of Defence; operated by Ministry of Research and Education otherwise);
   1 Beautemps-beaupre
   AGS 3 Laperouse
   AORH 3 Durance with 1-3 twin Simbad lnchr with Mistral SAM (capacity 1 SA319 Alouette III/AS365 Dauphin/Lynx)
   ATF 3: 2 Malabar; 1 Revi
   AXL 10: 8 Leopard; 2 Glycine
   AXS 4: 2 La Belle Poule; 2 other

Naval Aviation 6,500
Flying hours 180-220 hrs/yr on strike/FGA ac
FORCES BY ROLE
STRIKE/FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   2 sqn with Rafale M F3
   1 sqn (forming) with Rafale M F3
ANTI-SURFACE WARFARE
   1 sqn with AS565SA Panther
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   2 sqn (forming) with NH90 NFH
   1 sqn with Lynx Mk4
MARITIME PATROL
   2 sqn with Atlantique 2
   1 sqn with Falcon 20H Gardian
   1 sqn with Falcon 50MI
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   1 sqn with E-2C Hawkeye
SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with AS365N/F Dauphin 2
TRAINING
   1 sqn with EMB 121 Xingu
   1 unit with SA319B Alouette III
   1 unit with Falcon 10MER
   1 unit with CAP 10M
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 54 combat capable
   FGA 42 Rafale M F3
   ASW 12 Atlantique 2 (10 more in store)
   AEW&C 3 E-2C Hawkeye
   SAR 4 Falcon 50MS
   TPT 26: Light 11 EMB-121 Xingu; PAX 15: 6 Falcon 10MER; 5 Falcon 20H Gardian; 4 Falcon 50MI
   TRG 7 CAP 10M
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 34: 16 Lynx Mk4; 18 NH90 NFH
   MRH 45: 9 AS365N/F/SP Dauphin 2; 2 AS365N3; 16 AS565SA Panther; 18 SA319B Alouette III
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR R-550 Magic 2; IIR Mica IR; ARH Mica RF
   ASM AASM; AS-30L; AShM AM39 Exocet; LACM ASMP-A
BOMBS
   Laser-guided: GBU-12 Paveway II

Marines 2,000
Commando Units 550
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   1 recce gp
Amphibious
   2 aslt gp
   1 atk swimmer gp
   1 raiding gp
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 cbt spt gp
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 spt gp

Fusiliers-Marin 1,450
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   2 sy gp
   7 sy coy

Reserves 5,200 reservists

Air Force 41,150
Flying hours 180 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
STRIKE
   1 sqn with Mirage 2000N with ASMPA msl
   1 sqn with Rafale B with ASMPA msl
SPACE
   1 (satellite obs) sqn
FIGHTER
   1 sqn with Mirage 2000-5
   1 sqn with Mirage 2000B/C
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with Mirage 2000D
   1 (composite) sqn with Mirage 2000-5/D (Djibouti)
   2 sqn with Rafale B/C
   1 sqn with Rafale B/C (UAE)
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   1 flt with C-160G Gabriel (ESM)
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   1 (Surveillance & Control) sqn with E-3F Sentry
SEARCH & RESCUE/TRANSPORT
   4 sqn with C-160R Transall; CN235M; SA330 Puma; AS555 Fennec (Djibouti, French Guiana, Gabon, Indian Ocean & New Caledonia)
TANKER
   1 sqn with C-135FR; KC-135 Stratotanker
TANKER/TRANSPORT
   2 sqn with C-160R Transall
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with A310-300; A330; A340-200 (on lease)
   1 sqn with A400M
   2 sqn with C-130H/H-30 Hercules; C-160R Transall
   2 sqn with CN235M
   1 sqn with EMB-121
   1 sqn with Falcon 7X (VIP); Falcon 900 (VIP); Falcon 2000
   3 flt with TBM-700A
   1 (mixed) gp with AS532 Cougar; C-160 Transall; DHC-6-300 Twin Otter
TRAINING
   1 OCU sqn with Mirage 2000D
   1 OCU sqn with Rafale B/C F3
   1 OCU sqn with SA330 Puma; AS555 Fennec
   1 OCU unit with C-160 Transall
   1 (aggressor) sqn with Alpha Jet*
   4 sqn with Alpha Jet*
   3 sqn with Grob G120A-F; TB-30 Epsilon
   1 OEU with Mirage 2000, Rafale, Alpha Jet*
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with AS555 Fennec
   2 sqn with AS332C/L Super Puma; SA330 Puma; H225M
ISR UAV
   1 sqn with Harfang; MQ-9A Reaper
AIR DEFENCE
   3 sqn with Crotale NG; SAMP/T
   1 sqn with SAMP/T
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES see Space
AIRCRAFT 294 combat capable
   FTR 41: 35 Mirage 2000-5/2000C; 6 Mirage 2000B
   FGA 189: 67 Mirage 2000D; 22 Mirage 2000N; 52 Rafale B; 48 Rafale C
   ELINT 2 C-160G Gabriel (ESM)
   AEW&C 4 E-3F Sentry
   TKR 3 KC-135 Stratotanker
   TKR/TPT 11 C-135FR
   TPT 128: Heavy 11 A400M; Medium 35: 5 C-130H Hercules; 9 C-130H-30 Hercules; 21 C-160R Transall;
   Light 70: 19 CN235M-100; 8 CN235M-300; 5 DHC-6-300 Twin Otter; 23 EMB-121 Xingu; 15 TBM-700;
   PAX 12: 3 A310-300; 1 A330; 2 A340-200 (on lease); 2 Falcon 7X; 2 Falcon 900 (VIP); 2 Falcon 2000
   TRG 107: 64 Alpha Jet*; 18 Grob G120A-F; 25 TB-30 Epsilon (incl many in storage)
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 37 AS555 Fennec
   TPT 43: Heavy 11 H225M Caracal; Medium 32: 3 AS332C Super Puma; 4 AS332L Super Puma; 3 AS532UL Cougar (tpt/VIP); 22 SA330B Puma
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   CISR Heavy 6 MQ-9A Reaper (unarmed)
   ISR Heavy 4 Harfang
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Long-range 9 SAMP/T; Short-range 12 Crotale NG
   GUNS 20mm Cerbere 76T2
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR R-550 Magic 2; IIR Mica IR; ARH Mica RF
   ASM AASM; AS-30L; Apache; LACM ASMP-A; SCALP EG
BOMBS
   Laser-guided: GBU-12 Paveway II

Security and Intervention Brigade
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   3 SF gp
MANOEUVRE
Other
   24 protection units
   30 (fire fighting and rescue) unit

Reserves 4,800 reservists

Paramilitary 103,400
Gendarmerie 103,400; 40,000 reservists
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   ASLT 28 VBC-90
   APC APC (W) 153 VXB-170 (VBRG-170)
ARTILLERY MOR 81mm some
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 38
   PB 38: 2 Athos; 4 Geranium; 24 VCSM; 8 VSMP
HELICOPTERS TPT Light 60: 25 AS350BA Ecureuil; 20 H135; 15 H145

Customs (Direction Generale des Douanes et Droits Indirects)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 20
   PCO 3: 2 Jacques Oudart Fourmentin; 1 Jean-FranГois Deniau
   PB 17: 7 Plascoa 2100; 7 Haize Hegoa; 1 Rafale; 1 Vent d'Amont; 1 La Rance

Coast Guard (Direction des Affaires Maritimes)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 25
   PCO 1 Themis
   PCC 1 Iris
   PB 23: 4 Callisto; 19 others
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT AG 7

Cyber
In mid-December 2016, the French defence ministry published a new cyber-security doctrine based on a concept of active defence, whereby a newly formed military-cyber corps is authorised to pre-emptively identify, trace and track potential attackers, neutralise such attacks on a preemptive basis and retaliate against attacks on the basis of an escalation model that also allows for kinetic responses. Cyber defence is formally designated an art of war and is to be taught to France's entire officer corps. The militarycyber corps, staffed largely by the foreign-intelligence service, will report directly to the chief of general staff. The doctrine acknowledges the presence of a Tailored Access Unit, which has in fact been in existence for over 30 years and is deployed overseas to provide covert coverage of specific targets. The military-cyber corps personnel level is scheduled to rise to 2,600, supplemented by a reserve force, which itself is scheduled to rise to 4,400.
Кибер
В середине декабря 2016 года Министерство обороны Франции опубликовало новую доктрину кибербезопасности, основанную на концепции активной обороны, в соответствии с которой вновь сформированный военный кибер корпус уполномочен упреждающе идентифицировать, отслеживать и отслеживать потенциальных атакующих, нейтрализовать такие атаки на упреждающей основе и мстить атакам на основе модели эскалации, которая также позволяет кинетические реакции. Киберзащита официально называется искусством войны и должна преподаваться всему офицерскому корпусу Франции. Военные кибер пехотs, в основном, работают на иностранную разведку, будет подчиняться напрямую начальнику Генерального штаба. В доктрине признается наличие специального подразделения доступа, которое фактически существует уже более 30 лет и развернуто за рубежом для обеспечения скрытого охвата конкретных целей. Военно-кибернетические уровня кадрового корпуса планируется рост до 2600, дополнено резервной группы, который сам планирует подняться до 4400.

DEPLOYMENT
ARABIAN SEA: Combined Maritime Forces CTF-150: 1 DDGHM
BURKINA FASO: Operation Barkhane 250; 1 SF gp
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 53; UN MINUSCA 91; 1 UAV unit
CHAD: Operation Barkhane 1,500; 1 mech inf BG; 1 FGA det with 2 Mirage 2000D; 2 Mirage 2000N; 1 tpt det with 1 C-130H; 4 CN235M
CтTE D'IVOIRE: 950; 1 (Marine) inf bn
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 2
DJIBOUTI: 1,450; 1 (Marine) combined arms regt with (2 recce sqn, 2 inf coy, 1 arty bty, 1 engr coy);
   1 hel det with 2 SA330 Puma; 1 SA342 Gazelle; 1 LCM; 1 FGA sqn with 4 Mirage 2000-5/D; 1 SAR/tpt sqn with 1 C-160 Transall; 2 SA330 Puma
EGYPT: MFO 1
ESTONIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 300; 1 armd inf coy(+)
FRENCH GUIANA: 2,100: 1 (Foreign Legion) inf regt; 1 (Marine) inf regt; 1 SMA regt; 2 PCC;
   1 tpt sqn with 3 CN235M; 5 SA330 Puma; 4 AS555 Fennec; 3 gendarmerie coy; 1 AS350BA Ecureuil
FRENCH POLYNESIA: 900: (incl Centre d'Experimentation du Pacifique); 1 SMA coy; 1 naval HQ at Papeete;
   1 FFGHM; 1 PSO; 1 PCO; 1 AFS; 3 Falcon 200 Gardian; 1 SAR/tpt sqn with 2 CN235M
FRENCH WEST INDIES: 1,000; 1 (Marine) inf regt; 2 SMA regt; 2 FFGHM; 1 LST; 1 naval base at Fort de France (Martinique);
   4 gendarmerie coy; 2 AS350BA Ecureuil
GABON: 350; 1 AB bn
GERMANY: 2,000 (incl elm Eurocorps and FRA/GER bde); 1 (FRA/GER) mech bde (1 armd cav regt, 1 mech inf regt)
GULF OF GUINEA: Operation Corymbe 1 LHD; 1 FSM
INDIAN OCEAN: 1,600 (incl La Reunion and TAAF); 1 (Marine) para regt; 1 (Foreign Legion) inf coy; 1 SMA regt ; 1 SMA coy;
   2 FFGHM; 1 PCO; 1 LCM; 1 naval HQ at Port-des-Galets (La Reunion); 1 naval base at Dzaoudzi (Mayotte);
   1 SAR/tpt sqn with 2 CN235M; 5 gendarmerie coy; 1 SA319 Alouette III
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve (Chammal) 500; 1 SF gp; 1 trg unit; 1 SP arty bty with 4 CAESAR
JORDAN: Operation Inherent Resolve (Chammal) 8 Rafale F3; 1 Atlantique 2
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 661; 1 mech inf bn(-); 1 maint coy; VBL; VBCI; VAB; Mistral
MALI: Operation Barkhane 1,750; 1 mech inf BG; 1 log bn; 1 hel unit with 4 Tiger; 3 NH90 TTH; 6 SA330 Puma; 4 SA342 Gazelle
   EU EUTM Mali 13; UN MINUSMA 21
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: Operation Inherent Resolve (Chammal) 1 FFGHM; EU EU NAVFOR MED: 1 FSM
NEW CALEDONIA: 1,450; 1 (Marine) mech inf regt; 1 SMA coy; 6 ERC-90F1 Lynx; 1 FFGHM; 1 PSO; 2 PCC;
   1 base with 2 Falcon 200 Gardian at Noumea; 1 tpt unit with 2 CN235 MPA; 3 SA330 Puma; 4 gendarmerie coy; 2 AS350BA Ecureuil
NIGER: Operation Barkhane 500; 1 FGA det with 2 Mirage 2000C; 2 Mirage 2000D;
   1 tkr/tpt det with 1 C-135FR; 1 C-160 Transall; 1 UAV det with 5 MQ-9A Reaper
SENEGAL: 350; 1 Falcon 50MI
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 1
SYRIA: Operation Inherent Resolve (Chammal) 1 SF unit
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 14
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: 650: 1 armd BG (1 tk coy, 1 arty bty); Leclerc; CAESAR;
   Operation Inherent Resolve (Chammal); 1 FGA sqn with 6 Rafale F3; 1 C-135FR

FOREIGN FORCES
Belgium 28 Alpha Jet trg ac located at Cazaux/Tours
Germany 400 (GER elm Eurocorps)
Singapore 200; 1 trg sqn with 12 M-346 Master

   GERMANY
    []

Capabilities
The 2016 white paper on security policy and the future of the armed forces commits Germany to a leadership role in European defence. It also emphasises the importance of NATO and the need for the armed forces to be able to contribute to collective-defence tasks. Compared to previous strategy documents, the white paper acknowledges the return of inter-state armed conflict and describes Russia as a challenge to European security rather than a partner. Germany's Cyber Command achieved initial operating capability in April 2017. The initial aim is to centralise responsibility for cyber, information technology, military intelligence and electronic warfare, geographic-information services and some communications tasks in one command. In this process, Germany is expected to strengthen its capacity for Computer Network Operations. Continuing the recent trend, current government budget planning foresees annual defence-budget growth from 2017 to 2021. Budget parameters are reviewed annually by the cabinet and rolling five-year budget plans are agreed on that basis. Available additional funding is likely to mostly benefit the army. Once agreed goals are implemented, for example to increase equipment levels for operational units from 70% to 100%, additional modernisation steps would require yet more funding. The defence ministry has also announced the objective of increasing authorised active force numbers to 198,000 by 2024. Given that the Bundeswehr is already struggling with recruitment and retention after conscription was suspended in 2011, the ministry is due to recommend recruitment goals with a seven-year time horizon and a shift towards a more flexible approach to generating the authorised personnel strength. The German armed forces are struggling to improve their readiness levels in light of increasing demands on NATO's eastern flank. As several reports to parliament have outlined, the budget cuts of previous years have led to a shortage of spare parts and maintenance problems. Guidelines for the future Bundeswehr capability profile, initially expected for summer 2017, were yet to be released as of November.
Потенциал
"Белая книга" 2016 года по политике безопасности и будущему вооруженных сил обязывает Германию играть ведущую роль в европейской обороне. В нем также подчеркивается важность НАТО и необходимость того, чтобы вооруженные силы могли вносить вклад в решение задач коллективной обороны. По сравнению с предыдущими стратегическими документами "Белая книга" признает возвращение межгосударственного вооруженного конфликта и описывает Россию как вызов европейской безопасности, а не как партнера. Киберкомандование Германии достигло начальной операционной способности в апреле 2017 года. Первоначальная цель заключается в централизации ответственности за кибер -, информационные технологии, военную разведку и радиоэлектронную войну, геоинформационные службы и некоторые коммуникационные задачи в рамках одного командования. Ожидается, что в ходе этого процесса Германия укрепит свой потенциал в области функционирования компьютерных сетей. Продолжая недавнюю тенденцию, текущее планирование государственного бюджета предусматривает ежегодный рост оборонного бюджета с 2017 по 2021 год. Бюджетные параметры ежегодно пересматриваются Кабинетом министров и на этой основе согласовываются переходящие пятилетние бюджетные планы. Имеющееся дополнительное финансирование, скорее всего, пойдет на пользу армии. После достижения согласованных целей, например повышения уровня оснащенности оперативных подразделений с 70% до 100%, дополнительные шаги по модернизации потребуют еще большего финансирования. Министерство обороны также объявило о цели увеличения санкционированной численности действующих сил до 198 000 человек к 2024 году. Учитывая, что бундесвер уже борется с вербовкой и удержанием после приостановления призыва в 2011 году, министерство должно рекомендовать цели набора с семилетним сроком и переходом к более гибкому подходу к формированию утвержденной численности персонала. Вооруженные силы Германии пытаются повысить уровень своей готовности в свете растущих требований к восточному флангу НАТО. Как отмечалось в нескольких докладах парламенту, сокращение бюджета в предыдущие годы привело к нехватке запасных частей и проблемам технического обслуживания. Руководящие принципы для будущего профиля возможностей Бундесвера, первоначально ожидаемого на лето 2017 года, еще не были выпущены по состоянию на ноябрь.

ACTIVE 178,600 (Army 60,900 Navy 16,300 Air 28,300 Joint Support Service 28,200 Joint Medical Service 19,900 Cyber 12,200; Other 12,800)
   Paramilitary 500
Conscript liability Voluntary conscription only. Voluntary conscripts can serve up to 23 months
RESERVE 27,900 (Army 6,350 Navy 1,150 Air 3,450 Joint Support Service 12,400 Joint Medical Service 3,100 Other 1,450)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES 7
COMMUNICATIONS 2 COMSATBw (1 & 2)
   ISR 5 SAR-Lupe

Army 60,900
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
elm 2 (1 GNC & MNC NE) corps HQ
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
1 (1st) armd div (1 (9th) armd bde (1 armd recce bn, 1 tk bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 lt inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 spt bn);
   1 (21st) armd bde (1 armd recce bn, 1 tk bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 mech inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 spt bn);
   1 (41st) mech inf bde (1 armd recce bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 lt inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 sigs bn, 1 spt bn); 1 tk bn (for NLD 43rd Bde); 1 SP arty bn; 1 sigs bn)
1 (10th) armd div (1 (12th) armd bde (1 armd recce bn, 1 tk bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 spt bn);
   1 (37th) mech inf bde (1 armd recce bn, 1 tk bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 mech inf bn, 1 engr bn, 1 spt bn);
   1 (23rd) mtn inf bde (1 recce bn, 3 mtn inf bn, 1 cbt engr bn, 1 spt bn);
   1 SP arty bn; 1 SP arty trg bn; 2 mech inf bn (GER/FRA bde); 1 arty bn (GER/FRA bde); 1 cbt engr coy (GER/FRA bde); 1 spt bn (GER/FRA bde))
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (rapid reaction) AB div (1 SOF bde (2 SOF bn); 1 AB bde (2 recce coy, 2 para regt, 2 cbt engr coy); 1 atk hel regt; 2 tpt hel regt; 1 sigs coy)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 236: 217 Leopard 2A5/A6; 19 Leopard 2A7
   RECCE 182: 166 Fennek (incl 14 engr recce, 14 fires spt); 16 Wiesel
   IFV 590: 357 Marder 1A3/A4/A5; 160 Puma; 73 Wiesel 1 Mk20 (with 20mm gun)
   APC 1,046
   APC (T) 316: 194 Bv-206D/S; 122 M113 (inc variants)
   APC (W) 730: 199 Boxer (inc CP and trg variants); 531 TPz-1 Fuchs (inc variants)
   AUV 424: 202 Dingo 2; 222 Eagle IV/V
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 42 Dachs
   ARV 97: 56 ARV Leopard 1; 41 BPz-3 Buffel
   VLB 47: 22 Biber; 25 M3
   MW 15 Keiler
   NBC VEHICLES 8 TPz-1 Fuchs NBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP 102 Wiesel with TOW
   MANPATS Milan; Spike-LR (MELLS)
ARTILLERY 214
   SP 155mm 101 PzH 2000
   MRL 227mm 20 M270 MLRS
   MOR 120mm 93 Tampella
RADARS LAND 82: 9 Cobra; 61 RASIT (veh, arty); 12 RATAC (veh, arty)
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 50 Tiger
   TPT 110: Medium 55 NH90; Light 55: 41 Bell 205 (UH-1D Iroquois); 14 H135
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR 128: Medium 44 KZO; Light 84 LUNA

Navy 16,300
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 6:
   6 Type-212A with 6 single 533mm TT with 12 A4 Seehecht DM2 HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 14
DESTROYERS DDGHM 7:
   4 Brandenburg with 2 twin lnchr with MM38 Exocet AShM, 1 16-cell Mk41 VLS with RIM-7M/P, 2 Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 RAM SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 Sea Lynx Mk88A hel)
   3 Sachsen with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84F Harpoon AShM, 1 32-cell Mk41 VLS with SM-2MR/RIM-162B ESSM SAM,
   2 21-cell Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 RAM SAM, 2 triple Mk32 324mm ASTT with MU90 LWT, 1 76mm gun (capacity; 2 Sea Lynx Mk88A hel)
FRIGATES 7
   FFGHM 2 Bremen with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 octuple Mk29 GMLS with RIM-7M/P Sea Sparrow SAM,
   2 Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 RAM SAM, 2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 Sea Lynx Mk88A hel)
   FFGM 5 Braunschweig (K130) with 2 twin lnchr with RBS-15 AShM, 2 Mk49 GMLS each with RIM-116 RAM SAM, 1 76mm gun, 1 hel landing platform
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 26
   MHO 12: 10 Frankenthal (2 used as diving support); 2 Kulmbach
   MSO 2 Ensdorf
   MSD 12 Seehund
AMPHIBIOUS LCU 1 Type-520
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 22
   AFSH 3 Berlin (Type-702) (capacity 2 Sea King Mk41 hel; 2 RAMs)
   AG 4: 2 Schwedeneck (Type-748); 2 Stollergrund (Type-745)
   AGI 3 Oste (Type-423)
   AGOR 1 Planet (Type-751)
   AOR 6 Elbe (Type-404) with 1 hel landing platform(2 specified for PFM support; 1 specified for SSK support; 3 specified for MHC/MSC support)
   AOT 2 RhЖn (Type-704)
   APB 2: 1 Knurrhahn; 1 Ohre
   AXS 1 Gorch Fock

Naval Aviation 2,000
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 8 combat capable
   ASW 8 AP-3C Orion
   TPT Light 2 Do-228 (pollution control)
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 22 Lynx Mk88A
   SAR 21 Sea King Mk41

Naval Special Forces Command
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF coy
   Sea Battalion
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Amphibious
   1 mne bn

Air Force 28,300
Flying hours 140 hrs/yr (plus 40 hrs high-fidelity simulator)
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   3 wg (2 sqn with Eurofighter Typhoon)
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 wg (2 sqn with Tornado IDS)
   1 wg (2 sqn with Eurofighter Typhoon (multi-role))
ISR
   1 wg (1 ISR sqn with Tornado ECR/IDS; 2 UAV sqn with Heron)
TANKER/TRANSPORT
   1 (special air mission) wg (3 sqn with A310 MRTT; A319; A340; AS532U2 Cougar II; Global 5000)
TRANSPORT
   2 wg (total: 3 sqn with C-160D Transall)
   1 wg (1 sqn (forming) with A400M Atlas)
TRAINING
   1 sqn located at Holloman AFB (US) with Tornado IDS
   1 unit (ENJJPT) located at Sheppard AFB (US) with T-6 Texan II; T-38A
   1 hel unit located at Fassberg
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 tpt hel wg (3 sqn with CH-53G/GA/GE/GS Stallion; 1 sqn with H145M)
AIR DEFENCE
   1 wg (3 SAM gp) with MIM-104C/F Patriot PAC-2/3
   1 AD gp with ASRAD Ozelot; C-RAM Mantis and trg unit
   1 AD trg unit located at Fort Bliss (US) with MIM-104C/F Patriot PAC-2/3
   3 (tac air ctrl) radar gp

Air Force Regiment
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   1 sy regt

EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 211 combat capable
   FTR 123 Eurofighter Typhoon
   ATK 68 Tornado IDS
   ATK/EW 20 Tornado ECR*
   TKR/TPT 4 A310 MRTT
   TPT 55: Heavy 13 A400M; Medium 33 C-160D Transall; PAX 9: 1 A310; 2 A340 (VIP); 2 A319; 4 Global 5000
   TRG 109: 69 T-6A Texan II, 40 T-38A
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 15 H145M
   TPT 73: Heavy 70 CH-53G/GA/GS/GE Stallion; Medium 3 AS532U2 Cougar II (VIP)
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES ISR Heavy 8 Heron 1
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Long-range 30 MIM-104C/F Patriot PAC-2/PAC-3
   Point-defence 10 ASRAD Ozelot (with FIM-92 Stinger)
   GUNS 35mm 12 C-RAM Mantis
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L/Li Sidewinder; IIR IRIS-T; ARH AIM-120B AMRAAM
   LACM Taurus KEPD 350
   ARM AGM-88B HARM
BOMBS
   Laser-guided GBU-24 Paveway III, GBU-54 JDAM
   Joint Support Service 28,200
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   3 MP regt
   2 NBC bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   6 log bn
   1 spt regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 74 TPz-1 Fuchs (inc variants)
   AUV 362: 168 Dingo 2; 194 Eagle IV/V
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 6 Dachs
   ARV 30 BPz-3 Buffel
   NBC VEHICLES 34 TPz-1 Fuchs A6/A7/A8 NBC
Joint Medical Services 19,900
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   4 med regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 79: 57 Boxer (amb); 22 TPz-1 Fuchs (amb)
   AUV 21 Eagle IV/V (amb)

Cyber & Information Command 12,200
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   4 EW bn
   6 sigs bn

Paramilitary
Coast Guard 500
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 9
   PCO 4: 3 Bad Bramstedt; 1 Bredstedt
   PB 5 Prignitz

Cyber
Germany issued a Cyber Security Strategy in February 2011. The National Cyber Security Council, an inter-ministerial body at state-secretary level, analyses cyber-related issues. A National Cyber Response Centre was set up at the Federal Office for Information Security on 1 April 2011. In 2016, Germany boosted its cyber capabilities by implementing far-reaching reforms. A new Directorate-General Cyber/IT (CIT) was created within the Federal Ministry of Defence, with two divisions for Cyber/IT Governance and IT Services/Information Security. The Director-General serves as Chief Information Officer and point of contact for other federal ministries and agencies. The Directorate-General's tasks include advancing technical cyber/IT capabilities, and guiding cyber policies. A Cyber and Information Space Command (KdoCIR) led by a Chief of Staff for Cyber and Information Space (InspCIR) was launched in April 2017. The overall aim of these reforms is to assign current capabilities to defined responsibilities, protect Bundeswehr and national cyber and IT infrastructure, and improve capabilities in order to better respond to cyber attacks. Germany's defence minister stated in April 2017 that the armed forces could respond with offensive cyber operations if its networks are attacked.
Кибер
Германия выпустила стратегию кибербезопасности в феврале 2011 года. Национальный совет по кибербезопасности, являющийся межведомственным органом на уровне государственного секретаря, анализирует вопросы, связанные с кибербезопасностью. 1 апреля 2011 года в Федеральном управлении информационной безопасности был создан Национальный центр кибернетического реагирования. В 2016 году Германия расширила свои кибер-возможности, проведя далеко идущие реформы. В рамках федерального Министерства обороны был создан новый Генеральный директорат по кибер/ИТ (CIT) с двумя отделами по кибер/ИТ-управлению и ИТ-услугам/информационной безопасности. Генеральный директор выполняет функции главного сотрудника по вопросам информации и координатора для других федеральных министерств и ведомств. Задачи Генерального директората включают в себя развитие технических кибер/ИТ-возможностей и руководство кибер-политикой. В апреле 2017 года было запущено кибер-и информационное Космическое командование (KdoCIR) во главе с начальником штаба по кибер-и информационному пространству (InspCIR). Общая цель этих реформ состоит в том, чтобы возложить текущие возможности на определенные обязанности, защитить Бундесвер и национальную кибер-и ИТ-инфраструктуру, а также улучшить возможности для лучшего реагирования на кибератаки. Министр обороны Германии заявил в апреле 2017 года, что Вооруженные силы могли бы ответить наступательными операциями, если ее сетей подвергаются нападению.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 980; 1 bde HQ; 1 recce bn; 1 UAV flt with 3 Heron 1 UAV
   UN UNAMA 1 obs
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 2
ALBANIA: OSCE Minsk Conference 1
DJIBOUTI: EU Operation Atalanta 1 AP-3C Orion
FRANCE: 400 (incl GER elm Eurocorps)
IRAQ: 145 (trg spt)
JORDAN: Operation Inherent Resolve 284; 4 Tornado ECR; 1 A310 MRTT
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 122; 1 FFGM
LITHUANIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 450; 1 armd inf bn HQ; 1 armd inf coy(+)
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 83
   UN MINUSMA 610; 1 obs; 1 int coy; 1 hel bn
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: EU EU NAVFOR MED: 1 DDGHM
   NATO SNMG 1: 1 AOT
   NATO SNMG 2: 1 FFGHM
NORTH SEA: NATO SNMCMG 1: 1 MHO
POLAND: 67 (GER elm MNC-NE)
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 650
   OSCE Kosovo 4
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 7
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 5; 11 obs
SUDAN: UN UNAMID 8
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 27
UNITED STATES: TRG units with 40 T-38 Talon; 69 T-6A Texan II at Goodyear AFB (AZ)/Sheppard AFB (TX);
   1 trg sqn with 14 Tornado IDS at Holloman AFB (NM); NAS Pensacola (FL); Fort Rucker (AL); Missile trg at Fort Bliss (TX)
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 5 obs

FOREIGN FORCES
France 2,000; 1 (FRA/GER) mech bde (1 armd cav regt, 1 mech inf regt)
United Kingdom 3,750; 1 armd bde(-) (1 tk regt, 1 armd inf bn); 1 SP arty regt; 1 cbt engr regt; 1 maint regt; 1 med regt
United States
   US Africa Command: Army; 1 HQ at Stuttgart US European Command: 37,450; 1 combined service HQ (EUCOM) at Stuttgart-Vaihingen
   Army 23,000; 1 HQ (US Army Europe (USAREUR) at Heidelberg; 1 div HQ (fwd); 1 SF gp; 1 armd recce bn; 2 armd bn; 1 mech bde(-); 1 arty bn;
   1 (cbt avn) hel bde(-); 1 (cbt avn) hel bde HQ; 1 int bde; 1 MP bde; 1 sigs bde; 1 spt bde; 1 (APS) armd bde eqpt set; M1 Abrams;
   M2/M3 Bradley; Stryker; M109; M119A2; M777; AH-64D/E Apache; CH-47F Chinook; UH-60L/M Black Hawk; HH-60M Black Hawk
   Navy 1,000
   USAF 12,300; 1 HQ (US Airforce Europe (USAFE)) at Ramstein AB; 1 HQ (3rd Air Force) at Ramstein AB;
   1 FTR wg at Spangdahlem AB with 1 ftr sqn with 24 F-16CJ Fighting Falcon;
   1 airlift wg at Ramstein AB with 14 C-130J-30 Hercules; 2 Gulfstream V (C-37A); 5 Learjet 35A (C-21A); 1 B-737-700 (C-40B)
   USMC 1,150

   GREECE
    []

Capabilities
Principal tasks for Greece's armed forces include ensuring territorial integrity and supporting Cyprus in the event of conflict. The armed forces have traditionally been well funded. The general staff is aiming to produce more flexible, agile and mobile forces at the tactical and operational levels. In 2017, there was growing cooperation with Egypt and Israel, including joint exercises, as well as continued tensions with Turkey over airspace violations. Despite challenging fiscal circumstances, Greece is modernising and upgrading its stored P-3B Orion aircraft in order to strengthen its maritime-patrol and anti-submarine-warfare capability, as well as enhancing surveillance capacity in the eastern Mediterranean. Greece is also bolstering its rotary-wing transport capability and in late 2017 the US approved the upgrade of Greece's F-16 fleet. Development of the local defence-industrial base is a priority, in order to preserve local maintenance capabilities and improve equipment readiness. Greece trains widely with NATO allies and other partners.
Потенциал
Основные задачи Вооруженных сил Греции включают обеспечение территориальной целостности и поддержку Кипра в случае конфликта. Вооруженные силы традиционно хорошо финансируются. Генеральный штаб стремится создавать более гибкие, подвижные силы на тактическом и оперативном уровнях. В 2017 году росло сотрудничество с Египтом и Израилем, включая совместные учения, а также продолжалась напряженность с Турцией по поводу нарушений воздушного пространства. Несмотря на сложные финансовые условия, Греция модернизирует свои складированные самолеты P-3B Orion в целях укрепления своего потенциала морского патрулирования и противолодочной обороны, а также укрепления потенциала наблюдения в Восточном Средиземноморье. Греция также укрепляет свои вертолетные транспортные возможности, и в конце 2017 года США одобрили модернизацию флота F-16 Греции. Развитие местной оборонно-промышленной базы является приоритетной задачей в целях сохранения местных эксплуатационных возможностей и повышения готовности оборудования. Греция широко тренируется с союзниками по НАТО и другими партнерами.

ACTIVE 141,350 (Army 93,500 Navy 16,250 Air 20,000 Joint 11,600) Paramilitary 4,000
Conscript liability Up to 9 months in all services
RESERVE 220,500 (Army 181,500 Navy 5,000 Air 34,000)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 48,500; 45,000 conscripts (total 93,500)
Units are manned at 3 different levels - Cat A 85% fully ready, Cat B 60% ready in 24 hours, Cat C 20% ready in 48 hours (requiring reserve mobilisation).
3 military regions
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   2 corps HQ (incl NDC-GR)
   1 armd div HQ
   3 mech inf div HQ
   1 inf div HQ
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF comd
   1 cdo/para bde
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   4 recce bn
Armoured
   4 armd bde (2 armd bn, 1 mech inf bn, 1 SP arty bn)
Mechanised
   9 mech inf bde (1 armd bn, 2 mech bn, 1 SP arty bn)
Light
   1 inf bde (1 armd bn, 3 inf regt, 1 arty regt)
Air Manoeuvre
   1 air mob bde
   1 air aslt bde
Amphibious
   1 mne bde
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty regt (1 arty bn, 2 MRL bn)
   3 AD bn (2 with I-Hawk, 1 with Tor M1)
   3 engr regt
   2 engr bn
   1 EW regt
   10 sigs bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log corps HQ
   1 log div (3 log bde)
HELICOPTER
   1 hel bde (1 hel regt with (2 atk hel bn), 2 tpt hel bn, 4 hel bn)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 1,341: 170 Leopard 2A6HEL; 183 Leopard 2A4; 513 Leopard 1A4/5; 100 M60A1/A3; 375 M48A5
   RECCE 242 VBL
   IFV 398 BMP-1
   APC 2,418
   APC (T) 2,407: 86 Leonidas Mk1/2; 2,108 M113A1/A2; 213 M577 (CP)
   PPV 11 Maxxpro
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 261: 12 Buffel; 43 Leopard 1; 94 M88A1; 112 M578
   VLB 12+: 12 Leopard 1; Leguan
   MW Giant Viper
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL
   SP 600: 196 HMMWV with 9K135 Kornet-E (AT-14 Spriggan); 42 HMMWV with Milan; 362 M901
   MANPATS 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot); Milan; TOW
   RCL 84mm Carl Gustav; 90mm EM-67; SP 106mm 581 M40A1
ARTILLERY 3,607
   SP 587: 155mm 442: 418 M109A1B/A2/A3GEA1/A5; 24 PzH 2000; 203mm 145 M110A2
   TOWED 553: 105mm 347: 329 M101; 18 M-56; 155mm 206 M114
   MRL 147: 122mm 111 RM-70; 227mm 36 M270 MLRS
   MOR 2,320: 81mm 1,700; 107mm 620 M30 (incl 231 SP)
SURFACE-TO-SURFACE MISSILE LAUNCHERS
   SRBM Conventional MGM-140A ATACMS (launched from M270 MLRS)
RADAR LAND 76: 3 ARTHUR; 5 AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder (arty, mor); 8 AN/TPQ-37(V)3; 40 BOR-A; 20 MARGOT
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 18: 1 Beech 200 King Air (C-12C) 2 Beech 200 King Air (C-12R/AP Huron); 15 Cessna 185 (U-17A/B)
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 28: 19 AH-64A Apache; 9 AH-64D Apache
   TPT 140: Heavy 21: 15 CH-47D Chinook; 6 CH-47SD Chinook; Medium 13 NH90 TTH;
   Light 106: 92 Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois); 14 Bell 206 (AB-206) Jet Ranger
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Medium 4 Sperwer
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM 155
   Medium-range 42 MIM-23B I-Hawk
   Short-range 21 9K331 Tor-M1 (SA-15 Gauntlet)
   Point-range 92+: 38 9K33 Osa-M (SA-8B Gecko); 54 ASRAD HMMWV; FIM-92 Stinger
   GUNS TOWED 727: 20mm 204 Rh 202; 23mm 523 ZU-23-2

National Guard 33,000 reservists
Internal security role
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   1 inf div
Air Manoeuvre
   1 para regt
COMBAT SUPPORT
   8 arty bn
   4 AD bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 hel bn

Navy 14,200; 2,050 conscript (total 16,250)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 11:
   3 Poseidon (GER Type-209/1200) with 8 single 533mm TT with SUT HWT
   1 Poseidon (GER Type-209/1200) (modernised with AIP technology) with 8 single 533mm TT with SUT HWT
   3 Glavkos (GER Type-209/1100) with 8 single 533mm TT with UGM-84C Harpoon AShM/SUT HWT
   4 Papanikolis (GER Type-214) with 8 single 533mm TT with UGM-84C Harpoon AShM/SUT HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 13
FRIGATES FFGHM 13:
   4 Elli Batch I (ex-NLD Kortenaer Batch 2) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 octuple Mk29 GMLS with RIM-7M/P
   Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Phalanx CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel or 1 S-70B Seahawk hel)
   2 Elli Batch II (ex-NLD Kortenaer Batch 2) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 octuple Mk29 GMLS with RIM-7M/P
   Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 2 Phalanx CIWS, 2 76mm gun (capacity 2 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel or 1 S-70B Seahawk hel)
   3 Elli Batch III (ex-NLD Kortenaer Batch 2) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 octuple Mk29 lnchr with RIM-7M/P
   Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Phalanx CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
   4 Hydra (GER MEKO 200) with 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84G Harpoon AShM, 1 16-cell Mk48 Mod 5 VLS with RIM-162 ESSM SAM,
   2 triple 324mm ASTT each with Mk46 LWT, 2 Phalanx CIWS, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 S-70B Seahawk ASW hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 33
   CORVETTES
   FSGM 5 Roussen (Super Vita) with 2 quad lnchr with MM40 Exocet Block 2 AShM, 1 21-cell Mk49 GMLS with RIM-116 RAM SAM, 1 76mm gun
   PCFG 12:
   2 Kavaloudis (FRA La Combattante IIIB) with 6 single lnchr with RB 12 Penguin AShM, 2 single 533mm TT with SST-4 HWT, 2 76mm gun
   3 Kavaloudis (FRA La Combattante IIIB) with 2 twin lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 2 single 533mm TT with SST-4 HWT, 2 76mm gun
   2 Laskos (FRA La Combattante III) with 4 MM38 Exocet AShM, 2 single 533mm TT with SST-4 HWT, 2 76mm gun
   2 Laskos (FRA La Combattante III) with 2 twin lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 2 single 533mm TT with SST-4 HWT, 2 76mm gun
   1 Votsis (ex-GER Tiger) with 2 twin Mk-141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 76mm gun
   2 Votsis (ex-GER Tiger) with 2 twin MM38 Exocet AShM, 1 76mm gun
   PCO 8:
   2 Armatolos (DNK Osprey) with 1 76mm gun
   2 Kasos with 1 76mm gun
   4 Machitis with 1 76mm gun
   PB 8: 4 Andromeda (NOR Nasty); 2 Stamou; 2 Tolmi
MINE COUNTERMEASURES 4
   MHO 4: 2 Evropi (ex-UK Hunt); 2 Evniki (ex-US Osprey)
AMPHIBIOUS
LANDING SHIPS LST 5:
   5 Chios (capacity 4 LCVP; 300 troops) with 1 76mm gun, 1 hel landing platform
LANDING CRAFT 15
   LCU 5
   LCA 7
   LCAC 3 Kefallinia (Zubr) with 2 AK630 CIWS (capacity either 3 MBT or 10 APC (T); 230 troops)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 25
   ABU 2
   AG 2 Pandora
   AGOR 1 Naftilos
   AGS 2: 1 Stravon; 1 Pytheas
   AOR 2 Axios (ex-GER Luneburg)
   AORH 1 Prometheus (ITA Etna) with 1 Phalanx CIWS
   AOT 4 Ouranos
   AWT 6 Kerkini
   AXS 5

Coastal Defence
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
COASTAL DEFENCE AShM 2 MM40 Exocet

Naval Aviation
FORCES BY ROLE
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   1 div with S-70B Seahawk; Bell 212 (AB-212) ASW
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT ASW (5 P-3B Orion in store undergoing modernisation)
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 18: 7 Bell 212 (AB-212) ASW; 11 S-70B Seahawk
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   ASM AGM-114 Hellfire
   AShM AGM-119 Penguin

Air Force 18,000; 2,000 conscripts (total 20,000)
Tactical Air Force
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with F-16CG/DG Block 30/50 Fighting Falcon
   3 sqn with F-16CG/DG Block 52+ Fighting Falcon
   2 sqn with F-16C/D Block 52+ ADV Fighting Falcon
   1 sqn with Mirage 2000-5EG/BG Mk2
   1 sqn with Mirage 2000EG/BG
   1 sqn with F-4E Phantom II
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING
   1 sqn with EMB-145H Erieye
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 218 combat capable
   FGA 218: 20 F-4E Phantom II; 70 F-16CG/DG Block 30/50 Fighting Falcon; 55 F-16CG/DG Block 52+; 30 F-16 C/D Block 52+ ADV Fighting Falcon;
   20 Mirage 2000-5EG Mk2; 5 Mirage 2000-5BG Mk2; 16 Mirage 2000EG; 2 Mirage 2000BG
   AEW 4 EMB-145AEW (EMB-145H) Erieye
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L/P Sidewinder; R-550 Magic 2; IIR IRIS-T; Mica IR; ARH AIM-120B/C AMRAAM; Mica RF
   ASM AGM-65A/B/G Maverick; LACM SCALP EG; AShM AM39 Exocet; ARM AGM-88 HARM
BOMBS
Electro-optical guided: GBU-8B HOBOS
   Laser-guided: GBU-10/12/16 Paveway II; GBU-24 Paveway III; GBU-50 Enhanced Paveway II
   INS/GPS-guided GBU-31 JDAM; AGM-154C JSOW

Air Defence
FORCES BY ROLE
AIR DEFENCE
   6 sqn/bty with MIM-104A/B/D Patriot/Patriot PAC-1 SOJC/Patriot PAC-2 GEM
   2 sqn/bty with S-300PMU-1 (SA-10C Grumble)
   12 bty with Skyguard/RIM-7 Sparrow/guns; Crotale NG/GR; Tor-M1 (SA-15 Gauntlet)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Long-range 48: 36 MIM-104A/B/D Patriot/Patriot PAC-1 SOJC/PAC-2 GEM; 12 S-300PMU-1 (SA-10C Grumble)
   Short-range 13+: 9 Crotale NG/GR; 4 9K331 Tor-M1 (SA-15 Gauntlet); some Skyguard/Sparrow
   GUNS 35+ 35mm

Air Support Command
FORCES BY ROLE
SEARCH & RESCUE/TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with AS332C Super Puma (SAR/CSAR)
   1 sqn with AW109; Bell 205A (AB-205A) (SAR); Bell 212 (AB-212 - VIP, tpt)
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-27J Spartan
   1 sqn with C-130B/H Hercules
   1 sqn with EMB-135BJ Legacy; ERJ-135LR; Gulfstream V
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   TPT 26: Medium 23: 8 C-27J Spartan; 5 C-130B Hercules; 10 C-130H Hercules; Light 2: 1 EMB-135BJ Legacy; 1 ERJ-135LR; PAX 1 Gulfstream V
HELICOPTERS
   TPT 31: Medium 12 AS332C Super Puma; Light 19: 12 Bell 205A (AB-205A) (SAR); 4 Bell 212 (AB-212) (VIP, TPT); 3 AW109

Air Training Command
FORCES BY ROLE
TRAINING
   2 sqn with T-2C/E Buckeye
   2 sqn with T-6A/B Texan II
   1 sqn with T-41D
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT TRG 93: 30 T-2C/E Buckeye; 20 T-6A Texan II; 25 T-6B Texan II; 18 T-41D

Paramilitary
Coast Guard and Customs 4,000
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 124:
   PCC 3
   PCO 1 Gavdos (Damen 5009)
   PBF 54
   PB 66
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 4: 2 Cessna 172RG Cutlass; 2 TB-20 Trinidad
HELICOPTERS
   SAR: 3 AS365N3

Cyber
A new Joint Cyber Command in the Hellenic National Defence General Staff was established in 2014, replacing the existing Cyber Defence Directorate. The National Policy on Cyber Defence is under development and expected to be complete by the end of 2016.
Кибер
Новое Объединенное Кибер Командование в Генеральном штабе национальной обороны Греции было создано в 2014 году, заменив существующее Управление киберзащиты. Национальная политика в области киберзащиты находится в стадии разработки и, как ожидается, будет завершена к концу 2016 года.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 4
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 1
CYPRUS: Army 950 (ELDYK army); ~200 (officers/NCO seconded to Greek-Cypriot National Guard) (total 1,150);
   1 mech bde (1 armd bn, 2 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn); 61 M48A5 MOLF MBT; 80 Leonidas APC; 12 M114 arty; 6 M110A2 arty
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 49; 1 PCFG
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 2
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: EU EUNAVFOR MED 1 SSK; NATO SNMG 2: 1 FSGM; 2 PCO
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 112; 1 inf coy; OSCE Kosovo 1
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 22

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 400; 1 naval base at Makri; 1 naval base at Soudha Bay; 1 air base at Iraklion

   HUNGARY
    []

Capabilities
A National Security Strategy (NSS) and National Military Strategy (NMS) were published in 2012. Territorial defence and the ability to participate in NATO and other international operations are central tenets of the NMS, including the medium-term aim of having forces capable of taking part in high-intensity operations. A review of the NSS has been under way since 2016. Hungary coordinates policy with the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovakia in the so-called VisegrАd 4 (V4) format, including on defence. The V4 EU Battlegroup is scheduled to be on standby for the second time in the second half of 2019. Increasing migration pressure has directly affected Hungary, and its armed forces have been involved in internal bordercontrol operations, assisting national police forces. The government aims to gradually increase defence spending to reach NATO's 2% of GDP benchmark by 2026, to coincide with the completion of the ZrМnyi 2026 nationaldefence and armed-forces modernisation plan announced in December 2016. The defence-modernisation programme aims to reorganise reserve forces on a territorial basis with units in each district. Announced equipment modernisation priorities focus on individual soldier equipment and fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft. In 2017, the defence ministry established the Military Augmentation Preparation and Training Command (MAPTC) to improve recruitment, training and military education. The NCO Academy and Ludovika Academy will be subordinated to the MAPTC. The defence ministry has also set up an inter-ministerial defence-industry working group to boost domestic capacity in the small-arms sector. Hungary hosts the NATO Centre of Excellence for Military Medicine.
Потенциал
В 2012 году были опубликованы Стратегия национальной безопасности (NSS) и Национальная военная стратегия (NMS). Территориальная оборона и возможность участия в НАТО и других международных операциях являются центральными принципами NMS, включая среднесрочную цель создания сил, способных принимать участие в операциях высокой интенсивности. Обзор NSS проводится с 2016 года. Венгрия координирует политику с Чешской Республикой, Польшей и Словакией в так называемом формате Вышеград 4 (V4), в том числе в области обороны. Планируется, что боевая группа V4 EU будет находиться в режиме ожидания во второй половине 2019 года. Усиление миграционного давления непосредственно затронуло Венгрию, и ее вооруженные силы участвуют во внутренних операциях по пограничному контролю, оказывая помощь национальным полицейским силам. Правительство намерено постепенно увеличить расходы на оборону до уровня 2% ВВП НАТО к 2026 году, что совпадает с завершением плана национальной обороны и модернизации вооруженных сил ZrМnyi 2026, объявленного в декабре 2016 года. Программа модернизации обороны направлена на реорганизацию резервных сил на территориальной основе с подразделениями в каждом районе. Объявлены приоритеты модернизации оборудования с сосредоточением на индивидуальном оружии солдат и оборудования самолетов и вертолетов. В 2017 году Минобороны создало военное командование подготовки и обучения (MAPTC) для улучшения набора, обучения и военного образования. Академии сержантского состава и Академии Ludovika будет подчинена MAPTC. Министерство обороны также создало межведомственную рабочую группу по оборонной промышленности в целях укрепления внутреннего потенциала в секторе стрелкового оружия. В Венгрии находится Центр передового опыта НАТО в области военной медицины.

ACTIVE 27,800 (Army 10,450 Air 5,750 Joint 11,600) Paramilitary 12,000
RESERVE 44,000 (Army 35,200 Air 8,800)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE
Hungary's armed forces have reorganised into a joint force

Land Component 10,450 (incl riverine element)
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF regt
MANOEUVRE
Mechanised
   1 (5th) mech inf bde (1 armd recce bn; 3 mech inf bn, 1 cbt engr coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn)
   1 (25th) mech inf bde (1 tk bn; 2 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AT bn, 1 log bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 engr regt
   1 EOD/rvn regt
   1 CBRN bn
   1 sigs regt
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 30 T-72
   IFV 120 BTR-80A
   APC APC (W) 260 BTR-80
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV BAT-2
   ARV BMP-1 VPV; T-54/T-55; VT-55A
   VLB BLG-60; MTU; TMM
   NBC VEHICLES 24+: 24 K90 CBRN Recce; PSZH-IV CBRN Recce
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot); 9K111-1 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel)
ARTILLERY 67
   TOWED 152mm 17 D-20
   MOR 82mm 50
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PBR 2
MINE COUNTERMEASURES MSR 4 Nestin

Air Component 5,750
Flying hours 50 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with Gripen C/D
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with An-26 Curl
TRAINING
   1 sqn with Z-143LSi; Z-242L
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-24 Hind
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-8 Hip; Mi-17 Hip H
AIR DEFENCE
   1 SAM regt (9 bty with Mistral; 3 bty with 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful))
   1 radar regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 14 combat capable
   FGA 14: 12 Gripen C; 2 Gripen D
   TPT Light 4 An-26 Curl
   TRG 4: 2 Z-143LSi; 2 Z-242L
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 11: 3 Mi-24D Hind D; 6 Mi-24V Hind E; 2 Mi-24P Hind F
   MRH 7 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT Medium 13 Mi-8 Hip
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence 16 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful); Mistral
RADAR 29: 3 RAT-31DL; 6 P-18; 6 SZT-68UM; 14 P-37
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9 Sidewinder SARH R-27 (AA-10 Alamo A); ARH AIM-120C AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65 Maverick; 3M11 Falanga (AT-2 Swatter); 9K114 Shturm-V (AT-6 Spiral)
BOMBS Laser-guided Paveway II

Paramilitary 12,000
Border Guards 12,000 (to reduce)
Ministry of Interior
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   1 (Budapest) paramilitary district (7 rapid reaction coy)
   11 (regt/district) paramilitary regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 68 BTR-80

Cyber
The National Cyber Security Strategy, coordinating cyber security at the governmental level, is led by the prime minister's office. There is also a National Cyber Defence Forum and a Hungarian Cyber Defence Management Authority within the National Security Authority. In 2013, the defence ministry developed a Military Cyber Defence concept. A Computer Incident Response Capability (MilCIRC) and Military Computer Emergency Response Team (MilCERT) have also been established. In 2015, the ministry launched a modernisation programme as a part of Ministerial Program (2015-19), including military CIS and CIS security/cyber-defence technical modernisation. In 2016, a Defence Sectorial Cyber Defence Centre (CDC) for security management, vulnerability assessment and incident handling in the defence sector was established within the Military National Security Service. IOC is planned for 2018.
Кибер
Национальная стратегия кибербезопасности, координирующая кибербезопасность на правительственном уровне, осуществляется под руководством канцелярии премьер-министра. Существует также Национальный форум по киберзащите и венгерский орган по управлению киберзащитой в рамках Управления национальной безопасности. В 2013 году Министерство обороны разработало концепцию военной киберзащиты. Потенциал реагирования на компьютерные инциденты (MilCIRC) и военной службы реагирования на компьютерные инциденты (MilCERT) были созданы. В 2015 году министерство приступило к реализации программы модернизации в рамках министерской программы (2015-19 годы), включающей техническую модернизацию в области военной безопасности и киберзащиты. В 2016 году в военной службе национальной безопасности был создан оборонный Отраслевой центр киберзащиты (CDC) для управления безопасностью, оценки уязвимости и обработки инцидентов в оборонном секторе. IOC запланирован на 2018 год.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 110
ALBANIA; OSCE Albania 1
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU Operation Althea 165; 1 inf coy
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: UN MINUSCA 2; 2 obs
CYPRUS: UN UNFICYP 77; 1 inf pl
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 140
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 4
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 3
MOLDOVA: OSCE Moldova 1
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 373; 1 inf coy (KTM); OSCE Kosovo 1
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 4
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 30
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 7 obs

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 100; 1 armd recce tp; M3 Bradley

   ICELAND
    []

Capabilities
Iceland is a NATO member but maintains only a coastguard service. In 2016, the country established a National Security Council to implement and monitor security policy. Iceland hosts NATO and regional partners for exercises, transits and naval task groups, as well as the Icelandic Air Policing mission. Increased Russian air and naval activities in the Atlantic and close to NATO airspace have led to complaints from Iceland that aircraft could threaten civil flights. In late 2016, the US Navy began operating P-8 Poseidon maritime patrol aircraft from Keflavik air base, and was reportedly upgrading hangars and other infrastructure at the site to enable regular, rotational patrols.
Потенциал
Исландия является членом НАТО, но имеет только службу береговой охраны. В 2016 году в стране создан Совет национальной безопасности для реализации и мониторинга политики безопасности. Исландия принимает у себя НАТО и региональных партнеров для проведения учений, транзитных перевозок и военно-морских оперативных групп, а также исландскую миссию воздушной полиции. Активизация российской военно-воздушной и военно-морской деятельности в Атлантике и вблизи воздушного пространства НАТО привела к жалобам Исландии на то, что самолеты могут угрожать гражданским полетам. В конце 2016 года ВМС США начали эксплуатировать морские патрульные самолеты P-8 Poseidon с авиабазы Кефлавик и, как сообщается, модернизировали ангары и другую инфраструктуру на месте, чтобы обеспечить регулярное ротационное патрулирование.

ACTIVE NIL Paramilitary 250

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Paramilitary
Iceland Coast Guard 250
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 3
   PSOH: 2 Aegir
   PSO 1 Thor
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT AGS 1 Baldur
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 1 DHC-8-300 (MP)
HELICOPTERS TPT Medium 2 AS332L1 Super Puma

FOREIGN FORCES
Iceland Air Policing: Aircraft and personnel from various NATO members on a rotating basis

   IRELAND
    []

Capabilities
The armed forces' core missions remain defending the state against armed aggression, although a 2015 white paper broadened the scope of the national-security risk assessment beyond traditional military and paramilitary threats. It listed as priority threats inter- and intra-state conflict, cyber attacks, terrorism, emergencies and natural disasters, as well as espionage and transnational organised crime. October 2017 saw a major domestic military operation to manage the consequences of Hurricane Ophelia. Ireland continues to contribute to multinational operations, principally UNDOF on the Golan Heights. After the white paper, Dublin identified 88 projects to be completed over a ten-year period. Key priorities after 2017 include a mid-life upgrade for the army's Piranha armoured personnel carriers and the replacement of the existing maritime-patrol aircraft. The army maintains substantial EOD capabilities.
Потенциал
Основные задачи Вооруженных сил по-прежнему заключаются в защите государства от вооруженной агрессии, хотя "Белая книга" 2015 года расширила рамки оценки рисков национальной безопасности за пределы традиционных военных и военизированных угроз. В нем в качестве приоритетных перечислены угрозы межгосударственного и внутригосударственного конфликта, кибератаки, терроризм, чрезвычайные ситуации и стихийные бедствия, а также шпионаж и транснациональная организованная преступность. В октябре 2017 года была проведена крупная отечественная военная операция по ликвидации последствий урагана "Офелия". Ирландия продолжает вносить вклад в многонациональные операции, главным образом UNDOF на Голанских высотах. После подготовки "Белой книги" Дублин определил 88 проектов, которые должны быть завершены в течение десятилетнего периода. Основные приоритеты после 2017 года включают модернизацию бронетранспортеров "Пиранья" и замену существующих морских патрульных самолетов. Армия поддерживает значительные возможности EOD.

ACTIVE 9,100 (Army 7,300 Navy 1,100 Air 700)
RESERVE 2,480 (Army 2,250 Navy 200 Air 30)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 7,300
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 ranger coy
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 armd recce sqn
Mechanised
   1 mech inf coy
Light
   1 inf bde (1 cav recce sqn, 4 inf bn, 1 arty regt (3 fd arty bty, 1 AD bty), 1 fd engr coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 MP coy, 1 TPT coy)
   1 inf bde (1 cav recce sqn, 3 inf bn, 1 arty regt (3 fd arty bty, 1 AD bty), 1 fd engr coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 MP coy, 1 tpt coy)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   RECCE 6 Piranha IIIH 30mm
   APC 99
   APC (W) 74: 56 Piranha III; 18 Piranha IIIH
   PPV 25 RG-32M
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTURCTURE
   MSL MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin
   RCL 84mm Carl Gustav
ARTILLERY 299
   TOWED 105mm 24: 18 L118 Light Gun; 6 L119 Light Gun
   MOR 275: 81mm 180; 120mm 95
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence RBS-70
   GUNS TOWED 40mm 32 L/70 each with 8 Flycatcher

Reserves 2,400 reservists
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   1 (integrated) armd recce sqn
   2 (integrated) cav sqn
Mechanised
   1 (integrated) mech inf coy
Light
   14 (integrated) inf coy
COMBAT SUPPORT
   4 (integrated) arty bty
   2 engr gp
   2 MP coy
   3 sigs coy
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   2 med det
   2 tpt coy

Naval Service 1,100
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 8
   PSOH 1 Eithne with 1 57mm gun
   PSO 5: 2 Roisin with 1 76mm gun; 3 Samuel Beckett with 1 76mm gun
   PCO 2 Orla (ex-UK Peacock) with 1 76mm gun
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 2
   AXS 2

Air Corps 700
   2 ops wg; 2 spt wg; 1 trg wg; 1 comms and info sqn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   MP 2 CN235 MPA
   TPT Light 6: 5 Cessna FR-172H; 1 Learjet 45 (VIP)
   TRG 8 PC-9M
HELICOPTERS:
   MRH 6 AW139
   TPT Light 2 H135 (incl trg/medevac)

Cyber
The Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources has lead responsibilities relating to cyber security, and established a National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) to assist in identifying and protecting Ireland from cyber attacks. The department has produced a Cyber Security Strategy 2015-17, which says that `the Defence Forces maintains a capability in the area of cyber security for the purpose of protecting its own networks and users'.
Кибер
Департамент коммуникаций, энергетики и природных ресурсов несет главную ответственность за кибербезопасность и создал Национальный центр кибербезопасности (NCSC) для оказания помощи в выявлении и защите Ирландии от кибератак. Департамент разработал Стратегию кибербезопасности 2015-17, в которой говорится, что "Силы обороны сохраняют потенциал в области кибербезопасности с целью защиты своих собственных сетей и пользователей".

DEPLOYMENT
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 1
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 5; OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 1
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 4
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 374; elm 1 mech inf bn
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 20
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 12 obs
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 12; OSCE Kosovo 1
SYRIA/ISRAEL: UN UNDOF 136; 1 inf coy 118 THE MILITARY BALANCE 2018
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 12
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 2 obs

   ITALY
    []

Capabilities
In 2017, a defence plan covering 2017-19 and a new defence white paper were released. These outlined the goal of reducing personnel from 190,000 to 150,000 by 2024, with an aspiration for more joint activity between the services. The paper detailed capability-enhancement programmes including upgrades to main battle tanks, systems to counter UAV operations and electronic warfare. Extra funds are to be allocated to continue the lease of the King Air SIGINT aircraft, which has been involved in surveillance operations along the Italian and Libyan coasts. The expected retirement of much of the naval fleet over the next ten years has triggered a long-term replacement plan and, according to the white paper, funds have been allocated for the continuation of the FREMM frigate programme. Italy has an advanced defence industry. Leonardo is headquartered there, and the country hosts Europe's F-35 final assembly and check-out facility at Cameri, which is also a European hub for F-35 maintenance. The air force was due to take delivery of its first F-35B by the end of 2017. Italy continues to support NATO operations in Afghanistan and Italian forces contribute to Operation Inherent Resolve in Iraq. Maritime deployments have been aimed at countering terrorism and human trafficking, as well as search and rescue in the Mediterranean. Italy is the lead nation in the EUNAVFOR- MED force, which is headquartered in Rome, and the Italian coastguard has been training its Libyan counterpart. The country takes part in NATO exercises and air-policing missions, and in early 2017 deployed to Latvia as part of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence.
Потенциал
В 2017 году был выпущен план обороны на 2017-19 годы и новая "белая книга" по обороне. В них была намечена цель сокращения численности персонала со 190 000 до 150 000 человек к 2024 году с учетом стремления к большей совместной деятельности служб. В документе подробно описаны программы повышения боеспособности, включая модернизацию основных боевых танков, систем противодействия операциям БПЛА и радиоэлектронной борьбы. Дополнительные средства будут выделены на продолжение аренды самолета King Air SIGINT, который участвовал в операциях по наблюдению вдоль итальянского и Ливийского побережий. Ожидаемое снятие со службы большей части Военно-морского флота в течение следующих десяти лет привел к разработке долгосрочного плана замены, и, согласно "Белой книге", были выделены средства для продолжения программы фрегатов FREMM. Италия имеет развитую оборонную промышленность. Штаб-квартира Leonardo находится там, и в стране проходит окончательная сборка и регистрация F-35 в Европе в Cameri, которая также является Европейским центром обслуживания F-35. ВВС должны были принять поставку своего первого F-35B к концу 2017 года. Италия продолжает поддерживать операции НАТО в Афганистане, а итальянские силы вносят вклад в операцию "Непоколебимая решимость" в Ираке. Морские действия направлены на борьбу с терроризмом и торговлей людьми, а также на поисково-спасательные работы в Средиземноморье. Италия является ведущей страной в силах EUNAVFOR- MED, штаб-квартира которых находится в Риме, а итальянская береговая охрана занимается подготовкой своего ливийского коллеги. Страна принимает участие в учениях НАТО и миссиях воздушной полиции, а в начале 2017 года развернута в Латвии в рамках расширенного передового присутствия НАТО.

ACTIVE 174,500 (Army 102,200 Navy 30,400 Air 41,900) Paramilitary 182,350
RESERVES 18,300 (Army 13,400 Navy 4,900)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES 9
   COMMUNICATIONS 4: 1 Athena-Fidus (also used by FRA); 3 Sicral
   ISR 5: 4 Cosmo (Skymed); 1 OPSAT-3000

Army 102,200
Regt are bn sized
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   1 (NRDC-ITA) corps HQ (1 spt bde, 1 sigs regt, 1 spt regt)
MANOEUVRE
Mechanised
1 (Friuli) div
   (1 (Ariete) armd bde (1 cav regt, 2 tk regt, 1 mech inf regt, 1 SP arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt, 1 log regt);
   1 (Pozzuolo del Friuli) cav bde (1 cav regt, 1 amph regt, 1 arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt, 1 log regt);
   1 (Folgore) AB bde (1 cav regt, 3 para regt, 1 arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt, 1 log regt);
   1 (Friuli) air mob bde (1 air mob regt, 1 log regt, 2 avn regt))
1 (Acqui) div
   (1 (Pinerolo) mech bde (3 mech inf regt, 1 SP arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt);
   1 (Granatieri) mech bde (1 cav regt, 1 mech inf regt);
   1 (Garibaldi Bersaglieri) mech bde (1 cav regt, 1 tk regt, 2 mech inf regt, 1 SP arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt);
   1 (Aosta) mech bde (1 cav regt, 3 mech inf regt, 1 SP arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt);
   1 (Sassari) lt mech bde (3 mech inf regt, 1 cbt engr regt))
Mountain
   1 (Tridentina) mtn div (2 mtn bde (1 cav regt, 3 mtn inf regt, 1 arty regt, 1 mtn cbt engr regt, 1 spt bn, 1 log regt))
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty comd (3 arty regt, 1 NBC regt)
   1 AD comd (2 SAM regt, 1 ADA regt)
   1 engr comd (2 engr regt, 1 ptn br regt, 1 CIMIC regt)
   1 EW/sigs comd (1 EW/ISR bde (1 EW regt, 1 int regt, 1 STA regt); 1 sigs bde with (7 sigs regt))
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log comd (2 log regt, 1 med unit)
HELICOPTER
   1 hel bde (3 hel regt)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 160 C1 Ariete
   ASLT 259 B1 Centauro
   IFV 428: 200 VCC-80 Dardo; 208 VBM 8в8 Freccia (incl 36 with Spike-LR); 20 VBM 8в8 Freccia (CP)
   APC 890
   APC (T) 361: 246 Bv-206; 115 M113 (incl variants)
   APC (W) 529 Puma
   AUV 10 Cougar; IVECO LMV
AAV 15: 14 AAVP-7; 1 AAVC-7
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 40 Leopard 1; M113
   ARV 138: 137 Leopard 1; 1 AAVR-7
   VLB 64 Biber
   MW 9: 6 Buffalo; 3 Miniflail
   NBC VEHICLES 14 VAB NRBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike; Milan
   RCL 80mm Folgore
ARTILLERY 992
   SP 155mm 192: 124 M109L; 68 PzH 2000
   TOWED 155mm 163 FH-70
   MRL 227mm 21 MLRS
   MOR 616: 81mm 270: 212 Brandt; 58 Expal 120mm 325: 183 Brandt; 142 RT-61 (RT-F1) SP 120mm 21 VBM 8в8 Freccia
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 6: 3 Do-228 (ACTL-1); 3 P-180 Avanti
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 43 AW129CBT Mangusta
   MRH 15 Bell 412 (AB-412) Twin Huey
   TPT 131: Heavy 19: 5 CH-47C Chinook; 14 CH-47F Chinook; Medium 31 NH90 TTH;
   Light 81: 6 AW109; 34 Bell 205 (AB-205); 26 Bell 206 Jet Ranger (AB-206); 15 Bell 212 (AB-212)
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Long-range 16 SAMP/T
   Short-range 32 Skyguard/Aspide
   Point-range FIM-92 Stinger
   GUNS SP 25mm 64 SIDAM
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   ASM Spike-ER

Navy 30,400
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 8:
   4 Pelosi (imp Sauro, 3rd and 4th series) with 6 single 533mm TT with Type-A-184 HWT
   4 Salvatore Todaro (Type-212A) with 6 single 533mm TT with Type-A-184 Mod 3 HWT/DM2A4 HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 20
AIRCRAFT CARRIERS CVS 2:
   1 Cavour with 4 octuple VLS with Aster 15 SAM, 2 76mm guns (capacity mixed air group of 20 AV-8B Harrier II; AW101 Merlin; NH90; Bell 212)
   1 G. Garibaldi with 2 octuple Albatros lnchr with Aspide SAM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT
   (capacity mixed air group of 18 AV-8B Harrier II; AW101 Merlin; NH90; Bell 212)
DESTROYERS DDGHM 10:
   2 Andrea Doria with 2 quad lnchr with Otomat Mk2A AShM, 1 48-cell VLS with Aster 15/Aster 30 SAM, 2 single 324mm ASTT with MU90 LWT,
   3 76mm guns (capacity 1 AW101 Merlin/NH90 hel)
   2 Luigi Durand de la Penne (ex-Animoso) with 2 quad lnchr with Otomat Mk 2A AShM/Milas A/S, 1 Mk13 GMLS with SM-1MR SAM,
   1 octuple Albatros lnchr with Aspide SAM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 127mm gun, 3 76mm guns (capacity 1 NH90 or 2 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
   2 Bergamini (GP) with 2 quad lnchr with Otomat Mk2A AShM, 1 16-cell VLS with Aster 15/Aster 30 SAM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with MU90 LWT,
   1 127mm gun, 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 AW101/NH90 hel)
   4 Bergamini (ASW) with 2 quad lnchr with Otomat Mk2A AShM, 1 16-cell VLS with Aster 15/Aster 30 SAM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with MU90 LWT,
   2 76mm gun (capacity 2 AW101/NH90 hel)
FRIGATES FFGHM 8:
   2 Artigliere with 8 single lnchr with Otomat Mk 2 AShM, 1 octuple Albatros lnchr with Aspide SAM, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
   6 Maestrale with 4 single lnchr with Otomat Mk2 AShM, 1 octuple Albatros lnchr with Aspide SAM, 2 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 127mm gun
   (capacity 1 NH90 or 2 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 16
   CORVETTES 2
   FS 2 Minerva 1 76mm gun
   PSOH 10:
   4 Cassiopea with 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel
   4 Comandante Cigala Fuligosi with 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212)/NH90 hel)
   2 Comandante Cigala Fuligosi (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212) or NH90 hel)
   PB 4 Esploratore
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 10
   MHO 10: 8 Gaeta; 2 Lerici
AMPHIBIOUS
PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS 3
LHD 3:
   2 San Giorgio with 1 76mm gun (capacity 3-4 AW101/NH90/Bell 212; 3 LCM 2 LCVP; 30 trucks; 36 APC (T); 350 troops)
   1 San Giusto with 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 AW101 Merlin/ NH90/Bell 212; 3 LCM 2 LCVP; 30 trucks; 36 APC (T); 350 troops)
LANDING CRAFT 24: 15 LCVP; 9 LCM
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 63
   ABU 5 Ponza
   AFD 9
   AGE 3: 1 Leonardo (coastal); 1 Raffaele Rosseti; 1 Vincenzo Martellota
   AGI 1 Elettra
   AGOR 1 Alliance
   AGS 3: 1 Ammiraglio Magnaghi with 1 hel landing platform; 2 Aretusa (coastal)
   AKSL 6 Gorgona
   AORH 3: 1 Etna with 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 AW101/NH90/Bell 212 hel); 2 Stromboli with 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 AW101/NH90 hel)
   AOT 7 Depoli
   ARSH 1 Anteo (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
   ATS 6 Ciclope
   AWT 7: 1 Bormida; 2 Simeto; 4 Panarea
   AXL 3 Aragosta
   AXS 8: 1 Amerigo Vespucci; 1 Palinuro; 1 Italia; 5 Caroly

Naval Aviation 2,200
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with AV-8B Harrier II; TAV-8B Harrier II
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE/TRANSPORT
   5 sqn with AW101 ASW Merlin; Bell 212 ASW (AB-212AS); Bell 212 (AB-212); NH90 NFH
MARITIME PATROL
   1 flt with P-180
AIRBORNE EARLY WANRING & CONTROL
   1 flt with AW101 AEW Merlin
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 16 combat capable
   FGA 16: 14 AV-8B Harrier II; 2 TAV-8B Harrier II
   MP 3 P-180
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 39: 10 AW101 ASW Merlin; 12 Bell 212 ASW; 17 NH90 NFH
   AEW 4 AW101 AEW Merlin
   TPT 15: Medium 9: 8 AW101 Merlin; 1 NH-90 MITT;
Light 6 Bell 212 (AB-212)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IRAIM-9L Sidewinder; ARH AIM-120 AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65 Maverick
   AShM Marte Mk 2/S

Marines 3,000
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Amphibious
   1 mne regt (1 SF coy, 1 mne bn, 1 cbt spt bn, 1 log bn)
   1 (boarding) mne regt (2 mne bn)
   1 landing craft gp
Other
   1 sy regt (3 sy bn)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC (T) 24 VCC-1
   AAV 18: 15 AAVP-7; 3 AAVC-7
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 2: 1 AAV-7RAI; 1 AAVR-7
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Milan; Spike
ARTILLERY
   MOR 23: 81mm 13 Brandt; 120mm 10 Brandt
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger

Air Force 41,900
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   4 sqn with Eurofighter Typhoon
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with AMX Ghibli
   1 (SEAD/EW) sqn with Tornado ECR
   2 sqn with Tornado IDS
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK/ISR
   1 sqn with AMX Ghibli
MARITIME PATROL
   1 sqn (opcon Navy) with ATR-72MP (P-72A)
TANKER/TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with KC-767A
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with AB-212 ICO
SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 wg with AW139 (HH-139A); Bell 212 (HH-212); HH-3F Pelican
TRANSPORT
   2 (VIP) sqn with A319CJ; AW139 (VH-139A); Falcon 50; Falcon 900 Easy; Falcon 900EX; SH-3D Sea King
   2 sqn with C-130J/C-130J-30/KC-130J Hercules
   1 sqn with C-27J Spartan
   1 (calibration) sqn with P-180 Avanti
TRAINING
   1 OCU sqn with Eurofighter Typhoon
   1 sqn with MB-339PAN (aerobatic team)
   1 sqn with MD-500D/E (NH-500D/E)
   1 OCU sqn with Tornado
   1 OCU sqn with AMX-T Ghibli
   1 sqn with MB-339A
   1 sqn with MB-339CD*
   1 sqn with SF-260EA, 3 P2006T (T-2006A)
ISR UAV
   1 sqn with MQ-9A Reaper; RQ-1B Predator
AIR DEFENCE
   2 bty with Spada
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 260 combat capable
   FTR 86 Eurofighter Typhoon
   FGA 78: 63 AMX Ghibli; 8 AMX-T Ghibli; 7 F-35A Lightning II (in test)
   ATK 53 Tornado IDS
   ATK/EW 15 Tornado ECR*
   MP 2 ATR-72MP (P-72A)
   SIGINT 1 Beech 350 King Air
   AEW&C 1 Gulfstream G550 CAEW
   TKR/TPT 6: 4 KC-767A; 2 KC-130J Hercules
   TPT 66: Medium 31: 9 C-130J Hercules; 10 C-130J-30 Hercules; 12 C-27J Spartan; Light 25: 15 P-180 Avanti; 10 S-208 (liaison);
   PAX 11: 1 A340-541; 3 A319CJ; 2 Falcon 50 (VIP); 2 Falcon 900 Easy; 3 Falcon 900EX (VIP)
   TRG 103: 3 M-346; 21 MB-339A; 28 MB-339CD*; 21 MB-339PAN (aerobatics); 30 SF-260EA
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 58: 10 AW139 (HH-139A/VH-139A); 2 MD-500D (NH-500D); 46 MD-500E (NH-500E)
   CSAR 4 AW101 (HH-101A)
   SAR 12 HH-3F Pelican
   TPT 31: Medium 2 SH-3D Sea King (liaison/VIP); Light 29 Bell 212 (HH-212)/AB-212 ICO
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES ISR Heavy 14: 9 MQ-9A Reaper; 5 RQ-1B Predator
AIR DEFENCE SAM Short SPADA
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L Sidewinder; IIR IRIS-T; ARH AIM-120B AMRAAM
   ARM AGM-88 HARM
   LACM SCALP EG/Storm Shadow
BOMBS
   Laser-guided/GPS: Enhanced Paveway II; Enhanced Paveway III

Joint Special Forces Command (COFS)
Army
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF regt (9th Assalto paracadutisti)
   1 STA regt
   1 ranger regt (4th Alpini paracadutisti)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 psyops regt
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 spec ops hel regt

Navy (COMSUBIN)
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF gp (GOI)
   1 diving gp (GOS)

Air Force
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 wg (sqn) (17th Stormo Incursori)

Paramilitary
Carabinieri
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 spec ops gp (GIS)

Paramilitary 182,350
Carabinieri 103,750
The Carabinieri are organisationally under the MoD.
They are a separate service in the Italian Armed Forces as well as a police force with judicial competence

Mobile and Specialised Branch
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   1 (mobile) paramilitary div (1 bde (1st) with (1 horsed cav regt, 11 mobile bn); 1 bde (2nd) with (1 (1st) AB regt, 2 (7th & 13th) mobile regt))
HELICOPTER
   1 hel gp
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (T) 3 VCC-2
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PB 69
AIRCRAFT TPT Light: 1 P-180 Avanti
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 24 Bell 412 (AB-412)
   TPT Light 19 AW109

Customs 68,100
(Servizio Navale Guardia Di Finanza)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 179
   PCF 1 Antonio Zara
   PBF 146: 19 Bigliani; 24 Corrubia; 9 Mazzei; 62 V-2000; 32 V-5000/V-6000
   PB 32: 24 Buratti; 8 Meatini
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT AX 1 Giorgio Cini

Coast Guard 10,500
(Guardia Costiera - Capitanerie Di Porto)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 332
   PCO 3: 2 Dattilo; 1 Gregoretti
   PCC 32: 3 Diciotti; 1 Saettia; 22 200-class; 6 400-class
   PB 297: 21 300-class; 3 454-class; 72 500-class; 12 600-class; 47 700-class; 94 800-class; 48 2000-class
AIRCRAFT MP 6: 3 ATR-42 MP Surveyor, 1 P-180GC; 2 PL-166-DL3
HELICOPTERS MRH 11: 7 AW139; 4 Bell 412SP (AB-412SP Griffin)

Cyber
Overall responsibility for cyber security rests with the presidency of the Council of Ministers and the InterMinisterial Situation and Planning Group, which includes, among others, representatives from the defence, interior and foreign-affairs ministries. A Joint Integrated Concept on Computer Network Operations was approved in 2009 and, in 2014, a Joint Interagency Concept on Cyberwarfare. The National Strategic Framework for Cyberspace Security, released in 2013, says that the defence ministry `plans, executes and sustains Computer Network Operations (CNO) in the cyber domain in order to prevent, localize and defend (actively and in-depth), oppose and neutralise all threats and/or hostile actions in the cyber domain'.
Кибер
Общая ответственность за обеспечение кибербезопасности возложена на председателя Совета Министров и межведомственную группу по ситуациям и планированию, в состав которой входят, в частности, представители министерств обороны, внутренних дел и иностранных дел. В 2009 году была утверждена совместная комплексная концепция операций компьютерных сетей, а в 2014 году-совместная межведомственная концепция кибервойн. В национальной стратегической Рамочной программе по Киберпространственной безопасности, выпущенной в 2013 году, говорится, что Министерство обороны "планирует, выполняет и поддерживает операции компьютерной сети (CNO) в киберпространстве в целях предотвращения, локализации и защиты (активно и углубленно), противодействия и нейтрализации всех угроз и/или враждебных действий в киберпространстве".

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 1,037; 1 mtn inf bde HQ; 1 mtn inf regt(-); 1 hel regt(-); AW129 Mangusta; CH-47; NH90
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 1
BLACK SEA: NATO SNMCMG 2: 1 MHO
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 4; OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 6
BULGARIA: NATO Air Policing 4 Eurofighter Typhoon
DJIBOUTI: 90
EGYPT: MFO 75; 3 PB
GULF OF ADEN & INDIAN OCEAN: EU Operation Atalanta 1 DDGHM 122 THE MILITARY BALANCE 2018
INDIAN/PAKISTAN: UN UNMOGIP 2 obs
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve (Prima Parthica) 1,220; 1 inf regt; 1 trg unit; 1 hel sqn with 4 AW129 Mangusta; 4 NH90
KUWAIT: Operation Inherent Resolve (Prima Parthica) 280; 4 AMX; 2 MQ-9A Reaper; 1 KC-767A
LATVIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 160; 1 mech inf coy
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 1,077; 1 AB bde HQ; 1 mech inf bn; 1 engr coy; 1 sigs coy; 1 hel bn
LIBYA: Operation Ippocrate 300; 1 inf coy; 1 log unit; 1 fd hospital; UN UNSMIL 2 obs
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 9; UN MINUSMA 1
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: EU EU NAVFOR MED: 1 FFGHM
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 551; 1 inf BG HQ; 1 Carabinieri unit; OSCE Kosovo 11
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 112
TURKEY: NATO Operation Active Fence: 1 SAM bty with SAMP/T
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 19
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: 120; 1 tpt flt with 2 C-130J Hercules

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 12,050
   Army 4,400; 1 AB IBCT(-)
   Navy 3,600; 1 HQ (US Navy Europe (USNAVEUR)) at Naples; 1 HQ (6th Fleet) at Gaeta; 1 ASW Sqn with 4 P-8A Poseidon at Sigonella
   USAF 3,850; 1 ftr wg with 2 ftr sqn with 21 F-16C/D Fighting Falcon at Aviano
   USMC 200

   LATVIA
    []

Capabilities
Latvia's National Security Concept was revised in 2015, amid growing concerns over regional security. As with the other Baltic states, central to Latvia's security policy is membership of NATO. Like these countries and Poland, it also hosts a NATO battlegroup. The battlegroup, part of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence, deployed in June 2017 and was certified as fully operational two months later. Latvia is on course to meet the NATO target of spending 2% of GDP on defence in 2018. This was part of the country's 2018-20 medium-term budget framework, adopted by the government in October 2017. The defence ministry intends to improve combat readiness as well as the equipment inventory. It is acquiring second-hand M109 self-propelled artillery pieces from Austria and has selected the Stinger man-portable air-defence system. Latvian forces have deployed on a range of NATO operations and exercises, and EU civilian and military missions.
Потенциал
Концепция национальной безопасности Латвии была пересмотрена в 2015 году на фоне растущей обеспокоенности региональной безопасностью. Как и в других странах Балтии, центральное место в политике безопасности Латвии занимает членство в НАТО. Как и эти страны и Польша, он также принимает боевую группу НАТО. Боевая группа, часть расширенного передового присутствия НАТО, развернута в июне 2017 года и была сертифицирована как полностью действующая два месяца спустя. Латвия находится на пути к достижению цели НАТО затрат 2% ВВП на оборону в 2018 году. Это было частью среднесрочной бюджетной программы страны на 2018-20 годы, принятой правительством в октябре 2017 года. Министерство обороны намерено повысить боеготовность, а также инвентаризацию техники. Он приобретает подержанные самоходные артиллерийские орудия М109 из Австрии и выбрал переносную зенитную систему "Стингер". Латвийские силы развернуты на ряде операций и учений НАТО, а также гражданских и военных миссий ЕС.

ACTIVE 5,310 (Army 1,250 Navy 550 Air 310 Joint Staff 2,600 National Guard 600)
RESERVE 7,850 (National Guard 7,850)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Joint 2,600
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF unit
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MP bn
Army 1,250
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   1 inf bde (2 inf bn, 1 cbt spt bn HQ, 1 CSS bn HQ)

National Guard 600; 7,850 part-time (8,450 total)
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   11 inf bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty bn
   1 AD bn
   1 engr bn
   1 NBC bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   3 spt bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 3 T-55 (trg)
   RECCE 47+ FV107 Scimitar (incl variants)
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MANPATS Spike-LR
   RCL 84mm Carl Gustav; 90mm 130 Pvpj 1110
ARTILLERY 80
   SP 155mm 4 M109A5жE
   TOWED 100mm 23 K-53
   MOR 53: 81mm 28 L16; 120mm 25 M120

Navy 550 (incl Coast Guard)
Naval Forces Flotilla separated into an MCM squadron and a patrol-boat squadron. LVA, EST and LTU have set up a joint naval unit, BALTRON, with bases at Liepaja, Riga, Ventspils (LVA), Tallinn (EST), Klaipeda (LTU). Each nation contributes 1-2 MCMVs
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 5
   PB 5 Skrunda (GER Swath)
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 6
   MHO 5 Imanta (ex-NLD Alkmaar/Tripartite)
   MCCS 1 Vidar (ex-NOR)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 1
   AXL 1 Varonis (comd and spt ship, ex-NLD)

Coast Guard
Under command of the Latvian Naval Forces
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS
   PB 6: 1 Astra; 5 KBV 236 (ex-SWE)

Air Force 310
Main tasks are airspace control and defence, maritime and land SAR and air transportation
FORCES BY ROLE
TRANSPORT
   1 (mixed) tpt sqn with An-2 Colt; Mi-17 Hip H; PZL Mi-2 Hoplite
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD bn
   1 radar sqn (radar/air ctrl)
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 4 An-2 Colt
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 4 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT Light 2 PZL Mi-2 Hoplite
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence RBS-70
   GUNS TOWED 40mm 24 L/70

Paramilitary
State Border Guard
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS
   PB 3: 1 Valpas (ex-FIN); 1 Lokki (ex-FIN); 1 Randa

Cyber
The Cyber Security Strategy of Latvia was published in 2014. Latvia established a military CERT unit in early 2016. The unit cooperates closely with the national CERT, participates in international exercises and increases cyberdefence capabilities. A Cyber Defence Unit has been operational in the National Guard since 2014. Its main role is to ensure the formation of reserve cyber-defence capabilities, which could be used for both civil and military tasks.
Кибер
Стратегия кибербезопасности Латвии была опубликована в 2014 году. Латвия создала подразделение военного сертификата в начале 2016 года. Группа тесно сотрудничает с национальным сертификатом, участвует в международных учениях и наращивает потенциал киберзащиты. Подразделение киберзащиты действует в Национальной гвардии с 2014 года. Его основная роль заключается в обеспечении формирования резервных возможностей киберзащиты, которые могли бы использоваться как для гражданских, так и для военных задач.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 22
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 6
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 3; UN MINUSMA 2
NORTH SEA: NATO SNMCMG 1: 1 MCCS
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 4

FOREIGN FORCES
All NATO Enhanced Forward Presence unless stated
Albania 18; 1 EOD pl
Canada 450; 1 mech inf bn HQ; 1 mech inf coy(+)
Italy 160; 1 mech inf coy
Poland 160; 1 tk coy
Slovenia 50; 1 CBRN pl(+)
Spain 300; 1 armd inf coy(+)
United States Operation Atlantic Resolve: 1 tpt hel flt; 5 UH-60M Black Hawk

   LITHIANIA
    []

Capabilities
In January 2017, Lithuania adopted a new National Security Strategy (NSS) intended to reflect the worsening regional security environment. The NSS identified the main security threat as `posed by aggressive actions of the Russian Federation'. Sovereignty, territorial integrity and democratic constitutional order are the key tenets of the NSS. Given Lithuania's size and the scale of its armed forces, conventional deterrence and territorial defence are predicated on NATO membership. Lithuania, along with the two other Baltic states and Poland, now hosts a multinational NATO battlegroup as part of the Alliance's Enhanced Forward Presence. The country intends to spend a minimum of 2% of GDP on defence by 2018, with further increases to follow. Improved combat readiness and the exploration of `universal military service' were also included in the strategy. The country is purchasing the NASAMS medium-range surface-to-air missile system to improve its ground-based air defences. Like the other Baltic states, it is reliant on NATO's air-policing deployment for a combat-aircraft capacity.
Потенциал
В январе 2017 года Литва приняла новую Стратегию национальной безопасности (NSS), призванную отразить ухудшение обстановки в области региональной безопасности. NSS определила главную угрозу безопасности как "исходящую от агрессивных действий Российской Федерации". Суверенитет, территориальная целостность и демократический конституционный порядок являются ключевыми принципами NSS. Учитывая размеры Литвы и масштабы ее вооруженных сил, обычное сдерживание и территориальная оборона зависят от членства в НАТО. Литва, наряду с двумя другими государствами Балтии и Польшей, в настоящее время принимает многонациональную боевую группу НАТО в рамках расширенного передового присутствия альянса. Страна намерена потратить минимум 2% ВВП на оборону к 2018 году, с последующим увеличением. В стратегию также были включены повышение боевой готовности и изучение "всеобщей воинской повинности". Страна закупает ракетный комплекс средней дальности NASAMS класса "земля-воздух" для совершенствования средств ПВО наземного базирования. Как и другие прибалтийские государства, она зависит от развертывания воздушной полиции НАТО в качестве боевого самолета.

ACTIVE 18,350 (Army 11,650 Navy 700 Air 1,100 Other 4,900) Paramilitary 11,300
Conscript liability 9 months
RESERVE 6,700 (Army 6,700)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 6,800; 4,850 active reserves (total 11,650)
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Mechanised
   1 (1st) mech bde (1 recce coy, 4 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn)
Light
   1 (2nd) mot inf bde (2 mot inf bn, 1 arty bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 engr bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 trg regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (T) 238: 234 M113A1; 4 M577 (CP)
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 8 MT-LB
   ARV 6: 2 BPz-2; 4 M113
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL
   SP 10 M1025A2 HMMWV with FGM-148 Javelin
   MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin
   RCL 84mm Carl Gustav
ARTILLERY 52
   SP 4 PzH 2000
   TOWED 105mm 18 M101
   MOR 120mm 30: 5 2B11; 10 M/41D; 15 M113 with Tampella
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence GROM

Reserves
National Defence Voluntary Forces 4,850 active reservists
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   6 (territorial) def unit

Navy 680
LVA, EST and LTU established a joint naval unit, BALTRON, with bases at Liepaja, Riga, Ventpils (LVA), Tallinn (EST), Klaipeda (LTU)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 4
   PCC 4 Zemaitis (ex-DNK Flyvefisken) with 1 76mm gun
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 4
   MHC 3: 1 Suduvis (ex-GER Lindau); 2 Skulvis (ex-UK Hunt)
   MCCS 1 Jotvingis (ex-NOR Vidar)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT AAR 1 Šakiai

Air Force 1,100
Flying hours 120 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   TPT 5: Medium 3 C-27J Spartan; Light 2 L-410 Turbolet
   TRG 1 L-39ZA Albatros
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 3 AS365M3 Dauphin (SAR)
   TPT Medium 3 Mi-8 Hip (tpt/SAR)
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger; RBS-70

Special Operation Force
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF gp (1 CT unit; 1 Jaeger bn, 1 cbt diver unit)
Logistics Support Command 1,400
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log bn

Training and Doctrine Command 900
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 trg regt
Other Units 1,900
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MP bn

Paramilitary 11,300
Riflemen Union 7,800
State Border Guard Service 3,500
Ministry of Interior
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PB 3: 1 Lokki (ex-FIN); 1 KBV 041 (ex-SWE); 1 KBV 101 (ex-SWE)
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT UCAC 2 Christina (Griffon 2000)
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 1 Cessna 172RG
HELICOPTERS TPT Light 5: 1 BK-117 (SAR); 2 H120 Colibri; 2 H135

Cyber
A law on cyber security was adopted in December 2014. The Ministry of Defence (MoD) is the leading national authority on cyber-security policy formulation and implementation. The National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) under the MoD supports other national entities in their cyber-security activities by performing a wide range of functions, such as setting standards and regulations, performing network monitoring and penetration testing, tasking national entities to improve their cyber-security measures, assisting in cyber-incident detection and consequence management. A national cyber-incident management plan was approved by the government in January 2016; organisational and technical cyber-security requirements for critical information infrastructure and state-information resources were approved by the government in April 2016; and a cyber-incident management plan for critical information infrastructure was approved in July 2016. The 2016 Military Strategy says that the armed forces will focus on ensuring the reliability of command-and-control systems and investing in cyber-defence capabilities. The 2017 National Security Strategy states that Lithuania will continue to develop the NCSC.
Кибер
Был принят в декабре 2014 года закон о кибербезопасности. Министерство обороны (МО) является ведущим национальным органом по разработке и осуществлению политики в области кибербезопасности. Национальный центр кибербезопасности (NCSC) в рамках МО оказывает поддержку другим национальным структурам в их деятельности по кибербезопасности, выполняя широкий спектр функций, таких как установление стандартов и правил, проведение сетевого мониторинга и тестирования на проникновение, постановка задач национальным структурам по совершенствованию их мер кибербезопасности, оказание помощи в обнаружении кибер-инцидентов и управлении последствиями. Национальный план управления кибер-инцидентами был утвержден правительством в январе 2016 года; организационные и технические требования кибербезопасности для критической информационной инфраструктуры и государственных информационных ресурсов были утверждены правительством в апреле 2016 года; и план управления кибер-инцидентами для критической информационной инфраструктуры был утвержден в июле 2016 года. В военной стратегии 2016 года говорится, что Вооруженные силы будут сосредоточены на обеспечении надежности систем командования и управления и инвестировании в возможности киберзащиты. В Стратегии национальной безопасности на 2017 год говорится, что Литва продолжит развивать NCSC.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 29
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 1
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 2; UN MINUSMA 5; 1 obs
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 1
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 3; JMTG-U 16

FOREIGN FORCES
All NATO Enhanced Forward Presence unless stated
Belgium 100; 1 tpt coy
Germany 450; 1 armd inf bn HQ; 1 armd inf coy(+)
Netherlands 250; 1 armd inf coy
Norway 200; 1 armd coy
United States NATO Baltic Air Policing 4 F-15C Eagle

   LUXEMBOURG
    []

Capabilities
Luxembourg maintains limited military capabilities in order to participate in European collective security and crisis management. It has contributed troops to the multinational battlegroup in Lithuania as part of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence. It is also part of the European Multi-Role Tanker Transport Fleet programme, part funding one A330 MRTT. Delivery of an A400M medium strategic-transport aircraft is expected in 2018-19. Personnel are embedded within European military headquarters and take part in the EU training mission in Mali. Luxembourg contributes a contractor-operated maritime-patrol aircraft to the EU counter-human-trafficking operation in the Mediterranean. The Belgian and Dutch air forces are responsible for policing Luxembourg's airspace.
Потенциал
Люксембург поддерживает ограниченный военный потенциал для участия в европейской коллективной безопасности и управления кризисами. Он предоставил войска многонациональной боевой группе в Литве в рамках расширенного передового присутствия НАТО. Он также является частью европейской многоцелевой программы танкерного транспортного флота, частично финансирующей один А330 MRTT. Поставка среднего стратегически-транспортного самолета А400М ожидается в 2018-19 годах. Персонал размещен в европейском военном штабе и принимает участие в учебной миссии ЕС в Мали. Люксембург предоставляет самолет морского патрулирования, эксплуатируемый подрядчиком, для проведения операции ЕС по борьбе с торговлей людьми в Средиземноморье. Ответственность за охрану воздушного пространства Люксембурга несут Военно-воздушные силы Бельгии и Нидерландов.

ACTIVE 900 (Army 900) Paramilitary 600

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 900
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   2 recce coy (1 to Eurocorps/BEL div, 1 to NATO pool of deployable forces)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   AUV 48 Dingo 2
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS TOW
ARTILLERY MOR 81mm 6
Paramilitary 600
Gendarmerie 600

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 1
LITHUANIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 22; 1 tpt pl
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 2
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: EU EUNAVFOR MED 2 Merlin IIIC (leased)
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 23

   MACEDONIA
    []

Capabilities
The small army-focused joint force has modest maritime and air wings, and the forces rely on ageing Soviet-era equipment. A 2014-23 modernisation plan is intended to reform the armed forces and update equipment to NATO standards, but to date progress has been limited. NATO's Membership Action Plan was joined in 1999 and in 2017 the country became part of the NATO Program for the Advancement of Defence Education. FYR Macedonia continues to deploy personnel to Operation Resolute Support in Afghanistan. The country hosts the Balkan Medical Task Force Headquarters and has been chosen to host SEEBRIG headquarters in 2020-26. Exercises regularly take place with regional states and the US.
Потенциал
Небольшие совместные силы, сосредоточенные на армии, имеют скромные морские и воздушные крылья, и силы полагаются на устаревшую технику советской эпохи. План модернизации на 2014-23 годы направлен на реформирование Вооруженных сил и обновление техники до стандартов НАТО, но на сегодняшний день прогресс ограничен. План действий по членству в НАТО был принят в 1999 году, а в 2017 году страна стала частью программы НАТО по развитию оборонного образования. FYR Македония продолжает развертывание персонала для операции "Решительная поддержка" в Афганистане. В стране находится штаб-квартира Балканской медицинской целевой группы и была выбрана для размещения штаба SEEBRIG в 2020-26 годах. Учения регулярно проводятся с государствами региона и США.

ACTIVE 8,000 (Army 8,000) Paramilitary 7,600
RESERVE 4,850

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 8,000
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF regt (1 SF bn, 1 Ranger bn)
MANOEUVRE
Mechanised
   1 mech inf bde (1 tk bn, 4 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 engr bn, 1 NBC coy)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MP bn
   1 sigs bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log bde (3 log bn)

Reserves
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE Light
   1 inf bde

EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 31 T-72A
   RECCE 10 BRDM-2
   IFV 11: 10 BMP-2; 1 BMP-2K (CP)
   APC 202
   APC (T) 47: 9 Leonidas; 28 M113; 10 MT-LB
   APC (W) 155: 57 BTR-70; 12 BTR-80; 2 Cobra; 84 TM-170 Hermelin
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Milan
   RCL 57mm; 82mm M60A
ARTILLERY 126
   TOWED 70: 105mm 14 M-56; 122mm 56 M-30 M-1938
   MRL 17: 122mm 6 BM-21; 128mm 11
   MOR 39: 120mm 39

Marine Wing
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PB 2 Botica

Aviation Brigade
FORCES BY ROLE
TRAINING
   1 flt with Z-242; Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois)
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-24K Hind G2; Mi-24V Hind E
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-8MTV Hip; Mi-17 Hip H
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   TPT Light 1 An-2 Colt
   TRG 5 Z-242
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 4 Mi-24V Hind E (10: 2 Mi-24K Hind G2; 8 Mi-24V Hind E in store)
   MRH 6: 4 Mi-8MTV Hip; 2 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT Light 2 Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois)
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence 8 9K35 Strela-10 (SA-13 Gopher); 9K310 Igla-1 (SA-16 Gimlet)
   GUNS 40mm 36 L20

Paramilitary
Police 7,600 (some 5,000 armed) incl 2 SF units
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC
   APC (T) M113
   APC (W) BTR-80; TM-170 Heimlin
   AUV Ze'ev
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 1 Bell 412EP Twin Huey
   TPT Light 2: 1 Bell 206B (AB-206B) Jet Ranger II; 1 Bell 212 (AB-212)

DEPLOYMENT
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 2
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 3; OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 1
SERBIA: OSCE Kosovo 14
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 24

   MALTA
    []

Capabilities
The armed forces consist of a limited number of army personnel supported by small naval and air units. Principal roles are external security, civil-emergency support and support to the police in certain areas. Defence-spending growth has been modest; however, the European Internal Security Fund is funding some modernisation. With the addition of a third King Air maritime-patrol aircraft, Malta can now reportedly ensure a continuous presence in its airspace. The country participates in various European training missions as well as the EUNAVFOR- MED mission. The government has announced a modest increase in personnel and intends to increase reservist numbers.
Потенциал
Вооруженные силы состоят из ограниченного числа военнослужащих при поддержке небольших военно-морских и воздушных подразделений. Основные функции заключаются в обеспечении внешней безопасности, оказании поддержки в чрезвычайных ситуациях гражданского характера и оказании поддержки полиции в определенных областях. Рост оборонных расходов был скромным, однако Европейский фонд внутренней безопасности финансирует некоторую модернизацию. С добавлением третьего самолета Военно-морского патрулирования компании "Кинг Эйр" Мальта теперь, как сообщается, может обеспечить постоянное присутствие в своем воздушном пространстве. Страна участвует в различных европейских учебных миссиях, а также в миссии EUNAVFOR- MED. Правительство объявило о незначительном увеличении численности личного состава и намерено увеличить численность резервистов.

ACTIVE 1,950 (Armed Forces 1,950)
RESERVE 180 (Emergency Volunteer Reserve Force 120 Individual Reserve 60)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Armed Forces of Malta 1,950
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF unit
MANOEUVRE
Light
   1 (1st) inf regt (3 inf coy, 1 cbt spt coy)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 (3rd) cbt spt regt (1 cbt engr sqn, 1 EOD sqn, 1 maint sqn)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 (4th) CSS regt (1 CIS coy, 1 sy coy)

Maritime Squadron
Organised into 5 divisions: offshore patrol; inshore patrol; rapid deployment and training; marine engineering; and logistics
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 8
   PCO 1 Emer
   PCC 1 Diciotti
   PB 6: 4 Austal 21m; 2 Marine Protector
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 2
AAR 2 Cantieri Vittoria

Air Wing
   1 base party. 1 flt ops div; 1 maint div; 1 integrated log div;
   1 rescue section
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   TPT Light 5: 3 Beech 200 King Air (maritime patrol); 2 BN-2B Islander
   TRG 3 Bulldog T MK1
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 6: 3 AW139 (SAR); 3 SA316B Alouette III

   MONTENRGRO
    []

Capabilities
Montenegro joined NATO in 2017. The country's armed forces are small and primarily organised around the army, with few air and naval assets. The force is supported by a significant paramilitary organisation. Capability remains focused on internal security and limited support to international peacekeeping. Montenegrin forces have deployed to Afghanistan with NATO, affording them valuable experience. Reform and professionalisation of the armed forces has been slow, with only a limited portion of the defence budget spent on modernisation. Podgorica intends to replace its ageing Soviet-era equipment and procurement priorities include light and medium helicopters and light armoured vehicles. NATO's latest Trust Fund Project in Montenegro opened in February 2017 and is expected to support the demilitarisation of more than 400 tonnes of surplus ammunition. The country's defence industry has sold large numbers of surplus small arms and anti-tank weapons abroad. In 2017, Podgorica signed a defence bilateral cooperation plan with Poland, France and Slovenia as well as a memorandum of understanding with the UK. Montenegro has deepened ties with NATO partners and neighbours, including Croatia, Germany, Serbia, Slovenia and the US, through extensive exercises.
Потенциал
Черногория вступила в НАТО в 2017 году. Вооруженные силы страны малочисленны и в основном организованы вокруг армии, с небольшим количеством воздушных и морских средств. Силы поддерживаются значительной военизированной организацией. Потенциал по-прежнему сосредоточен на внутренней безопасности и ограниченной поддержке международного миротворчества. Черногорские силы развернуты в Афганистане совместно с НАТО, что дает им ценный опыт. Реформа и профессионализация вооруженных сил идет медленно, и лишь ограниченная часть оборонного бюджета расходуется на модернизацию. Подгорица намерена заменить устаревшее советское оборудование, и в число приоритетов закупок входят легкие и средние вертолеты и легкая бронетехника. Последний проект Целевого фонда НАТО в Черногории открылся в феврале 2017 года и, как ожидается, будет способствовать демилитаризации более 400 тонн избыточных боеприпасов. Оборонная промышленность страны продала большое количество излишков стрелкового оружия и противотанковых вооружений за рубеж. В 2017 году Подгорица подписала план двустороннего сотрудничества в области обороны с Польшей, Францией и Словенией, а также меморандум о взаимопонимании с Великобританией. Черногория углубила связи с партнерами и соседями по НАТО, включая Хорватию, Германию, Сербию, Словению и США, путем проведения обширных учений.

ACTIVE 1,950 (Army 875 Navy 350 Air Force 225 Other 500) Paramilitary 10,100

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 875
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   1 recce coy
Light
   1 mot inf bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MP coy
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 8 BOV-VP M-86
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   SP 9 BOV-1
   MSL MANPATS 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot); 9K111-1 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel)
ARTILLERY 135
   TOWED 122mm 12 D-30
   MRL 128mm 18 M-63/M-94 Plamen
   MOR 105: 82mm 73; 120mm 32

Navy 350
1 Naval Cmd HQ with 4 operational naval units (patrol boat; coastal surveillance; maritime detachment; and SAR) with additional sigs, log and trg units with a separate coastguard element. Some listed units are in the process of decommissioning
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 5
   PSO 1 Kotor with 1 twin 76mm gun (1 further vessel in reserve)
   PCFG 2 Rade Konsar? (of which 1 in refit) with 2 single lnchr with P-15 Termit (SS-N-2B Styx) AShM (missiles disarmed)
   PB 2 Mirna (Type-140) (Police units)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 1
   AXS 1 Jadran?

Air Force 225
Golubovci (Podgorica) air base under army command
FORCES BY ROLE
TRAINING
   1 (mixed) sqn with G-4 Super Galeb; Utva-75 (none operational)
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with SA341/SA342L Gazelle
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT TRG (4 G-4 Super Galeb non-operational; 4 Utva-75 non-operational)
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 13 SA341/SA342L (HN-45M) Gazelle

Paramilitary ~10,100
Montenegrin Ministry of Interior Personnel ~6,000
Special Police Units ~4,100

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 18
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 1
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 1
SERBIA: OSCE Kosovo 1
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 2
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 2 obs


   MULTINATIONAL ORGANISATION

Capabilities
The following represent shared capabilities held by contributors collectively rather than as part of national inventories.
Потенциал
Нижеследующее представляет собой общие возможности, которыми располагают вкладчики коллективно, а не в рамках национальных кадастров.

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

NATO AEW&C Force
Based at Geilenkirchen (GER). 12 original participating countries (BEL, CAN, DNK, GER, GRC, ITA, NLD, NOR, PRT, TUR, USA) have been subsequently joined by 5 more (CZE, ESP, HUN, POL, ROM).
FORCES BY ROLE
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   1 sqn with B-757 (trg); E-3A Sentry (NATO standard)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   AEW&C 16 E-3A Sentry (NATO standard)
   TPT PAX 1 B-757 (trg)
Strategic Airlift Capability
Heavy Airlift Wing based at Papa air base (HUN). 12 participating countries (BLG, EST, FIN, HUN, LTU, NLD, NOR, POL, ROM, SVN, SWE, USA)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT TPT Heavy 3 C-17A Globemaster III
Strategic Airlift Interim Solution
Intended to provide strategic-airlift capacity pending the delivery of A400M aircraft by leasing An-124s. 14 participating countries (BEL, CZE, FIN, FRA, GER, GRC, HUN, LUX, NOR, POL, SVK, SVN, SWE, UK)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT TPT Heavy 2 An-124-100 (4 more available on 6-9 days' notice)

   NETHERLANDS
    []

Capabilities
Dutch defence documents reflect concern over the security situation in Europe's east and south. Defence tasks include securing the integrity of Dutch territory and society; international stability and security in Europe's periphery; and security of supply routes, both physical and technological. Dutch forces are well trained and fully professional, but improving readiness is a key concern and priority will be given to those formations needed for deployments, including rapid-reaction units. Improvements are planned to enabling capabilities such as intelligence, including MALE UAVs, command and control, and strategic transport. The Netherlands makes significant contributions to NATO and EU military operations and its forces have become more integrated with their NATO allies, particularly Belgium and Germany. There are air-policing agreements with France, Belgium and Luxembourg. Elements of the army are increasingly cooperating with the Bundeswehr, and its 43rd mechanised brigade and airmobile brigade are associated with host German divisions. Defence-budget cuts have been arrested and increased allocations will allow for the consolidation of rapid-reaction and expeditionary capabilities. The Netherlands is part of the EDA's MMF project, which is acquiring seven A330 tankers for NATO use. There is a small defence industry. DutchAero, a subsidiary of KMWE, agreed with Pratt and Whitney in January 2016 to manufacture engine components for the F-35, while the country also worked with Germany on the Fennek and Boxer armoured vehicles. The army continues to replace a proportion of its tracked armoured vehicles with wheeled platforms.
Потенциал
Голландские оборонные документы отражают обеспокоенность положением в области безопасности на востоке и юге Европы. Оборонные задачи включают обеспечение целостности голландской территории и общества; международную стабильность и безопасность на периферии Европы; и безопасность маршрутов поставок, как физических, так и технических. Голландские силы хорошо подготовлены и полностью профессиональны, но повышение готовности является одной из ключевых задач, и приоритет будет отдаваться тем формированиям, которые необходимы для развертывания, включая подразделения быстрого реагирования. Планируется усовершенствовать такие возможности, как разведка, включая беспилотные летательные аппараты, командование и управление, а также стратегический транспорт. Нидерланды вносят значительный вклад в военные операции НАТО и ЕС, и их силы стали более интегрированными со своими союзниками по НАТО, в частности Бельгией и Германией. Существуют соглашения о воздушной полиции с Францией, Бельгией и Люксембургом. Элементы армии все больше сотрудничают с Бундесвером, а ее 43-я механизированная бригада и аэромобильная бригада связаны с принимающими немецкими дивизиями. Сокращение оборонного бюджета было приостановлено, и увеличение ассигнований позволит укрепить потенциал быстрого реагирования и экспедиционный потенциал. Нидерланды являются частью проекта EDA MMF, который приобретает семь танкеров A330 для использования НАТО. Есть небольшая оборонная промышленность. Dutchaero, дочерняя компания KMWE, договорилась с Pratt and Whitney в январе 2016 года о производстве компонентов двигателя для F-35, в то время как страна также работала с Германией над бронетехникой Fennek и Boxer. Армия продолжает заменять часть своей гусеничной бронетехники колесной.

ACTIVE 35,410 (Army 18,860 Navy 8,500 Air 8,050) Military Constabulary 5,900
RESERVE 4,500 (Army 4,000 Navy 80 Air 420) Military Constabulary 160
Reserve liability to age 35 for soldiers/sailors, 40 for NCOs, 45 for officers

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 18,860
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   elm 1 (1 GNC) corps HQ
SPECIAL FORCES
   4 SF coy
MANOEUVRE Reconnaissance
   1 ISR bn (2 armd recce sqn, 1 EW coy, 2 int sqn, 1 UAV bty)
Mechanised
   1 (43rd) mech bde (1 armd recce sqn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 engr bn, 1 maint coy, 1 med coy)
   1 (13th) lt mech bde (1 recce sqn, 2 lt mech inf bn, 1 engr bn, 1 maint coy, 1 med coy)
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (11th) air mob bde (3 air mob inf bn, 1 engr coy, 1 med coy, 1 supply coy, 1 maint coy)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 SP arty bn (3 SP arty bty)
   1 AD comd (1 AD sqn; 1 AD bty)
   1 CIMIC bn
   1 engr bn
   2 EOD coy 1 (CIS) sigs bn 1 CBRN coy
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 med bn
   5 fd hospital
   3 maint coy
   2 tpt bn

Reserves 2,700 reservists
National Command
Cadre bde and corps tps completed by call-up of reservists (incl Territorial Comd)
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   3 inf bn (could be mobilised for territorial def)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   RECCE 196 Fennek
   IFV 170 CV9035N
   APC APC (W) 143 Boxer (8 driver trg; 52 amb; 60 CP; 23 log)
   AUV 60 Bushmaster IMV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 60: 50 Boxer; 10 Kodiak
   ARV 25 BPz-3 Buffel
   VLB 13 Leopard 1
   MW Bozena
   NBC VEHICLES 6 TPz-1 Fuchs NBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP 40 Fennek MRAT
   MANPATS Spike-MR (Gil)
ARTILLERY 119:
   SP 155mm 18 PzH 2000
   MOR 101: 81mm 83 L16/M1; 120mm 18 Brandt
RADAR LAND 6+: 6 AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder (arty, mor); WALS; 10 Squire
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Long-range 20 MIM-104D/F Patriot PAC-2 GEM/PAC-3 (TMD capable)
   Short-range 6 NASAMS II
   Point-defence 18+: FIM-92 Stinger; 18 Fennek with FIM-92 Stinger

Navy 8,500 (incl Marines)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 4:
   4 Walrus with 4 single 533mm TT with Mk48 Sea Arrow HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 6
DESTROYERS DDGHM 4:
   3 De Zeven ProvinciКn with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84F Harpoon AShM, 1 40-cell Mk41 VLS with SM-2MR/ESSM SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Goalkeeper CIWS, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 NH90 hel)
   1 Zeven ProvinciКn with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84F Harpoon AShM, 1 40-cell Mk41 VLS with SM-2MR/ESSM SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 2 Goalkeeper CIWS, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 NH90 hel)
FRIGATES FFGHM 2:
   2 Karel Doorman with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 16-cell Mk48 VLS with RIM-7P Sea Sparrow SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Goalkeeper CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 NH90 hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS
   PSOH 4 Holland with 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 NH90 hel)
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES
   MHO 6 Alkmaar (Tripartite)
AMPHIBIOUS
PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS LPD 2:
   1 Rotterdam with 2 Goalkeeper CIWS (capacity 6 NH90/AS532 Cougar hel; either 6 LCVP or 2 LCU and 3 LCVP; either 170 APC or 33 MBT; 538 troops)
   1 Johan de Witt with 2 Goalkeeper CIWS (capacity 6 NH90 hel or 4 AS532 Cougar hel; either 6 LCVP or 2 LCU and 3 LCVP; either 170 APC or 33 MBT;
   700 troops)
LANDING CRAFT 17
   LCU 5 Mk9
   LCVP 12 Mk5
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 8
   AFSH 1 Karel Doorman with 2 Goalkeeper CIWS (capacity 6 NH90/AS532 Cougar or 2 CH-47F Chinook hel; 2 LCVP)
   AGS 2 Snellius
   AK 1 Pelikaan
   AOT 1 Patria
   AS 1 Mercuur
   AXL 1 Van Kingsbergen
   AXS 1 Urania

Marines 2,650
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF gp (1 SF sqn, 1 CT sqn)
MANOEUVRE
Amphibious
   2 mne bn
   1 amph aslt gp
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 spt gp (coy)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (T) 160: 87 Bv-206D; 73 BvS-10 Viking
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 4 BvS-10; 4 Leopard 1
MED 4 BvS-10
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike-MR (Gil)
ARTILLERY MOR 81mm 12 L16/M1
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger

Air Force 8,050
Flying hours 180 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE/SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with NH90 NFH
TANKER/TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-130H/H-30 Hercules
   1 sqn with KDC-10; Gulfstream IV
TRAINING
   1 OEU sqn with F-35A Lightning II
   1 sqn with PC-7 Turbo Trainer
   1 hel sqn with AH-64D Apache; CH-47D Chinook (based at Fort Hood, TX)
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with AH-64D Apache
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with AS532U2 Cougar II
   1 sqn with CH-47D/F Chinook
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 63 combat capable
   FTR 61 F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
   FGA 2 F-35A Lightning II (in test)
   TKR 2 KDC-10
   TPT 5: Medium 4: 2 C-130H Hercules; 2 C-130H-30 Hercules; PAX 1 Gulfstream IV
   TRG 13 PC-7 Turbo Trainer
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 28 AH-64D Apache
   ASW 12 NH90 NFH
   TPT 33: Heavy 17: 11 CH-47D Chinook; 6 CH-47F Chinook;
Medium 8 AS532U2 Cougar II, 8 NH90 TTH
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L/M Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; ARH AIM-120B AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-114K Hellfire; AGM-65D/G Maverick
BOMBS
   Laser-guided GBU-10/GBU-12 Paveway II; GBU-24 Paveway III (all supported by LANTIRN)
   INS/GPS guided GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb

Paramilitary
Royal Military Constabulary 5,900
Subordinate to the Ministry of Defence, but performs most of its work under the authority of other ministries
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   5 paramilitary district (total: 28 paramilitary unit)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 24 YPR-KMar

Cyber
The Defence Cyber Strategy was updated in early 2015. A Defence Cyber Command (DCC) was launched in September 2014 and became operational in early 2017. The DCC is situated in the army, but comprises personnel from all the armed services. An announcement from the Ministry of Defence in November 2016 stated the DCC had an offensive and defensive mandate, though it had not yet performed any offensive operations. According to the defence ministry, `the armed forces can attack, manipulate and disable the digital systems of opponents. Potential opponents might be other states, terrorist or other organisations, or hackers.' A Joint SIGINT Cyber Unit was stood up in 2014 under the General Intelligence and Security Service and the Dutch Military Intelligence and Security Service. A defence cyber doctrine is under development.
Кибер
Киберстратегия обороны была обновлена в начале 2015 года. Киберкомандование обороны (DCC) было запущено в сентябре 2014 года и начало функционировать в начале 2017 года. DCC находится в армии, но включает в себя персонал всех вооруженных сил. В заявлении Министерства обороны в ноябре 2016 года говорится, что DCC имеет наступательный и оборонительный мандат, хотя он еще не проводил никаких наступательных операций. По данным Минобороны, "вооруженные силы могут атаковать, манипулировать и выводить из строя цифровые системы противника. Потенциальными противниками могут быть другие государства, террористические или иные организации или хакеры". В 2014 году при Генеральной службе разведки и безопасности и Службе военной разведки и безопасности Нидерландов было создано совместное кибер подразделение SIGINT. Разрабатывается оборонная кибер доктрина.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 100
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 1
CARIBBEAN: 1 AFSH
GULF OF ADEN & INDIAN OCEAN: EU Operation Atalanta 1 LPD
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 150; 3 trg unit
JORDAN: Operation Inherent Resolve 35
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 1
LITHUANIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 250; 1 armd inf coy
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 1; UN MINUSMA 258; 1 SF coy
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 13 obs
NORTH SEA: NATO SNMCMG 1: 1 MHO
SERBIA: OSCE Kosovo 1
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 11
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 6
SYRIA/ISRAEL: UN UNDOF 2
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 4
UNITED STATES: 1 hel trg sqn with AH-64D Apache; CH-47D Chinook based at Fort Hood (TX)

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 410

   NORWAY
    []

Capabilities
Norway sustains small but well-equipped and highly trained armed forces. Territorial defence is at the heart of security policy. In June 2016, Norway published its Long Term Defence Plan, which stated that further adjustments to the armed forces were needed to address evolving security challenges at home and abroad. In October 2017, the defence ministry announced a NOK3 billion increase in defence spending and indicated that there would be a raft of measures to strengthen Norwegian capability in the High North, including a new Arctic Ranger company. Equipment recapitalisation is ongoing. Norway's first F-15A arrived in late 2017 and the government earlier announced that it would procure four submarines as part of a strategic partnership with Germany. The partnership also includes an agreement to cooperate on missiles. In March 2017, Norway ordered five P-8A Poseidon slated for delivery between 2022 and 2023. Large procurement items, such as the F-35A, the submarines and the P-8s, will stretch budgetary resources. According to the defence ministry, the F-35 alone will take up 35% of all procurement spending between 2017 and 2025. At any one time, around one-third of the country's troops are conscripts. In January 2015, Norwegian conscription became gender neutral. Around one-third of conscripts in the 2016 intake were female, with expectations that this will rise. A US Marine Corps contingent has been deployed to Vaernes, on a rotational basis, since January 2017. (See pp. 75-81.)
Потенциал
Норвегия располагает небольшими, но хорошо оснащенными и хорошо обученными вооруженными силами. В основе политики в области безопасности лежит территориальная оборона. В июне 2016 года Норвегия опубликовала свой долгосрочный план обороны, в котором говорилось о необходимости дальнейшей корректировки вооруженных сил для решения возникающих проблем безопасности в стране и за рубежом. В октябре 2017 года Министерство обороны объявило об увеличении оборонных расходов на 3 млрд норвежских крон и указало, что будет принят ряд мер по укреплению норвежского потенциала на Крайнем Севере, включая новую арктическую Рейнджерскую компанию. Продолжается рекапитализация вооружения. Первый F-15A Норвегии прибыл в конце 2017 года, и правительство ранее объявило, что оно закупит четыре подводные лодки в рамках стратегического партнерства с Германией. Партнерство также включает соглашение о сотрудничестве по ракетам. В марте 2017 года Норвегия заказала пять P-8A Poseidon, запланированных к поставке между 2022 и 2023 годами. Крупные закупки, такие как F-35A, подводные лодки и C-8, приведут к увеличению бюджетных ресурсов. По данным Министерства обороны, только F-35 займет 35% всех расходов на закупки в период с 2017 по 2025 год. В любой момент времени около трети военнослужащих страны являются призывниками. В январе 2015 года норвежская воинская повинность стала гендерно нейтральной. Около одной трети призывников в 2016 году были женщинами, с ожиданиями, что это возрастет. Контингент Корпуса морской пехоты США был развернут на Вернесе на ротационной основе с января 2017 года. (См. стр. 75-81.)

ACTIVE 23,950 (Army 9,350 Navy 4,300 Air 3,600 Central Support 6,150 Home Guard 550)
Conscript liability 18 months maximum. Conscripts first serve 12 months from 19-21, and then up to 4-5 refresher training periods until age 35, 44, 55 or 60 depending on rank and function. Active numbers include conscripts on initial service. Conscription was extended to women in 2015
RESERVE 38,590 (Army 270 Navy 320 Home Guard 38,000)
Readiness varies from a few hours to several days

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 4,350; 5,000 conscript (total 9,350)
The armoured infantry brigade - Brigade North - trains new personnel of all categories and provides units for international operations. At any time around one-third of the brigade will be trained and ready to conduct operations. The brigade includes one high-readiness armoured battalion (Telemark Battalion) with combat support and combat service support units on high readiness
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   1 (GSV) bn (1 (border) recce coy, 1 ranger coy, 1 spt coy, 1 trg coy)
Armoured
   1 armd inf bde (1 ISR bn, 2 armd bn, 1 lt inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 engr bn, 1 MP coy, 1 CIS bn, 1 spt bn, 1 med bn)
Light
   1 lt inf bn (His Majesty The King's Guards)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 36 Leopard 2A4 (16 more in store)
   RECCE 21 CV9030
   IFV 89: 74 CV9030N; 15 CV9030N (CP)
   APC 390
   APC (T) 315 M113 (incl variants)
   APC (W) 75 XA-186 Sisu/XA-200 Sisu
   AUV 20+: 20 Dingo 2; IVECO LMV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 28: 22 Alvis; 6 CV90 STING
   ARV 9+: 3 M88A1; M578; 6 Leopard 1
   VLB 35: 26 Leguan; 9 Leopard 1
   MW 9 910 MCV-2
   NBC VEHICLES 6 TPz-1 Fuchs NBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin
   RCL 84mm Carl Gustav
ARTILLERY 212
   SP 155mm 18 M109A3GN
   MOR 194: 81mm 150 L16; SP 81mm 20: 8 CV9030; 12 M125A2; SP 107mm 24 M106A1
RADAR LAND 12 ARTHUR

Navy 2,300; 2,000 conscripts (total 4,300)
Joint Command - Norwegian National Joint Headquarters. The Royal Norwegian Navy is organised into four elements under the command of the chief of staff of the Navy: the naval units (Kysteskadren), the schools (Sjoforsvarets Skoler), the naval bases and the coastguard (Kystvakten)
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   1 ISR coy (Coastal Rangers)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 EOD pl
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 6 Ula with 8 single 533mm TT with A3 Seal DM2 HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 5
DESTROYERS DDGHM 5 Fridtjof Nansen with Aegis C2 (mod), 2 quad lnchr with NSM AShM, 1 8-cell Mk41 VLS with ESSM SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Sting Ray LWT, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 NH90 hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 23:
   PSO 1 Harstad
   PCFG 6 Skjold with 8 single lnchr with NSM AShM, 1 76mm gun
   PBF 16 S90N (capacity 20 troops)
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 6:
   MSC 3 Alta with 1 twin Simbad lnchr with Mistral SAM
   MHC 3 Oksoy with 1 twin Simbad lnchr with Mistral SAM
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 7
   AGI 1 Marjata IV
   AGS 2: 1 HU Sverdrup II; 1 Marjata III with 1 hel landing platform
   ATS 1 Valkyrien
   AX 2 Kvarven
   AXL 1 Reine

Coast Guard
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 14
   PSOH 3 Nordkapp with 1 57mm gun (capacity 1 med TPT hel)
   PSO 4: 3 Barentshav; 1 Svalbard with 1 57mm gun, 1 hel landing platform
   PCC 5 Nornen
   PCO 2: 1 Aalesund; 1 Reine

Air Force 2,600 ; 1,000 conscript (total 3,600)
Joint Command - Norwegian National HQ Flying hours 180 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   2 sqn with F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
MARITIME PATROL
   1 sqn with P-3C Orion; P-3N Orion (pilot trg)
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   1 sqn with Falcon 20C (EW, Flight Inspection Service)
SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with Sea King Mk43B
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-130J-30 Hercules
TRAINING
   1 sqn with MFI-15 Safari
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with Bell 412SP Twin Huey
   1 sqn with NH90 (forming)
AIR DEFENCE
   1 bn with NASAMS II
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 73 combat capable
   FTR 67: 47 F-16AM Fighting Falcon; 10 F-16BM Fighting Falcon; 10 F-35A Lightning II (in test)
   ASW 6: 4 P-3C Orion; 2 P-3N Orion (pilot trg)
   EW 2 Falcon 20C
   TPT Medium 4 C-130J-30 Hercules
   TRG 16 MFI-15 Safari
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 8 NH90 NFH
   SAR 12 Sea King Mk43B
   MRH 18: 6 Bell 412HP; 12 Bell 412SP
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Short-range NASAMS II
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; IRIS-T; ARH AIM-120B AMRAAM; AIM-120C AMRAAM
BOMBS
   Laser-guided EGBU-12 Paveway II
   INS/GPS guided JDAM

Special Operations Command (NORSOCOM)
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 (armed forces) SF comd (2 SF gp)
   1 (navy) SF comd (1 SF gp)

Central Support, Administration and Command 5,550; 600 conscripts (total 6,150)
Central Support, Administration and Command includes military personnel in all joint elements and they are responsible for logistics and CIS in support of all forces in Norway and abroad

Home Guard 600 (45,000 reserves)
The Home Guard is a separate organisation, but closely cooperates with all services. The Home Guard can be mobilised on very short notice for local security operations

Land Home Guard 41,150 with reserves
11 Home Guard Districts with mobile Rapid Reaction Forces (3,000 troops in total) as well as reinforcements and follow-on forces (38,150 troops in total)

Naval Home Guard 1,900 with reserves
Consisting of Rapid Reaction Forces (500 troops), and 17 `Naval Home Guard Areas'. A number of civilian vessels can be requisitioned as required
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PB 11: 4 Harek; 2 Gyda; 5 Alusafe 1290

Air Home Guard 1,450 with reserves Provides force protection and security detachments for air bases

Cyber
The defence ministry is responsible for defending military networks and national coordination in armed conflict. The 2012 Cyber Security Strategy for Norway contained crossgovernmental guidelines for cyber defence. Norwegian Armed Forces Cyber Defence supports the armed forces with establishing, operating and protecting networks. It is responsible for defending military networks against cyber attack. It also supports the Norwegian Armed Forces at home and abroad with the establishment, operation, development and protection of communications systems, and is responsible for defending military networks against cyber attacks as well as developing network-based defence.
Кибер
Министерство обороны отвечает за защиту военных сетей и национальную координацию в вооруженном конфликте. Стратегия кибербезопасности Норвегии 2012 года содержала кросс-правительственные руководящие принципы киберзащиты. Норвежские вооруженные силы поддерживают вооруженные силы в создании, функционировании и защите сетей. Он отвечает за защиту военных сетей от кибератак. Он также оказывает поддержку норвежским Вооруженным силам в стране и за рубежом в создании, эксплуатации, развитии и защите систем связи и отвечает за защиту военных сетей от кибератак, а также за развитие сетевой обороны.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 50
EGYPT: MFO 3
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 60; 1 trg unit
JORDAN: Operation Inherent Resolve 60
LITHUANIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 200; 1 armd coy
MALI: UN MINUSMA 16
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 1: 1 DDGHM
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 13 obs
NORTH SEA: NATO SNMCMG 1: 1 MSC
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 2; OSCE Kosovo 1
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 15
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 17

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 330; 1 (USMC) MEU eqpt set; 1 (APS) 155mm SP Arty bn eqpt set

   POLAND
    []

Capabilities
Territorial defence and NATO membership are two central pillars of Poland's defence policy. A classified Strategic Defence Review was undertaken by the new government following the October 2015 elections. A summary of this was released in May 2017 as `The Defence Concept of the Republic of Poland'. The primary focus of the public document, covering the period 2017-32, is to prepare Poland's armed forces to provide a deterrent against Russian aggression. Russia is characterised as a direct threat to Poland and to a stable international order in general. The defence concept defines the ambition to restore divisions as tactical combat units, rather than administrative units. Poland is moving once again to a service command structure, assisted by a support inspectorate. Reforms of the defence-acquisition system are planned but a national armaments strategy is yet to be released. While observers expected a new Technical Modernization Programme (TMP) for 2017-26 to be released at the end of 2016, Poland has instead opted to revise plans for 2017-22 within the framework of the TMP 2013-22. In part, these revisions reflect delays caused by financial constraints, inefficiencies in the acquisition process and evolving requirements. Warsaw continues plans to strengthen its domestic defence-industrial base. Technology transfer and international partnering are seen as mechanisms to develop domestic industry, most of which is now consolidated in the government-owned holding company PGZ. Defence spending is planned to reach 2.5% of GDP by 2030. Poland intends to build up its own A2/AD capacity and in its 2017 Defence Concept expressed an interest in pursuing research in emerging technologies. Warsaw has also established a fund to bolster the defence-modernisation ambitions of neighbours under the Regional Security Assistance Programme. Recruitment for the first six brigades of a Territorial Defence Force is under way with the first volunteers completing basic training in May 2017. The full force is due to be established by 2019.
Потенциал
Территориальная оборона и членство в НАТО являются двумя центральными столпами оборонной политики Польши. После выборов в октябре 2015 года новое правительство провело секретный обзор стратегической обороны. Резюме этого было выпущено в мае 2017 года как "оборонная концепция Республики Польша". Основной целью публичного документа, охватывающего период 2017-32 гг., является подготовка Вооруженных сил Польши к обеспечению сдерживания российской агрессии. Россия характеризуется как прямая угроза Польше и стабильному международному порядку в целом. Концепция обороны определяет стремление к восстановлению дивизий как тактических боевых единиц, а не административных единиц. Польша вновь переходит к командно-служебной структуре при содействии инспектората поддержки. Планируется провести реформы системы оборонных закупок, однако Национальная стратегия в области вооружений еще не разработана. В то время как наблюдатели ожидали, что новая программа технической модернизации (TMP) на 2017-26 будет выпущена в конце 2016 года, Польша вместо этого решила пересмотреть планы на 2017-22 годы в рамках TMP 2013-22. Отчасти эти изменения отражают задержки, вызванные финансовыми трудностями, неэффективностью процесса закупок и меняющимися потребностями. Варшава продолжает планы по укреплению своей оборонно-промышленной базы. Передача технологий и международное партнерство рассматриваются как механизмы развития отечественной промышленности, большая часть которой в настоящее время консолидирована в государственном холдинге ПГЗ. Расходы на оборону планируетс довести до 2,5% ВВП к 2030 году. Польша намерена наращивать собственный потенциал A2/AD и в своей оборонной концепции 2017 года выразила заинтересованность в проведении исследований в новых технологиях. Варшава также учредила фонд для поддержки амбиций соседей в области модернизации обороны в рамках региональной программы помощи в области безопасности. Набор в первые шесть бригад сил территориальной обороны осуществляется с первыми добровольцами, завершающими базовую подготовку в мае 2017 года. Полные силы должны быть созданы к 2019 году.

ACTIVE 105,000 (Army 61,200 Navy 7,400 Air Force 18,700 Special Forces 3,400 Territorial 800 Joint 13,500) Paramilitary 73,400

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 61,200
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   elm 1 (MNC NE) corps HQ
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   3 recce regt
Armoured
   1 (11th) armd cav div (2 armd bde, 1 mech bde, 1 arty regt)
Mechanised
   1 (12th) div (2 mech bde, 1 (coastal) mech bde, 1 arty regt)
   1 (16th) div (2 armd bde, 2 mech bde, 1 arty regt)
   1 (21st) mech bde (1 armd bn, 3 mech bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bn, 1 engr bn)
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (6th) air aslt bde (3 air aslt bn)
   1 (25th) air cav bde (3 air cav bn, 2 tpt hel bn, 1 (casevac) med unit)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   2 engr regt
   1 ptn br regt
   2 chem regt
HELICOPTER
   1 (1st) hel bde (2 atk hel sqn with Mi-24D/V Hind D/E, 1 CSAR sqn with Mi-24V Hind E; PZL W-3PL Gluszec;
   2 ISR hel sqn with Mi-2URP; 2 hel sqn with Mi-2)
AIR DEFENCE
   3 AD regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 937: 142 Leopard 2A4; 105 Leopard 2A5; 232 PT-91 Twardy; 458 T-72/T-72M1D/T-72M1
   RECCE 407: 282 BRDM-2; 38 BWR; 87 WD R-5
   IFV 1,636: 1,277 BMP-1; 359 Rosomak IFV
   APC 249
   APC (W) 219: 211 Rosomak APC; 8 RAK (CP)
   PPV 30 Maxxpro
   AUV 85: 40 Cougar (on loan from US); 45 M-ATV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 17+: IWT; MT-LB; 17 Rosomak WRT
   ARV 56: 15 BPz-2; 15 MT-LB; 26 WZT-3M
   VLB 62: 4 Biber; 48 BLG67M2; 10 MS-20 Daglezja
   MW 18: 14 Bozena; 4 Kalina SUM
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS 9K11 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger); 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot); Spike-LR
ARTILLERY 807
   SP 427: 122mm 292 2S1 Gvozdika; 152mm 111 M-77 Dana;
155mm 24 Krab
   MRL 122mm 180: 75 BM-21; 30 RM-70; 75 WR-40 Langusta
   MOR 200: 98mm 89 M-98; 120mm 95 M120; SP 120mm 16 RAK-A
RADAR LAND 3 LIWIEC (veh, arty)
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 28 Mi-24D/V Hind D/E
   MRH 64: 7 Mi-8MT Hip; 3 Mi-17 Hip H; 1 Mi-17AE Hip (aeromedical); 5 Mi-17-1V Hip; 16 PZL Mi-2URP Hoplite; 24 PZL W-3W/WA Sokol;
   8 PZL W-3PL Gluszec (CSAR)
   TPT 34: Medium 9: 7 Mi-8T Hip; 2 PZL W-3AE Sokol (aeromedical); Light 25 PZL Mi-2 Hoplite
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Short-range 20 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful)
   Point-defence 64+: 9K32 Strela-2? (SA-7 Grail); 64 9K33 Osa-AK (SA-8 Gecko); GROM
   GUNS 352
   SP 23mm 28: 8 ZSU-23-4; 20 ZSU-23-4MP Biala
   TOWED 23mm 324; 252 ZU-23-2; 72 ZUR-23-2KG/PG

Navy 7,400
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL 5
   SSK 5:
   4 Sokol (ex-NOR Type-207) with 8 single 533mm TT
   1 Orzel (ex-FSU Kilo) with 6 single 533mm TT each with 53-65 HWT (currently non-operational; has been in refit since 2014; damaged by fire in 2017)
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 2
FRIGATES FFGHM 2 Pulaski (ex-US Oliver Hazard Perry) with 1 Mk13 GMLS with RGM-84D/F Harpoon AShM/SM-1MR SAM,
   2 triple 324mm ASTT with MU90 LWT, 1 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 SH-2G Super Seasprite ASW hel)
   (1 vessel used as training ship)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 4
   CORVETTES FSM 1 Kaszub with 2 quad lnchr with 9K32 Strela-2 (SA-N-5 Grail) SAM, 2 twin 533mm ASTT with SET-53 HWT,
   2 RBU 6000 Smerch 2 A/S mor, 1 76mm gun
   PCFGM 3:
   3 Orkan (ex-GDR Sassnitz) with 1 quad lnchr with RBS-15 Mk3 AShM, 1 quad lnchr (manual aiming) with Strela-2 (SA-N-5 Grail) SAM, 1 AK630 CIWS,
   1 76mm gun
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 21
   MCCS 1 Kontradmiral Xawery Czernicki
   MHO 3 Krogulec
   MSI 17: 1 Goplo; 12 Gardno; 4 Mamry
AMPHIBIOUS 8
LANDING SHIPS LSM 5 Lublin (capacity 9 tanks; 135 troops)
LANDING CRAFT LCU 3 Deba (capacity 50 troops)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 21
   AGI 2 Moma
   AGS 9: 2 Heweliusz; 4 Wildcat 40; 3 (coastal)
   AORL 1 Baltyk
   AOL 1 Moskit
   ARS 4: 2 Piast; 2 Zbyszko
   ATF 2
   AX 1 Wodnik with 1 twin AK230 CIWS
   AXS 1 Iskra
COASTAL DEFENCE AShM 6+: 6 NSM; MM40 Exocet
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Short-range Crotale NG/GR

Naval Aviation 1,300
FORCES BY ROLE
ANTI SUBMARINE WARFARE/SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with Mi-14PL Haze A; Mi-14PL/R Haze C
   1 sqn with PZL W-3RM Anakonda; SH-2G Super Seasprite
MARITIME PATROL
   1 sqn with An-28RM; An-28E
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with An-28TD; M-28B TD Bryza
   1 sqn with An-28TD; M-28B; Mi-17 Hip H; PZL Mi-2 Hoplite; PZL W-3T; 1 PZL W-3A
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   MP 10: 8 An-28RM Bryza; 2 An-28E Bryza
   TPT Light 4: 2 An-28TD Bryza; 2 M-28B TD Bryza
HELICOPTERS ASW 11: 7 Mi-14PL Haze; 4 SH-2G Super Seasprite
   MRH 1 Mi-17 Hip H
   SAR 8: 2 Mi-14PL/R Haze C; 4 PZL W-3RM Anakonda; 2 PZL W-3WA RM Anakonda
   TPT Light 7: 4 PZL Mi-2 Hoplite; 1 PZL W-3A; 2 PZLW-3T

Air Force 18,700
Flying hours 160-200 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   2 sqn with MiG-29A/UB Fulcrum
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with F-16C/D Block 52+ Fighting Falcon
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK/ISR
   2 sqn with Su-22M-4 Fitter
SEARCH AND RESCUE
   1 sqn with Mi-2; PZL W-3 Sokol
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-130E; PZL M-28 Bryza
   1 sqn with C-295M; PZL M-28 Bryza
TRAINING
   1 sqn with PZL-130 Orlik
   1 sqn with TS-11 Iskra
   1 hel sqn with SW-4 Puszczyk
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 (Spec Ops) sqn with Mi-17 Hip H
   1 (VIP) sqn with Mi-8; W-3WA Sokol
AIR DEFENCE
   1 bde with S-125 Neva SC (SA-3 Goa); S-200C Vega (SA-5 Gammon)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 99 combat capable
   FTR 33: 26 MiG-29A Fulcrum; 7 MiG-29UB Fulcrum
   FGA 66: 36 F-16C Block 52+ Fighting Falcon; 12 F-16D Block 52+ Fighting Falcon; 12 Su-22M-4 Fitter; 6 Su-22UM3K Fitter
   TPT 45: Medium 5 C-130E Hercules; Light 39: 16 C-295M; 23 M-28 Bryza TD; PAX 1 Gulfstream G550
   TRG 62: 2 M-346; 28 PZL-130 Orlik; 32 TS-11 Iskra
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 8 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT 69: Medium 29: 9 Mi-8 Hip; 10 PZL W-3 Sokol; 10 PZL W-3WA Sokol (VIP); Light 40: 16 PZL Mi-2 Hoplite; 24 SW-4 Puszczyk (trg)
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Long-range 1 S-200C Vega (SA-5 Gammon)
   Short-range 17 S-125 Neva SC (SA-3 Goa)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR R-60 (AA-8 Aphid); R-73 (AA-11 Archer); AIM-9 Sidewinder; R-27T (AA-10B Alamo); IIR AIM-9X Sidwinder II; ARH AIM-120C AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65J/G Maverick; Kh-25 (AS-10 Karen); Kh-29 (AS-14 Kedge); LACM Conventional AGM-158 JASSM

Special Forces 3,400
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   3 SF units (GROM, FORMOZA & cdo)
COMBAT SUPPORT/
   1 cbt spt unit (AGAT)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 spt unit (NIL)

Territorial Defence Forces 800
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   1 (1st) sy bde (2 sy bn)
   2 (2nd & 3rd) sy bde (1 sy bn)

Paramilitary 73,400
Border Guards 14,300
Ministry of Interior
Maritime Border Guard 3,700
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 18
   PCC 2 Kaper
   PBF 6: 2 Straznik; 4 IC16M
   PB 10: 2 Wisloka; 2 Baltic 24; 1 Project MI-6
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT UCAC 2 Griffon 2000TDX

Prevention Units (Police) 59,100
Anti-terrorist Operations Bureau n.k.
Ministry of Interior

Cyber
The National Security Bureau issued a cyber-security doctrine in January 2015. The doctrine specifies significant tasks needed in order to build national cyber-security capability. It was reported that the document noted the need to pursue `active cyber defence, including offensive actions in cyberspace, and maintaining readiness for cyberwar'. A draft version of a cyber-security strategy for 2018-22 emerged, noting the requirement for tools to enable military activities in cyberspace. The defence minister said in October 2017 that the defence ministry was to create `cyberspace forces', numbering around 1,000.
Кибер
В январе 2015 года Бюро национальной безопасности выпустило доктрину кибербезопасности. Доктрина определяет важные задачи, необходимые для создания национального потенциала кибербезопасности. Сообщалось, что в документе отмечается необходимость продолжения "активной киберзащиты, включая наступательные действия в киберпространстве, и поддержания готовности к кибервойне". Был разработан проект Стратегии кибербезопасности на 2018-22 годы, в котором отмечается потребность в средствах, позволяющих осуществлять военную деятельность в киберпространстве. В октябре 2017 года министр обороны заявил, что Министерство обороны должно создать "киберпространственные силы" численностью около 1000 человек.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 220; UN UNAMA 1 obs
ARMENIA/AZERBAIJAN: OSCE Minsk Conference 1
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 39
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 1
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 2 obs
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 60
KUWAIT: Operation Inherent Resolve 4 F-16C Fighting Falcon
LATVIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 160; 1 tk coy
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 240; 1 inf coy; UN UNMIK 1 obs
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 1 obs
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 35
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 1 obs

   PORTUGAL
    []

Capabilities
Principal roles for the armed forces include NATO, EU and UN operations, homeland defence and maritime security. Portugal's military-planning law for 2015-26 set key milestones for platform-acquisition and modernisation programmes. The plan envisages a reduction in army strength and the recalibration of the forces into `immediate reaction forces', `permanent forces for the defence of national sovereignty' and modular forces. Investment plans support Portugal's ambition to field rapid-reaction and maritime-surveillance capabilities for territorial defence and multinational operations. Army-upgrade plans include enhancing the electronic-warfare capacity, while in 2017, air defence was bolstered by government approval for the acquisition of the SHORAD missile system via the NATO Support and Procurement Agency. The navy intends to modernise its frigates and submarines and to acquire patrol vessels and a logistic-support vessel. The air force plans to modernise its remaining F-16s and its P-3C Orion maritime-patrol aircraft, replace its Alouette III helicopters and continue acquiring precision-guided munitions. In June 2017, Portugal began negotiations with Brazil's Embraer for the purchase of KC-390 tanker/ transport aircraft, with a planned initial operating capability in 2021.
Потенциал
Основные функции вооруженных сил включают операции НАТО, ЕС и ООН, национальную оборону и безопасность на море. Закон Португалии о военном планировании на 2015-26 годы установил ключевые вехи для программ приобретения и модернизации платформ. План предусматривает сокращение численности армии и ее перераспределение в "силы немедленного реагирования", "постоянные силы для защиты национального суверенитета" и модульные силы. Инвестиционные планы поддерживают стремление Португалии к созданию потенциала быстрого реагирования и морского наблюдения для целей территориальной обороны и многонациональных операций. Планы модернизации армии включают в себя укрепление потенциала в области радиоэлектронной борьбы, в то время как в 2017 году противовоздушная оборона была подкреплена правительственным разрешением на приобретение ракетной системы SHORAD через агентство поддержки и закупок НАТО. ВМС намерены модернизировать свои фрегаты и подводные лодки, приобрести патрульные суда и судно материально-технического обеспечения. ВВС планируют модернизировать оставшиеся F-16 и морской патрульный самолет P-3C Orion, заменить вертолеты Alouette III и продолжить приобретение высокоточных боеприпасов. В июне 2017 года Португалия начала переговоры с бразильским Embraer о покупке танкера KC-390 / транспортного самолета, с запланированной начальной эксплуатационной способностью в 2021 году.

ACTIVE 30,500 (Army 16,500 Navy 8,000 Air 6,000) Paramilitary 44,000
RESERVE 211,950 (Army 210,000 Navy 1,250, Air Force 700)
Reserve obligation to age 35

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 16,500
   5 territorial comd (2 mil region, 1 mil district, 2 mil zone)
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF bn
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 ISR bn
Mechanised
   1 mech bde (1 cav tp, 1 tk regt, 2 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bty, 1 engr coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 spt bn)
   1 (intervention) bde (1 cav tp, 1 recce regt, 2 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bty, 1 engr coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 spt bn)
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (rapid reaction) bde (1 cav tp, 1 cdo bn, 2 para bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bty, 1 engr coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 spt bn)
Other
   1 (Azores) inf gp (2 inf bn, 1 AD bty)
   1 (Madeira) inf gp (1 inf bn, 1 AD bty)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 STA bty
   1 engr bn
   1 EOD unit
   1 ptn br coy
   1 EW coy
   2 MP coy
   1 CBRN coy
   1 psyops unit
   1 CIMIC coy (joint)
   1 sigs bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 construction coy
   1 maint coy
   1 log coy
   1 tpt coy
   1 med unit
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD bn

Reserves 210,000
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   3 (territorial) def bde (on mobilisation)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 58: 37 Leopard 2A6; 21 M60A3 TTS
   RECCE 48: 14 V-150 Chaimite; 34 VBL
   IFV 22 Pandur II MK 30mm
   APC 416
   APC (T) 255: 173 M113A1; 33 M113A2; 49 M577A2 (CP)
   APC (W) 165: 21 V-200 Chaimite; 144 Pandur II (all variants)
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV M728
   ARV 13: 6 M88A1, 7 Pandur
   VLB M48
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL
   SP 20: 16 M113 with TOW; 4 M901 with TOW
   MANPATS Milan; TOW
   RCL 236: 84mm 162 Carl Gustav; 90mm 29 M67; 106mm 45 M40A1
ARTILLERY 323
   SP 155mm 24: 6 M109A2; 18 M109A5
   TOWED 65: 105mm 41: 17 L119 Light Gun; 21 M101A1; 3 Model 56 pack howitzer; 155mm 24 M114A1
   MOR 234: 81mm 143; SP 81mm 12: 2 M125A1; 10 M125A2; 107mm 11 M30; SP 107mm 18: 3 M106A1; 15 M106A2; 120mm 50 Tampella
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence 24+: 5 M48A2 Chaparral; 19 M48A3 Chaparral; FIM-92 Stinger
   GUNS TOWED 20mm 24 Rh 202

Navy 8,000 (incl 1,250 Marines)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 2 Tridente (GER Type-214) with 8 533mm TT with Black Shark HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 5
FRIGATES FFGHM 5:
   2 Bartolomeu Dias (ex-NLD Karel Doorman) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 16-cell Mk48 VLS with
   RIM-7M Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 Mk32 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Goalkeeper CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity: 1 Lynx Mk95 (Super Lynx) hel)
   3 Vasco Da Gama with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 octuple Mk 29 GMLS with RIM-7M Sea Sparrow SAM,
   2 Mk32 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 1 100mm gun (capacity 2 Lynx Mk95 (Super Lynx) hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 20
CORVETTES FS 3:
   1 Baptista de Andrade with 1 100mm gun, 1 hel landing platform
   2 Joao Coutinho with 1 twin 76mm gun, 1 hel landing platform
   PSO 2 Viana do Castelo with 1 hel landing platform
   PCC 3: 2 Cacine; 1 Tejo (ex-DNK Flyvisken)
   PBR 12: 2 Albatroz; 5 Argos; 4 Centauro; 1 Rio Minho
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 11
   AGS 4: 2 D Carlos I (ex-US Stalwart); 2 Andromeda
   AORL 1 Berrio (ex-UK Rover) with 1 hel landing platform (for medium hel)
   AXS 6: 1 Sagres; 1 Creoula; 1 Polar; 2 Belatrix; 1 Zarco

Marines 1,250
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF det
MANOEUVRE
Light
   2 lt inf bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 mor coy
   1 MP det
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARTILLERY MOR 120mm 30

Naval Aviation
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
HELICOPTERS ASW 5 Lynx Mk95 (Super Lynx)

Air Force 6,000
Flying hours 180 hrs/yr on F-16 Fighting Falcon
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   2 sqn with F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
MARITIME PATROL
   1 sqn with P-3C Orion
ISR/TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C295M
COMBAT SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with with AW101 Merlin
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with C-130H/C-130H-30 Hercules
   1 sqn with Falcon 50
TRAINING
   1 sqn with Alpha Jet*
   1 sqn with SA316 Alouette III
   1 sqn with TB-30 Epsilon
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 41 combat capable
   FTR 30: 26 F-16AM Fighting Falcon; 4 F-16BM Fighting Falcon
   ASW 5 P-3C Orion
   ISR: 7: 5 C295M (maritime surveillance), 2 C295M (photo recce)
   TPT 13: Medium 5: 2 C-130H Hercules; 3 C-130H-30 Hercules (tpt/SAR); Light 5 C295M; PAX 3 Falcon 50 (tpt/VIP)
   TRG 22: 6 Alpha Jet*; 16 TB-30 Epsilon
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 6 SA316 Alouette III (trg, utl)
   TPT Medium 12 AW101 Merlin (6 SAR, 4 CSAR, 2 fishery protection)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L/I Sidewinder; ARH AIM-120C AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65A Maverick; AShM AGM-84A Harpoon
BOMBS
   Laser-guided/GPS GBU-49 Enhanced Paveway II; INS/GPS guided GBU-31 JDAM

Paramilitary 44,000

National Republican Guard 22,400
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 32
   PBF 12
   PB 20
HELICOPTERS MRH 7 SA315 Lama

Public Security Police 21,600

Cyber
The 2013 Cyber Defence Policy Guidance established a national cyber-defence structure. Portugal released a National Cyberspace Security Strategy in 2015, which called for the country to develop a cyber-defence capacity and consolidate the role of the National Centre for Cyber Security. The strategic-military aspects of cyber defence are the responsibility of the Council of the Chiefs of Staff. A Center for Cyber Defence, under the Directorate of Communications and Information Systems of the General Staff, reached FOC in 2017. Cyber-defence units within the three branches of the armed forces are responsible for responding to cyber attacks.
Кибер
Руководство по политике киберзащиты 2013 года создало национальную структуру киберзащиты. В 2015 году Португалия опубликовала Национальную стратегию Киберпространственной безопасности, в которой содержится призыв к стране развивать потенциал киберзащиты и укреплять роль Национального центра кибербезопасности. За военно-стратегические аспекты киберзащиты отвечает Совет начальников штабов. Центр киберзащиты при дирекции связи и информационных систем Генерального штаба достиг FOC в 2017 году. Подразделения киберзащиты в трех подразделениях Вооруженных сил отвечают за реагирование на кибератаки.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 10; UN UNAMA 2 obs
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 11; UN MINUSCA 150; 1 cdo coy
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 31
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 11; UN MINUSMA 2
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: EU EUNAVFOR MED 1 SSK; NATO SNMG 1: 1 FFGHM
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 15; OSCE Kosovo 1
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 4
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 3

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 200; 1 spt facility at Lajes

   ROMANIA
    []

Capabilities
Romania intends to modernise its forces, with ageing Soviet-era equipment seen as a factor limiting its military capability. According to a government strategy approved in August 2017, Romania is to replace its MiG-21 fleet by 2020 and acquire new combat helicopters. The country is additionally seeking to procure corvettes, armoured vehicles and rocket artillery; the plan is to acquire US manufactured High Mobility Artillery Rocket Systems. Acquisition of the Patriot air-defence system was approved by the US State Department, and Romania signed a LoA with the US Army in November. The financing of ongoing projects and meeting critical procurement requirements are key components of the 2017-26 defence plan. The Supreme Defence Council pledged to spend 2% of GDP on defence. In 2017, Canada and the UK, in rotation, deployed forces to Romania as part of a NATO Air Policing Mission. The Aegis Ashore ballistic-missile-defence system was activated at the US Naval Support Facility Deveselu. It is expected to become fully operational in 2018. Romania's armed forces have traditionally been structured around territorial defence and support to NATO, contributing to missions in Afghanistan and Iraq during the last decade.
Потенциал
Румыния намерена модернизировать свои силы, причем устаревшее советское оборудование рассматривается в качестве фактора, ограничивающего ее военный потенциал. Согласно правительственной стратегии, утвержденной в августе 2017 года, Румыния должна заменить свой парк МиГ-21 к 2020 году и приобрести новые боевые вертолеты. Страна дополнительно стремится закупить корветы, бронетехнику и ракетную артиллерию; план заключается в приобретении произведенных нами Высокомобильных артиллерийских ракетных систем. Приобретение системы противовоздушной обороны Patriot было одобрено Госдепартаментом США, а Румыния подписала LoA с армией США в ноябре. Финансирование текущих проектов и удовлетворение важнейших потребностей в закупках являются ключевыми компонентами плана обороны на 2017-26 годы. Высший совет обороны обязался потратить на оборону 2% ВВП. В 2017 году Канада и Великобритания по очереди развернули силы в Румынии в рамках миссии воздушной полиции НАТО. Система противоракетной обороны Aegis была активирована на базе Военно-Морской поддержки США "Девеселу". Ожидается, что он начнет функционировать в полном объеме в 2018 году. Вооруженные силы Румынии традиционно строились вокруг территориальной обороны и поддержки НАТО, внося вклад в миссии в Афганистане и Ираке в течение последнего десятилетия.
  
ACTIVE 69,300 (Army 36,000 Navy 6,500 Air 10,300 Joint 16,500) Paramilitary 79,900
RESERVE 50,000 (Joint 50,000)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 36,000
Readiness is reported as 70-90% for NATO-designated forces (1 div HQ, 1 mech bde, 1 inf bde & 1 mtn inf bde) and 40-70% for other forces
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   2 div HQ (2nd & 4th)
   elm 1 div HQ (MND-SE)
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF bde (2 SF bn, 1 para bn, 1 log bn)
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 recce bde
   2 recce regt
Mechanised
   5 mech bde (1 tk bn, 2 mech inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bn, 1 log bn)
Light
   1 (MNB-SE) inf bde (3 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bn, 1 log bn)
   2 mtn inf bde (3 mtn inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 AD bn, 1 log bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MRL bde (3 MRL bn, 1 STA bn, 1 log bn)
   2 arty regt
   1 engr bde (4 engr bn, 1 ptn br bn, 1 log bn)
   2 engr bn
   3 sigs bn
   1 CIMIC bn
   1 MP bn
   3 CBRN bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   4 spt bn
AIR DEFENCE
   3 AD regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 460: 260 T-55; 42 TR-580; 104 TR-85; 54 TR-85 M1
   IFV 124: 23 MLI-84; 101 MLI-84 JDER
   APC 1,253
   APC (T) 76 MLVM
   APC (W) 643: 69 B33 TAB Zimbru; 31 Piranha III; 390 TAB-71; 153 TAB-77
   TYPE VARIANTS 474 APC
   PPV 60 Maxxpro
   AUV 377 TABC-79
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV 3 BPz-2
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL SP 134: 12 9P122 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger); 74 9P133 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger); 48 9P148 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel)
   GUNS
   SP 100mm 23 SU-100
   TOWED 100mm 222 M-1977
ARTILLERY 927
   SP 122mm 24: 6 2S1; 18 Model 89
   TOWED 449: 122mm 98 (M-30) M-1938 (A-19); 152mm 351: 247 M-1981; 104 M-1985
   MRL 122mm 188: 134 APR-40; 54 LAROM
   MOR 120mm 266 M-1982
RADARS LAND 9 SNAR-10 Big Fred
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Short-range 32 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful)
   GUNS 60
   SP 35mm 36 Gepard
   TOWED 35mm 24 GDF-203

Navy 6,600
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 3
DESTROYERS 3
   DDGH 1 Marasesti with 4 twin lnchr with P-15M Termit-M (SS-N-2C Styx) AShM, 2 triple 533mm ASTT with 53-65 HWT, 2 RBU 6000
   Smerch 2 A/S mor, 2 twin 76mm guns (capacity 2 SA-316 (IAR-316) Alouette III hel)
   DDH 2 Regele Ferdinand (ex-UK Type-22), with 2 triple 324mm TT, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 SA330 (IAR-330) Puma)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 24
CORVETTES 4
   FSH 2 Tetal II with 2 twin 533mm ASTT, 2 RBU 6000 Smerch 2 A/S mor, 2 AK630 CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 SA316 (IAR-316) Alouette III hel)
   FS 2 Tetal I with 2 twin 533mm ASTT with 53-65E HWT, 2 RBU 2500 Smerch 1 A/S mor, 2 twin 76mm guns
   PCFG 3 Zborul with 2 twin lnchr with P-15M Termit-M (SS-N-2C Styx) AShM, 2 AK630 CIWS, 1 76mm gun
   PCFT 3 Naluca with 4 single 533mm ASTT
   PCR 8:
   5 Brutar II with 2 BM-21 MRL, 1 100mm gun
   3 Kogalniceanu with 2 BM-21 MRL, 2 100mm guns
   PBR 6 VD141 (ex-MSR now used for river patrol)
MINE WARFARE 11
MINE COUNTERMEASURES 10
   MSO 4 Musca with 2 RBU 1200 A/S mor, 2 AK230 CIWS
   MSR 6 VD141
MINELAYERS ML 1 Corsar with up to 100 mines, 2 RBU 1200 A/S mor, 1 57mm gun
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 8
   AE 2 Constanta with 2 RBU 1200 A/S mor, 2 twin 57mm guns
   AGOR 1 Corsar
   AGS 2: 1 Emil Racovita;1 Catuneanu
   AOL 1 Tulcea
   ATF 1 Grozavu
   AXS 1 Mircea

Naval Infantry
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   1 naval inf bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   AUV 14: 11 ABC-79M; 3 TABC-79M

Air Force 10,300
Flying hours 120 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   2 sqn with MiG-21 Lancer C
FIGHTER GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn (forming) with with F-16AM/BM Fighting Falcon
GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with IAR-99 Soim
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with An-30 Clank; C-27J Spartan
   1 sqn with C-130B/H Hercules
TRAINING
   1 sqn with IAR-99 Soim*
   1 sqn with SA316B Alouette III (IAR-316B); Yak-52 (Iak-52)
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 (multi-role) sqn with IAR-330 SOCAT Puma
   3 sqn with SA330 Puma (IAR-330)
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD bde
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 engr spt regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 55 combat capable
   FTR 9: 7 F-16AM Fighting Falcon; 2 F-16BM Fighting Falcon
   FGA 25: 6 MiG-21 Lancer B; 19 MiG-21 Lancer C
   ISR 2 An-30 Clank
   TPT Medium 12: 7 C-27J Spartan; 4 C-130B Hercules; 1 C-130H Hercules
   TRG 33: 10 IAR-99*; 11 IAR-99C Soim*; 12 Yak-52 (Iak-52)
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 30: 22 IAR-330 SOCAT Puma; 8 SA316B Alouette III (IAR-316B)
   TPT Medium 36: 21 SA330L Puma (IAR-330L); 15 SA330M Puma (IAR-330M)
AIR DEFENCE SAM Medium-range 14: 6 S-75M3 Volkhov (SA-2 Guideline); 8 MIM-23 Hawk PIP III
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9M Sidewinder; R-73 (AA-11 Archer); R-550 Magic 2; Python 3 ARH AIM-120C AMRAAM
   ASM Spike-ER
BOMBS
   Laser-guided GBU-12 Paveway; INS/GPS guided GBU-38 JDAM

Paramilitary 79,900
Border Guards 22,900 (incl conscripts)
Ministry of Interior
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 14
   PCO 1 Stefan cel Mare (Damen Stan OPV 950)
   PBF 1 Bigliani
   PB 12: 4 Neustadt; 3 Mai; 5 SNR-17

Gendarmerie ~57,000
Ministry of Interior

Cyber
Romania's 2013 and 2015 cyber-security strategies define the conceptual framework, aim, objectives, priorities and courses of action for providing cyber security at the national level. Romania's 2016 Military Strategy said the country needed to develop the legal framework to conduct operations in cyberspace. The defence ministry contains a military CERT (CERTMIL) and a Cyber Defence Command is expected to be established within the military command structure by 2018. Romania is the lead nation for the NATO Trust Fund established to develop Ukraine's cyber defences.
Кибер
Стратегии Румынии в области кибербезопасности на 2013 и 2015 годы определяют концептуальные рамки, цели, задачи, приоритеты и направления действий по обеспечению кибербезопасности на национальном уровне. В военной стратегии Румынии 2016 года говорится, что стране необходимо разработать правовую базу для проведения операций в киберпространстве. Министерство обороны содержит военный сертификат (CERT MIL), и ожидается, что к 2018 году в структуре военного командования будет создано Командование киберзащиты. Румыния является ведущей страной для целевого фонда НАТО, созданного для развития киберзащиты Украины.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 683; 1 inf bn; UN UNAMA 4 obs:
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 39
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 9
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 17 obs
INDIA/PAKISTAN: UN UNMOGIP 2 obs
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 50
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 1; UN MINUSMA 1
POLAND: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 120; 1 ADA bty; 1 MP coy
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 61; UN UNMIK 1 obs
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 4
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 2; 4 obs
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 32

FOREIGN FORCES
Canada NATO Air Policing: 135; 4 F/A-18A Hornet (CF-18)
United States US European Command: 1,000; 1 armd inf bn HQ; 1 armd/armd inf coy; M1 Abrams; M2 Bradley; 1 tpt hel flt with 5 UH-60L Black Hawk

   SERBIA
    []

Capabilities
Principal missions for Serbia's armed forces include territorial defence, internal security and limited support to peacekeeping missions. The forces have reduced in size over the last decade. Plans to acquire Western military equipment have reportedly changed in favour of acquiring Russian hardware. In 2017, Serbia received six disassembled Russian MiG-29 fighters (currently nonoperational). As part of a military-technical agreement between Russia and Serbia, Belgrade is expected to also receive a donation of T-72 main battle tanks and BRDM-2 reconnaissance vehicles. Serbia is also seeking to acquire S-300, improving in this way its air-defence capability. In 2017, Serbia joined the HELBROC Balkan battlegroup, led by Greece. The armed forces reportedly saw a 10% salary increase and additional recruitment of professional soldiers. The prime minister announced an intention to invest in the domestic defence industry, particularly to develop new factories and overhaul existing plants. Local production mainly focuses on missile and artillery systems, and small arms and ammunition. In 2017, Serbia took part in regional military exercises with its Balkan neighbours, the UK and the US, as well as with Belarus and Russia.
Потенциал
Основные миссии Вооруженных сил Сербии включают территориальную оборону, внутреннюю безопасность и ограниченную поддержку миротворческих миссий. За последнее десятилетие численность сил сократилась. Сообщается, что планы приобретения западной военной техники изменились в пользу приобретения российской техники. В 2017 году Сербия получила шесть разобранных российских истребителей МиГ-29 (В настоящее время не эксплуатируемых). В рамках военно-технического соглашения между Россией и Сербией Белград, как ожидается, также получит в дар основные боевые танки Т-72 и разведывательные машины БРДМ-2. Сербия также стремится приобрести С-300, улучшая таким образом свой потенциал противовоздушной обороны. В 2017 году Сербия присоединилась к балканской боевой группе HELBROC во главе с Грецией. Согласно сообщениям, в Вооруженных силах была отмечена 10-процентная прибавка к заработной плате и дополнительный набор профессиональных солдат. Премьер-министр объявил о намерении инвестировать в отечественную оборонную промышленность, в частности, в развитие новых заводов и капитальный ремонт существующих. Основное внимание в местном производстве уделяется ракетным и артиллерийским системам, а также стрелковому оружию и боеприпасам. В 2017 году Сербия приняла участие в региональных военных учениях со своими балканскими соседями, Великобританией и США, а также с Беларусью и Россией.

ACTIVE 28,150 (Army 13,250 Air Force and Air Defence 5,100 Training Command 3,000 Guards 1,600 Other MoD 5,200) Paramilitary 3,700
Conscript liability 6 months (voluntary)
RESERVE 50,150

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 13,250
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF bde (1 CT bn, 1 cdo bn, 1 para bn, 1 log bn)
MANOEUVRE
Mechanised
   1 (1st) bde (1 tk bn, 2 mech inf bn, 1 inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 MRL bn, 1 AD bn, 1 engr bn, 1 log bn)
   3 (2nd, 3rd & 4th) bde (1 tk bn, 2 mech inf bn, 2 inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 MRL bn, 1 AD bn, 1 engr bn, 1 log bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 (mixed) arty bde (4 arty bn, 1 MRL bn, 1 spt bn)
   2 ptn bridging bn
   1 NBC bn
   1 sigs bn
   2 MP bn

Reserve Organisations
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Light
   8 (territorial) inf bde
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 212: 199 M-84; 13 T-72
   RECCE 46 BRDM-2
   IFV 335: 323 M-80; 12 Lazar-3
   APC 71
   APC(T) 32 MT-LB (CP)
   APC (W) 39 BOV-VP M-86; some Lazar-3
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV IWT
   ARV M84A1; T-54/T-55
   VLB MT-55; TMM
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL
   SP 48 BOV-1 (M-83) with 9K11 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger)
   MANPATS 9K11 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger); 9K111 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot)
   RCL 90mm 6 M-79
ARTILLERY 443
   SP 67+: 122mm 67 2S1 Gvozdika; 155mm B-52 NORA
   TOWED 132: 122mm 78 D-30; 130mm 18 M-46; 152mm 36 M-84 NORA-A
   MRL 81: 128mm 78: 18 M-63 Plamen; 60 M-77 Organj; 262mm 3 M-87 Orkan
   MOR 163: 82mm 106 M-69; 120mm 57 M-74/M-75
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Short-range 77 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful);
   Point-defence 17+: 12 9K31M Strela-1M (SA-9 Gaskin); 5 9K35M Strela-10M; 9K32M Strela-2M (SA-7 Grail)?; Šilo (SA-16 Gimlet)
   GUNS TOWED 40mm 36 Bofors L/70

River Flotilla
The Serbian-Montenegrin navy was transferred to Montenegro upon independence in 2006, but the Danube flotilla remained in Serbian control. The flotilla is subordinate to the Land Forces
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 5
   PBR 5: 3 Type-20; 2 others
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 4
   MSI 4 Nestin with 1 quad lnchr with Strela 2M (SA-N-5 Grail) SAM
AMPHIBOUS LANDING CRAFT LCU 5 Type-22
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 2
   AGF 1 Kozara
   AOL 1

Air Force and Air Defence 5,100
Flying hours: Ftr - 40 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   1 sqn with MiG-21bis Fishbed; MiG-29 Fulcrum
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with G-4 Super Galeb*; J-22 Orao
ISR
   2 flt with IJ-22 Orao 1*; MiG-21R Fishbed H*
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with An-2; An-26; Do-28; Yak-40 (Jak-40); 1 PA-34 Seneca V
TRAINING
   1 sqn with G-4 Super Galeb* (adv trg/light atk); SA341/342 Gazelle; Utva-75 (basic trg)
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with SA341H/342L Gazelle; (HN-42/45); Mi-24 Hind
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with Mi-8 Hip; Mi-17 Hip H; Mi-17V-5 Hip
AIR DEFENCE
   1 bde (5 bn (2 msl, 3 SP msl) with S-125 Neva (SA-3 Goa); 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful); 9K32 Strela-2 (SA-7 Grail); 9K310 Igla-1 (SA-16 Gimlet))
   2 radar bn (for early warning and reporting)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 sigs bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 maint bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 65 combat capable
   FTR 13+ : 2+ MiG-21bis Fishbed; 2+ MiG-21UM Mongol B; 4 MiG-29 Fulcrum; 3 MiG-29UB Fulcrum; 2 MiG-29S Fulcrum C
   FGA 17 J-22 Orao 1
   ISR 12: 10 IJ-22R Orao 1*; 2 MiG-21R Fishbed H*
   TPT Light 10: 1 An-2 Colt; 4 An-26 Curl; 2 Do-28 Skyservant; 2 Yak-40 (Jak-40); 1 PA-34 Seneca V
   TRG 44: 23 G-4 Super Galeb*; 11 Utva-75; 10 Lasta 95
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 2 Mi-24 Hind
   MRH 52: 1 Mi-17 Hip H; 2 Mi-17V-5 Hip; 2 SA341H Gazelle (HI-42); 34 SA341H Gazelle (HN-42)/SA342L Gazelle (HN-45);
   13 SA341H Gazelle (HO-42)/SA342L1 Gazelle (HO-45)
   TPT Medium 8 Mi-8T Hip (HT-40)
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Short-range 15: 6 S-125 Pechora (SA-3 Goa); 9 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful)
   Point-defence 9K32 Strela-2 (SA-7 Grail)?; 9K310 Igla-1 (SA-16 Gimlet)
   GUNS TOWED 40mm 24 Bofors L/70
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR R-60 (AA-8 Aphid)
   ASM AGM-65 Maverick; A-77 Thunder

Guards 1,600
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   1 (ceremonial) gd bde (1 gd bn, 1 MP bn, 1 spt bn)

Paramilitary 3,700
Gendarmerie 3,700
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC APC (W) 12+: some Lazar-3; 12 BOV-VP M-86
   AUV BOV M-16 Milos

DEPLOYMENT
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 2
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 1
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 7; UN MINUSCA 69; 1 med coy
CYPRUS: UN UNFICYP 47; 1 inf pl
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 8
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 174; 1 mech inf coy
LIBERIA: UN UNMIL 1 obs
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 3
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 1 obs
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 6
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 10

TERRITORY WHERE THE GOVERNMENT DOES NOT EXERCISE EFFECTIVE CONTROL
Data here represents the de facto situation in Kosovo. This does not imply international recognition as a sovereign state. In February 2008, Kosovo declared itself independent. Serbia remains opposed to this, and while Kosovo has not been admitted to the United Nations, a number of states have recognised Kosovo's self-declared status.

Kosovo Security Force 2,500; reserves 800
The Kosovo Security Force (KSF) was formed in January 2009 as a non-military organisation with responsibility for crisis response, civil protection and EOD. In 2017, a proposal by Kosovan leaders to establish an army was opposed by Russia, Serbia, the US and NATO. The force is armed with small arms and light vehicles only. A July 2010 law created a reserve force. In 2017, a KSF contingent participated in the joint exercise KFOR 23 at the Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Germany.

FOREIGN FORCES
All under Kosovo Force (KFOR) command unless otherwise specified
Albania 28 OSCE 3
Armenia 35
Austria 440; 2 mech inf coy
Bosnia-Herzegovina OSCE 8
Bulgaria 20 OSCE 1
Canada 6 OSCE 5
Croatia 33; 1 hel flt with Mi-8 OSCE 1
Czech Republic 9 OSCE 1 UNMIK 2 obs
Denmark 35
Estonia 2
Finland 19
Georgia OSCE 1
Germany 650 OSCE 4
Greece 112; 1 inf coy OSCE 1
Hungary 373; 1 inf coy (KTM) OSCE 1
Ireland 12 OSCE 1
Italy 551; 1 inf BG HQ; 1 Carabinieri unit OSCE 11
Kyrgyzstan OSCE 2
Lithuania 1
Luxembourg 23
Macedonia (FYROM) OSCE 14
Moldova 41 OSCE 1 UNMIK 1 obs
Montenegro OSCE 1
Netherlands OSCE 1
Norway 2 OSCE 1
Poland 240; 1 inf coy UNMIK 1 obs
Portugal 15 OSCE 1
Romania 61 UNMIK 1 obs
Russia OSCE 1
Slovenia 252; 1 mot inf coy; 1 MP unit; 1 hel unit
Spain OSCE 1
Sweden 3 OSCE 3
Switzerland 234; 1 inf coy; 1 engr pl; 1 hel flt with AS332 OSCE 1
Tajikistan OSCE 1
Turkey 307; 1 inf coy UNMIK 1 obs
Ukraine 40 OSCE 1 UNMIK 2 obs
United Kingdom 29 OSCE 7
United States 675; elm 1 ARNG inf bde HQ; 1 inf bn; 1 hel flt with UH-60 OSCE 5

   SLOVAKIA
    []

Capabilities
Slovakia released a defence white paper in September 2016, setting out its security priorities and a plan to increase defence capabilities. In 2017, the government approved a new defence strategy, a new military strategy and a Long-Term Defence Development Plan, which envisages spending rising to 1.6% of GDP by 2020 and 2% of GDP by 2024. Bratislava is planning to replace its small fighter and rotary-wing transport fleets, though financial constraints will make the outright replacement of the fighter fleet challenging. Slovakia announced in January 2017 that it was considering several offers for the purchase or lease of aircraft, including the Gripen-E. The Gripen is used by the Czech Republic, with whom the Slovak government signed a Joint Sky agreement to facilitate air policing and closer integration of air-defence capabilities. This was ratified by the Czech and Slovak parliaments in summer 2017. There are also ambitions to replace land equipment and improve the overall technology level in the armed forces. The government stated in May 2017 that it would seek to acquire a large number of 4x4 and 8x8 vehicles, and in November it was announced that Patria would develop a prototype based on the AMVXP 8x8 chassis for the programme. Also in May, and after amending the law on conscription, Slovakia implemented its Active Reserves pilot project, in order to help address shortfalls in specialist capacities, including in engineering.
Потенциал
В сентябре 2016 года Словакия выпустила "Белую книгу" по вопросам обороны, в которой излагаются ее приоритеты в области безопасности и план наращивания оборонного потенциала. В 2017 году правительство утвердило новую оборонную стратегию, новую военную стратегию и долгосрочный план развития обороны, который предусматривает увеличение расходов до 1,6% ВВП к 2020 году и 2% ВВП к 2024 году. Братислава планирует заменить свои небольшие истребительные и вертолетные транспортные флоты, хотя финансовые ограничения сделают прямую замену истребительной авиации сложной задачей. Словакия объявила в январе 2017 года, что рассматривает несколько предложений о покупке или аренде самолетов, в том числе Gripen-E. Gripen используется Чешской Республикой, с которой словацкое правительство подписало совместное соглашение о небе для облегчения воздушной полиции и более тесной интеграции средств противовоздушной обороны. Это было ратифицировано парламентами Чехии и Словакии летом 2017 года. Есть также амбиции заменить наземную технику и улучшить общий технологический уровень в Вооруженных силах. В мае 2017 года правительство заявило, что будет стремиться приобрести большое количество автомобилей 4x4 и 8x8, а в ноябре было объявлено, что Patria разработает прототип на основе шасси AMVXP 8x8 для программы. Также в мае и после внесения поправок в закон О воинской повинности Словакия осуществила свой экспериментальный проект "активные резервы", с тем чтобы помочь решить проблему нехватки специалистов, в том числе в области инженерного дела.

ACTIVE 15,850 (Army 6,250 Air 3,950 Central Staff 2,550 Support and Training 3,100)
Conscript liability 6 months

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Central Staff 2,550
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 (5th) spec ops bn

Army 6,250
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Armoured
   1 (2nd) armd bde (1 recce bn, 1 tk bn, 1 armd inf bn, 1 mot inf bn, 1 mixed SP arty bn)
Mechanised
   1 (1st) mech bde (3 armd inf bn, 1 MRL bn, 1 engr bn, 1 NBC bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 MP bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 spt bde (2 log bn, 1 maint bn, 1 spt bn)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHITING VEHICLES
   MBT 30 T-72M
   IFV 239: 148 BMP-1; 91 BMP-2
   APC 101+
   APC (T) 72 OT-90
   APC (W) 22: 7 OT-64; 15 Tatrapan (6в6)
   PPV 7+ RG-32M
   AUV IVECO LMV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV MT-55; VT-55A; VT-72B; WPT-TOPAS
   VLB AM-50; MT-55A
   MW Bozena; UOS-155 Belarty
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   SP 9S428 with Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger) on BMP-1; 9P135 Fagot (AT-4 Spigot) on BMP-2; 9P148 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel) on BRDM-2
   MANPATS 9K11 Malyutka (AT-3 Sagger); 9K111-1 Konkurs (AT-5 Spandrel)
   RCL 84mm Carl Gustav
ARTILLERY 68
   SP 19: 152mm 3 M-77 Dana; 155mm 16 M-2000 Zuzana
   TOWED 122mm 19 D-30
   MRL 30: 122mm 4 RM-70; 122/227mm 26 RM-70/85 MODULAR
RADAR LAND SNAR-10 Big Fred (veh, arty)
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Point-defence 48+: 48 9K35 Strela-10 (SA-13 Gopher); 9K32 Strela-2 (SA-7 Grail); 9K310 Igla-1 (SA-16 Gimlet)

Air Force 3,950
Flying hours 90 hrs/yr for MiG-29 pilots (NATO Integrated AD System); 90 hrs/yr for Mi-8/17 crews (reserved for EU & NATO)
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   1 sqn with MiG-29AS/UBS Fulcrum
TRANSPORT
   1 flt with C-27J Spartan
   1 flt with L-410FG/T/UVP Turbolet
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Mi-8 Hip; Mi-17 Hip H
   1 sqn with PZL MI-2 Hoplite
TRAINING
   1 sqn with L-39CM/ZA/ZAM Albatros
AIR DEFENCE
   1 bde with 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful); 9K32 Strela-2 (SA-7 Grail); S-300 (SA-10 Grumble)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 25 combat capable
   FTR 12: 10 MiG-29AS Fulcrum; 2 MiG-29UBS Fulcrum;
   TPT 9: Medium 1 C-27J Spartan; Light 8: 2 L-410FG Turbolet; 2 L-410T Turbolet; 4 L-410UVP Turbolet
   TRG 13: 6 L-39CM Albatros*; 5 L-39ZA Albatros*; 2 L-39ZAM Albatros*
HELICOPTERS
   ATK (15: 5 Mi-24D Hind D; 10 Mi-24V Hind E all in store)
   MRH 13 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT 9: Medium 3: 1 Mi-8 Hip; 2 UH-60M Black Hawk Light 6 PZL MI-2 Hoplite
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Long-range S-300PS (SA-10B Grumble)
   Short-range 2K12 Kub (SA-6 Gainful)
   Point-defence 9K32 Strela-2 (SA-7 Grail)?
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR R-60 (AA-8 Aphid); R-73 (AA-11 Archer)
   SARH R-27R (AA-10A Alamo); ASM S5K/S5KO (57mm rockets); S8KP/S8KOM (80mm rockets)

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 40
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 41
CYPRUS: UN UNFICYP 169; 1 inf coy(-); 1 engr pl
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 2 obs
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 10
   SLOVENIA
    []

Capabilities
Territorial defence and the ability to take part in peacesupport operations are central to Slovenia's defence strategy. The defence ministry completed a Strategic Defence Review in December 2016. Its core conclusion was that the goals of the last review, conducted in 2009, had been missed and that capability development had stalled at a time when Europe's security environment had deteriorated. Underfunding and a bureaucratic failure to implement the agreed policy guidelines were singled out as key reasons for this assessment. The ministry also plans to review the current military doctrine. Slovenia has launched several invitations to tender in order to sell off obsolete equipment to raise funds for defence modernisation. However, given continuing resource challenges, significant modernisation steps seem unlikely during the current Medium-Term Defence Programme, which runs until 2020. The main development goal to 2023 has been defined as the formation and equipping of two battalion-sized battle groups. Recruitment and retention continues to be a challenge and it is questionable whether the planned target size of 10,000 active personnel for 2018 can be met. Slovenia acts as the framework nation for the NATO Mountain Warfare Centre of Excellence. Its small air wing is not equipped to provide air policing; Italy and Hungary currently partner in providing this capability. The country has contributed regularly to NATO and EU operations.
Потенциал
Территориальная оборона и способность принимать участие в операциях по поддержанию мира занимают центральное место в оборонной стратегии Словении. Министерство обороны выпустило стратегический обзор обороны в декабре 2016 года. Его основной вывод заключается в том, что цели последнего обзора, проведенного в 2009 году, были упущены и что развитие потенциала застопорилось в то время, когда обстановка в Европе в плане безопасности ухудшилась. В качестве основных причин такой оценки были выделены недостаточное финансирование и бюрократическая неспособность выполнить согласованные руководящие принципы политики. Министерство также планирует пересмотреть нынешнюю военную доктрину. Словения направила несколько приглашений к участию в торгах с целью продажи устаревшего оборудования для сбора средств на модернизацию обороны. Однако с учетом сохраняющихся проблем с ресурсами значительные шаги по модернизации представляются маловероятными в рамках текущей среднесрочной оборонной программы, которая рассчитана до 2020 года. Основной целью развития до 2023 года было определено формирование и оснащение двух батальонных боевых групп. Набор и удержание персонала по-прежнему является проблемой, и сомнительно, что запланированный целевой размер 10 000 активных сотрудников на 2018 год может быть выполнен. Словения выступает в качестве рамочного государства для Центра передового опыта НАТО по горной войне. Его небольшое воздушное крыло не оборудовано для обеспечения воздушной полиции; Италия и Венгрия в настоящее время сотрудничают в обеспечении этого потенциала. Страна регулярно вносит свой вклад в операции НАТО и ЕС.

ACTIVE 7,250 (Army 7,250) Paramilitary 5,950
RESERVE 1,500 (Army 1,500) Paramilitary 260

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 7,250
FORCES BY ROLE
Regt are bn sized
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF unit (1 spec ops coy, 1 CSS coy)
MANOEUVRE
Mechanised
   1 (1st) mech inf bde (1 mech inf regt, 1 mtn inf regt, 1 cbt spt bn (1 ISR coy, 1 arty bty, 1 engr coy, 1 MP coy, 1 CBRN coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 SAM bty))
   1 (72nd) mech inf bde (2 mech inf regt, 1 cbt spt bn (1 ISR coy, 1 arty bty, 1 engr coy, 1 MP coy, 1 CBRN coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 SAM bty))
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 EW coy
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log bde (1 log regt, 1 maint regt (1 tk coy), 1 med regt)

Reserves
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Mountain
   2 inf regt (territorial - 1 allocated to each inf bde)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 14 M-84 (trg role) (32 more in store)
   APC APC (W) 115: 85 Pandur 6в6 (Valuk); 30 Patria 8в8 (Svarun)
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   ARV VT-55A
   VLB MTU
   NBC VEHICLES 10 Cobra CBRN
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike MR/LR
ARTILLERY 68
   TOWED 155mm 18 TN-90
   MOR 120mm 50 MN-9/M-74
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence 9K338 Igla-S (SA-24 Grinch)

Army Maritime Element 130
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 SF unit
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 2
   PCC 1 Triglav III (RUS Svetlyak)
   PBF 1 Super Dvora MkII

Air Element 610
FORCES BY ROLE
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with Falcon 2000EX; L-410 Turbolet; PC-6B Turbo Porter;
TRAINING
   1 unit with Bell 206 Jet Ranger (AB-206); PC-9M*; Z-143L; Z-242L
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with AS532AL Cougar; Bell 412 Twin Huey
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 maint sqn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 9 combat capable
   TPT 4: Light 3: 1 L-410 Turbolet; 2 PC-6B Turbo Porter PAX 1 Falcon 2000EX
   TRG 19: 9 PC-9M*; 2 Z-143L; 8 Z-242L
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 8: 5 Bell 412EP Twin Huey; 2 Bell 412HP Twin Huey; 1 Bell 412SP Twin Huey (some armed)
   TPT 8: Medium 4 AS532AL Cougar; Light 4 Bell 206 Jet Ranger (AB-206)

Paramilitary 5,950
Police 5,950; 260 reservists
Ministry of Interior (civilian; limited elements could be prequalified to cooperate in military defence with the armed forces during state of emergency or war)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PBF 1 Ladse
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 1 Bell 412 Twin Huey,
   TPT Light 5: 1 AW109; 2 Bell 206 (AB-206) Jet Ranger; 1 Bell 212 (AB-212); 1 H135

Cyber
A National Cyber Security Strategy was endorsed in February 2016 by the government
Кибер
Национальная стратегия кибербезопасности была одобрена правительством в феврале 2016 года

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 7
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 14
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 6
LATVIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 50; 1 CBRN pl(+)
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 15
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 4
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 3 obs
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 252; 1 mot inf coy; 1 MP unit; 1 hel unit
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 2

   SPAIN
    []

Capabilities
The Spanish Army began a comprehensive force-structure review in 2016, which resulted in a reorganisation into multipurpose brigades with heavy, medium and light capabilities, optimised for deployable operations and with a greater emphasis on mechanised formations and specialoperations forces. Local defence industry manufactures across all domains and exports globally. However, the S-80 submarine programme, undertaken by Navantia, is significantly behind schedule. Having originally declined to take part in the project, Spain has reportedly expressed interest in acquiring the F-35 to replace its ageing naval aviation AV-8s. Spain has also announced that it will participate in funding the European MALE 2020 unmannedaerial-vehicle project, although it has also signed a contract for MQ-9 MALE UAVs. The country's equipment and logistic-support capability appears to be sufficient to meet its national commitments and contribution to NATO operations and exercises. Spain hosts one of NATO's two Combined Air Operations Centres, and the country's Joint Special Operations Command will provide the Special Operations Component Command for the NATO Response Force in 2018. Spain retains a small contingent in Kabul as part of the NATO HQ.
Потенциал
Испанская армия начала всеобъемлющий пересмотр структуры сил в 2016 году, который привел к реорганизации в многоцелевые бригады с тяжелым, средним и легким потенциалом, оптимизированные для развертываемых операций и с большим акцентом на механизированные формирования и силы специальных операций. Местная оборонная промышленность производит продукцию во всех областях и экспортирует ее по всему миру. Однако, С-80 подводная лодка программы, осуществляемой Navantia, значительно отстает от графика. Первоначально отказавшись от участия в проекте, Испания, как сообщается, выразила заинтересованность в приобретении F-35 для замены своих стареющих морских самолетов AV-8. Испания также объявила, что будет участвовать в финансировании проекта европейского беспилотного летательного аппарата MALE 2020, хотя она также подписала контракт на БПЛА MQ-9 MALE. Как представляется, имеющегося у страны оборудования и материально-технического обеспечения достаточно для выполнения ее национальных обязательств и внесения вклада в операции и учения НАТО. В Испании находится один из двух объединенных центров воздушных операций НАТО, а объединенное командование специальных операций страны обеспечит командование компонентом специальных операций для Сил реагирования НАТО в 2018 году. Испания сохраняет небольшой контингент в Кабуле в составе штаба НАТО.

ACTIVE 121,200 (Army 70,950 Navy 20,050 Air 19,250 Joint 10,950) Paramilitary 76,750
RESERVE 15,450 (Army 8,800 Navy 2,750 Air 2,750 Other 1,150)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES COMMUNICATIONS 2: 1 Spainsat; 1 Xtar-Eur
Army 70,950
The Land Forces High Readiness HQ Spain provides one NATO Rapid Deployment Corps HQ (NRDC-ESP)
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   1 corps HQ (CGTAD/NRDC-ESP) (1 int regt, 1 MP bn)
   2 div HQ
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 comd (4 spec ops bn, 1 int coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn)
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 armd cav regt (2 armd recce bn)
Mechanised
   3 (10th, 11th & 12th) mech bde (1 armd regt (1 armd recce bn, 1 tk bn), 1 mech inf regt (1 armd inf bn, 1 mech inf bn), 1 lt inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 AT coy,
   1 AD coy, 1 engr bn, 1 int coy, 1 NBC coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn)
   1 (1st) mech bde (1 armd regt (1 armd recce bn, 1 tk bn), 1 mech inf regt (1 armd inf bn, 1 mech inf bn), 1 mtn inf bn, 1 SP arty bn, 1 AT coy, 1 AD coy,
   1 engr bn, 1 int coy, 1 NBC coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn)
   2 (2nd/La Legion & 7th) lt mech bde (1 armd recce bn, 1 mech inf regt (2 mech inf bn), 1 lt inf bn, 1 fd arty bn, 1 AT coy, 1 AD coy, 1 engr bn, 1 int coy,
   1 NBC coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn)
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (6th) bde (1 recce bn, 3 para bn, 1 fd arty bn, 1 AT coy, 1 AD coy, 1 engr bn, 1 int coy, 1 NBC coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn)
Other
   1 (Canary Islands) comd (1 lt inf bde (3 lt inf regt, 1 fd arty regt, 1 AT coy, 1 engr bn, 1 int coy, 1 NBC coy, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn); 1 spt hel bn; 1 AD regt)
   1 (Balearic Islands) comd (1 inf regt)
   2 (Ceuta and Melilla) comd (1 recce regt, 2 inf bn, 1 arty regt, 1 engr bn, 1 sigs coy, 1 log bn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty comd (1 arty regt; 1 MRL regt; 1 coastal arty regt)
   1 engr comd (2 engr regt, 1 bridging regt)
   1 EW/sigs bde (1 EW regt, 3 sigs regt)
   1 EW regt
   1 NBC regt
   1 railway regt
   1 sigs regt
   1 CIMIC bn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log bde (5 log regt)
   1 med bde (1 log unit, 2 med regt, 1 fd hospital unit)
HELICOPTER
   1 hel comd (1 atk hel bn, 2 spt hel bn, 1 tpt hel bn, 1 sigs bn, 1 log unit (1 spt coy, 1 supply coy))
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD comd (3 SAM regt, 1 sigs unit)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 331: 108 Leopard 2A4; 223 Leopard 2A5E
   RECCE 271: 84 B1 Centauro; 187 VEC-M1
   IFV 227: 206 Pizarro; 21 Pizarro (CP)
   APC 875
   APC (T) 453 M113 (incl variants)
   APC (W) 312 BMR-600/BMR-600M1
   PPV 110 RG-31
   AUV IVECO LMV
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 34 CZ-10/25E
   ARV 72: 16 Leopard REC; 1 AMX-30; 3 BMR REC; 4 Centauro REC; 14 Maxxpro MRV; 12 M113; 22 M47
   VLB 16: 1 M47; 15 M60
   MW 6 Husky 2G
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike-LR; TOW
ARTILLERY 1,556
   SP 155mm 96 M109A5
   TOWED 281: 105mm 217: 56 L118 Light Gun; 161 Model 56 pack howitzer; 155mm 64 SBT 155/52 SIAC
   MOR 1,179: 81mm 777; 120mm 402
RADAR LAND 6: 4 ARTHUR; 2 AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder
COASTAL DEFENCE ARTY 155mm 19 SBT 155/52 APU SBT V07
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 17: 6 Tiger HAP-E; 11 Tiger HAD-E
   MRH 17 Bo-105 HOT?
   TPT 84: Heavy 17 CH-47D Chinook (HT-17D); Medium 40: 16 AS332B Super Puma (HU-21); 12 AS532UL Cougar; 6 AS532AL Cougar; 6 NH90 TTH;
   Light 27: 6 Bell 205 (HU-10B Iroquois); 5 Bell 212 (HU.18); 16 H135 (HE.26/HU.26)
UAV ISR Medium 6: 2 Searcher MkII-J (PASI); 4 Searcher MkIII (PASI)
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Long-range 18 MIM-104C Patriot PAC-2
   Medium-range 38 MIM-23B I-Hawk Phase III
   Short-range 21: 8 NASAMS; 13 Skyguard/Aspide
   Point-defence Mistral
   GUNS TOWED 35mm 67: 19 GDF-005; 48 GDF-007

Navy 20,050 (incl Naval Aviation and Marines)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 3:
   3 Galerna with 4 single 533mm TT with F17 Mod 2/L5 HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 11
DESTROYERS DDGHM 5:
   5 Alvaro de Bazan with Aegis Baseline 5 C2, 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84F Harpoon AShM, 1 48-cell Mk41 VLS with SM-2MR/RIM-162B
   Sea Sparrow SAM, 2 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 SH-60B Seahawk ASW hel)
FRIGATES FFGHM 6:
   6 Santa Maria with 1 Mk13 GMLS with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM/SM-1MR SAM, 2 Mk32 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT,
   1 Meroka mod 2 CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 2 SH-60B Seahawk ASW hel)
AMPHIBIOUS
PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS 3:
   LHD 1 Juan Carlos I (capacity 18 hel or 10 AV-8B FGA ac; 4 LCM-1E; 42 APC; 46 MBT; 900 troops)
   LPD 2 Galicia (capacity 6 Bell 212 or 4 SH-3D Sea King hel; 4 LCM or 2 LCM & 8 AAV; 130 APC or 33 MBT; 540 troops)
LANDING CRAFT 14
   LCM 14 LCM 1E
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 2
   AORH 2: 1 Patino (capacity 3 Bell 212 or 2 SH-3D Sea King hel); 1 Cantabria (capacity 3 Bell 212 or 2 SH-3D Sea King hel)

Maritime Action Force
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 23
   PSOH 4 Meteoro (Buques de Accion Maritima) with 1 76mm gun
   PSO 7: 3 Alboran each with 1 hel landing platform; 4 Descubierta with 1 76mm gun
   PCO 4 Serviola with 1 76mm gun
   PCC 3 Anaga with 1 76mm gun
   PB 4: 2 P-101; 2 Toralla
   PBR 1 Cabo Fradera
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 6
   MHO 6 Segura
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 29
   AGI 1 Alerta
   AGOR 2 (with ice-strengthened hull, for polar research duties in Antarctica)
   AGS 3: 2 Malaspina; 1 Castor
   AK 2: 1 Martin Posadillo with 1 hel landing platform; 1 El Camino EspaЯol
   AP 1 Contramaestre Casado with 1 hel landing platform
   ASR 1 Neptuno
   ATF 3: 1 Mar Caribe; 1 Mahon; 1 La Grana
   AXL 8: 4 Contramaestre; 4 Guardiamarina
   AXS 8

Naval Aviation 850
Flying hours 150 hrs/yr on AV-8B Harrier II FGA ac; 200 hrs/yr on hel
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with AV-8B Harrier II Plus
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   1 sqn with SH-60B/F Seahawk
TRANSPORT
   1 (liaison) sqn with Cessna 550 Citation II; Cessna 650 Citation VII
TRAINING
   1 sqn with Hughes 500MD8
   1 flt with TAV-8B Harrier
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with Bell 212 (HU-18)
   1 sqn with SH-3D Sea King
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 13 combat capable
   FGA 13: 8 AV-8B Harrier II Plus; 4 AV-8B Harrier II (upgraded to II Plus standard); 1 TAV-8B Harrier (on lease from USMC)
   TPT Light 4: 3 Cessna 550 Citation II; 1 Cessna 650 Citation VII
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 21: 7 SH-3D Sea King (tpt); 12 SH-60B Seahawk; 2 SH-60F Seahawk
   MRH 9 Hughes 500MD
   TPT Light 7 Bell 212 (HA-18)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L Sidewinder; ARH AIM-120 AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-65G Maverick
   AShM AGM-119 Penguin

Marines 5,800
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 spec ops bn
MANOEUVRE
Amphibious
   1 mne bde (1 recce unit, 1 mech inf bn, 2 inf bn, 1 arty bn, 1 log bn)
Other
   1 sy bde (5 mne garrison gp)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 4 M60A3TTS
   APC APC (W) 34: 32 Piranha IIIC; 1 Piranha IIIC (amb); 1 Piranha IIIC EW (EW)
   AAV 18: 16 AAV-7A1/AAVP-7A1; 2 AAVC-7A1 (CP)
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 4 Piranha IIIC
   ARV 2: 1 AAVR-7A1; 1 Piranha IIIC
ARTILLERY 30
   SP 155mm 6 M109A2
   TOWED 105mm 24 Model 56 pack howitzer
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS Spike-LR; TOW-2
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence Mistral

Air Force 19,250
The Spanish Air Force is organised in 3 commands - General Air Command, Combat Air Command and Canary Islands Air Command Flying hours 120 hrs/yr on hel/tpt ac; 180 hrs/yr on FGA/FTR
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   2 sqn with Eurofighter Typhoon
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   5 sqn with F/A-18A/B MLU Hornet (EF-18A/B MLU)
MARITIME PATROL
   1 sqn with P-3A/M Orion
ISR
   1 sqn with Beech C90 King Air
   1 sqn with Cessna 550 Citation V; CN235 (TR-19A)
ELECTRONIC WARFARE
   1 sqn with C-212 Aviocar; Falcon 20D
SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with AS332B/B1 Super Puma; CN235 VIGMA
   1 sqn with AS332B Super Puma; CN235 VIGMA
   1 sqn with C-212 Aviocar; CN235 VIGMA
TANKER/TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with KC-130H Hercules
TRANSPORT
   1 VIP sqn with A310; Falcon 900
   1 sqn with C-130H/H-30 Hercules
   1 sqn with C-212 Aviocar
   2 sqn with C295
   1 sqn with CN235
TRAINING
   1 OCU sqn with Eurofighter Typhoon
   1 OCU sqn with F/A-18A/B (EF-18A/B MLU) Hornet
   1 sqn with Beech F33C Bonanza
   2 sqn with C-101 Aviojet
   1 sqn with C-212 Aviocar
   1 sqn with T-35 Pillan (E-26)
   2 (LIFT) sqn with F-5B Freedom Fighter
   1 hel sqn with H120 Colibri
   1 hel sqn with S-76C
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   1 sqn with AS332M1 Super Puma; AS532UL Cougar (VIP)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 168 combat capable
   FTR 80: 61 Eurofighter Typhoon; 19 F-5B Freedom Fighter
   FGA 85: 20 F/A-18A Hornet (EF-18A); 53 EF-18A MLU; 12 EF-18B MLU
   ASW 3 P-3M Orion
   MP 8 CN235 VIGMA
   ISR 2 CN235 (TR-19A)
   EW 3: 1 C-212 Aviocar (TM.12D); 2 Falcon 20D
   TKR 5 KC-130H Hercules
   TPT 75: Heavy 1 A400M; Medium 7: 6 C-130H Hercules; 1 C-130H-30 Hercules;
   Light 59: 3 Beech C90 King Air; 22 Beech F33C Bonanza; 10 C-212 Aviocar (incl 9 trg); 13 C295; 8 CN235; 3 Cessna 550 Citation V (ISR);
   PAX 8: 2 A310; 1 B-707; 5 Falcon 900 (VIP)
   TRG 102: 65 C-101 Aviojet; 37 T-35 Pillan (E-26)
HELICOPTERS
   TPT 37: Medium 15: 9 AS332B/B1 Super Puma; 4 AS332M1 Super Puma; 2 AS532UL Cougar (VIP); Light 22: 14 H120 Colibri; 8 S-76C
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Short-range Skyguard/Aspide
   Point-defence Mistral
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L/JULI Sidewinder; IIR IRIS-T; SARH AIM-7P Sparrow; ARH AIM-120B/C AMRAAM
   ARM AGM-88B HARM; ASM AGM-65G Maverick; AShM AGM-84D Harpoon; LACM Taurus KEPD 350
BOMBS
   Laser-guided: GBU-10/12/16 Paveway II; GBU-24 Paveway III; EGBU-16 Paveway II; BPG-2000

Emergencies Military Unit (UME)
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   1 div HQ
MANOEUVRE
Other
   5 Emergency Intervention bn
   1 Emergency Support and Intervention regt
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 sigs bn
HELICOPTER
   1 hel bn opcon Army

Paramilitary 89,050
Guardia Civil 89,050
17 regions, 54 Rural Comds
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   8 (rural) gp
MANOEUVRE
Other
   15 (traffic) sy gp
   1 (Special) sy bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 64
   PSO 1 with 1 hel landing platform
   PCC 2
   PBF 34
   PB 27
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 2 CN235-300
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 20: 2 AS653N3 Dauphin; 18 Bo-105ATH
   TPT Light 21: 8 BK-117; 13 H135

Cyber
A Joint Cyber Command was set up in 2013. In 2014, short/medium-term goals included achieving FOC on `CN Defense, CN Exploitation, and CN Attack'. Spain's intelligence CERT (CCN-CERT) coordinates CERT activities.
Кибер
Объединенное Киберкомандование было создано в 2013 году. В 2014 году краткосрочные/среднесрочные цели включали достижение FOC на " CN обороне, CN эксплуатации и CN атаке. Испанский сертификат разведки (CCN-CERT) координирует деятельность CERT.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 16
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 2; OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 2
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 30
DJIBOUTI: EU Operation Atalanta 1 P-3M Orion
GULF OF ADEN & INDIAN OCEAN: EU Operation Atalanta 1 PSOH
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 400; 2 trg unit
LATVIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 300; 1 armd inf coy(+)
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 628; 1 lt inf bde HQ; 1 mech inf bn(-); 1 engr coy; 1 sigs coy
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 127; UN MINUSMA 1
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 1: 1 FFGHM; EU EU NAVFOR MED: 1 AORH; 1 CN235
SERBIA: OSCE Kosovo 1
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 16
TURKEY: NATO Operation Active Fence 149; 1 SAM bty with MIM-104C Patriot PAC-2
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 13

FOREIGN FORCES
United States US European Command: 3,200; 1 air base at MorСn; 1 naval base at Rota

   SWEDEN
    []

Capabilities
Sweden's armed forces remain configured for territorial defence. In June 2015, a defence bill for 2016-20 was adopted, which set out the aims of strengthening operational capabilities and deepening multilateral and bilateral defence relationships. Increased cooperation with neighbours and NATO has been a prevalent theme for the last few years. In June 2016, Sweden signed a statement of intent with the US and a Programme of Defence Cooperation with the UK. Concerns over readiness levels have led to greater cooperation with NATO and NORDEFCO partners, as well as further deliberation over Swedish membership of the Alliance. Under the auspices of NORDEFCO, Sweden is expanding its defence cooperation with Finland. In response to security concerns, the government announced an increase in planned defence spending, and confirmed in August 2017 that spending would be put on an upward trajectory at least until 2020. Readiness, exercises and training, as well as cyber defence, are spending priorities. Sweden intends to establish a Gotland Regiment by 2018, stationed on the island. Readiness challenges in the air force triggered a discussion about extending the service life of its JAS-39C Gripen Cs beyond their intended 2026 retirement date, not least since the air force was slated to receive a lower number of JAS-39Es than requested. Plans to replace the C-130H Hercules fleet from 2021 have been superseded by a mid-life upgrade to extend service life to about 2030. In September 2017, Sweden conducted Aurora 2017, its largest exercise in two decades. Amid recruitment challenges, Sweden announced in March 2017 that it would reinstate conscription from January 2018. The armed-forces chief stated that the change in the post-Cold War landscape will mean the downgrading of international missions in order to prioritise domestic readiness.
Потенциал
Вооруженные силы Швеции по-прежнему настроены на территориальную оборону. В июне 2015 года был принят оборонный законопроект на 2016-20 годы, в котором определены цели укрепления оперативного потенциала и углубления многосторонних и двусторонних оборонных отношений. Расширение сотрудничества с соседями и НАТО является основной темой последних нескольких лет. В июне 2016 года Швеция подписала заявление о намерениях с США и программу оборонного сотрудничества с Великобританией. Обеспокоенность по поводу уровня готовности привела к расширению сотрудничества с партнерами по НАТО и NORDEFCO, а также к дальнейшему обсуждению вопроса о членстве Швеции в Североатлантическом союзе. Под эгидой NORDEFCO Швеция расширяет свое оборонное сотрудничество с Финляндией. В ответ на проблемы безопасности правительство объявило об увеличении запланированных расходов на оборону и подтвердило в августе 2017 года, что расходы будут поставлены на восходящую траекторию по крайней мере до 2020 года. Готовность, учения и обучение, а также киберзащита являются приоритетами расходов. Швеция намерена создать Готландский полк к 2018 году, дислоцированный на острове. Проблемы с готовностью в ВВС вызвали дискуссию о продлении срока службы его JAS-39C Gripen C после предполагаемой даты вывода 2026 года, не в последнюю очередь потому, что ВВС планировалось получить меньшее количество JAS-39Es, чем требовалось. Планы по замене C-130H Hercules с 2021 года были заменены обновлением среднего срока службы, чтобы продлить срок службы примерно до 2030 года. В сентябре 2017 года Швеция провела крупнейшее за два десятилетия мероприятие Aurora 2017. На фоне проблем с вербовкой Швеция объявила в марте 2017 года, что она восстановит призыв с января 2018 года. Начальник вооруженных сил заявил, что изменение обстановки после окончания "Холодной войны" будет означать понижение статуса международных миссий, с тем чтобы в первую очередь обеспечить внутреннюю готовность.

ACTIVE 29,750 (Army 6,850 Navy 2,100 Air 2,700 Other 18,100) Paramilitary 750 Voluntary Auxiliary Organisations 21,200

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Army 6,850
The army has been transformed to provide brigade-sized task forces depending on the operational requirement
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   2 bde HQ
MANOEUVRE
Reconnaissance
   1 recce bn
Armoured
   3 armd coy
Mechanised
   5 mech bn
Light
   1 mot inf bn
   1 lt inf bn
Air Manoeuvre
   1 AB bn
Other
   1 sy bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   2 arty bn
   2 engr bn
   2 MP coy
   1 CBRN coy
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 tpt coy
AIR DEFENCE
   2 AD bn

Reserves
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
40 Home Guard bn

EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 129: 9 Leopard 2A4 (Strv-121); 120 Leopard 2A5 (Strv 122)
   IFV 354 CV9040 (Strf 9040)
   APC 1,106
   APC (T) 431: 281 Pbv 302; 150 BvS10 MkII
   APC (W) 315: 34 XA-180 Sisu (Patgb 180); 20 XA-202 Sisu (Patgb 202); 148 XA-203 Sisu (Patgb 203); 113 Patria AMV (XA-360/Patgb 360)
   PPV 360 RG-32M
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 6 Kodiak
   ARV 40: 14 Bgbv 120; 26 CV90
   MW 33+: Aardvark Mk2; 33 Area Clearing System
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS RB-55
   RCL 84mm Carl Gustav
ARTILLERY 304
   SP 155mm 8 Archer
   MOR 296; 81mm 212 M/86; 120mm 84 M/41D
RADAR LAND ARTHUR (arty)
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Medium-range MIM-23B Hawk (RBS-97); Point-defence RBS-70
   GUNS SP 40mm 30 Strv 90LV

Navy 1,250; 850 Amphibious (total 2,100)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINE TACTICAL SSK 5:
   3 Gotland (AIP fitted) with 2 single 400mm TT with Tp432/Tp 451, 4 single 533mm TT with Tp613/Tp62
   2 Sodermanland (AIP fitted) with 6 single 533mm TT with Tp432/Tp451/Tp613/Tp62
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 147
CORVETTES FSG 5 Visby with 8 RBS-15 AShM, 4 single 400mm ASTT with Tp45 LWT, 1 57mm gun, 1 hel landing platform
   PCGT 4:
   2 GЖteborg with 4 twin lnchr with RBS-15 Mk2 AShM, 4 single 400mm ASTT with Tp431 LWT, 4 Saab 601 A/S mor, 1 57mm gun
   2 Stockholm with 4 twin lnchr with RBS-15 Mk2 AShM,
   4 Saab 601 mortars, 4 single 400mm ASTT with Tp431 LWT, 1 57mm gun (in refit)
   PBF 129 Combat Boat 90E/H/HS (capacity 20 troops)
   PB 9 Tapper
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 7
   MCC 5 Koster
MCD 2 SpЕrЖ (StyrsЖ mod)
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT 11
   LCVP 8 Trossbat
   LCAC 3 Griffon 8100TD
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 17
   AG 2: 1 Carlskrona with 2 57mm gun, 1 hel landing platform (former ML); 1 Trosso (spt ship for corvettes and patrol vessels but can also be used as HQ ship)
   AGF 2 LedningsbЕt 2000
   AGI 1 Orion
   AGS 2 (Government Maritime Forces)
   AKL 1 Loke
   ARS 2: 1 Belos III; 1 Furusund (former ML)
   AX 5 Altair
   AXS 2: 1 Falken; 1 Gladan

Amphibious 850
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Amphibious
   1 amph bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARTILLERY MOR 81mm 12 M/86
COASTAL DEFENCE AShM 8 RBS-17 Hellfire

Air Force 2,700
Flying hours 100-150 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK/ISR
   6 sqn with JAS 39C/D Gripen
TRANSPORT/ISR/AEW&C
   1 sqn with C-130H Hercules (Tp-84); KC-130H Hercules (Tp-84); Gulfstream IV SRA-4 (S-102B); S-100B/D Argus
TRAINING
   1 unit with Sk-60
AIR DEFENCE
   1 (fighter control and air surv) bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 97 combat capable
   FGA 97 JAS 39C/D Gripen
   ELINT 2 Gulfstream IV SRA-4 (S-102B)
   AEW&C 3: 1 S-100B Argus; 2 S-100D Argus
   TKR 1 KC-130H Hercules (Tp-84)
   TPT 8: Medium 5 C-130H Hercules (Tp-84); Light 2 Saab 340 (OS-100A/Tp-100C); PAX 1 Gulfstream 550 (Tp-102D)
   TRG 67 Sk-60W
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Medium 8 RQ-7 Shadow (AUV 3 жrnen)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   ASM AGM-65 Maverick (RB-75); AShM RB-15F
   AAM IR AIM-9L Sidewinder (RB-74); IIR IRIS-T (RB-98); ARH AIM-120B AMRAAM (RB-99); Meteor (entering service)
BOMBS
   Laser-Guided GBU-12 Paveway II; INS/GPS guided GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb

Armed Forces Hel Wing
FORCES BY ROLE
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   3 sqn with AW109 (Hkp 15A); AW109M (Hkp-15B); NH90 (Hkp-14) (SAR/ASW); UH-60M Black Hawk (Hkp-16)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 5 NH90 ASW
   TPT 48: Medium 28: 15 UH-60M Black Hawk (Hkp-16); 13 NH90 TTH (Hkp-14); Light 20: 12 AW109 (Hkp-15A); 8 AW109M (Hkp-15B)

Special Forces
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 spec ops gp
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 cbt spt gp

Other 18,100
Includes staff, logisitics and intelligence personnel
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 EW bn
   1 psyops unit
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   2 log bn
   1 maint bn
   4 med coy
   1 tpt coy

Paramilitary 750
Coast Guard 750
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 25
   PSO 3 Poseidon (Damen Multipurpose Vessel 8116)
   PCO 1 KBV-181 (fishery protection)
   PCC 6: 2 KBV-201; 4 Sipe
   PB 15: 10 KBV-301; 5 KBV-312
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT UCAC 2: 1 Griffon 2000TDX (KBV-592); 1 Griffon 2450TD

Air Arm
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 3 DHC-8Q-300

Cyber
Sweden has a national CERT, is involved in informal CERT communities and is a member of the European Government CERTs group. The Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, which reports to the defence ministry, is in charge of supporting and coordinating security nationwide. The 2016-20 defence bill states that `cyber defence capabilities are an important part of the Swedish Defence. [...] This also requires the ability to carry out active operations in the cyber domain.' A new national cyber-security strategy in June 2017 outlined six priority areas for national cyber security, and noted that `an advanced cyber defence must be in place that includes enhanced military capability to respond to and handle an attack by an advanced opponent in cyberspace'.
Кибер
Швеция имеет национальный сертификат, участвует в неформальных сообществах сертификатов и является членом Группы европейских правительственных сертификатов. Шведское агентство по гражданским чрезвычайным ситуациям, подотчетное Министерству обороны, отвечает за поддержку и координацию безопасности по всей стране. В законопроекте об обороне 2016-20 говорится, что " возможности киберзащиты являются важной частью шведской обороны. [...] Это также требует возможности проводить активные операции в кибер-домене". Новая национальная стратегия кибербезопасности в июне 2017 года определила шесть приоритетных областей для национальной кибербезопасности и отметила, что" должна быть создана передовая киберзащита, которая включает в себя повышенный военный потенциал для реагирования и обработки атаки передового противника в киберпространстве".

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 25
CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC: EU EUTM RCA 9
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 2 obs
INDIA/PAKISTAN: UN UNMOGIP 6 obs
IRAQ: Operation Inherent Resolve 70
KOREA, REPUBLIC OF: NNSC 5 obs
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 3; UN MINUSMA 212; 1 int coy
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 7 obs
MOLDOVA: OSCE Moldova 1
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 3; OSCE Kosovo 3
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 4
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 2 obs
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 10
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 4 obs

   SWITZERLAND
    []

Capabilities
The armed forces are overwhelmingly conscript-based and are geared for territorial defence and limited participation in international peace-support operations. Under the 2017 Military Doctrine, which followed the 2016 Security Policy Report, Switzerland judged as remote a direct military threat but said that potential threats included espionage, cyber attack, influence operations and sabotage, as well as the actions of non-state groups. The Swiss government has begun to reduce the size of its armed forces, reflecting the assessment that in the militia-based system not all personnel would realistically be available for active service in times of conflict. However, the smaller force is supposed to benefit from additional equipment. This armed-forces development plan was approved in March 2016 and emphasises improvements in readiness, training and equipment; implementation is due in 2018-21. Switzerland's approach to readiness is shifting to a more flexible model, in which different units would be called up for active service gradually and on different timelines. Plans to replace combat aircraft and ground-based airdefence (GBAD) capability progressed in late 2017 with the announcement that CHF8 billion would be invested in airspace protection. Bids for new combat aircraft will be requested in early 2018, and a decision is expected around 2020, following a possible referendum. GBAD procurement will proceed in parallel. In the meantime, the government decided in 2017 to fund a service-life-extension programme enabling the country's F/A-18 Hornet jets to remain in service until about 2030. The defence budget is planned to increase by 1.4% per year in order to fund these new airspace-protection programmes.
Потенциал
Вооруженные силы в основном базируются на призыве и предназначены для территориальной обороны и ограниченного участия в международных операциях по поддержанию мира. В соответствии с военной доктриной 2017 года, которая последовала за докладом о политике безопасности 2016 года, Швейцария оценила как удаленную прямую военную угрозу, но заявила, что потенциальные угрозы включают шпионаж, кибератаку, операции влияния и саботаж, а также действия негосударственных групп. Швейцарское правительство приступило к сокращению численности своих вооруженных сил, что отражает оценку того, что в системе, основанной на ополчении, не весь персонал будет реально доступен для активной службы во время конфликта. Однако предполагается, что меньшие силы будут пользоваться дополнительным оборудованием. Этот план развития Вооруженных сил был утвержден в марте 2016 года и предусматривает улучшение готовности, подготовки и оснащения, реализация которого намечена на 2018-21 годы. Подход Швейцарии к обеспечению готовности переходит на более гибкую модель, в соответствии с которой различные подразделения будут привлекаться к активной службе постепенно и в разные сроки. Планы по замене боевых самолетов и наземных средств ПВО (GBAD) продвинулись в конце 2017 года с объявлением о том, что CHF8 миллиард будет инвестирован в защиту воздушного пространства. Заявки на новые боевые самолеты будут запрошены в начале 2018 года, а решение ожидается около 2020 года после возможного референдума. Закупки ГБАД будут осуществляться параллельно. Между тем, правительство приняло решение в 2017 году профинансировать программу продления срока службы, позволяющую самолетам F/A-18 Hornet оставаться в эксплуатации до 2030 года. Для финансирования этих новых программ по защите воздушного пространства планируется ежегодно увеличивать оборонный бюджет на 1,4%.

ACTIVE 20,950 (Joint 20,950)
Conscript liability Recruit trg of 18, 21 or 25 weeks (depending on military branch) at age 19-20, followed by 7, 6 or 5 refresher trg courses (3 weeks each) over a 10-year period between ages 20 and 30
RESERVE 144,270 (Army 93,100 Air 22,870 Armed Forces Logistic Organisation 13,700 Command Support Organisation 14,600)
Civil Defence 74,000 (55,000 Reserve)

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Joint 3,350 active; 17,600 conscript (20,950 total)

Land Forces (Army) 93,100 on mobilisation
4 Territorial Regions. With the exception of military security all units are non-active
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   4 regional comd (2 engr bn, 1 sigs bn)
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
   1 (1st) bde (1 recce bn, 2 armd bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 sp arty bn, 2 engr bn, 1 sigs bn)
   1 (11th) bde (1 recce bn, 2 armd bn, 2 armd inf bn, 1 inf bn, 2 SP arty bn, 1 engr bn, 1 sigs bn)
Light
   1 (2nd) inf bde (1 recce bn, 4 inf bn, 2 SP arty bn, 1 engr bn, 1 sigs bn)
   1 (5th) inf bde (1 recce bn, 3 inf bn, 2 SP arty bn, 1 engr bn, 1 sigs bn)
   1 (7th) reserve inf bde (3 recce bn, 3 inf bn, 2 mtn inf bn, 1 sigs bn)
   1 (9th) mtn inf bde (5 mtn inf bn, 1 SP Arty bn, 1 sigs bn)
   1 (12th) mtn inf bde (2 inf bn, 3 mtn inf bn, 1 (fortress) arty bn, 1 sigs bn)
   1 (10th) reserve mtn inf bde (1 recce bn, 2 armd bn, 3 inf bn, 2 mtn inf bn, 2 SP arty bn, 2 sigs bn)
Other
   1 sy bde
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 armd/arty trg unit
   1 inf trg unit
   1 engr rescue trg unit
   1 log trg unit
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 134 Leopard 2 (Pz-87 Leo)
   IFV 186: 154 CV9030; 32 CV9030 CP
   APC 914
   APC (T) 238 M113A2 (incl variants)
   APC (W) 676: 346 Piranha II; 330 Piranha I/II/IIIC (CP)
   AUV 441 Eagle II
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 12 Kodiak
   ARV 25 Buffel
   MW 46: 26 Area Clearing System; 20 M113A2
   NBC VEHICLES 12 Piranha IIIC CBRN
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL SP 106 Piranha I TOW-2
ARTILLERY 433
   SP 155mm 133 M109
   MOR 81mm 300 Mw-72
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PBR 11 Aquarius
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence FIM-92 Stinger

Air Force 22,870 (incl air defence units and military airfield guard units)
Flying hours 200-250 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   3 sqn with F-5E/F Tiger II
   3 sqn with F/A-18C/D Hornet
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with Beech 350 King Air; DHC-6 Twin Otter; PC-6 Turbo Porter; PC-12
   1 VIP Flt with Beech 1900D; Cessna 560XL Citation; Falcon 900EX
TRAINING
   1 sqn with PC-7CH Turbo Trainer; PC-21
   1 sqn with PC-9 (tgt towing)
   1 OCU Sqn with F-5E/F Tiger II
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   6 sqn with AS332M Super Puma; AS532UL Cougar; H135M
ISR UAV
   1 sqn with ADS 95 Ranger
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 85 combat capable
   FTR 54: 42 F-5E Tiger II; 12 F-5F Tiger II
   FGA 31: 25 F/A-18C Hornet; 6 F/A-18D Hornet
   TPT 22: Light 21: 1 Beech 350 King Air; 1 Beech 1900D; 1 Cessna 560XL Citation; 1 DHC-6 Twin Otter; 15 PC-6 Turbo Porter;
   1 PC-6 (owned by armasuisse, civil registration); 1 PC-12 (owned by armasuisse, civil registration); PAX 1 Falcon 900EX
TRG 44: 28 PC-7CH Turbo Trainer; 8 PC-9; 8 PC-21
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 20 H135M
   TPT Medium 25: 14 AS332M Super Puma; 11 AS532UL Cougar
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   ISR Medium 16 ADS 95 Ranger (4 systems)
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES AAM IR AIM-9P Sidewinder; IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; ARH AIM-120B/C-7 AMRAAM

Ground Based Air Defence (GBAD) GBAD assets can be used to form AD clusters to be deployed independently as task forces within Swiss territory
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point Rapier; FIM-92 Stinger
   GUNS 35mm Some
RADARS AD RADARS Skyguard

Armed Forces Logistic Organisation 13,700 on mobilisation
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 log bde

Command Support Organisation 14,600 on mobilisation
FORCES BY ROLE
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 spt bde

Civil Defence 74,000 (55,000 Reserve) (not part of armed forces)

Cyber
Five major Swiss government organisations maintain an overview of elements of cyber threats and responses: the Federal Intelligence Service; the Military Intelligence Service; the Command Support Organisation; Information Security and Facility Protection; and the Federal Office for Civil Protection. A National Cyber Defence Strategy was published in 2012. As cyber protection is decentralised, the Federal Department of Finance is in charge of implementing the strategy until 2017.
Кибер
Обзор элементов киберугрозы и ответных мер ведется пятью крупными швейцарскими правительственными организациями: Федеральной разведывательной службой; Службой военной разведки; организацией командной поддержки; информационной безопасностью и защитой объектов; и Федеральным управлением гражданской защиты. В 2012 году была опубликована Национальная стратегия киберзащиты. Поскольку киберзащита децентрализована, Федеральный департамент финансов отвечает за реализацию стратегии до 2017 года.

DEPLOYMENT
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 21
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 3
INDIA/PAKISTAN: UN UNMOGIP 3 obs
KOREA, REPUBLIC OF: NNSC 5 officers
MALI: UN MINUSMA 6
MIDDLE EAST: UN UNTSO 12 obs
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 234 (military volunteers); 1 inf coy; 1 engr pl; 1 hel flt with AS332M Super Puma; OSCE Kosovo 1
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 2
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 11
WESTERN SAHARA: UN MINURSO 2 obs

   TURKEY
    []

Capabilities
According to government officials, terrorism is designated as Turkey's main security threat. The armed forces are capable and aim to provide a highly mobile force able to fight across the spectrum of conflict. In 2017, Turkey published its `Strategic Paper 2017-21', which outlined an aspiration to improve local input into national-defence programmes, and develop indigenous platforms across all domains. Following the failed attempt at a military coup in July 2016, Ankara dismissed large numbers of officers from its armed forces, and the loss of experienced personnel will likely have had some impact on both operational effectiveness and training levels. The armed forces remain engaged in ground operations in northern Iraq, as well as in airstrikes against the Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) and the People's Protection Units (YPG) in both northern Iraq and Syria. In 2017, Turkey opened a base in Mogadishu to train Somali forces. Turkey has also dispatched personnel to Qatar. To bolster its air-defence capability, Ankara signed a contract with Russia for S-400 surface-to-air missile systems. However, the extent (if any) to which Turkey can integrate the S-400 with Western airdefence systems and NATO air defences remains open to question.
Потенциал
По словам правительственных чиновников, главной угрозой безопасности Турции является терроризм. Вооруженные силы способны и стремятся обеспечить высокомобильные силы, способные вести борьбу по всему спектру конфликтов. В 2017 году Турция опубликовала свой "стратегический документ 2017-21", в котором изложила стремление улучшить местный вклад в программы национальной обороны и развивать платформы коренных народов во всех областях. После неудачной попытки военного переворота в июле 2016 года, Анкара уволила большое количество офицеров из вооруженных сил, и потеря опытного персонала, вероятно, оказали определенное влияние на эффективность и уровни подготовки. Вооруженные силы продолжают проводить наземные операции на севере Ирака, а также наносить авиаудары по Рабочей партии Курдистана (РПК) и подразделениям Народной защиты (НПГ) как на севере Ирака, так и в Сирии. В 2017 году Турция открыла базу в Могадишо для подготовки сомалийских сил. Турция также направила персонал в Катар. Для укрепления потенциала противовоздушной обороны Анкара подписала с Россией контракт на ракетные комплексы класса С-400 "земля-воздух". Однако степень (если таковая имеется), в которой Турция может интегрировать С-400 с западными системами ПВО и ПВО НАТО, остается под вопросом.

ACTIVE 355,200 (Army 260,200 Navy 45,600 Air 50,000) Paramilitary 156,800
Conscript liability 15 months. Active figure reducing
RESERVE 378,700 (Army 258,700 Navy 55,000 Air 65,000)
Reserve service to age 41 for all services

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES ISR 2 Gokturk-1/2

Army ~260,200 (including conscripts)
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   4 army HQ
   9 corps HQ
SPECIAL FORCES
   4 cdo bde
   1 mtn cdo bde
   1 cdo regt
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
   1 (52nd) armd div (2 armd bde, 1 mech bde)
   7 armd bde
Mechanised
   2 (28th & 29th) mech div
   14 mech inf bde
Light
   1 (23rd) mot inf div (3 mot inf regt)
   11 mot inf bde
COMBAT SUPPORT
   2 arty bde
   1 trg arty bde
   6 arty regt
   2 engr regt
AVIATION
   4 avn regt
   4 avn bn
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 2,485: 321 Leopard 2A4; 170 Leopard 1A4; 227 Leopard 1A3; 250 M60A1; 500 M60A3; 167 M60T; 850 M48A5 T1/T2 (2,000 more in store)
   RECCE ~250 Akrep
   IFV 645 ACV AIFV
   APC 4,138
   APC (T) 3,636: 823 ACV AAPC; 2,813 M113/M113A1/M113A2
   APC (W) 152+: 70+ Cobra; 82 Cobra II
   PPV 350+: 50+ Edjer Yaclin 4в4; 300+ Kirpi
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 12+: 12 M48; M113A2T2
   ARV 150: 12 Leopard 1; 105 M48T5; 33 M88A1
   VLB 52 Mobile Floating Assault Bridge
   MW Husky 2G; Tamkar
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE
   MSL
   SP 365 ACV TOW
   MANPATS 9K135 Kornet-E (AT-14 Spriggan); Cobra; Eryx; Milan
   RCL 3,869: 57mm 923 M18; 75mm 617; 106mm 2,329 M40A1
ARTILLERY 7,795+
   SP 1,076: 105mm 391: 26 M108T; 365 M52T; 155mm 430: ~150 M44T1; ~280 T-155 Firtina (K9 Thunder); 175mm 36 M107; 203mm 219 M110A2
   TOWED 760+: 105mm 75+ M101A1; 155mm 523: 517 M114A1/M114A2; 6 Panter; 203mm 162 M115
   MRL 146+: 107mm 48; 122mm ~36 T-122; 227mm 12 M270 MLRS; 302mm 50+ TR-300 Kasirga (WS-1)
   MOR 5,813+
   SP 1,443+: 81mm; 107mm 1,264 M106; 120mm 179
   TOWED 4,370: 81mm 3,792; 120mm 578
SURFACE-TO-SURFACE MISSILE LAUNCHERS
SRBM Conventional MGM-140A ATACMS (launched from M270 MLRS); J-600T Yildrim (B-611/CH-SS-9 mod 1)
RADAR LAND AN/TPQ-36 Firefinder; 2 Cobra
AIRCRAFT
   ISR 5 Beech 350 King Air
   TPT Light 8: 5 Beech 200 King Air; 3 Cessna 421
   TRG 49: 45 Cessna T182; 4 T-42A Cochise
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 64: 18 AH-1P Cobra; 12 AH-1S Cobra; 5 AH-1W Cobra; 4 TAH-1P Cobra; 9 T129A; 16 T129B
   MRH 28 Hughes 300C
   TPT 224+: Heavy 6 CH-47F Chinook; Medium 77+: 29 AS532UL Cougar; 48+ S-70A Black Hawk;
   Light 141: 12 Bell 204B (AB-204B); ~45 Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois); 64 Bell 205A (AB-205A); 20 Bell 206 Jet Ranger
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   CISR Medium 26 Bayraktar TB2
   ISR Heavy Falcon 600/Firebee; Medium CL-89; Gnat;
Light Harpy
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM Point-defence 148+: 70 Altigan PMADS octuple Stinger lnchr, 78 Zipkin PMADS quad Stinger lnchr; FIM-43 Redeye (being withdrawn); FIM-92 Stinger
   GUNS 1,664
   SP 40mm 262 M42A1
   TOWED 1,402: 20mm 439 GAI-D01; 35mm 120 GDF-001/GDF-003; 40mm 843: 803 L/60/L/70; 40 T-1
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   ASM Mizrak-U (UMTAS)
BOMBS
   Laser-guided MAM-L; MAM-C

Navy ~45,000 (including conscripts)
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES TACTICAL SSK 12:
   4 Atilay (GER Type-209/1200) with 8 single 533mm ASTT with SST-4 HWT
   8 Preveze/Gur (GER Type-209/1400) with 8 single 533mm ASTT with UGM-84 Harpoon AShM/Tigerfish Mk2 HWT/DM2A4 HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 18
FRIGATES FFGHM 18:
   2 Barbaros (mod GER MEKO 200 F244 & F245) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 octuple Mk29 lnchr with Aspide SAM,
   2 Mk32 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 3 Sea Zenith CIWS, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
   2 Barbaros (mod GER MEKO 200 F246 & F247) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 8-cell Mk41 VLS with Aspide SAM,
   2 Mk32 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 3 Sea Zenith CIWS, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
   3 Gabya (ex-US Oliver Hazard Perry class) with 1 Mk13 GMLS with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM/SM-1MR SAM, 1 8-cell Mk41 VLS with RIM-162 SAM,
   2 Mk32 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 S-70B Seahawk ASW hel)
   5 Gabya (ex-US Oliver Hazard Perry class) with 1 Mk13 GMLS with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM/SM-1MR SAM,
   2 Mk32 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 S-70B Seahawk ASW hel)
   4 Yavuz (GER MEKO 200TN) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 octuple Mk29 GMLS with Aspide SAM,
   2 Mk32 triple 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 3 Sea Zenith CIWS, 1 127mm gun (capacity 1 Bell 212 (AB-212) hel)
   2 Ada with 2 quad lnchr with RCM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 Mk49 21-cell lnchr with RIM-116 SAM,
   2 Mk32 twin 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 76mm gun (capacity 1 S-70B Seahawk hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 53:
CORVETTES FSGM 6:
   6 Burak (ex-FRA d'Estienne d'Orves) with 2 single lnchr with MM38 Exocet AShM, 4 single 324mm ASTT with Mk46 LWT, 1 Mk54 A/S mor, 1 100mm gun
   PCFG 19:
   4 Dogan (GER Lurssen-57) with 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 76mm gun
   9 Kilic with 2 quad Mk 141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 76mm gun
   4 Ruzgar (GER Lurssen-57) with 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 76mm gun
   2 Yildiz with 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84A/C Harpoon AShM, 1 76mm gun
   PCC 15 Tuzla
   PBFG 2 Kartal (GER Jaguar) with 4 single lnchr with RB 12 Penguin AShM, 2 single 533mm TT
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 15:
   MHO 11: 5 Engin (FRA Circe); 6 Aydin
   MSC 4 Seydi (US Adjutant)
AMPHIBIOUS
LANDING SHIPS LST 5:
   1 Bayraktar with 1 hel landing platform (capacity 20 MBT; 250 troops)
   1 Ertugrul (ex-US Terrebonne Parish) with 3 76mm guns (capacity 18 tanks; 400 troops) (with 1 hel landing platform)
   1 Osman Gazi with 1 Phalanx CIWS (capacity 4 LCVP; 17 tanks; 980 troops) (with 1 hel landing platform)
   2 Sarucabey with 1 Phalanx CIWS (capacity 11 tanks; 600 troops) (with 1 hel landing platform)
LANDING CRAFT 30
   LCT 21: 2 C-120/130; 11 C-140; 8 C-151
   LCM 9: 1 C-310; 8 C-320
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 34
   ABU 2: 1 AG5; 1 AG6 with 1 76mm gun
   AGS 2: 1 Cesme (ex-US Silas Bent); 1 Cubuklu
   AOR 2 Akar with 1 twin 76mm gun, 1 Phalanx CIWS, 1 hel landing platform
   AOT 2 Burak
   AOL 1 Gurcan
   AP 1 Iskenderun
   ASR 2: 1 Alemdar with 1 hel landing platform; 1 Isin II
   ATF 9: 1 Akbas; 1 Degirmendere; 1 Gazal; 1 Inebolu; 5 Onder
   AWT 3 Sogut
   AXL 8
   AX 2 Pasa (ex-GER Rhein)

Marines 3,000
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Amphibious
   1 mne bde (3 mne bn; 1 arty bn)

Naval Aviation
FORCES BY ROLE
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   2 sqn with Bell 212 ASW (AB-212 ASW); S-70B Seahawk
   1 sqn with ATR-72-600; CN235M-100; TB-20 Trinidad
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT
   MP 6 CN235M-100
   TPT Light 7: 2 ATR-72-600; 5 TB-20 Trinidad
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 29: 11 Bell 212 ASW (AB-212 ASW); 18 S-70B Seahawk

Air Force ~50,000
2 tac air forces (divided between east and west)
Flying hours 180 hrs/yr
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   1 sqn with F-4E Phantom 2020
   8 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
ISR
   1 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
   1 unit with King Air 350
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   1 sqn (forming) with B-737 AEW&C
EW
   1 unit with CN235M EW
SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with AS532AL/UL Cougar
TANKER
   1 sqn with KC-135R Stratotanker
TRANSPORT
   1 sqn with A400M; C-160D Transall
   1 sqn with C-130B/E/H Hercules
   1 (VIP) sqn with Cessna 550 Citation II (UC-35); Cessna 650 Citation VII; CN235M; Gulfstream 550
   3 sqn with CN235M 10 (liaison) flt with Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois); CN235M
TRAINING
   1 sqn with F-16C/D Fighting Falcon
   1 sqn with F-5A/B Freedom Fighter; NF-5A/B Freedom Fighter
   1 sqn with SF-260D
   1 sqn with KT-IT
   1 sqn with T-38A/M Talon
   1 sqn with T-41D Mescalero
AIR DEFENCE
   4 sqn with MIM-14 Nike Hercules
   2 sqn with Rapier
   8 (firing) unit with MIM-23 Hawk
MANOEUVRE
Air Manoeuvre
   1 AB bde
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 333 combat capable
   FTR 53: 18 F-5A Freedom Fighter; 8 F-5B Freedom Fighter; 17 NF-5A Freedom Fighter; 10 NF-5B Freedom Fighter (48 F-5s being upgraded as LIFT)
   FGA 280: 20 F-4E Phantom 2020; 27 F-16C Fighting Falcon Block 30; 162 F-16C Fighting Falcon Block 50; 14 F-16C Fighting Falcon Block 50+;
   8 F-16D Block 30 Fighting Falcon; 33 F-16D Fighting Falcon Block 50; 16 F-16D Fighting Falcon Block 50+
   ISR 5 Beech 350 King Air
EW 2+ CN235M EW
   AEW&C 4 B-737 AEW&C
   TKR 7 KC-135R Stratotanker
   TPT 87: Heavy 5 A400M; Medium 31: 6 C-130B Hercules; 12 C-130E Hercules; 1 C-130H Hercules; 12 C-160D Transall;
   Light 50: 2 Cessna 550 Citation II (UC-35 - VIP); 2 Cessna 650 Citation VII; 46 CN235M; PAX 1 Gulfstream 550
   TRG 169: 34 SF-260D; 70 T-38A/M Talon; 25 T-41D Mescalero; 40 KT-IT
HELICOPTERS
   TPT 35: Medium 20: 6 AS532AL Cougar (CSAR); 14 AS532UL Cougar (SAR); Light 15 Bell 205 (UH-1H Iroquois)
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES 27+
   CISR Heavy some ANKA-S
   ISR 27+: Heavy 9+: some ANKA; 9 Heron; Medium 18 Gnat 750
AIR DEFENCE
   SAM
   Long-range MIM-14 Nike Hercules; Medium-range MIM-23 Hawk; Point-defence Rapier
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9S Sidewinder; Shafrir 2(?); IIR AIM-9X Sidewinder II; SARH AIM-7E Sparrow; ARH AIM-120A/B AMRAAM
   ARM AGM-88A HARM; SM AGM-65A/G Maverick; Popeye I; LACM Coventional AGM-84K SLAM-ER
BOMBS
   Electro-optical guided GBU-8B HOBOS (GBU-15); INS/GPS guided AGM-154A JSOW; AGM-154C JSOW
   Laser-guided MAM-C; MAM-L; Paveway I; Paveway II

Paramilitary 156,800
Gendarmerie 152,100
Ministry of Interior; Ministry of Defence in war
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 cdo bde
MANOEUVRE
Other
   1 (border) paramilitary div
   2 paramilitary bde
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   RECCE Akrep
   APC APC (W) 560: 535 BTR-60/BTR-80; 25 Condor
AIRCRAFT
   ISR Some O-1E Bird Dog
   TPT Light 2 Do-28D
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 19 Mi-17 Hip H
   TPT 35: Medium 12 S-70A Black Hawk; Light 23: 8 Bell 204B (AB-204B); 6 Bell 205A (AB-205A); 8 Bell 206A (AB-206A) Jet Ranger; 1 Bell 212 (AB-212)
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES
   CISR Medium 6 Bayraktar TB2

Coast Guard 4,700
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 104
   PSOH 4 Dost with 1 76mm gun
   PBF 60
   PB 40
AIRCRAFT MP 3 CN235 MPA
HELICOPTERS MRH 8 Bell 412EP (AB-412EP - SAR)

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 659; 1 mot inf bn(-)
ARABIAN SEA & GULF OF ADEN: Combined Maritime Forces CTF-151: 1 FFGHM
BLACK SEA: NATO SNMCMG 2: 1 MHO
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 199; 1 inf coy
CYPRUS (NORTHERN): ~43,000; 1 army corps HQ; 1 armd bde; 2 mech inf div; 1 avn comd; 8 M48A2 (trg;) 340 M48A5T1/T2;
   361 AAPC (incl variants); 266 M113 (incl variants); 72 M101A1; 18 M114A2; 12 M115; 90 M44T; 6 T-122; 175 81mm mor; 148 M30; 127 HY-12;
   66 Milan; 48 TOW; 192 M40A1; Rh 202; 16 GDF-003; 48 M1; 3 Cessna 185 (U-17); 1 AS532UL Cougar; 3 UH-1H Iroquois; 1 PB
IRAQ: Army: 2,000; 1 armd BG
LEBANON: UN UNIFIL 49; 1 PCFG
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 2: 1 FFGHM
QATAR: Army: 200 (trg team); 1 mech inf coy; 1 arty unit; 12+ ACV AIFV/AAPC; 2 T-155 Firtina
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 307; 1 inf coy; UN UNMIK 1 obs
SOMALIA: UN UNSOM 1 obs
SYRIA: 500+; 1 SF coy; 1 armd coy(+); 1 arty unit
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 11

FOREIGN FORCES
Italy Active Fence: 1 bty with SAMP/T
Saudi Arabia Inherent Resolve: 6 F-15S Eagle
Spain Active Fence: 149; 1 bty with MIM-104C Patriot PAC-2
United States US European Command: 2,700; 1 atk sqn with 12 A-10C Thunderbolt II; 1 tkr sqn with 14 KC-135; 1 CISR sqn with MQ-1B Predator UAV;
   1 ELINT flt with EP-3E Aries II; 1 spt facility at Izmir; 1 spt facility at Ankara; 1 air base at Incirlik
   US Strategic Command: 1 AN/TPY-2 X-band radar at Kurecik

   UNITED KINGDOM
    []

Capabilities
In Europe, the UK is equalled only by France in its ability to project credible expeditionary combat power. Its forces are relatively well balanced, but many key capabilities are close to critical mass. The defence budget is under pressure because of the fall in the value of the pound, the cost growth of some major programmes and the difficulty of achieving savings targets. Plans to field an improved `Future Force 2025' by 2025 face considerable challenges in delivery. A `national security capability review', ongoing in late 2017, will likely result in further changes to defence capability plans. The defence ministry's current top policy priorities are contributing to the counter-ISIS coalition in the Middle East and being on standby to assist the police and security services to counter domestic terrorism. Forcemodernisation continues, but it will be some time before the forces have a credible full-spectrum combat capability against a peer competitor such as Russia. The UK continues to invest in special-forces, counter-terrorist and cyber capabilities. The army is rebuilding its ability to field a full division of three combat brigades. HMS Queen Elizabeth, the new aircraft carrier, began sea trials, while the navy announced it would test a laser weapon on a warship. There has been much investment in strategic airlift. Current lift capacity is sufficient to deploy and sustain small- and medium-scale contingents. Expeditionary logistic capability meets policy requirements, but peacetime logistic support within the UK is dependent on contractors. The sophisticated domestic defence industry cannot meet all of the UK's defence-industrial and logistics requirements. The UK maintains forces in Afghanistan, Iraq and Nigeria and in 2017 rapidly deployed a joint force for hurricane relief in the Caribbean. The UK leads a multinational battlegroup deployed to Estonia as part of NATO's Enhanced Forward Presence, and deploys combat aircraft for NATO air policing. (See pp. 80-81.)
Потенциал
В Европе Великобритания сравнялась только с Францией в своей способности использовать надежную экспедиционную боевую мощь. Ее силы относительно хорошо сбалансированы, но многие ключевые возможности близки к критической массе. Оборонный бюджет находится под давлением из-за падения стоимости фунта, роста стоимости некоторых крупных программ и трудностей с достижением целевых показателей экономии. Планы по развертыванию усовершенствованных "будущих сил 2025 года" к 2025 году сталкиваются со значительными трудностями в осуществлении. "Обзор потенциала национальной безопасности", продолжающийся в конце 2017 года, вероятно, приведет к дальнейшим изменениям в планах оборонного потенциала. В настоящее время приоритетными направлениями политики Министерства обороны являются содействие коалиции по борьбе с ИГИЛ на Ближнем Востоке и оказание помощи полиции и службам безопасности в борьбе с внутренним терроризмом. Форс-модернизация продолжается, но пройдет некоторое время, прежде чем силы будут иметь надежную боеспособность полного спектра против равного конкурента, такого как Россия. Великобритания продолжает инвестировать в специальные силы, контртеррористические и кибернетические возможности. Армия восстанавливает свою способность выставлять полную дивизию из трех боевых бригад. HMS Queen Elizabeth, новый авианосец, начал морские испытания, в то время как флот объявил, что он будет испытывать лазерное оружие на военном корабле. Было много инвестиций в стратегические воздушные перевозки. В настоящее время грузоподъемность достаточна для развертывания и поддержания малых и средних контингентов. Экспедиционный логистический потенциал отвечает требованиям политики, но в мирное время логистическая поддержка в Великобритании зависит от подрядчиков. Сложная отечественная оборонная промышленность не может удовлетворить все оборонно-промышленные и логистические потребности Великобритании. Великобритания сохраняет силы в Афганистане, Ираке и Нигерии, а в 2017 году быстро развернула совместные силы для ликвидации последствий ураганов в Карибском бассейне. Великобритания возглавляет многонациональную боевую группу, развернутую в Эстонии в рамках расширенного передового присутствия НАТО, и развертывает боевые самолеты для воздушной полиции НАТО. (См. стр. 80-81.)

ACTIVE 150,250 (Army 85,000 Navy 32,350 Air 32,900)
RESERVE 82,650 (Regular Reserve 43,600 (Army 29,450, Navy 6,550, Air 7,600); Volunteer Reserve 37,000 (Army 30,500, Navy 3,650, Air 2,850);
   Sponsored Reserve 2,050) Includes both trained and those currently under training within the Regular Forces, excluding university cadet units

ORGANISATIONS BY SERVICE

Strategic Forces 1,000
Royal Navy
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES STRATEGIC SSBN 4:
   4 Vanguard with 1 16-cell VLS with UGM-133A Trident II D-5/D-5LE nuclear SLBM, 4 533mm TT with Spearfish HWT
   (each boat will not deploy with more than 40 warheads, but each missile could carry up to 12 MIRV;
   some Trident D-5 capable of being configured for sub-strategic role)
MSL SLBM Nuclear 48 UGM-133A Trident II D-5 (fewer than 160 declared operational warheads)
Royal Air Force
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
RADAR STRATEGIC 1 Ballistic Missile Early Warning System (BMEWS) at Fylingdales Moor

Space
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SATELLITES COMMUNICATIONS 8: 1 NATO-4B; 3 Skynet-4; 4 Skynet-5

Army 82,050; 2,950 Gurkhas (total 85,000)
Regt normally bn size. Many cbt spt and CSS regt and bn have reservist sub-units
FORCES BY ROLE
COMMAND
   1 (ARRC) corps HQ
MANOEUVRE
Armoured
1 (3rd) armd div (2 (12th & 20th) armd inf bde (1 armd recce regt, 1 tk regt, 2 armd inf bn, 1 mech inf bn);
   1 (1st) armd inf bde (1 armd recce regt, 1 tk regt, 2 armd inf bn);
   1 log bde (6 log regt; 4 maint regt; 3 med regt))
Light
1 (1st) lt inf div (1 (4th) inf bde (1 recce regt, 1 lt mech inf bn; 2 lt inf bn);
   1 (7th) inf bde (1 recce regt, 3 lt mech inf bn; 2 lt inf bn);
   1 (11th) inf bde (1 lt mech inf bn; 1 lt inf bn; 1 (Gurkha) lt inf bn);
   1 (51st) inf bde (1 recce regt; 2 lt mech inf bn; 1 lt inf bn);
   2 (38th & 160th) inf bde (1 lt inf bn); 1 log bde (2 log regt; 2 maint bn; 2 med regt))
   2 lt inf bn (London)
   1 (Gurkha) lt inf bn (Brunei)
   1 (Spec Inf Gp) inf bde(-) (2 inf bn(-))
Air Manoeuvre
   1 (16th) air aslt bde (1 recce pl, 2 para bn, 1 fd arty regt, 1 cbt engr regt, 1 log regt, 1 med regt)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 arty bde (3 SP arty regt, 2 fd arty regt)
   2 AD regt
   1 engr bde (5 cbt engr regt, 2 EOD regt, 1 (MWD) EOD search regt, 1 engr regt, 1 (air spt) engr regt, 1 log regt)
   1 (geographic) engr regt
   1 ISR bde (1 STA regt, 1 EW regt, 3 int bn, 1 ISR UAV regt)
   1 MP bde (3 MP regt)
   1 sigs bde (7 sigs regt)
   1 sigs bde (2 sigs regt; 1 (ARRC) sigs bn)
   1 (77th) info ops bde (3 info ops gp, 1 spt gp, 1 engr spt/log gp)
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 engr spt gp
   1 log bde (2 log regt)
   1 med bde (3 fd hospital)

Reserves
Army Reserve 30,500 reservists
The Army Reserve (AR) generates individuals, sub-units and some full units. The majority of units are subordinate to regular formation headquarters and paired with one or more regular units
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Reconnaissance
   3 recce regt
Armoured
   1 armd regt
Light
   15 lt inf bn
Air Manoeuvre
   1 para bn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   3 arty regt
   1 STA regt
   1 MRL regt
   3 engr regt
   4 int bn
   4 sigs regt
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   11 log regt
   6 maint regt
   4 med regt
   10 fd hospital
AIR DEFENCE
   1 AD regt
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   MBT 227 Challenger 2
   RECCE 613: 197 Jackal; 110 Jackal 2; 130 Jackal 2A; 145 FV107 Scimitar; 31 Scimitar Mk2
   IFV 623: 466 FV510 Warrior; 88 FV511 Warrior (CP); 51 FV514 Warrior (OP); 18 FV515 Warrior (CP)
   APC 1,291
   APC (T) 895 Bulldog Mk3
   PPV 396 Mastiff (6в6)
   AUV 1,238: 399 Foxhound; 252 FV103 Spartan (incl variants); 23 Spartan Mk2 (incl variants); 396 Panther CLV; 168 Ridgback
ENGINEERING & MAINTENANCE VEHICLES
   AEV 92: 60 Terrier; 32 Trojan
   ARV 259: 80 Challenger ARRV; 28 FV106 Samson; 5 Samson Mk2; 105 FV512 Warrior; 41 FV513 Warrior
   MW 64 Aardvark
   VLB 70: 37 M3; 33 Titan
   NBC VEHICLES 8 TPz-1 Fuchs NBC
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTRUCTURE MSL
   SP Exactor (Spike NLOS)
   MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin
ARTILLERY 598
   SP 155mm 89 AS90
   TOWED 105mm 114 L118 Light Gun
   MRL 227mm 35 M270B1 MLRS
   MOR 81mm 360 L16A1
RADAR LAND 150: 6 Giraffe AMB; 5 Mamba; 139 MSTAR
AMPHIBIOUS LCU 3 Ramped Craft Logistic
AIR DEFENCE SAM
   Point-defence 74: 60 FV4333 Stormer with Starstreak; 14 Rapier FSC; Starstreak (LML)

Joint Helicopter Command
Tri-service joint organisation including Royal Navy, Army and RAF units Army
FORCES BY ROLE
ISR
   1 regt (1 sqn with BN-2 Defender/Islander; 1 sqn with SA341B Gazelle AH1)
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 regt (2 sqn with AH-64D Apache; 1 trg sqn with AH-64D Apache)
   1 regt (2 sqn with AH-64D Apache)
HELICOPTER
   1 regt (2 sqn with AW159 Wildcat AH1)
   1 (spec ops) sqn with Lynx AH9A
   1 (spec ops) sqn with AS365N3; SA341B Gazelle AH1
   1 flt with Bell 212 (Brunei)
   1 flt with SA341B Gazelle AH1 (Canada)
TRAINING
   1 hel regt (1 sqn with AH-64D Apache; 1 sqn with AS350B Ecureuil; 1 sqn with Bell 212; Lynx AH9A; SA341B Gazelle AH1)
ISR UAV
   1 ISR UAV regt
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 maint regt

Army Reserve
FORCES BY ROLE
HELICOPTER
   1 hel regt (4 sqn personnel only)

Royal Navy
FORCES BY ROLE
ATTACK HELICOPTER
   1 lt sqn with AW159 Wildcat AH1
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   2 sqn with AW101 Merlin HC3/3A/3i

Royal Air Force
FORCES BY ROLE
TRANSPORT HELICOPTER
   3 sqn with CH-47D/SD/F Chinook HC3/4/4A/6
   2 sqn with SA330 Puma HC2
TRAINING
   1 OCU sqn with CH-47D/SD/F Chinook HC3/4/4A/6; SA330 Puma HC2
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT TPT Light 12: 9 BN-2T-4S Defender; 3 BN-2 Islander AL1
HELICOPTERS
   ATK 50 AH-64D Apache
   MRH 81: 5 AS365N3; 34 AW159 Wildcat AH1; 8 Lynx AH9A; 34 SA341B Gazelle AH1
   TPT 122: Heavy 60: 38 CH-47D Chinook HC4/4A; 7 CH-47SD Chinook HC3; 1 CH-47SD Chinook HC5; 14 CH-47F Chinook HC6;
   Medium 48: 25 AW101 Merlin HC3/3A/3i; 23 SA330 Puma HC2; Light 14: 9 AS350B Ecureuil; 5 Bell 212
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES ISR Medium 8 Watchkeeper (21+ more in store)

Royal Navy 32,350
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
SUBMARINES 10
STRATEGIC SSBN 4:
   4 Vanguard, opcon Strategic Forces with 1 16-cell VLS with UGM-133A Trident II D-5/D-5LE nuclear SLBM,
   4 single 533mm TT with Spearfish HWT (each boat will not deploy with more than 40 warheads, but each missile could carry up to 12 MIRV;
   some Trident D-5 capable of being configured for sub-strategic role)
TACTICAL SSN 6:
   3 Trafalgar with 5 single 533mm TT with Tomahawk LACM/Spearfish HWT
   3 Astute with 6 single 533mm TT with Tomahawk LACM/Spearfish HWT
PRINCIPAL SURFACE COMBATANTS 19
DESTROYERS 6
   DDGHM 3 Daring (Type-45) with 2 quad lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon, 1 48-cell VLS with Sea Viper SAM, 2 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS,
   1 114mm gun (capacity 1 AW159 Wildcat/AW101 Merlin hel)
   DDHM 3 Daring (Type-45) with 1 48-cell VLS with Sea Viper SAM, 2 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS, 1 114mm gun (capacity 1 AW159 Wildcat/AW101 Merlin hel)
FRIGATES FFGHM 13:
   9 Norfolk (Type-23) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 32-cell VLS with Sea Wolf SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Sting Ray LWT, 1 114mm gun (capacity either 2 AW159 Wildcat or 1 AW101 Merlin hel)
   4 Norfolk (Type-23) with 2 quad Mk141 lnchr with RGM-84C Harpoon AShM, 1 32-cell VLS with Sea Ceptor SAM,
   2 twin 324mm ASTT with Sting Ray LWT, 1 114mm gun (capacity either 2 AW159 Wildcat or 1 AW101 Merlin hel)
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS 21
   PSO 3: 2 River; 1 River (mod) with 1 hel landing platform
   PBI 18: 16 Archer (trg); 2 Scimitar
MINE WARFARE MINE COUNTERMEASURES 14
   MCO 6 Hunt (incl 4 mod Hunt)
   MHC 8 Sandown (1 decommissioned and used in trg role)
AMPHIBIOUS
PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS 3
   LPD 2 Albion with 2 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS (capacity 2 med hel; 4 LCU or 2 LCAC; 4 LCVP; 6 MBT; 300 troops) (of which 1 at extended readiness)
   LPH 1 Ocean with 3 Phalanx Block 1B CIWS (capacity 18 hel; 4 LCVP; 800 troops)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 4
   AGB 1 Protector with 1 hel landing platform
   AGS 3: 1 Scott; 2 Echo (all with 1 hel landing platform)

Royal Fleet Auxiliary
Support and miscellaneous vessels are mostly manned and maintained by the Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA), a civilian fleet owned by the UK MoD, which has approximately 1,900 personnel with type comd under CINCFLEET
AMPHIBIOUS PRINCIPAL AMPHIBIOUS SHIPS 3
   LSD 3 Bay (capacity 4 LCU; 2 LCVP; 24 CR2 Challenger 2 MBT; 350 troops)
LOGISTICS AND SUPPORT 12
   AORH 4: 2 Wave; 1 Fort Victoria with 2 Phalanx CIWS; 1 Tide (capacity 1 AW159 Wildcat/AW101 Merlin hel)
   AORL 1 Rover with 1 hel landing platform
   AFSH 2 Fort Rosalie
   AG 1 Argus (aviation trg ship with secondary role as primarily casualty-receiving ship)
   AKR 4 Point (not RFA manned)

Naval Aviation (Fleet Air Arm) 4,650
FORCES BY ROLE
ANTI-SUBMARINE WARFARE
   4 sqn with AW101 ASW Merlin HM2
   2 sqn with AW159 Wildcat HMA2
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING
   1 sqn with Sea King AEW7
TRAINING
   1 sqn with Beech 350ER King Air
   1 sqn with G-115
   1 sqn with Hawk T1
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 12 combat capable
   TPT Light 4 Beech 350ER King Air (Avenger)
   TRG 17: 5 G-115; 12 Hawk T1*
HELICOPTERS
   ASW 58: 28 AW159 Wildcat HMA2; 30 AW101 ASW Merlin HM2
   AEW 7 Sea King AEW7

Royal Marines 6,600
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Amphibious
   1 (3rd Cdo) mne bde (3 mne bn; 1 amph aslt sqn; 1 (army) arty regt; 1 (army) engr regt; 1 ISR gp (1 EW sqn; 1 cbt spt sqn; 1 sigs sqn; 1 log sqn), 1 log regt)
   2 landing craft sqn opcon Royal Navy
Other
   1 (Fleet Protection) sy gp
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
ARMOURED FIGHTING VEHICLES
   APC (T) 99 BvS-10 Mk2 Viking
ANTI-TANK/ANTI-INFRASTUCTURE
   MSL MANPATS FGM-148 Javelin
ARTILLERY 39
   TOWED 105mm 12 L118 Light Gun
   MOR 81mm 27 L16A1
PATROL AND COASTAL COMBATANTS PB 2 Island
AMPHIBIOUS LANDING CRAFT 30
   LCU 10 LCU Mk10 (capacity 4 Viking APC or 120 troops)
   LCVP 16 LCVP Mk5B (capacity 35 troops)
   UCAC 4 Griffon 2400TD
AIR DEFENCE SAM Point-defence Starstreak

Royal Air Force 32,900
Flying hours 210 hrs/yr on fast jets; 290 on tpt ac; 240 on hels
FORCES BY ROLE
FIGHTER
   2 sqn with Typhoon FGR4/T3
FIGHTER/GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with Typhoon FGR4/T3
   1 sqn with F-35B Lightning II (forming)
GROUND ATTACK
   3 sqn with Tornado GR4/4A
ISR
   1 sqn with Sentinel R1
   1 sqn with Shadow R1
ELINT
   1 sqn with RC-135W Rivet Joint
AIRBORNE EARLY WARNING & CONTROL
   1 sqn with E-3D Sentry
SEARCH & RESCUE
   1 sqn with Bell 412EP Griffin HAR-2
TANKER/TRANSPORT
   2 sqn with A330 MRTT Voyager KC2/3
TRANSPORT
   1 (comms) sqn with AW109E/SP; BAe-146; BN-2A Islander CC2
   1 sqn with A400M Atlas
   1 sqn with C-17A Globemaster
   3 sqn with C-130J/J-30 Hercules
TRAINING
   1 OCU sqn with Typhoon
   1 OCU sqn with E-3D Sentry; Sentinel R1
   1 sqn with Beech 200 King Air
   1 sqn with EMB-312 Tucano T1
   2 sqn with Hawk T1/1A/1W
   1 sqn with Hawk T2
   3 sqn with Tutor
COMBAT/ISR UAV
   2 sqn with MQ-9A Reaper
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
AIRCRAFT 258 combat capable
   FGA 152: 13 F-35B Lightning II (in test); 139 Typhoon FGR4/T3
   ATK 46 Tornado GR4/GR4A
   ISR 9: 4 Sentinel R1; 5 Shadow R1
   ELINT 3 RC-135W Rivet Joint
   AEW&C 6 E-3D Sentry
   TKR/TPT 14 A330 MRTT Voyager KC2/3
   TPT 58: Heavy 24: 16 A400M Atlas; 8 C-17A Globemaster; Medium 20: 6 C-130J Hercules; 14 C-130J-30 Hercules;
   Light 10: 5 Beech 200 King Air (on lease); 2 Beech 200GT King Air (on lease); 3 BN-2A Islander CC2; PAX 4 BAe-146 CC2/C3
   TRG 200: 39 EMB-312 Tucano T1 (39 more in store); 101 G-115E Tutor; 28 Hawk T2*; 32 Hawk T1/1A/1W* (~46 more in store)
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 5: 1 AW139; 4 Bell 412EP Griffin HAR-2
   TPT Light 3: 2 AW109E; 1 AW109SP
UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES CISR Heavy 10 MQ-9A Reaper
AIR-LAUNCHED MISSILES
   AAM IR AIM-9L/L(I) Sidewinder; IIR ASRAAM; ARH AIM-120C-5 AMRAAM
   ASM AGM-114 Hellfire; Brimstone; Dual-Mode Brimstone; Brimstone II; ALCM Storm Shadow
BOMBS
   Laser/GPS-guided GBU-10 Paveway II; GBU-24 Paveway III; Enhanced Paveway II/III; Paveway IV

Royal Air Force Regiment
FORCES BY ROLE
MANOEUVRE

Other
   6 sy sqn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   2 CBRN sqn

Tri-Service Defence Helicopter School
FORCES BY ROLE
TRAINING
   1 hel sqn with Bell 412EP Griffin HT1
   2 hel sqn with AS350B Ecureuil
EQUIPMENT BY TYPE
HELICOPTERS
   MRH 11 Bell 412EP Griffin HT1
   TPT Light 27: 25 AS350B Ecureuil; 2 AW109E

Volunteer Reserve Air Forces
(Royal Auxiliary Air Force/RAF Reserve)
MANOEUVRE
Other
   5 sy sqn
COMBAT SUPPORT
   2 int sqn
COMBAT SERVICE SUPPORT
   1 med sqn
   1 (air movements) sqn
   1 (HQ augmentation) sqn
   1 (C-130 Reserve Aircrew) flt

UK Special Forces
Includes Royal Navy, Army and RAF units
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   1 (SAS) SF regt
   1 (SBS) SF regt
   1 (Special Reconnaissance) SF regt
   1 SF BG (based on 1 para bn)
AVIATION
   1 wg (includes assets drawn from 3 Army hel sqn, 1 RAF tpt sqn and 1 RAF hel sqn)
COMBAT SUPPORT
   1 sigs regt

Reserve
FORCES BY ROLE
SPECIAL FORCES
   2 (SAS) SF regt

Cyber
The National Cyber Security Centre plays a central role in coordinating the UK's cyber policy and works with ministries and agencies to implement cyber-security programmes. The Defence Cyber Operations Group was set up in 2011 to place `cyber at the heart of defence operations, doctrine and training'. This group was transferred to Joint Forces Command on the formation's establishment in April 2012. A Joint Forces Cyber Group was set up in 2013, including a Joint Cyber Reserve, providing support to two Joint Cyber Units and other information-assurance units across the defence establishment. Increased concern about the potential of information operations in and through the cyber domain was central to the 2015 creation of 77 Bde. The 2015 SDSR designated cyber a tier-one risk and stated that the UK would respond to a cyber attack in the same way as it would an equivalent conventional attack. In October 2016, the UK acknowledged publicly the use of offensive cyber capabilities against ISIS. The 2016 National Cyber Security Strategy outlined ё1.9 billion in cyber-security investments in the period up to 2021. In April 2016, it was announced that a Cyber Security Operations Centre would be established under the MoD and tasked with protecting the MoD's cyberspace. A Defence Cyber School was scheduled to open in January 2018, bringing service cyber training together in one organisation.
Кибер
Национальный центр кибербезопасности играет центральную роль в координации киберполитики Великобритании и сотрудничает с министерствами и ведомствами в осуществлении программ кибербезопасности. Группа оборонных киберопераций была создана в 2011 году, чтобы поставить "кибер в центре оборонных операций, доктрины и обучения". Эта группа была передана командованию Объединенных сил при создании формирования в апреле 2012 года. В 2013 году была создана объединенная кибергруппа Вооруженных сил, включая Объединенный кибер-резерв, который оказывает поддержку двум Объединенным кибернетическим подразделениям и другим подразделениям по обеспечению информации в рамках оборонного комплекса. Повышенная озабоченность по поводу потенциала информационных операций в киберпространстве и через него имела центральное значение для создания 77 Bde в 2015 году. SDSR 2015 обозначил кибер-риск уровня один и заявил, что Великобритания ответит на кибератаку так же, как и на эквивалентную обычную атаку. В октябре 2016 года Великобритания публично признала использование наступательных кибер-возможностей против ИГИЛ. Национальная стратегия кибербезопасности 2016 года определила ё1,9 млрд инвестиций в кибербезопасность в период до 2021 года. В апреле 2016 года было объявлено, что в рамках мод будет создан Центр кибербезопасности, которому будет поручено защищать киберпространство мод. В январе 2018 года должна была открыться оборонная кибер-школа, объединившая сервисное кибер-обучение в одну организацию.

DEPLOYMENT
AFGHANISTAN: NATO Operation Resolute Support 500; 1 inf bn(-)
ALBANIA: OSCE Albania 3
ARABIAN SEA & GULF OF ADEN: 1 FFGHM
ARMENIA/AZERBAIJAN: OSCE Minsk Conference 1
ASCENSION ISLAND: 20
ATLANTIC (NORTH)/CARIBBEAN: Operation Ruman 1 LSD
ATLANTIC (SOUTH): 1 AORL
BAHRAIN: 80; 1 naval base
BELIZE: 20
BLACK SEA: NATO SNMCMG 2: 1 MHC; 1 AGS
BOSNIA-HERZEGOVINA: EU EUFOR Operation Althea 4; OSCE Bosnia and Herzegovina 3
BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY: 40; 1 navy/marine det
BRUNEI: 1,000; 1 (Gurkha) lt inf bn; 1 jungle trg centre; 1 hel flt with 3 Bell 212
CANADA: 370; 1 trg unit; 1 hel flt with SA341 Gazelle AH1
CYPRUS: 2,260; 2 inf bn; 1 SAR sqn with 4 Bell 412 Griffin HAR-2; 1 radar (on det)
   Operation Shader 500: 1 FGA sqn with 6 Tornado GR4; 6 Typhoon FGR4; 1 Sentinel R1; 1 E-3D Sentry; 1 A330 MRTT Voyager KC3; 2 C-130J Hercules
   UN UNFICYP 277; 1 inf coy
DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO: UN MONUSCO 6
EGYPT: MFO 2
ESTONIA: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 800; 1 armd inf bn HQ; 1 armd inf coy(+); 1 engr sqn
FALKLAND ISLANDS: 1,000: 1 inf coy(+); 1 sigs unit; 1 AD det with Rapier; 1 PSO; 1 FTR flt with 4 Typhoon FGR4; 1 tkr/tpt flt with C-130J Hercules
GERMANY: 3,750; 1 armd inf bde(-) (1 tk regt, 1 armd inf bn); 1 SP arty regt; 1 cbt engr regt; 1 maint regt; 1 med regt
GIBRALTAR: 570 (incl Royal Gibraltar regt); 2 PB
IRAQ: Operation Shader 600; 2 inf bn(-); 1 engr sqn(-)
KENYA: 250; 1 trg unit
KUWAIT: 30 (trg team); Operation Shader MQ-9A Reaper
LIBYA: UN UNSMIL 1 obs
MALI: EU EUTM Mali 8; UN MINUSMA 2
MEDITERRANEAN SEA: NATO SNMG 2: 1 LPH
MOLDOVA: OSCE Moldova 1
NEPAL: 60 (Gurkha trg org)
NIGERIA: 300 (trg teams)
OMAN: 90; 1 hel flt with AW101 ASW Merlin HM2; AW159 Wildcat HMA2
PERSIAN GULF: Operation Kipion 2 MCO; 2 MHC; 1 LSD
POLAND: NATO Enhanced Forward Presence 150; 1 recce sqn
SERBIA: NATO KFOR 29; OSCE Kosovo 7
SOMALIA: EU EUTM Somalia 4; UN UNSOM 4 obs; UN UNSOS 41
SOUTH SUDAN: UN UNMISS 373; 1 engr coy; 1 fd hospital
UKRAINE: OSCE Ukraine 51; Operation Orbital 100 (trg team)
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES: 1 tpt/tkr flt with C-17A Globemaster; C-130J Hercules; A330 MRTT Voyager

FOREIGN FORCES
United States
US European Command: 8,300; 1 ftr wg at RAF Lakenheath (1 ftr sqn with 24 F-15C/D Eagle, 2 ftr sqn with 23 F-15E Strike Eagle);
   1 ISR sqn at RAF Mildenhall with OC-135/RC-135; 1 TKR wg at RAF Mildenhall with 15 KC-135R/T Stratotanker;
   1 CSAR sqn at RAF Lakenheath with 8 HH-60G Pave Hawk:
   1 Spec Ops gp at RAF Mildenhall (1 sqn with 8 CV-22B Osprey; 1 sqn with 8 MC-130J Commando II)
   US Strategic Command: 1 AN/FPS-132 Upgraded Early Warning Radar and 1 Spacetrack radar at Fylingdales Moor

   Arms procurements and deliveries - Europe
   Selected events in 2017
   France and Germany announced that they are exploring the potential development of a new combat aircraft to be produced after Rafale and the Typhoon.
   Norway selected Thyssen Krupp Marine Systems (TKMS) and its improved Type-212A design for its future submarine requirement. The new design will be known as Type-212NG (Norway-Germany/Next Generation). The agreement will see both countries purchase the same submarine design, which will be delivered in 2020-30. Norway plans to purchase four boats and Germany two. A production contract is expected in 2019.
   AE Systems was awarded a US$4.83 billion contract for the United Kingdom's first three Type- 26 frigates. The first is planned to enter service in the mid-2020s.
   Naval Group, formerly called DCNS, was awarded a US$4.28bn contract for the first five Fregates de Taille Intermediaire frigates for the French Navy. The first vessel is planned to enter service in 2025.
   France temporarily nationalised STX France after Italian company Fincantieri was on the verge of acquiring Korean company STX Offshore and Shipbuilding's majority share. France and Italy are now negotiating the future of the company.
   France and the UK agreed a three-year concept phase with MBDA for a new generation of cruise missiles. Both countries plan to ultimately replace Exocet, Harpoon, SCALP and Storm Shadow. The current ambition is for the project to result in an operational system by the end of the 2020s.
   Turkey rejected Otokar's initial bid for Altay tank series production and issued a tender for the deal. Turkish tractor firm TэMOSAN had its contract to develop a powerpack for Altay cancelled after Austrian partner AVL withdrew due to the Turkish government's crackdown after the coup attempt. It is now unclear what propulsion system a series production Altay would use.
   The Turkish Air Force's ANKA-S UAV carried out its first operational weapons firings. Ten of these are to be supplied by TAI by the end of 2018.
   Belgium issued a request for proposals for its fighter competition. Thirty-four new aircraft are planned to reach initial operating capability in 2025 and full operating capability in 2030. A decision is expected in 2018.
   Закупки и поставки оружия - Европа
   Некоторые события в 2017 году
   Франция и Германия объявили, что изучают возможность разработки нового боевого самолета, который будет производиться после Rafale и Typhoon.
   Норвегия выбрала морские системы Thyssen Krupp (TKMS) и усовершенствованную конструкцию Type-212A для своих будущих потребностей в подводных лодках. Новая конструкция будет известна как Type-212NG (Норвегия-Германия/следующее поколение). Соглашение позволит обеим странам приобрести одну и ту же подводную лодку, которая будет поставлена в 2020-30 годах. Норвегия планирует приобрести четыре лодки, а Германия-две. Контракт на производство ожидается в 2019 году.
   AE Systems получила контракт на сумму US$4,83 млрд на первые три фрегата типа 26 В Соединенном Королевстве. Первый планируется ввести в эксплуатацию в середине 2020-х годов.
   Военно-морская группа, ранее называвшаяся DCNS, получила контракт на сумму US$4,28 млрд на первые пять фрегатов Fregates de Taille Intermediaire для французского флота. Первое судно планируется ввести в эксплуатацию в 2025 году.
   Франция временно национализировала STX France после того, как итальянская компания Fincantieri была на грани приобретения корейской компании STX Offshore и контрольной доли судостроения. Франция и Италия ведут переговоры о будущем компании.
   Франция и Соединенное Королевство согласовали трехлетний концептуальный этап с MBDA для крылатых ракет нового поколения. Обе страны планируют в конечном итоге заменить Exocet, Harpoon, SCALP и Storm Shadow. В настоящее время цель состоит в том, чтобы проект привел к созданию действующей системы к концу 2020-х годов.
   Турция отклонила первоначальную заявку Otokar на производство серии танков Altay и объявила тендер на сделку. Турецкая Тракторная фирма TэMOSAN расторгла контракт на разработку энергоблока для Altay после ухода австрийского партнера AVL из-за разгона турецкого правительства после попытки переворота. Сейчас непонятно, какая двигательная установка на серийном Altay будет использоваться.
   Беспилотник ANKA-S ВВС Турции осуществил первые боевые стрельбы. Десять из них должны быть поставлены TAI к концу 2018 года.
   Бельгия выдала запрос предложений конкурсный истребитель. Планируется, что тридцать четыре новых самолета выйдут на первоначальную эксплуатационную мощность в 2025 году, а полная-в 2030 году. Решение ожидается в 2018 году.
    []

    []

    []

    []



Chapter Five. Russia and Eurasia

   Chapter Five. Russia and Eurasia
   In 2017 Russia continued to pursue its aspiration to field a more modern suite of military capabilities and more professional armed forces held at a higher state of readiness. Elements of these forces continue to maintain and sustain the deployment to Syria, where Russian combat forces remain engaged across land, sea and air, and have proven instrumental to the Assad regime's survival in the six-year-long civil war.
   Meanwhile, there are further indications that Russia has moved away from important elements of the `New Look' reforms, which began in late 2008. In March 2017 a presidential decree raised the upper limit on the total number of military personnel from one million to 1,013,628. This constituted the first notional increase in the size of the armed forces for some years. Limiting the maximum numerical strength of the Russian armed forces to one million had been one of the key principles of `New Look', which continued a trend since the end of the Cold War of reducing personnel numbers. Indeed, in recent years the Russian armed forces have numbered under one million. The new requirement to increase personnel numbers is dictated by the accelerating shift from the land forces' `New Look' brigade structure towards divisions and armies. In 2016 alone, one combined-arms army, four motor-rifle divisions and one tank division were reestablished. These new divisions draw on existing brigades and equipmentstorage bases and, as such, this transformation process requires substantial additional personnel strength.
   At the same time, a new naval doctrine was approved in July 2017 for the period up to 2030. It identified among the main dangers facing Russia `the aspiration of a number of countries, primarily the United States and its allies, to dominate the world's oceans'. Its ambition included developing capabilities to act as a strategic conventional deterrent, including hypersonic missiles and autonomous systems, from 2025, and preserving Russia's position as the second global naval power. With the possible exception of its sub-surface capabilities, however, it would appear difficult for the Russian Navy fully to achieve these ambitions. Although Russia has stated its intention to continue its submarine-construction programme, and to develop the navy's capability to attack land targets with precision-guided, non-nuclear and nuclear weapons, funding for the navy will almost certainly be reduced in the new State Armament Programme (GPV) 2018-27. This makes no provision to build large surface combatants, such as a new aircraft carrier, cruisers and destroyers, before 2025. Despite this, the navy should still achieve some significant, if more limited, ability to pose major challenges to potential adversaries, at least close to home waters.
   Overall, total spending under the period of the GPV 2018-27 is planned fall from 20 to 17 trillion roubles (US$318 billion to US$270 bn) (see pp. 177-8). During this time, the aerospace forces and land forces will be prioritised. The need to upgrade equipment has led to a significant rise in costs for the land forces and the airborne troops (VDV), but it is expected that the pace of rearmament will slow and there will be greater focus on modernisation at the expense of new weapons purchases.
   The merger of the Interior Troops and various law-enforcement agencies into the National Guard (Rosgvardiya) was completed in 2017, bringing the organisation's overall personnel strength to around 340,000. The new National Guard structure is intended to tackle internal threats, but has not received any additional heavy weapons except what had been issued to the Interior Troops (although this in itself is significant in terms of capability).
   Under existing legislation, the National Guard can be used abroad for peacekeeping operations and to train foreign law-enforcement agencies. In Syria, however, Russia has instead used the military police for work with the civilian population. New legislation, which gave the military police additional functions, was adopted in 2015 with this purpose in mind.
   The civilian Federal Agency for Special Construction (Spetsstroy) was disbanded by September 2017. Spetsstroy was responsible for the construction of military infrastructure; however, this function and some of the agency's personnel have now been transferred to the defence ministry.
   Syria
   Russia's military intervention in Syria continued into 2017, and there was little sign that it was causing overstretch. The operation has not led to large-scale strategic change in the Russian armed forces and, for the most part, remains a distant conflict involving limited numbers of forces and only moderate losses, even if some of these have been high-ranking officers. That said, the mission remains an important proving ground for new and existing weapons, forces and tactics.
   Russian troops have trialled over 160 models of new and modernised weapons in Syria, including experimental systems and prototypes that had not yet completed their normal test-cycles. The defence minister said that at least ten weapons systems had been rejected and, though he did not elaborate on this point, it was reported separately that there had been problems with defensive systems deployed against man-portable air-defence systems and new radioelectronic equipment on Su-34 and Su-35 aircraft. In addition, some types of precision-guided munitions may have failed to demonstrate their effectiveness under operational conditions.
   Nonetheless, there has been progress in the ministry's ability to operationally coordinate the armed services. For example, military operations in Syria have been coordinated by the National Defence Control Centre in Moscow - the first operational use of this organisation. This experience has also led to improvements in automated command-and-control systems at tactical and divisional levels; this should in turn improve efficiency in transmitting information and orders.
   The further development of reconnaissance and strike systems, improved communications and interservice cooperation have been prioritised by the armed forces as a result of its Syrian experience. Intensive work has gone into reducing the time from the detection of a target by reconnaissance systems, including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and satellites, to engagement by an offensive system, a process that involves the extensive use of each service's automated systems.
   Indeed, during the deployment of the Admiral Kuznetsov carrier group to the eastern Mediterranean, the aircraft carrier's command centre controlled not only its own air component, but also air-force Su-24 combat aircraft based at Khmeimim air base in Syria. The headquarters of the Russian forces in Syria could, in turn, control carrier-borne aircraft. However, Russia's use of naval aviation during the operation was not considered successful. Two combat aircraft from the carrier's air component, including one of the newest MiG-29KRs, were lost during recovery to the carrier. This led to the redeployment of the air group from the Kuznetsov to land. Of over 360 combat sorties flown by naval Su-33s during the deployment, just over 30 were made from the carrier.
   The carrier group's deployment finished ahead of schedule, and, on return, the Admiral Kuznetsov was due to enter Zvezdochka Shipyard in Severodvinsk for a scheduled long-term refit. This is expected to take at least three years to complete, although at the time of writing the vessel had yet to enter the dock. However, the comparatively low effectiveness of the Russian carrier group during the Syria operation has jeopardised plans to develop new aircraft carriers and, more generally, larger blue-water naval vessels. This compounds the existing challenges in developing blue-water capability stemming from still-sclerotic surface-ship construction rates.
   Nevertheless, Russia's use of long-range, conventionally armed cruise missiles has continued to prove effective. These have been launched by submarines and surface ships as well as Russia's strategic aviation fleet. This success appears to have been a significant factor in the decision to resume production of the Tu-160 Blackjack strategic bomber.
   Russia's military leadership has also spoken of the need to increase the role of UAVs, robotic systems and precision weapons in the wake of operational lessons from Syria; these will be prioritised in the new GPV.
   Contract service
   A significant development in personnel management occurred with the long-heralded transition to a fully contract-manned, non-commissioned officer (NCO) corps, which was finally completed in 2017.
   The continued growth in the number of contractservice personnel has led to a reduction in the size of planned conscription drafts. Whereas in each spring draft in 2014-16, 150,000 to 155,000 soldiers were called up, in the spring of 2017 just 142,000 were liable to be conscripted. The total for both drafts in 2016 was 275,000. At the same time, the number of contractservice personnel continues to grow and was just short of the target (stated in 2016) of 384,000 soldiers and NCOs by mid-2017; the target for the end of 2017 was 405,000 (which was revised down from 420,000 due to budget considerations). The overall personnel strength in the armed forces, comprising conscript and contract personnel, was stated as being at 93%.
   Two new initiatives relating to terms of service are intended to further boost contract-personnel numbers. The first is the June 2017 presidential decree that allows conscripts to immediately sign up for at least two years of contract service, instead of being required to have served for at least six months after conscription. Other new legislation allows for short-term contracts, of under one year in duration, for reservists and conscripts in their final month of service, in an effort to increase the flexibility and efficiency of the manning system. Soldiers serving under these short-term contracts can be involved in operations abroad, including on special operations.
   Ukraine
   Russia's military presence along the border with Ukraine continues to be reinforced with both troops and infrastructure, while the motor-rifle brigades redeployed there from deep inside Russia were reorganised into divisions in 2016. The Western Military District's 20th Combined-Arms Army, based near the border with Ukraine, has also acquired two new motor-rifle divisions (the 3rd and 144th), a tank brigade in the process of formation, and support units.
   Meanwhile, the Southern Military District's new 8th Combined-Arms Army, established near the southeastern borders of Ukraine, is still in the process of formation. It includes one motor-rifle division (150th) and a motor-rifle brigade (20th), which might also be converted into a division in the future. The formation of these new divisions and armies has required an unprecedented level of infrastructure development, in an area where previously almost no troops were based. As of late 2017, however, only priority work to build housing and barracks had been completed; the remaining infrastructure projects will require several more years to complete.
   At the end of 2016, all ground troops stationed in Crimea were consolidated into the 22nd Army Corps, subordinated to the Black Sea Fleet. There have been no further increases in the numerical strength of the Russian group of forces in Crimea, but the rearmament of naval and air-force aviation - as well as the air defences deployed there - is now a priority.
    []

   New equipment
   Land forces
   Serial purchase of the land forces' new generation of armoured vehicles, which were first displayed at the by several years for financial and developmental reasons.
   According to Deputy Defence Minister Yury Borisov, the plan is to procure just 100 T-14 Armata main battle tanks (MBTs) by 2020 for trials. Until 2022, the main effort will be directed to acquiring modernised versions of tanks already in service. In 2017, units began to take delivery of the first updated T-72B3 tanks with improved active-protection and fire-control systems. The T-72B3 will remain the most widely purchased MBT over the next few years, although after a pause of several years the defence ministry signed a contract to buy more T-90 MBTs in August 2017. This will amount to one battalion of the new T-90M version, which has been developed based on combat experience in Syria.
   Similar decisions have been taken with Russia's light armour. A variant of the BMP-2 infantry fighting vehicle (IFV) with the Berezhok weapons system (a new turret with anti-armour missiles) was procured, whilst the Kurganets IFV is still in the development stage. Similarly, acquisition of the BTR-82A/AM IFV continues, in lieu of the new Bumerang armoured personnel carrier. Meanwhile, deliveries of the Koalitsiya-SV self-propelled gun are not scheduled to start before 2020.
   In 2016, two VDV airborne-assault divisions and four separate airborne-assault brigades each acquired a T-72B3 tank company. It is planned that three of these companies will reorganise into tank battalions in 2018; it is possible that the other three tank companies could also increase in size. This move underscores the current trend towards making Russia's airborne troops `heavier' and transforming them into mobile and expeditionary infantry.
   Air force
   Equipment for the Aerospace Forces (VKS) remains a priority for both the current and new GPVs, although while the VKS increasingly fields upgraded models of fourth-generation combat aircraft, the transition to fifth-generation designs remains elusive.
   The air force has continued to benefit from the re-equipment programme laid down in the 2010-20 GPV. The delivery of new-build Su-35S and Su-30SM multi-role combat aircraft and the Su-34 tactical bomber was maintained during 2017. Additional upgraded MiG-31 Foxhound interceptors (MiG-31BM) also entered the inventory, as did a handful of modestly upgraded Tu-160 Blackjack, Tu-95 Bear and Tu-22M Backfire bombers.
   However, the initial aspiration of the 2010-20 GPV to meet the air force's PAK-FA fifth-generationfighter requirement by funding, as a first batch, the acquisition of 60 multi-role aircraft in 2015-20 has not been met. In 2016-17, three more PAK-FA T-50 fifthgeneration fighter prototypes were built, bringing the number of airworthy prototypes to nine; the aircraft was officially designated as the Su-57 in 2017. In November 2016, ground tests began on the first example of Izdeliye (Article)-117: an improved, more powerful engine designed for the Su-57. Flight tests for the engine are supposed to take place by the end of 2017, and by 2019 the first serial-production Su-57 is supposed to be fitted with the Izdeliye-30 followon engine. The 2018-27 GPV, which was due to be released in the fourth quarter of 2017, should give a clearer indication of the pace and scale envisaged for the Su-57's introduction into service.
   It may also provide greater clarity on the level of support to be provided in the near to medium term to meet the PAK-DA requirement for a new longrange bomber. The defence ministry has approved the draft design of the PAK-DA as a subsonic, lowobservable aircraft. Although this allows development work to begin, PAK-DA is not expected to fly before 2025, with service entry not before the end of the 2020s at the earliest. In the meantime, the plan is to maintain the combat capability of the Tu-95MS Bear bomber and restart production of the Tu-160 bomber (as the upgraded Tu-160M2), together with renewed production of Tu-160 engines. The first `transitional' prototype, using parts from an unfinished Soviet-era Tu-160 fuselage, is expected to fly in 2018, with a new-build airframe due to fly in 2021. Around 50 Tu-160M2s might be purchased.
   The air force is also continuing to digest lessons from its ongoing operation in Syria. However, Russia has continued to rely, to a far greater extent than Western air powers, on unguided air-dropped munitions. The air force and Russian defence industry are keen to introduce into service a range of tactical air launched guided weapons to replace ageing designs presently in the inventory. Development of the second variant of the Kh-38 family of medium-range air-to-surface missiles was due to be complete in 2017. The Kh-38ML semi-active laser version has already completed testing and is likely in production, while the Kh-38MT, fitted with an electro-optical seeker, was due to complete tests in 2017. Similarly, work on the KAB-250LG laser-guided bomb was also due to finish in the same time frame. This will be the smallest bomb in the KAB family when it is introduced into the air-force inventory. Additionally, a long-range dual-capable cruise missile, Kh-BD, is being developed for Russia's strategic bombers.
   But while its combat-aircraft inventory is in the near term in comparatively good shape, the air force's tactical and heavy airlift fleets are increasingly old. Upgrade and successor projects are only slowly progressing.
   Meanwhile, significant progress has been made in modernising Russia's air-defence systems. More S-400 systems are being produced each year, along with Pantsir-S units to protect them. Ten S-400 battalion sets were produced in 2016 and the same number was scheduled for 2017. However, entry into service of the system has been slower. As of October 2017, only three additional regiments were confirmed to have received regimental sets produced in 2016 (the 18th, 584th and 1528th air-defence regiments). Deliveries of S-400 sets produced in 2017 only began in the autumn; the first regiment (511th) was expected to take delivery in November. Meanwhile, testing has begun on the Pantsir-SM, which has been developed based on Russia's experiences in Syria. The system has a greater detection range and the ability to engage high-speed ballistic targets, including multiple rocket-launcher munitions. A small, lightweight missile is being developed to specifically engage this type of target, as well as high-precision weapons and UAVs. This will increase the number of missiles in a single Pantsir loadout by up to a factor of four.
   Navy
   The elderly aircraft carrier Admiral Kuznetsov made its operational debut, launching missions against targets in Syria in the latter part of 2016. However, the high profile deployment to the eastern Mediterranean ended in January 2017, having had only limited operational effect. A lack of trained pilots contributed to the fact that the carrier deployed with only about a dozen fixed-wing aircraft - made up of Su-33s and, for the first time, newer MiG-29KRs.
   Of greater note, in terms of the navy's overall capability, were further sporadic strikes against targets in Syria with 3M14 Kalibr (SS-N-30) cruise missiles fired from surface ships and a Project 636.3 improved Varshavyanka (Kilo)-class submarine from the eastern Mediterranean. Russia's strategy to distribute Kalibr cruise missiles across the fleet, including to submarines and a variety of surface combatants, has given the Russian Navy (and air force) the capability to strike land targets located at a distance of up to 2,000 kilometres from the coast. This greatly enhances the navy's capability not just to project offensive power but also to support land operations. Indeed, the continuing proliferation of offensive missile capacity among large, medium and small surface combatants and submarines in the Russian inventory remains perhaps the most significant development in Russian naval capability, contributing to Russia's anti-access/ area-denial potential and a defence-in-depth strategy.
   Russia's shipbuilding industry continues to experience problems concerning the construction and testing of major naval combatants, while issues with the Poliment-Redut surface-to-air-missile system are causing delays. The first and name ship of the Project 22350 Admiral Gorshkov class of frigates was finally due to commission by the end of the year - 11 years after it was laid down. However, the construction of smaller ships with a displacement of up to 1,000 tonnes and armed with long-range cruise and antiship missiles has accelerated significantly. In addition, several older vessels (frigates and a cruiser) are being upgraded before being equipped with modern cruise-missile launchers.
   Submarine construction is still a priority, although the production of diesel-electric boats is proceeding more smoothly than that of nuclear submarines. Upgrade work for the fleet of diesel-electric submarines is under way. In 2017, the Black Sea Fleet took delivery of the last three of six new Project 636.3 improved Varshavyanka (Kilo)-class submarines armed with Kalibr cruise missiles, in addition to torpedoes. Construction of the next batch of six Kilos has begun, with these planned to join the Pacific Fleet in 2019-21. Meanwhile, work has resumed on two Project 677 Lada-class torpedo- and missile-equipped submarines. The first Project 08851 improved Yasen-M-class nuclear-power guided-missile attack submarine was floated out in March 2017. But, again, progress on new hulls remains slow, and much effort continues to be devoted to modernising the combat capabilities of existing hulls.
   The deployment of large surface warships or groups centred on, or consisting of, large legacy platforms like the Kuznetsov continues to allow Moscow to demonstrate force and to project status - and these platforms often pack a significant punch. Another such naval demonstration came in July, with the high-profile deployments of the Kirov-class cruiser Pyotr Veliky and Typhoon-class submarine Dmitry Donskoi (the world's largest submarine, but recently a missile-trials vessel), to the Baltic Sea for Navy Day celebrations in St Petersburg. However, this use of such vessels will become increasingly difficult as the prospects of sustaining, let alone replacing, these platforms in a timely fashion seem to be reducing - in large part due to renewed budgetary constraints.
   Strategic forces
   The Strategic Rocket Force (RVSN) continues to progressively rearm, with a number of regiments continuing to receive new Yars missiles and launchers in 2016. Meanwhile, tests of the heavy Sarmat liquid fuel intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) have been postponed several times due to technical difficulties, and these are now expected to resume towards the end of 2017. Ejection tests of the rail-mobile Barguzin ICBM were first carried out in November 2016, but the future of the system has yet to be decided. It is not clear whether purchases of Barguzin will be included in the GPV 2018-27.
   Although the first deliveries of the S-500 air- and missile-defence system are due to begin in 2020, so far only individual components have been tested. The system's official specifications and external appearance have not emerged in the public domain, which could indicate that it is not yet ready. However, it has been reported that the system's interceptor missile has been successfully tested. It is intended that this will have the capability to engage ballistic targets in the upper atmosphere. The S-500 is planned to be an air-portable system that can also provide theatre missile defence.
   Work is also continuing on modernising the strategic-missile-defence shield around Moscow. Tests of interceptor missiles for the new A-235 system began in 2014. Meanwhile, one or two test launches of the A-135 system currently deployed in the Moscow region, and one A-235 test launch, are performed each year at a test site in Kazakhstan. The defence ministry has said that the tests will last for at least two to three years, although this timescale is considered to be optimistic. Related to this, construction work is also continuing on Russia's network of Voronezh radar stations. These are intended to form a key component of a missile-attack warning system, with detection ranges of up to 6,000km. It was reported in 2016 that all of Russia's borders were covered by the system. These radar stations will be used for both the strategic-level A-235 and the theatre-level S-500 missile defence systems. In addition to seven radar sites already operational, three more are under construction and expected to be in service in 2019. A radar station for Crimea has also been announced, and this is intended to be operational in 2020-21. These additional radars, together with the Voronezh system's space-based sensors, should enable the detection of ICBMs at greater range and the possibility of over-the horizon detection for medium-range and short-range ballistic-missile, and even cruise-missile, launches.
   DEFENCE ECONOMICS
   Defence spending
   Although Russian defence spending appeared to increase sharply in 2016, this stemmed from a one-off settlement of debts that had been accumulated by defence industry under the government's scheme of state-guaranteed credits. If this exceptional payment of over 790 billion roubles (US$11.8bn) is excluded, military expenditure fell slightly in nominal terms.
   Spending under the `national defence' budget chapter in the 2016 budget, comprised mainly of funding for defence-ministry forces, amounted to over 2.980 trillion roubles (US$44.4bn), compared to 3.181trn roubles (US$52.2bn) in 2015. In real terms, using the annual GDP deflator, this represented a fall of almost 10%. In the 2017 budget, spending on `national defence' was reduced further in nominal terms, to 2.835trn roubles (US$45.02bn), although this was increased to 2.872trn roubles (US$45.6bn) when the budget was amended in July. Meanwhile, defence spending relating to other budget chapters, and according to the standard NATO definition, meant that total military expenditure in 2016 amounted to some 3.835trn roubles (US$57.2bn), with a modest increase to 3.855trn roubles (US$61.2bn) in the amended 2017 budget. In sum, Russia's defence spending has stabilised after a few years of rapid growth and, in real terms, is now falling.
   Analysis of the scale of Russian military spending has been complicated for some time by the fact that the Federal Service for State Statistics (Rosstat) has been transitioning from a System of National Accounts (SNA) which adheres to the international standard of 1993, to SNA-2008. This has meant that published GDP data has been frequently amended. The new methodology also captures some economic activities previously excluded from the records, which has resulted in a decline in the share of GDP allocated to defence, as shown in Table 8. According to previously published data, Russian military expenditure peaked in 2015 at the high level of 5.5% of GDP. But, according to the new data, the share was actually closer to 4.84% of GDP, falling to 4.46% in 2016 (excluding debt repayment) and 4.17% in 2017. This is still a relatively high level by international standards (for example, the United States spent 3.1% of GDP in 2017) but not as exceptional as it earlier appeared.
   This slower rate of military-spending growth should be viewed against the background of a faltering Russian economy, which in 2017 began to show some signs of recovery with an expected GDP growth rate of 1.8%. However, the principal factor underpinning this moderated growth is that levels of spending under the annual state defence order are no longer increasing, a trend that is likely to continue into the future. In August 2017, President Vladimir Putin stated firmly that military spending would fall in 2018, and a month later the ministry of finance's draft federal budget for 2018-20 gave 2018 spending on `national defence' as 2.772trn roubles (US$43.1bn), 100bn roubles (US$1.6bn) less than expected spending in 2017 and only 2.83% of GDP. According to the draft budget, `national defence' spending will thereafter be held at a fairly constant rate and by 2020 will be only 2.6% of GDP. This would bring the total share of military spending to approximately 3.5% of GDP, bringing Russia more in line with the US.
   Since 2015, the defence ministry has been striving to optimise its spending under a programme known as `Effective Army'. This covers many areas, including the better use of information technology, a reorganisation of logistics and reform of infrastructure construction. Substantial savings have been claimed, amounting to almost 37bn roubles (US$600m) in 2016. According to Tatyana Shevtsova, deputy defence minister for economic matters, when fully implemented the programme should provide annual savings of up to 47bn roubles (US$700m). If so, this will, to some degree, offset the more straitened defence-budget funding that is likely during the next few years. At the same time, a rigorous inter-agency system has been introduced to monitor all procurement spending under the state defence order. This permits the defence ministry to intervene directly if there is any evidence that funds are being diverted to other uses. Furthermore, it is claimed that corruption in defence procurement, formerly a serious problem, has been greatly reduced. There is little doubt that cost efficiency has improved in recent years, allowing the better use of budget funding. It is likely that the Syria campaign has been partly funded from such savings, as well as, it has been claimed by defenceministry representatives, by the diversion of some funding from military exercises and investment.
   State Armament Programme
   As noted in The Military Balance 2017 (p. 193), in early 2015 it became clear that the follow-on State Armament Programme (GPV) up to 2025 would be delayed. It was due to have started in 2016 but will now cover the years 2018-27. It was expected that the new GPV would be signed off by the president by the end of 2017 so that it could become operational from the beginning of 2018. While total funding under the new programme has not been confirmed officially, analysts claim that it will be 17trn roubles (US$270bn); this is less than the GPV 2011-20 allocation of 20trn roubles (US$318bn), but is for eight years instead of the previous programme's ten years. If confirmed, this will be a compromise that lands between the 12trn roubles (US$191bn) considered affordable by the finance ministry and the 24trn roubles (US$381bn) requested by the defence ministry.
   Nonetheless, some features of the programme are already clear. There is likely to be more emphasis on research and development; the defence ministry is now taking seriously the need to strengthen its own research capability as the old Soviet-era stock of knowledge is exhausted. In addition, some new military technologies will be prioritised, in particular robotics and unmanned vehicles, including those for use underwater. The ministry's Main Research and Testing Centre for Robot Technology, established following a November 2012 decision, is now seen as a versatile unit that is undertaking a wide range of applied research on military robotics within the framework of the `Robotizatsiya-2025' programme. Considerable progress is being made on the development of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) intended for the reconnaissance role, with much practical experience gained from the intensive application of such systems under combat conditions in Syria. The defence ministry claims to now have at least 2,000 UAVs in its inventory. However, Russia still possesses no armed UAVs, although development work on medium and heavy systems has been under way for some time, with new propulsion units also under development. This is likely to be a priority feature of GPV 2018-27.
   The funding of GPV 2011-20 initially prioritised the navy but was amended over the course of its implementation. The new programme will place a higher priority on equipping the ground forces, which have been comparatively starved of new equipment in recent years, partly because of delays and the high costs associated with the development of the new Armata, Kurganets and Bumerang armoured platforms. The army is now scheduled to receive a total of 100 T-14 Armata main battle tanks in the years 2019 and 2020 and then an as-yet-unknown quantity of these tanks by 2025. The rate of renewal of the Aerospace Forces' equipment looks set to slow, although the fifth-generation Su-57 combat aircraft should enter `service' in small numbers from 2019 until its new upgraded engine is finally available. Russia's strategic nuclear forces will continue to be a high priority, with the acquisition of new Sarmat heavy multi-warhead intercontinental ballistic missiles now scheduled from 2019 and possibly also the Barguzin rail-mounted-missile system.
   Meanwhile, GPV 2011-20 remains in force and the armed forces continue to receive significant quantities of new weapons, although progress has been uneven when comparing the introduction of different equipment types (see Table 9). However, the programme's main success indicator - the share of modern weapons in the inventories of combat-ready equipment which is in active use - is being met ahead of schedule. The original equipment-modernisation goal was to have a proportion of 30% modern equipment in the inventory by the end of 2015; instead, a level of 47% has been claimed by officials. The target for the end of 2017 was 62%, while it appeared that the original goal to have a 70% proportion of modern equipment by 2020 could even be achieved by the end of 2018.
   Defence industry
   In 2016, defence-industrial output grew more moderately, at a level of 10.7%, compared to 13% growth in 2015 and 15.5% in 2014. This reflected a slower rate of growth in the annual state defence order. As a result, the defence industry's equipment output only increased by 9.5% in 2016, compared to approximately 20% in the two preceding years. This trend looked set to continue in 2017 and beyond.
   As President Putin has been warning, defenceindustrial firms will have to begin diversifying in order to maintain their levels of output and employment rates. For many, this has echoes of the `conversion' policy pursued by Moscow with limited success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. But this time it is being underlined from the outset that defence companies are expected to manufacture high-technology civil and dual-use goods for domestic and export markets, not simply consumer items and other less demanding items. Targets have been issued for an increased share of civil-goods output. Indeed, following on from a 16.8% share of total output accounted for by civil goods in 2016, this is forecast to increase to 18.2% by 2020, and then rise to 30% by 2025 and 50% by 2030. Equipment for the energy sector, machine tools and other advanced production technology, medical equipment and civil electronic goods will be prioritised. Meanwhile, funding at low rates of interest will be made available through the Fund for Industrial Development, which launched the `Konversiya' programme in June 2017.
   Structural changes continue in the defence industry. The Rostec corporation, headed by Sergei Chemezov, which includes 700 enterprises grouped into 15 holding companies employing more than 450,000 people, has begun to implement a policy of partly privatising its assets. A pioneer in this move is Concern Kalashnikov, which is based in the Izhevsk machine-building works and is the country's largest producer of small arms. This firm is now diversifying into other fields, including shipbuilding and the development and manufacture of UAVs (under the Zala brand). Kalashnikov is now 49% privately owned and is undergoing rapid growth with a widening range of civil as well as military business activities.
   Arms exports
   Two of the most important recent Russian arms deals are now being realised: the delivery to China of 24 Su-35 combat aircraft, the first four of which were transferred in December 2016, and four divisions of S-400 air-defence systems. The S-400 will also be purchased by India, while Turkey and Russia reached agreement on a sale in November 2017. In late 2017, Indonesia and Russia were concluding the acquisition of 11 Su-35s.
   According to the Federal Service for MilitaryTechnical Cooperation, the total volume of armaments and military-services exports in 2016 was more than 914trn roubles (US$15bn) (compared with 884trn roubles (US$14.5bn) in 2015); the total was expected to be the same in 2017. Fixed-wing aircraft and helicopters accounted for half of total Russian exports, whilst ground-forces equipment accounted for 30%. It is now expected that air-defence systems (with a current share of 20%) will account for an increasing percentage of all exports, helped by the fact that the producer, Almaz-Antey, has introduced new production capacities. The use of Russian weaponry in Syria has also undoubtedly boosted international interest in Russian equipment, and this is beginning to influence the scale and pattern of new arms orders. According to Deputy Defence Minister Borisov, more than 600 different models of military hardware have been tested in Syria under combat conditions.
    []
 []

    []

    []

   UKRAINE: MILITARY REFORM
   Military reform continues in Ukraine, amid ongoing fighting in the east of the country and deployments by Russian forces close to the Russian-Ukrainian border. The security challenge from Russia has, in large measure, dictated the course of these reforms. They have led to the establishment of new military units, improved combat capabilities for existing units and development of the reserve system.
   At the same time, Ukraine is aiming to make its armed forces interoperable with those of NATO member states, as outlined in its 2015 military doctrine (see The Military Balance 2017, p. 196) and develop them to Western standards. This goal has guided a key element of Ukraine's military reform: the implementation of processes aimed at standardising with NATO structures, from the commandand-control system and civilian control of the armed forces, to military medicine and tactical protocols. Those units that have been trained with the help of Western instructors, or are intended to participate in international peacekeeping missions, have been most affected by these processes. Overall, the principal priorities of Ukraine's defence planning are to:
   1. Establish a joint command level, in accordance with NATO standards.
   2. Establish a system for planning and resource management, again in accordance with NATO standards.
   3. Construct a national military organisation capable of providing guaranteed defence against aggression and defence of the nation, and maintaining peace and international security.
   4. Establish a unified logistics- and medicalsupport structure that is capable of providing support to all components of the nation's military organisation.
   5. Establish professional armed forces with contract-service personnel, and to create a reserve system.
   These are each overseen by specific subcommittees set up under the defence ministry's Reform Committee. Civilian activists and non-governmental advisory and expert groups are heavily involved in the committee, and this is seen as one of the ways in which Ukraine puts into practice the concept of civilian control of the armed forces. Within the ministry, the main thrust of reform has been to reduce the size of the administrative apparatus, reduce the number of departments (through a process of consolidation), improve the delegation of authority from the minister to deputies and department heads, and increase procurement transparency through the ProZorro system.
   Armed-forces reform
   Reform of the armed forces has centred on improving command and control, and reorganising and standardising unit establishments. A priority in developing command and control has been to restructure the Joint Operational Headquarters as an agency for inter-service and interdepartmental coordination during joint operations. At the same time, the general staff has also been restructured in accordance with NATO standards, with departments established and reorganised into a Western-style J-structure (where J-1 is the personnel function, J-2 is intelligence, J-5 is policy and plans, etc.).
   With regard to the armed forces' organisational structure, reform efforts have been driven by the requirement to increase the proportion of combat personnel within overall establishment strength; reinforce reconnaissance capabilities and firepower, in the form of artillery (primarily anti-tank); and increase the autonomy of land-forces brigades.
   The newly established Special Operations Forces have been further developed within the framework of these reforms, with the 3rd and 8th Special Purpose Regiments and special-operations centres at their core. More broadly, the influence of NATO and its member states on the reform process is illustrated by Ukraine's special-operations forces, particularly the number of psychological- and information- operations centres that have been established within them.
   Meanwhile, Ukraine's Airborne Forces (VDV) have been moved from the land forces and are now a separate service arm in the military's strategic reserve. This stemmed from two factors: the relative weakness of Ukraine's airlift capability, and the nature of military operations in the Donbas region. In operational terms, the VDV serves as a rapid-reaction unit designed to contain crises on the front line. It consists of mobile land-force brigades, including tank units, and in function these are closer to US Stryker brigades than they are to Russian VDV airborne formations. In addition to the four pre-war brigades, three more VDV brigades are being formed. Overall, the large number of VDV units reflects the role assigned to them by the Ukrainian military leadership in its operational and strategic planning.
   Personnel reform
   Despite the establishment of new units, the total strength of the armed forces has remained relatively constant at around 204,000 military personnel and 46,000 civilians, which has led to shortages in some units. The problem of undermanning has been made worse by the decision not to proceed with the seventh wave of partial mobilisation as demobilisation from the previous six waves was completed, combined with the rather modest pace at which the army is being staffed with contract-service personnel. Because of the shortage of junior officers (at platooncommander and company-commander level), officer reservists - graduates of military-training schemes in civilian higher-education establishments (akin to Western Officer Training Corps) - were called up for 18-month terms.
   This model of personnel development was chosen in the expectation that units would be brought up to establishment strength with reservists. For instance, it is envisaged that the 4th Reserve Corps - with cadre brigades - would be brought up to establishment strength with the announcement of mobilisation. However, for this system to work effectively, a pool of trained reservists and a rapid mobilisation system are required.
   The operational reserve (OR) is the most combat capable component of the reserve system in Ukraine. It is subdivided into Stage One (OR-1) and Stage Two (OR-2). OR-1 includes former service personnel who were mainly mobilised during the six waves of partial mobilisation and discharged after one year of service. Many of these reservists have combat experience through their involvement in operations in the Donbas region. OR-1 reservists are assigned to specific military units (mostly those in which they previously served) and on mobilisation they are used to bring sub-units up to wartime strength, as attrition replacements or to create new sub-units. There are more than 100,000 OR-1 reservists in total, with this number seen as sufficient to bring the armed forces up to wartime strength. To maintain their professional skills, Ukraine's general staff and its subordinate structures periodically call up the OR-1 category of reservists for exercises at brigade bases and training centres.
   OR-2 mainly consists of those liable for military service who are physically fit but have not yet served. This category of reservists can be used both to establish new units in the regular army, primarily the brigades of the 4th Reserve Corps, and to form Territorial Defence units, including rifle battalions, Territorial Defence detachments and conscriptioncentre guard companies. The Territorial Defence units comprise more than 400,000 personnel. However, because OR-2 reservists are liable only for partial mobilisation, and since conscription centres have found it difficult to find the required numbers liable for service, the general staff's targets for mobilised personnel have been consistently missed. As a result, many notional OR-2 reservists may not be available or even exist. A new electronic register of those liable for military service, set up in 2017, is expected to alleviate this situation, while cross-referencing with other government databases should improve the effectiveness of measures designed to tackle the evasion of military service.
   Russia's military exercises
   The Russian armed forces have undertaken thousands of exercises during the last decade. These have grown considerably in both size and sophistication since 2010, and taken a variety of forms, from the annual strategic exercises that rotate quadrennially - Kavkaz (`Caucasus'), Tsentr (`Centre'), Vostok (`East') and Zapad (`West') - and all the preparatory exercises that accompany them, to surprise combat-readiness inspections, or `snap exercises', which were reintroduced in 2013.
   A lack of transparency, combined with some definitional variation, has meant that the precise number of the exercises is uncertain, and their exact size is prone to both exaggeration and understatement. But, along with other international deployments such as the resumption of strategic-aviation flights and the expeditionary campaign in Syria, they have given the Russian authorities a great deal of contemporary experience of operating in a wide range of conditions. They both illuminate Moscow's concerns about Russian security - particularly about countering regime change or `colour revolution'- type operations and anti-terrorism preparations - and have helped to shape a military tool that facilitates the leadership's more assertive stance on the international stage.
   The exercises serve a number of specific tasks. Perhaps that which is most often highlighted by officials and observers in the Euro-Atlantic community is their use as a coercive tool. They are interpreted as Moscow's use of military muscle to intimidate neighbours, including NATO allies in the Baltic region. Moscow has used exercises to concentrate force and apply pressure to neighbours, for instance, prior to the Russo-Georgian war in 2008 and again during the escalating crisis in Ukraine in early 2014. Weeks of exercises were conducted in Russia's Western Military District, neighbouring Ukraine, in early 2014, for instance, allowing Russia to mass forces on the border.
   This served to increase uncertainty and conceal intentions, showing Moscow's own political resolve to discourage other actors from intervening in Ukraine, while obliging Ukraine to defend itself on multiple fronts, as well as distracting attention from the developments then under way in Crimea. Ukrainian officials, including President Petro Poroshenko, suggested that Russia sought to use Zapad 2017 to similar effect, as cover for mobilisation for an invasion of Ukraine, and others suggested Moscow's intention was either to remain in Belarus or threaten the Baltic states.
   At the same time, the exercises send a range of other signals. Russian officials emphasise that the exercises are defensive in nature - Kavkaz 2016 was primarily about territorial defence, for instance, and Zapad 2017 about defending against a `colour revolution'- type emergency. Such exercises are also intended, therefore, to send deterrent signals to the Euro-Atlantic community by demonstrating that any intervention against Russian interests would bear heavy costs. Moscow has also conducted exercises with partners, such as Tajikistan in 2016 and 2017, in order to practise combined operations but also to signal reassurance and long-term commitment to them, and illustrate that Russia should be their partner of choice in a crisis.
   The exercises are also intended to deliver direct operational benefits for the armed forces themselves. Indeed, their primary purpose is internal, and they are an essential feature of the ongoing force modernisation and development that has followed many years of underinvestment and decline. They are being used both to reveal and address problems and shortfalls, as well as to integrate lessons learnt from the exercises themselves (and from experience in Ukraine and Syria) with new theories about contemporary and future warfare.
   In the wake of Russia's post-2008 military-modernisation process, the exercises are also designed to improve essential training, and are a feature of how the leadership has sought to integrate these reforms and new structures, and to ensure that the Russian armed forces develop appropriately.
   Three particular features stand out. Firstly, the exercises have been about training and testing both all-arms and joint operations, deploying increasingly substantial forces over long distances and commanding a mix of different types of forces in different theatres. Vostok 2014 featured long-distance marches with heavy weapons and subsequent regrouping, for instance, and Kavkaz 2016 deployed at-distance divisions from four armies, coordinating them with command units in a new operational theatre.
   Secondly, the exercises are often coordinated with, or integrated into, other elements of Russia's security apparatus, including interior forces, such as the newly established National Guard, police and other paramilitary forces, and civil-defence capabilities. Although exercises usually begin in one military district, they often spread to or include other districts: in March 2015, the armed forces conducted a major snap exercise of the northern fleet and its reinforcement with elements from the Central, Southern, Western and Eastern military districts. This was followed by a major policing exercise, Zaslon 2015. All of Russia's armed forces, including the nuclear triad, have taken part in exercises.
   Finally, the exercises are about testing command, control and coordination across regions and authorities. Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu has stated that the exercises are about checking mobilisation systems across Russia, including coordination between civilian and military agencies at federal, regional and local levels. Exercises have involved coordination not just with reserves, but with the ministries of health, communications and transport, for instance, as well as the Central Bank. Kavkaz 2016 also involved the first real-time test of the Russian defence ministry taking direct command of regional and local authorities.
   Weaving these threads together indicates that Russia is preparing and testing its entire state system to cope with a major emergency, including transitioning from peace and deterrence, through high-intensity conventional fighting and even escalating to nuclear deployment.

Пятая глава. Россия и Евразия

   В 2017 году Россия продолжила реализацию своего стремления к более современному комплексу военных возможностей и более профессиональным вооруженным силам, находящимся в более высокой степени готовности. Элементы этих сил продолжают поддерживать развертывание в Сирии, где российские боевые силы продолжают вести боевые действия на суше, на море и в воздухе и доказали свою полезность для выживания режима Асада в шестилетней гражданской войне.
   Между тем, есть и другие признаки того, что Россия отошла от важных элементов реформ "нового взгляда", которые начались в конце 2008 года. В марте 2017 года указом президента был повышен верхний предел общей численности военнослужащих с миллиона до 1 013 628 человек. Это было первое за несколько лет предполагаемое увеличение численности Вооруженных сил. Ограничение максимальной численного состава российских вооруженных сил до миллиона человек было одним из ключевых принципов "нового облика", который продолжает тенденцию сокращения численности личного состава после окончания Холодной войны. Действительно, в последние годы вооруженные силы России насчитывают менее миллиона человек. Новое требование увеличения численности личного состава продиктовано ускоряющимся переходом от бригадной структуры сухопутных войск "нового облика" к дивизиям и армиям. Только в 2016 году были восстановлены одна общевойсковая армия, четыре мотострелковые дивизии и одна танковая дивизия. Эти новые дивизии опираются на существующие бригады и базы материально-технического снабжения, и, как таковой, этот процесс преобразования требует значительного увеличения численности личного состава.
   В то же время в июле 2017 года была утверждена новая военно-морская доктрина на период до 2030 года. Среди основных опасностей, с которыми сталкивается Россия, она назвала "стремление ряда стран, прежде всего США и их союзников, доминировать в Мировом океане". Его амбиции включали развитие потенциала стратегического сдерживания обычных вооружений, включая гиперзвуковые ракеты и автономные системы, начиная с 2025 года и сохранение позиций России как второй мировой военно-морской державы. Однако, за возможным исключением его подводных возможностей, российскому Военно-Морскому Флоту будет трудно полностью реализовать эти амбиции. Несмотря на то, что Россия заявила о намерении продолжить программу строительства подводных лодок и развивать способность ВМС наносить удары по наземным целям высокоточным, неядерным и ядерным оружием, финансирование ВМС почти наверняка будет сокращено в новой государственной программе вооружения (ГПВ) 2018-27 гг. Она не предусматривает строительства крупных надводных кораблей, таких, как новые авианосцы, крейсера и эсминцы, до 2025 года. Несмотря на это, военно-морской флот должен по-прежнему обладать значительной, хотя и более ограниченной, способностью создавать серьезные проблемы потенциальным противникам, по крайней мере, вблизи родных вод.
   В целом, общие расходы в период ГПВ 2018-27 гг. планируется сократить с 20 до 17 трлн руб. ($318 млрд до $270 млрд) (см. стр. 177-8). В течение этого времени приоритет будет отдан Воздушно-космическим силам и сухопутным силам. Необходимость модернизации техники привела к значительному удорожанию сухопутных войск и воздушно-десантных войск (ВДВ), но ожидается, что темпы перевооружения замедлятся и будет больше внимания уделяться модернизации за счет новых закупок вооружений.
   Слияние внутренних войск и различных правоохранительных органов в Национальную гвардию (Росгвардию) было завершено в 2017 году, в результате чего общая численность персонала организации составила около 340 000 человек. Новая структура национальной гвардии предназначена для борьбы с внутренними угрозами, но не получила никакого дополнительного тяжелого вооружения, кроме того, что было выдано внутренним войскам (хотя это само по себе является значительным с точки зрения потенциала).
   В соответствии с действующим законодательством Национальная гвардия может использоваться за рубежом для проведения операций по поддержанию мира и подготовки сотрудников иностранных правоохранительных органов. В Сирии, однако, Россия в военной полиции для работы с гражданским населением. С этой целью в 2015 году было принято новое законодательство, наделившее военную полицию дополнительными функциями.
   Гражданское Федеральное агентство специального строительства (Спецстрой) было расформировано к сентябрю 2017 года. Спецстрой отвечал за строительство военной инфраструктуры, однако эта функция и часть персонала агентства теперь переданы Министерству обороны.
   Сирия
   Военное вмешательство России в Сирию продолжалось в 2017 году, и было мало признаков того, что оно вызывало перенапряжение. Операция не привела к крупномасштабным стратегическим изменениям в Вооруженных Силах России и, по большей части, остается отдаленным конфликтом, включающим ограниченное количество сил и лишь умеренные потери, даже если некоторые из них были высокопоставленными офицерами. Тем не менее, миссия остается важным испытательным полигоном для новых и существующих вооружений, сил и тактики.
   Российские войска опробовали в Сирии более 160 образцов нового и модернизированного оружия, включая экспериментальные системы и прототипы, которые еще не завершили свои обычные циклы испытаний. Министр обороны заявил, что, по меньшей мере, десять систем вооружения были отклонены, и, хотя он не уточнил этот момент, отдельно сообщалось о проблемах с оборонительными системами, развернутыми против переносных зенитных комплексов и новой радиоэлектронной аппаратуры на самолетах Су-34 и Су-35. Кроме того, некоторые типы высокоточных боеприпасов, возможно, не смогли продемонстрировать свою эффективность в оперативных условиях.
   Тем не менее, был достигнут прогресс в способности министерства оперативно координировать деятельность Вооруженных Сил. Например, военные операции в Сирии координировались Национальным центром управления обороной в Москве - первое оперативное использование этой организации. Этот опыт также позволил усовершенствовать автоматизированные системы командования и управления на тактическом и дивизионном уровнях; это, в свою очередь, должно повысить эффективность передачи информации и приказов.
   Дальнейшее развитие разведывательных и ударных систем, улучшение связи и межведомственное сотрудничество были приоритетными задачами Вооруженных сил в результате их сирийского опыта. Интенсивная работа была направлена на сокращение времени от обнаружения цели разведывательными системами, включая беспилотные летательные аппараты (БПЛА) и спутники, до участия наступательной системы, что предполагает широкое использование автоматизированных систем каждой службы.
   Действительно, во время развертывания авианосной группы Адмирал Кузнецов в Восточном Средиземноморье командный центр авианосца контролировал не только собственную авиационную составляющую, но и боевые самолеты Су-24 ВВС, базирующиеся на авиабазе Хмеймим в Сирии. Штаб российских войск в Сирии мог, в свою очередь, контролировать авианосец. Однако использование российской военно-морской авиации в ходе операции не считалось успешным. Два боевых самолета из состава авианосца, в том числе один из новейших МиГ-29КР, были потеряны при возвращении на авианосец. Это привело к передислокации авиагруппы с Кузнецова на сушу. Из более чем 360 боевых вылетов, выполненных военно-морскими Су-33 во время развертывания, с авианосца было совершено чуть более 30.
   Развертывание авианосной группы завершилось досрочно, и по возвращении Адмирал Кузнецов должен был прибыть на верфь "Звездочка" в Северодвинск для планового длительного ремонта